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John Swanson Yarbrough Archives
Timelines
Last Updated on Tuesday, 19-Jul-2005 00:48:06 MDT
Missouri Records Timeline and Discussion

1811 Dec. 10. Rowland Boyd, assignee of Joseph Boyer, assignee of Swanson Yarborough, claiming six hundred and forty arpents of land, siutate on the south fork of Saline creek, district of St. Genevieve; produces a notice to the recorder.

December 10, 1811: Present, a full Board. It is the opinion of the Board that this claim ought not to be granted. Land Claims in the Missouri Territory, p. 541.
p. 540 of the same book: Henry Glass, assignee of Joseph Mating, assignee of Francis Merryman, assignee of David Yarborough, claiming seven hundred and sixty-eight arpents of land, situate on river Saline, district of St. Genevieve; produces the records of a plat of survey, dated 30 December 1805, certified 5th February, 1806; the record of a transfer from Yarborough to Merryman, dated a20th February, 1804, the record of a transfer from Merryman to Mating, dated 5th February, 1804; the record of a transfer from Mating to claimant, dated 19th August, 1804; the record of a certificate of permission to settle, dated 20th February, 1806, signed Pierre Delassus Deluziere.

December 10, 1811. Present, a full Board. It is the opinion of the Board that this claim ought not to be granted.

From: First Settlers of the Missouri Territory, Containing Grants in present states of Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma:
p. 52: DAVID YARBOROUGH, claiming three hundred and forty-three arpents and sixty- three perches of land, situate on the Mississippi, district of St. Genevieve; produces to the Board a survey of the same, taken the 12th, and certified the 26th February, 1806.

Testimony taken. June 25, 1806. JOHN SMITH, sworn, says that some time about the fall of 1802, claimant, together with one JAMES HUNTER, called on him, the witness, and inquired of him whether the aforesaid tract of land was claimed by any one, to which he answered in the negative; that some time towards the latter end of that year, he saw claimant cutting house logs; that, in the following spring, he saw him cultivating the said tract; that he raised a crop on the same for the said JAMES HUNTER, he, the said JAMES, having purchased the said tract, as witness was informed, from said claimant; that the said HUNTER had, on the 20th December, 1803, a wife and four children, and gave said YARBOROUGH a horse in payment for said tract.
August 28, 1810: Present, LUCAS, PENROSE, and BATES, commissioners. It is the opinion of the Board that this claim ought___ (it is continued on p. 53 which I don't have- Karen).

p. 58: HENRY GRASS, claiming seven hundred and sixty-eight arpents of land, situate on the waters of the river Saline, district of St. Genevieve; produces to the Board a certificate of a permission to settle, from PETER D. DELUZIERE, dated January 28th, 1806, and a survey of the same, dated 30th December, 1806, and certified 5th February, 1806.

Testimony taken. June 28, 1806. AMOS ROWARK, sworn, says that he, the witness, was on the said tract of land some time in 1803(?), when one DAVID TARBOROUGH lived there: that he had a garden on the same, out of which the witness was supplied with some greens and sallad.

ThOMAS DONOHOE, sworn, says that claimant was living on said land, which had been improved before in November, 1803, and that he had, on the 20th December, 1803, when he actually inhabited and cultivated the same, a wife and child.

September 1, 1810: Present, LUCAS, PENROSE, and BATES, commissioners. It is the opinion of the Board that this claim ought not to be granted.

Karen's notes: St. Genevieve, MO is approximately 60 miles South of St. Louis. Salline Creek is about 9 miles South of St. Genevieve. they had a big salt works there.

The first permanent Missouri settlement was established about 1750 by the French. It was located along the Mississippi about 50 miles south of St. Louis and was called Sainte Genevieve. The first actual American settlement in Miissouri was in 1787 when one John Dodge established himself in Ste. Genevieve County.
From 1682 until 1803 control over the Missouri section was passed back and forth between France and Spain. In the Louisiana Purchase consummated in 1803 ownership passed into the hands of the United States.
In 1805 Missouri became part of the Territory of Louisiana and remained so until 1812 when it became a Territory in its own name.

Missouri became the 24th state in 1821.

Purpose of the brief history above - Many of the records for Missouri before it became a state are located in Louisiana. I have not read the introduction sections of the above books cited, so I don't know for sure whether these records are in Missouri records or if they came from Louisiana records. Something that needs to be checked.

John Swanson Y. was b. 1777, so he would have been about 26 years old in 1803. He appears on the 1810 census of Ouachita Parish, LA. Where was he in 1800? He would have been about 23 years old. Was he in LA .. or had he perhaps gone up the Mississippi and was in what became Missouri?

Of interest to me - and something that none of the JSY researchers have followed up on (to my knowledge) - who was the David Yarborough who appeared in the St. Genevieve Mo. records at the same time Swanson Y. was appearing? Could he have been a brother? Or maybe Swanson's father? Swanson did name a son David. If David produced a certificate in 1805, then he was at least 21 years of age in 1805 - making his birth by at least 1783/84. If he was a young man, then he would have been the right age to have perhaps been a brother to Swanson. As we seem to have no records on this David, it is just as possible that he could have been older and been Swanson's father. At any rate, it seems like this David would be worth some further research.

From Karen Mazock
 



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