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BIOGRAPHICAL APPENDIX.
 

MARSHALL COUNTY.

ROBERT L. ADAMS, clerk and master of the Chancery Court of Marshall County, was born June 15, 1833, in that part of Bedford County now included in Marshall County. He was reared on the farm but on account of physical disability did not engage in hard manual labor. He received a good practical education in the country schools and at the age of nineteen commenced teaching in the schools of this county, where he continued for ten years. In 1862 he was elected county court clerk and held that office for a period of twelve years. In 1876 be was appointed clerk and master of the Chancery Court and is still holding that position. When the Bank of Lewisburg was re-established in 1885, Mr.Adams was elected as its president, besides he is one of the directors of the same institution. Previous to this, in 1860, he wedded Jane E. Bell, and by her became the father of seven children, six of whom are living. Politically Mr. Adams is a firm supporter of Democratic principles for fifty years he has been a citizen of Marshall County and for twenty-two years of that time he has held positions of trust and honor. This fact alone speaks louder for his ability and popularity than mere words. His parents were Alexander D. and Elizabeth (LaRue) Adams, both natives of Virginia and both members of the Presbyterian Church. The father was a stanch Democrat, although all his brothers were Whigs previous to tile war. He died in 1866, and the mother passed away in 1875.

T. RIGGS ADAMS is one of ten children of Joseph and Eveline W. (Garrett) Adams, who were born in Bedford and Lincoln Counties, Tenn., respectively. They were married in Bedford County, and there lived until 1853, when they came to Marshall County, and there the father followed farming and stock raising. He was a Whig in former days, but now supports the Democratic party. The mother died in 1885, and the following year Mr. Adams wedded Mrs. Rachel McLean. T. Riggs' ancestors on his father's side were Irish, and on his mother's German. He was born in Bedford County on the 11th of January, 1840, and received the rearing and education of the average farmer's boy. In 1862 he volunteered in Company C, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, and during nearly three years' service was never wounded and only once taken prisoner, and then held but a few days. He has given his time and attention to farming, and owns 165 acres of land. He is unmarried, and a Democrat in politics.

WILLIAM V. ANDREWS, son of Jones and Lucy (Lanier) Andrews, who were born in Virginia in 1791 and 1803, respectively. They both came to Tennessee when young, and were married in Williamson County. To them were born eleven children, only three of whom are living at the present time. The father was an agriculturist, and one of the most successful of his day. He served in the war of 1812, and was a Whig in politics; he died in 1843. His widow and children lived on the old homestead until 1861, when the mother's death occurred. William V. was born November 1, 1824, and spent his early days on a farm. His father, though wealthy, believed in teaching children to work, and he was sent to the field with the servants and earned his living by the sweat of his brow. At the age of eighteen he took charge of the farm of 500 acres, which he managed until his marriage, in 1849, to Tennessee Tucker. To them were born seven children, four of whom are living. Mr. Andrews was a Whig previous to the war, but now votes the Democratic ticket. He owned 342 acres of land, but gave largely to his children. He has given his children good educational advantages, and contributes largely to the support of laudable enterprises.

CLINTON A. ARMSTRONG, junior member of the firm of Smithson &Armstrong.  is a son of George and Margaret (Orr) Armstrong, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Tennessee. After marriage they settled in that part of this county, formerly included in Bedford County. Their family consisted of ten children, nine of whom are living. The father followed the occupation of a tiller of the soil and was also engaged in stock trading. He did not aspire to public places, but rather chose to perform the duties of a quiet citizen. The mother was a member of the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church, and is still living on the old homestead at the ripe old age of seventy-six. Our subject was born in Marshall County, was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools. He subsequently attended Lewisburg Academy. In 1868 he commenced reading law with Col. W. N. Cowden, and the following year was admitted to the bar. In 1869 he led to the altar Maggie Kercheval, by whom he had two children, one of whom is living. For seven years he was a partner of Col. Cowden, but afterward went into partnership with Smithson, which continues to the present. Mrs. Armstrong was a member of the Presbyterian Church; she died April 20, 1886. Mr. Armstrong is a Democrat, and has been practicing his profession for seventeen years in Lewisburg, and has received his share of the business of the county.

 REV. P. L. ATKISSON is a son of Pleasant and Sophronia (Holmes) Atkisson. The father was born in Virginia, and when young came to Tennessee, where he married, andafter a short residence in Giles County moved to Alabama, and a few years later went toWest Tennessee. He was a shoe-maker by trade, and also farmed. To him and wife were born two sons. In 1835 the mother died, and later he wedded Emily Woods, who bore him one son. He was an 1812 soldier and a Jacksonian Democrat. Our subject was born in Mooresville, Ala., October 7, 1825, and was reared on a farm in West Tennessee. He
received an academic education, and after studying medicine for some time took a course of lectures at Memphis and practiced that profession a number of years. At the age of twenty-five he commenced his ministerial work, in which he has been engaged ever since. His marriage with Mary O. Ellison was solemnized in 1850, and to them were born eight children, seven of whom are living. Mrs. Atkisson is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, in which her husband is a minister. He is a Democrat, and in addition to his ministerial work runs a large farm of 500 acres.

ANDREW J. BARTLETT. Cyrus Bartlett was probably born in the Old Dominion, and when  a young man came to Tennessee and married Elizabeth Bedford, probably a native of the State, by whom he had twelve children. He was a house carpenter by trade, and many houses are now standing which bear the evidence of his skillful workmanship. He was a Whig in politics, but always cast his vote for Gen. Jackson, because his father fell while serving under him, and the General took upon himself the education of Cyrus. In 1846 he died, being nearly seventy years of age. The mother is yet living. Andrew J. Bartlett, the immediate subject of this sketch, was born in Marshall County, November 2, 1834,  and while young received a fair education in the common schools. Having learned the carpenter's trade, he worked at it until the breaking out of the war, when he volunteered in Company D, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and served for three and a half years, being sergeant-major the greater part of the time. In 1865 lie wedded Martha E. Turner, by whom he has bad one child--Alma. Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Democrat, and since 1869 has followed agricultural pursuits, owning at the present time 150 acres of good land in the garden of Tennessee.

HARTWELL G. BAKER was born September 25,1804. in Davidson County, Tenn., where he was as reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. At the age of twenty-four e left home and began clerking in a store, and at the end of five years bought out his employer's stock, valued at $9,000, on credit, and by close attention to business succeeded in paying his debt. He sold goods for about twelve years and made a snug little fortune, but the war breaking out about this time, swept away about $25,000 worth Of property. He has redeemed his fortunes somewhat and owns 225 acres of excellent farming, land. In 1837 lie was married to Narcissa J. Haynes, born October 9, 1817, in Cornersville, and eight children have been born to them, six of whom are living. Mr. Baker was a Whig, but is now a Democrat. About 1845 he quit the mercantile business and turned his attention to farming. He has  been a resident of the county forty-three years and belongs to the Masonic fraternity. His parents, Humphrey and Sallie ( Hyde) Baker, were born in Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. The father moved to
Kentucky when a boy and finally located in Davidson County, Tenn., where lie was married. He was a blacksmith by trade and a Democrat in politics, and became the father of ten children. The mother died in 1834, and the father afterward wedded Mrs. Furr, by whom he had two children. Shortly after their marriage they moved to Kentucky, where the father died during the war.

 THOMAS H. BELL, farmer, was born February 27, 1820, in Wilson County, and had a limited advantage for schooling though he has supplied the deficiency by private study, At the age of nineteen he was joined in marriage to Martha A. O'Neal, who was born in 1824. This union resulted in the birth of six children. At the end of ten years the mother died and in 1854 our subject wedded Elizabeth J. Bruce, who was born April 27, 1834. This union was blessed by the birth of twelve children. Mr. Bell is a supporter of Democratic principles, and he and wife are active members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He has held tile office of constable, deputy sheriff and magistrate, respectively. He was a strong Union man and is a solid prohibitionist. He has one of the best farms of 130 acres in the county though he has devoted considerable time to house carpentering, running engines and superintending mills. He is a son of Fielding and Elizabeth (Jenkins) Bell. The father was born in Virginia and came to Tennessee in 1802. The mother was a native of Tennesee and was a daughter of Col. Jenkins of Revolutionary fame. After marriage they moved to Wilson and finally to Bedford County in 1826 where they spent the remainder of their days. In 1854 the father died and in 1879 the mother, too, passed away.

 DR. G. W. BILLS. a retired physician of Marshall County, was born November 24, 1819, in this county and received a rather limited education. He is the son of Daniel G. and Rachel (Summers) Bills, natives of North Carolina, where they were married and lived until 1816 after which they came to this State and located in what is now Marshall County. The father was a doctor and farmer, and he and wife were members of the Christian Church. He was a Democrat in politics and his death occurred in 1862. The mother followed in 1883 in her ninetieth year. The subject's ancestors on both sides were of English-Irish descent. After reaching manhood he taught school for a short time. In 1843 he wedded A. E. A. Richardson, a native of -Marshall County, born April 10, 1823. To this union were born five children. In politics lie is conservative, having voted the national ticket but once since the war. He and wife are members of the Christain Church. About 1847 he began the study of medicine and after practicing for nearly six years, took a course of lectures at Macon, Ga. He then returned to this county and practiced
his profession until 1867, when lie turned his attention more exclusively to farming. He has a farm of 325 acres, and for twenty-two years has practiced his profession in this county. He has lived to see all his children, except the youngest, become members of the Christian Church, and marry companions who belong to the same. His eldest daughter, Rebecca C. (deceased), was the wife of Thomas J. Allen, a wide-awake young farmer; the second child is C. T., who married Elizabeth Blackwell, and is farming successfully; the third, Daniel W., married Josie Cowden, and is accounted a good farmer; Mollie G.
is the wife J. T. Wolland, who is also a tiller of the soil.

REUBEN BILLINGTON, son of James and Sarah (Walker) Billington, was born March 23, 1823, in what is now Marshall County, and while receiving a common education, worked on a farm. Like a dutiful son, he remained on the farm until twenty-one years of age, and a year later began the duties of a farmer, and has followed that calling up to the present time. It 1845 he married Matilda Wallace, who was born February 2, 1825, and four children were the result of their union: Malissa (wife of Charles Jones), William K., Amanda M. (wife of C. J. Parris), and Thomas J. Mr. Billington is a stanch Democrat, and after a year's faithful service in the late war in Col. Haynes' company, he was discharged on account of failing health. He owns a farm of 190 acres, and gives considerable attention to breeding stock. His parents were born in North Carolina: the father in 1792 and the mother in 1793. They carne to Marshall County, Tenn., when young, and after their marriage always followed agricultural pursuits. Of their nine, children seven lived to be grown, and five are still living. James Billington served for some time in the war of 1812; was magistrate and a Democrat. Mrs. Billington died in 1862, and he two years later. Both our subject's grandfathers were Revolutionary soldiers.

THOMAS C. BLACK, a leading druggist of Lewisburg, and a native of Rutherford County, was reared on the farm and educated in the common schools. He is the son of Thomas C. and Catherine W. (Morton) Black. The parents were natives of Rutherford County, Tenn.; the father born in 1808 and the mother 1816. They were married in their native county and were the parents of twelve children, eleven of whom are still living. The father was a physician and farmer. He died in 1876, and the mother still lives on the old homestead. Grandfather Black, a Scotch-Irishman, came in an early day from Scotland and taught one of the first schools of Murfreesboro. Our subject, after reaching manhood, began the mercantile business as salesman for Miles & McKinley, in Murfreesboro. After conducting business in that county on his own responsibility for a short time he came to Marshall County in 1875 and engaged in the lumber business. Five years later he opened a drug store with Dr. S. D. Ewing, in Lewisburg. After dissolving partnership Mr. Black opened the store where he now does an active business. For twelve months he served as a soldier in Col. W. S. McLemore's company. In politics he is a Democrat and is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

JOHN T. BLAKE, a leading merchant of Marshall County, Tenn., and a son of John W. and Mary A. (Morgan) Blake, was born on the 3d of January, 1834, in Lincoln County, Tenn., and received the education and rearing of the average farmer's boy. After attaining man's estate he attended and taught school a short time and then turned his attention to his trade and farming. He had access to the tools in his father's shop, and in time became proficient as a worker in wood and iron. Five children were the result of his marriage, in 1857, to Martha Phillips. Their son, John M., is a traveling salesman for Grayfall & Co., of Nashville, Tenn. Both Mr. and Mrs. Blake are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in politics he votes the Democratic ticket. Since 1857 he has resided on the farm where he now lives. He has a general work-shop and as a business man has been fairly successful. His father and mother were born in North Carolina and Virginia, respectively. After marriage they settled in Lincoln County, Tenn., where they spent the remainder of their days as tillers of the soil. Their family consisted of fourteen children, only five of whom are living. The father was an old-line Whig, and after a long and active life died in 1862. The mother, who was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, outlived him several years.

THOMAS A. BOYD, farmer, was born July 25, 1844, in Williamson County, Tenn, He bad the advantages of a common school education, but the war cut short all thoughts of continuing his studies. In 1861 he volunteered in Company C, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate Army. While scouting in East Tennessee he was captured, and after a short imprisonment at Camp Chase he was taken to Fort Delaware, where he remained until the close of the war. He then returned home and went to work on the farm. In 1866 he wedded Mattie S. Wilson, who was born December 2, 1849, in Marshall County. This union has been blessed by the birth of nine children, six of whom are living. Mr. Boyd is a Democrat and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He has a good farm of 250 acres furnished with good buildings. He is a son of Joseph B. and Susan W. (Camden) Boyd. The father was born in North Carolina in 1810, and the mother in Virginia in 1809. They were married in 1831 and soon after settled in this county. At the end of six years they moved to Williamson County and engaged in merchandising. In 1846 he quit the mercantile business to engage in farming. Both parents were active members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he has been an elder for about forty years. In 1885 his faithful companion was taken from his side by the hand of death. The father is living with his son Thomas.

THOMAS WESLEY BRENTS. D. D. and M. D. Thomas Brents, Sr., was born in the "Blue-grass State," and there married Jane McWhorter. They resided in the State until 1800, and then came to Marshall County, Tenn., and spent the remainder of their lives in agricultural pursuits. The father, although not an educated man, was a man of remarkable intellectual powers, superior to many of his associates in that particular. He and wife were not professed Christians, but they inclined to the Methodist Episcopal faith. He was an old-line Democrat and died at the age of sixty-two. The mother lived to be fifty-six years old. Thomas Wesley, our subject, was born in Marshall County, February 10, 1823. His early days were spent on a farm and in seeking an education in the old dirt-floor schoolhouse of early days, where the three "R's" were supposed to be sufficient for an education. Before attaining his twenty-first birthday he had never seen a grammar, but notwithstanding the many disadvantages under which he labored, he conceived the idea of gaining a better education, and began a course of private study, often burning the midnight oil in furtherance of his plans. He followed pedagoging about four years and became a disciple of Æsculapius and attended the Eclectic Medical College, of Memphis, Tenn., the Medical School of Nashville, and finally graduated, in 1855, from the Reform Medical College of Georgia, and was chosen demonstrator of anatomy, and later became professor of anatomy and surgery and held that position until the breaking out of the war. Owing to ill health he gave up his practice and moved to the country and devoted much of his time to the ministry, having started in that calling in 1850. He had acquired a thorough knowledge of Latin and his ministerial labors called for a knowledge of the Greek language, which he immediately began mastering. In 1841 he wedded Angeline Scott, who died in 1857, leaving five small children. Late in the same year he married Mrs. Elizabeth (Taylor) Brown, who bore him four children, two of whom are professional men: T. E., a physician, and John, a lawyer. Dr. Brents moved to Burritt in 1874 to educate his children in Burritt College, where three of them graduated. In 1882 he organized the present Bank of Lewisburg and acted as cashier for three years. In politics he is conservative, not having voted since 1856. For fifty-five years he has been a citizen of Marshall County, and whether as a physician, a professor or a minister of  the gospel he has few equals and fewer superiors.

ALEXANDER BRYANT, of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of John F. and Sarah (Amis) Bryant, and was born in Granville County, N. C., December 14, 1818. His parents were also born in North Carolina, and were married in that State, and became the parents of ten children. The father was a well-to-do farmer, and lived in his native State until 1837, and then moved to Tennessee, and located in Marshall County, and there died in 1857. He was a Democrat and for several years held the position of magistrate. The mother died in 1870. Alexander's early school advantages were very limited, never having attended school more than twelve months. After attaining manhood be began farming and has followed that calling through life. In 1842 he wedded Maria Wilkes, by whom he had eleven children. Both he and Mrs. Wilkes are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Bryant is a Democrat and as a farmer has met with well deserved success. He has been a resident of Marshall County for twenty-seven years, and has the confidence and respect of all who know him.

JOHN A. BRYANT, farmer, is a son of John F. and Sarah W. (Amis) Bryant, both natives of North Carolina; the father born in 1790 and the mother in 1794. After marriage, in 1837, they removed from their native State and came to Marshall County, where they spent the remainder of their days. This family consisted of ten children, six of whom are living. The father was an industrious tiller of the soil, owning nearly 800 acres of land. He was a Democrat and a man of fair education and good business qualities. His death occurred in 1857. After his death the mother lived a widow on the old homestead until 1870, when she, too, was called away. Our subject was born in North Carolina June 28, 1828, and his ancestors of both sides were of Irish extraction. He was reared on the farm, and owing to the demand for his services at home, received a very limited education. He worked for his father till twenty-one years of age, and then began his career as an independent farmer. In 1860 he wedded Sallie C. Fry, a native of Marshall County, born May 9,1835, and to them were born four children. In 1862, Mr. Bryant enlisted in Company E, Eleventh Tennessee Confederate Cavalry and after twelve months' service was appointed brigade forage master, and a year later held a position in the ordnance department. During three years of faithful service he was never wounded nor taken prisoner. After peace had been declared he returned to the more peaceful pursuits of farming. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and for eight years held the position of magistrate  He is a Democrat in politics. He owns over 500 acres of land, and for forty-nine years has been a resident of Marshall County.

JOHN R. BRYANT, farmer and stock raiser, was born February 17, 1849. in Marshall County. He was reared on the farm and received a common English education. At the age of seventeen he took charge of his father's farm and worked out the indebtedness of the estate. In 1870 he wedded Ada S. Pickens, a native of this county, born August 7, 1849. They are both active members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In politics he is a Democrat. Mr. Bryant has a good farm of 173 acres, nearly all of which he has made by industry and close attention to business. Mr. Bryant has lived in Marshall County all his life, and is a good farmer and an honest, upright citizen. He is the son of William T. and Mary E. (Hill) Bryant. The father was born about 1822 in North Carolina, and about 1837 came with his parents to this county. The mother was born in Maury County in 1824, where they were married. They soon settled in this county and made it their permanent home. They have a family of four children--three boys and one girl. Two of the boys are farmers of the neighborhood, and the third is a cotton trader in Texas. The father is a Democrat in politics, and followed the calling of a farmer and stock raiser.

JOHN A. BURROW is a son of John and Catherine (Barron) Burrow, born, respectively, in Maury County and Giles County, in 1810 and 1811, and died in 1882 and 1881. They married and located in Alabama, residing there until 1879, when they returned to Tennessee and settled near the mother's birth-place, in Giles County. Both parents belonged to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and the father was a Democrat. John A. was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., March 5, 1844. Owing to the breaking out of the war his educational advantages were retarded. He volunteered in Company E, Seventh Alabama Cavalry, and served two and a half years. He was in about twenty battles but did not receive a wound. After his return from the war he began tilling the soil and in 1872 he opened a store in Lawrence County, but at the end of one year was burned out, and soon after returned to the farm where he owns 641 acres of land. Three sons were born to his marriage with Ann E. Allen, whom he married in 1869. Mrs. Burrow died in 1876 and five years later he wedded Nannie Davis, who has borne him two children. He was one of the prime movers in building the Lynnville & Cornersville Turnpike and his efforts have been appreciated by those who know the advantage it has been to the county.

WILLIAM G. CLAYTON is a son of Stephen and Nancy (Hill) Clayton, who were natives of Tennessee and farmers by occupation. The former died in 1837 and the latter in 1826. William G. was born in Lincoln County, November 6, 1817, and received a common school education. In 1837 he wedded Jane S. Bachman, and to them were born eight children. William has followed in his father's footsteps and is a farmer. He started in life with little or no capital; but his hands and feet, step by step, climbed the ladder of success until he became one of the prosperous farmers of Marshall County, and commands the respect and esteem of all. His son, Dr. A. C. Clayton, was born in Marshall County, February 26, 1842, and spent his juvenile days on his father's farm. He attended the common schools, and in 1862 enlisted in Company I, Fifth Tennessee Confederate Infantry. He was wounded so severely at the battle of Murfreesboro, that he was compelled to give up all ideas of further service. Toward the latter part of the war he spent some time in Texas, and after his return took a course of instruction in Richland Academy, and afterward taught school about seven terms. In 1876 he entered the medical department of Vanderbilt University, and graduated the following year. He has since practiced in Marshall County, and besides this has dealt in stock, lumber, and has been engaged in the milling business. He has a tan-yard in Lawrence County, a small farm in this county and a large one in Gibson County. In 1883 he wedded Mary E. Carter, who lived only about two years. The Doctor is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and a Democrat. He has been a resident of the county about forty years, and has the respect and esteem of all.

DANIEL B. CLAYTON, farmer, of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of William G. and Jane S. (Bachman) Clayton, and was born in the county where he now resides May 11, 1855. After attending the common schools he completed his education at Lewisburg, and then began the battle of life for himself. He taught one term of school and, in 1818, went to Texas and engaged in the mercantile business. After selling agricultural implements for a short time he opened a grocery store, which he managed two years with good results. He sold out and returned to Marshall County in 1881, and was united in marriage to Cora McCord, by whom he has one child, Mary Lucile. Both Mr. and Mrs. Clayton are active workers in the Methodist Episcopal Church South. They own 325 acres of land in the most fertile portion of Marshall County, it being considered one of the finest stock farms in the county. He takes great interest in raising fine stock, and is a stanch Democrat in his political views.

WILLIAM M. CLARK, son of Thomas and Betsey (Robinson) Clark, is a well-to-do farmer of Marshall County, Tenn., and was born in Giles County June 22, 1822. He was allowed to follow his own inclination in regard to schooling, consequently his education is very limited indeed. After working one year for wages he purchased seventy-five acres of land, largely on credit, and by the sweat of his brow has increased his farm to 375 acres. Two sons and one daughter are the results of his marriage with Mary Jones, which took place in 1849. After her death he married Betsey White, and two children have blessed their union. Mr. Clark and his first wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South; his present wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In former days our subject was a Whig, but is now a Democrat. His parents were North Carolinians by birth, and shortly after their marriage came to Giles County, Tenn., and followed farming for a livelihood. The father was twice married, his second wife being Nancy McCandless. Nine children were born to his first union and three to his last. The father was a Whig and died when about forty-five years old.

JOHN COWDEN, M. D., one of the leading physicians of Marshall County, is a son of William and Rhoda (Davis) Cowden, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Tennessee. The father was born in 1806 and the mother in 1811. The father was a blacksmith and wagon-maker. They were married in 1828 and their family consisted of six children--three of whom died within two weeks of scarlet fever. Of the living, two are boys and one is a girl. One of the boys. William N., is a leading criminal lawyer of Lewisburg and the other appears at the head of this sketch. Both parents were united with the Christain Church and have ever lived in accordance with their profession. The father during his short life was an industrious, energetic worker, and was cut off in the bloom of manhood by the frosts of death. His death occurred in 1839. The mother was married again but after the death of her second husband has made her home with the Doctor. Dr. John Cowden was born October 6, 1834, in Marshall County, and received the rudiments of his education in the old-time subscription schools. At the age of sixteen he spent a year at an academy and then began the study of medicine with Dr. T. W. Brents. After studying about a year he took a course of lectures at Memphis and completed his medical education at Macon, Ga., graduating from that institution in 1854. He then began practicing and in 1856 he wedded Mary H. Leonard, a native of this county born January 23, 1837. To this Union were born twelve children, ten of whom are living. The eldest son, Charles N., is a graduate of Vanderbilt University and is a practicing physician. Mr. and Mrs. Cowden are members of the Christian Church, and he is a Democrat in politics. He has the honor of being president of the Duck River Valley Railroad, besides being a director of the road since its completion. He has a farm of 200 acres and has followed his profession for thirty-one years.

 THOMAS COLLINS, farmer, of Marshall County, Tenn., and son of Willis and Phoebe (Martin) Collins, is one of nine children and was born in the State of Georgia July 27, 1818. He was reared on a farm, and his early education was wholly and needlessly neglected. He was married at an early age, being only nineteen when he and Sarah Childs were united in marriage. Of the six children born to them only two are living: W. P. and Fannie. Since his marriage he has followed agricultural pursuits, and at one time was the owner of nearly 800 acres of land, the greater part of which he has given to his children. In 1884 his wife died, and, after living with his children a Year, he was married to Mrs. Nancy E. (Clark) Judia. Previous to the war Mr. Collins was a Whig; since that time he has not cast a party vote. He has been a resident of Marshall County, some thirty years, and has the confidence and respect of all who know him. Our subject's father and mother were born in North Carolina and Virginia. respectively, and were married in Georgia. The father was an overseer in the latter State, and came to Tennessee in 1826, where he became the possessor of nearly 1,000 acres of land. He was a soldier under Jackson, and in politics was an old-line Whig. He died in 1854. The mother lived to be about eighty-four years of age.

WILLIS P. COLLINS is the son of Thomas Collins (above written) and was raised on a farm in Giles County, Tenn., where he was born November 11, 1845. He received a common school education and like his father choose the free and independent life of a farmer. In 1866 be married Margaret Smith, who died in 1874, leaving four children. In 1875 he married Hannah G. Beard and to them were born five children. Mr. Collins and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. His first wife belonged to the Christian Church. After his first marriage Mr. Collins resided on a farm given him by his father until 1871 when he located on the farm of 257 acres where he now resides. He is considered one of the skillful farmers of the county and is a man who commands the respect of all.

DAVID COLLINS is a son of Jones Collins, who was born in 1791 in North Carolina. The mother, Sophia (Wright) Collins, was born in 1798, in Georgia. The father participated in the war of 1812. and in 1832 came to Marshall County, Tenn. He is a Jacksonian Democrat, and at the breaking out of the late war led some fourteen of his children and grandchildren to the front. He has always followed farming, and at one time was one of the most extensive land owners in the county. In 1875 the mother died. The father is now (1886) ninety-four years old and enjoys good health. The Collins family were among the earliest settlers of the county and are of Scotch-Irish descent. David Collins was born March 16, 1827, in Georgia. He had good educational advantages but did not improve them, which fact he has always regretted. At the age of seventeen he enlisted to serve in the Mexican war, and after a short service had his leg shattered by an ounce ball at Monterey, disabling him for further service. After he returned home he clerked, farmed, and at the age of twenty-two began operating the Allen Leper Mills. In 1853 he wedded Margaret Glenn, and to them were born five sons. Mr. Collins is a Democrat and the owner of 175 acres of land. His son, John C. Collins, was born September 15, 1858, in Marshall County. His rudimentary education was obtained in the common schools, and later he finished his education at Culleoka. After his return he kept several fine horses for about three years. In 1883 he came to Gill's Chapel and opened a grocery store in an old log house, his capital being $300. By good management he has built a new store-room, a nice frame residence and has increased his stock of goods many fold. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and is a Republican in politics.

JAMES W. COLLINS is of Irish-Scotch descent and is a son of Elisha and Betsey (McGregor) Collins, who were born in North Carolina and Virginia in 1807. They came to Tennessee when young and here were married. Of their ten children seven are living. The father was a farmer and Democrat and died in 1872. The mother is yet living at the age of seventy-nine. February 15, 1832, is the date of our subject's birth which occurred in Marshall County. Being the eldest son he was obliged to assist his father on the farm, consequently his educational advantages were limited. At the age of twenty-one he began farming for himself and in 1861 volunteered in Company I, Second Mississippi Infantry. He was captured at Maryville, Tenn., but succeeded in making his escape. After the war he resumed farming and, in 1866, was united in marriage to Nancy McKnight, daughter of Ezekiel M. Mr. and Mrs. Collins have no children. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and in politics Mr. Collins is a Democrat. He owns a farm of 185 acres, the fruits of his own labor.

 HENRY L. COLLINS, one of the prosperous farmers of Marshall County, Tenn., was born September 28, 1845. His early education was wholly neglected, but he has overcome this deficiency by study during his leisure moments, and now has a fair general education. In 1863 be volunteered in Forrest's command Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry and after serving two years and receiving a slight wound he returned home and resumed farming. In 1866 he wedded Fannie Collins, by whom he had ten children, eight of whom are living. He is a Democrat and owns a 330-acre farm, one of the best in the county. He takes great pride in raising fine Holstien cattle, and some of his animals are the best in the county. His parents, Henry and Nancy E. (Cunningham) Collins, had both been married previous to their union. The father was married to Fannie Martin, by
whom he had nine children, and the mother's first husband was O. P. Sheppard, by whom she had one child. Our subject, Henry Collins, is the only child born to their union. The father was a native of North Carolina, and moved from there to Georgia, thence to Tennessee in 1826. He was a Democrat and farmer and died in 1861, followed by his widow a year later.

SAMUEL A. CRUTCHER, farmer, is a son of Robert and Nancy L. (Childress) Crutcher, both parents born and reared in Virginia. The father was born in 1788 and the mother in 1800. They were united in marriage in 1815, and lived in Virginia till 1823, when they came to Tennessee and settled in Williamson County, where they passed the remainder of their days. They reared eleven children, nine of whom are living at the present time. The mother died in 1861 and the father in 1866. Our subject was born October 14, 1818, in Amherst County, Va., and when five years old came with his parents to Williamson County. He received a rather limited education, and at the age of twenty-one began the free life of a farmer. In 1843 he married Catherine P. Blackwell, a native of Kentucky, born February 22, 1822, and the fruits of this union were an interesting family of ten children, eight of whom are living. Having saved his earnings Mr. Crutcher bought a sixty-acre tract of land, which he afterward sold, and bought the farm of 282 acres where he now lives, going in debt for nearly all of it. By hard work and good management he paid for it in three years. Mr. Crutcher is a Democrat, and he and wife are church members, he of the Cumberland Presbyterian and she of the Methodist Protestant Church. For twenty-six years he has been a citizen of Marshall County, and enjoys the confidence and respect of all who know him.

 ROBERT P. CRUTCHER, farmer and miller of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of Robert and Nancy L. (Childress) Crutcher, and was born in Williamson County, Tenn., February 3, 1828. He mode his home with his parents until twenty-seven years of age, and acquired a common school education, after which he began doing for himself. In 1855 he married Mary E. Thompson, who bore him three children: Hugh M., Mary A. and William B. (deceased). Hugh wedded Jennie Wallace. and is a farmer and miller; Mary is the wife of Whit Rone, also a farmer and miller. Mrs. Crutcher was born September 8, 1831, in Williamson County, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Soon after his marriage Mr. Crutcher located on the farm where he now lives. He also worked at the shoe-maker's trade, and had a good custom until 1859, when he
opened a tan-yard where his mill now stands. Shortly after the close of the war he erected a small grist and saw-mill, which he ran with a ten-horse thresher engine, but soon tore this building down and erected a fine mill. He owned a farm of 400 acres, part of which he has given to his children, and now owns about 212 acres. He is a stirring business man, and upright in all his dealings with his fellow-men.

W. M. CRUTCHER, dentist, is a son of Robert and Nancy L. (Childress) Crutcher (for further particulars of parents see sketch of Samuel A. Crutcher), and was born November 16, 1833, in Williamson County. During his youth he had good advantages for receiving an education, but did not make the best use of them, a fact he has regretted all his life. In 1861 he enlisted in Company D, First Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army, and during the four years of service was never taken prisoner. At the battle of Chickamauga he was struck by a minie-ball, inflicting an ugly flesh wound. Having returned and farmed a year he turned his attention to the profession of dentistry. In 1866 he married May L. Hays, who was born in Maury County, June 9, 1846. This union was blessed by the birth of nine children. Mr. Crutcher is a Democrat, and he and wife and three of the boys are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Our subject has now practiced his profession in this country about nineteen years and has received a liberal patronage from the people.

 WILLIAM A. DYSART, farmer, was born in Marshall County in 1831. He was reared on the farm, attended the district school in the winter seasons and received a good pratctical education. January 31, 1860, he married Elizabeth E. Bivins, and the union was blessed by three children: Clarence M., Anna L. and William E. Both parents are consistent members of the Presbyterian Church. November 8, 1862, Mr. Dysart volunteered in Company D, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry and was engaged in all the battles in which his company took part. His regiment was detailed through North Carolina as a body-guard for Jefferson Davis. Mr. Dysart remained with his command until it returned to Chattanooga, when his regiment was disbanded and he returned home. He is a Democrat and has voted that ticket since the Rebellion. He is one of Marshall County's most enterprising and energetic farmers, has a fine tract of land and his residence is beautifully located. Mrs. Dysart is a very intelligent and accomplished lady. Our subject's parents were Andrew and Jane (Ewing) Dysart. The father was born in North Carolina in about 1782,  immigrated with his parents to Kentucky when quite young; then to Williamson County, and in about 1800 came to Marshall County. Here, in about 1815, he was married and became the father of thirteen children, eight of whom are living. He and wife are worthy members of the Old School Presbyterian Church. The mother died in 1867, and the father in 1868. Our subject's ancestors were of Scotch-Irish lineage. His grandfather was one of the brave men who fought in the Revolutionary war,

CHARLES A. DABNEY was born November 8,1819, and received a common English education. At the age of eighteen he began to make his own way in the world. In 1865 the nuptials of his marriage with Miss Sallie Cox were celebrated. She is a daughter of Robert Cox, of North Carolina. In early life Mr. Dabney was a Whig in politics, but is now a strong supporter of Democratic principles. He is a wealthy farmer, and owns 741 acres of good land, the greater part of which he has made by his own industry. He has been a resident of Marshall County for over fifty years, and is one of the thrifty farmers and honest citizens of the county. His parents, John and Nancy (Cox) Dabney, were born, reared and married in North Carolina. They came to Tennessee in 1806, and located in what is now Marshall County when it was almost an unbroken canebrake. The father served as magistrate a number of years, and in politics was an old-line Whig. He died in 1857 and the mother in 1831.

 ISAAC V. DARK, farmer, was born July 14,1818, in Wilson County, Tenn., son of James and Martha (Gates) Dark, both natives of North Carolina. They were married in Wilson County, and afterward moved to this county, where the mother died. The father then married Sarah Fisher, went to Illinois, but finally settled in West Tennessee, where he died. He was a farmer and millwright by occupation. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm and received a common school education. In 1839 his marriage to Lydia C. Green was solemnized and the results of this union were the birth of eight children--three boys and five girls. Two of the boys, James and Harris, were soldiers in the late war. At Chickamauga the former received a wound in the foot from the effects of which he died. The second served until the close of the war. In 1876 our subject's first wife died and about five months later be married Martha Steward, by whom he had five children--three boys and two girls. Mr. Dark is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. For twelve years lie served as magistrate, filling that office in an able and satisfactory manner. For about twenty-six years he worked at the shoe-making trade, being a first-class workman. At the present he is engaged in agricultural pursuits and has a good farm of 168 acres. He has been a resident of Marshall County for sixty-one years and is accounted a good farmer and an excellent citizen. He is Democrat in politics.

GEORGE W. DAVIS, one of the leading liverymen of Lewisburg, was born on a farm in Marshall County, in 1855, and received a common school education, He is a son of Martin and Lizzie (Talley) Davis. The father was a farmer and a stanch Democrat. He died in 1866. The mother was a member of the Baptist Church, and died while she was yet comparatively young. At the age of nineteen the subject of this sketch, after tending bar some time, opened a saloon in Lewisburg, in 1877, and about five years later engaged in the livery business. He has been quite successful and is engaged in that business at the present time. In 1880 he was united in marriage to Mollie E. Richie, and to this union was born one child, Mabel C. In 1885 our subject's first stable was burned, and the same year he built the large brick that he now has. In politics Mr. Davis is. like his father, an ardent Democrat. For nine years he has been in business in Lewisburg and has succeeded well. He has a good stable well stocked.

WILLIAM M. DAVIS AND WILLIAM R. JAMES are members of the firm of Clayton. Davis & Co., millers, of Cornersville, Tenn. The former is a son of Nathan C. and Mary (Woods) Davis, who were born in the State and became the parents of seven children. The father was an agriculturist and a Democrat, and died in 1882. After his wife's death. in 1860, he married Mrs. Sallie Johnson, by whom he had five children. William M. was born August 23, 1851, and secured the rearing and education of the average farmer's boy. After attaining his majority he began farming for himself, and in 1876 married Ella M. McMahon, by whom he had two children: Minnie K. and Sallie J. In 1883 Mr. Davis engaged in his present business of grist and saw-mlling, and is now making preparations to put in the patent rollers. Mr. Davis is a Democrat, and a man who
attends closely to business, consequently he has prospered in his undertakings. William R. James, one of the above named firm, is a son of Pleasant L. and Emily (Freeland) James, who were born and passed their lives in Tennessee. Their family consisted of four children, our subject and one other son being the only living members. The father was a Democrat, and died in 1853. The mother's death occurred in 1862. William R. was born in Giles County, October 16, 1845, and was reared on a farm in Marshall County. In 1861 he volunteered in Company H, Third Tennessee Infantry, and was one of the defenders of Fort Donelson. He was captured and imprisoned at Chicago, and, after being exchanged at Vicksburg, returned to the army, but was soon discharged, being too young for the service. He then returned home and resumed farming. In 1869 he and Amanda K. Ferguson were united in marriage. She, died in 1878, leaving four Children. He then wedded Jennie McMahon, who died in 1884, having become the mother of two children. The following year Mr. James married Nannie McMahon, sister of his second wife. In 1884 he moved to Cornersville and in 1886 engaged in the milling business.

WILLIAM M. DOZIER, farmer, is a son of Zechariah and Cynthia A. (Johnson) Dozier, natives, respectively, of Missouri and Tennessee. The former was born in 1800 and the latter in 1809. The father moved, when young, to Kentucky, and finally to Rutherford County, where he was married. He was a farmer and a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. as was also his wife. He was a Democrat in politics. His death occurred in 1870. The mother died in 1885. William M. Dozier was born December 15, 1834, and like the average country boy, received his education in the common schools. At the age of nineteen he went into the mercantile business as salesman, where he remained for eight years. In 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Webb's company of Eighteenth Tennessee Infantry as second lieutenant, and after nearly two Years of faithful service he returned to his mercantile business. In 1868 he wedded Calidonia Talley, by whom he has two children: Ada M. and William Z. Mr. Dozier is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. For ten years he has successively and successfully held the office of constable. He has been a resident of Marshall County for over twenty-one years, and is considered one of the county's best citizens.

 ALLAN L. EWING is a son of Lyle A. and Rebecca A. (Leeper) Ewing, born, respectively, in Georgia and Tennessee, in 1808. They became the parents of nine children, eight of whom lived to be grown. The father began life a poor boy and afterward opened a store in Farmington and became a wealthy man. He was magistrate of his district sixteen years and was an old-line Whig in politics. He died in 1853 and the mother in 1878. Our subject's ancestors on both sides were Scotch-Irish. He was born April 28, 1833, in Marshall County. His early school advantages were very good; besides this he attended Lewisburg Academy, Maryville College, and completed his education at Shelbyville University. After teaching about four years he turned his attention to farming, and in 1861 volunteered in Company H, Forty-first Tennessee Infantry. In 1863 he was captured at
Farmington, Miss., and after an imprisonment of four months at Alton, Ill, he was exchanged at Vicksburg. After returning to service he was made sergeant. In 1864 he was again taken prisoner and would have been shot had it not been for a Union lad of seventeen. A drunken Federal soldier had leveled his gun to shoot him when the lad knocked aside the gun, the ball barely missing Mr. Ewing. He returned to farming after the surrender and in 1868 wedded Marian V. Palmer They are both church members, and in politics he is a conservative Democrat, He owns 353 acres of land besides a house and lot and grist-mill.

NEWTON B. EWING is a son of James Ewing, who was born in the "Keystone State " in 1782. After residing in Georgia for some time he came to Tennessee, and, soon after his marriage with Mary Neill, settled in Marshall County, where he reared a family of eight children. He was a Whig and acted as magistrate for many years. After the mother's death, in 1828, he wedded Mrs. Sarah How, and died in 1860. Our subject was born in Bedford County, Tenn., November 2, 1826, and inherits Scotch-Irish blood from his father. He received the education and rearing of the average farmer's boy, and at the age of nineteen began to battle his own way in the world by farming and trading. He owns 223 acres of land and is quite a successful farmer. In 1853 he married Florella J. Ewing, who was born May 2, 1835. They are members of the Presbyterian Church. During the war he served some time in Company H, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, although his health was very poor. Previous to the war he was a Whig, but is now a Democrat. He has lived within the limits of Marshall County all his life, and he and wife have passed thirty-three years of happy wedlock, and are surrounded by many warm friends and relatives.

DR. J.C. C. EWING, one of the good farmers of Marshall County, is a son of James V. and Elizabeth (Ewing) Ewing. The father was born in Wythe County, Va., in 1805 and was one of the most extensive farmers in this county. He was for many years magistrate, and held for several terms the position of chairman of the county court. He died in 1878. The mother was born near Athens, Ga., in 1813, and since the death of her husband has been living on the old homestead, and is now seventy-three years of age. Our subject was born November 12, 1839, in Marshall County, and his ancestors on both sides were of Scotch-Irish extraction. He -was reared on the farm and had a fair opportunity for schooling, completing his education at Shelbyville. In 1860 he began the study of medicine under McClure & Johnson, of Lewisburg, and the same year took a course of lectures at the University of Nashville. The stirring events of the war cut short his medical pursuits. In 1861 he volunteered in Company H, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry. During the four years of the war he never received a scratch nor was he ever taken prisoner. After returning home he practiced his profession four years at Lewisburg, and then completed his course at the Bellevue Medical College, and graduated from that institution in 1870. He then returned home and engaged in agricultural pursuits, and has continued that occupation up to the present time. Mr. Ewing his a farm of 500 acres. and is accounted a good farmer and an enterprising citizen. In politics he is conservative, voting for the man rather than the party.

 GEORGE WYTHE EWING AND WILLIAM K. KERCHEVAL, editors and proprietors of Marshall Gazette, were born and reared in this county, and. while growing up, received their education in the common schools. The former (Mr. Ewing) took quite an extensive course under William Stoddert, D. D.. embracing nearly the entire course of the University of Virginia. After completing his school days, he taught mathematics and lauguage in Lewisburg Institute for two terms, and the same at Farmington Academy and some minor schools. Mr. Kercheval finished his education at Fayetteville, Tenn. In 1841
the Marshall Gazctte was established, and, two years later, Mr. Ewing and two partners purchased the paper and office, and soon after Mr. Kercheval joined him; thus Mr. Ewing and he became sole proprietors, going in debt for the greater portion of it. Both were wholly unacquainted with the business, but notwithstanding, they have made it a success and their crisp, newsy, eight-column paper has a circulation of about 1,100. George Wythe Ewing is a son of James S. Ewing, who was born July 5, 1824, in Maury County, and at the age of twenty began his career as a farmer, following that occupation for a period of fourteen years. In 1845 he wedded Eliza J. Rivens, by whom he had two children, only one of whom (our subject) is living. In 1859 the father came to Lewisburg and engaged in merchandising, following that business almost ever since. Both he and wife are worthy members of the Presbyterian Church. of which he has been an elder for about thirty-two years. For some time during the war he served as conscript officer in the Confederacy. He served as trustee of this county, and also as magistrate. He is a Democrat in politics and the son of William D. and Rebecca (Ewing) Ewing, the former born in 1786, and died in 1872, and the latter born in 1791 and died in 1847.

J. BRITT EZELL, farmer, was born July 14, 1838, in Marshall County, and at the age of thirteen, with the consent of his parents. went to live with J. Britt Fulton, an uncle, who had no children of his own. While with him he received a good academic education. About the same time his uncle took a little girl, by the name of Sarah J. Reynolds, to raise. She and Britt grew up together, went to school together, and as time passed on childish affection gave place to the stronger affections of man and womanhood, and,. in 1860, they were united in matrimony. To them seven children were born, five of whom are living. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1861 Mr. Ezell volunteered in Company A, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate Army. After about fifteen months' service as quartermaster and commissary, he was transferred to the purchasing commissary department, where he continued till the close of the war. During the whole time he was in the war he was neither wounded nor taken prisoner. Since that time he has been extensively engaged in farming and trading. When his uncle died he left a farm of 236 acres to our subject and wife, to which has been added sufficient to make it 670 acres. Our subject has lived in this county all his life, and is considered a good farmer and an enterprising citizen. He is a son of Joseph D. and Mary C. (Fulton) Ezell, both natives of Tennessee, the father born in 1810 and the mother in 1817. The father was a farmer, besides being engaged largely in trading and stock raising. For several years he held the position of magistrate, but was not a man who aspired to places of public trust. He died in 1880, leaving his widow and children well provided for. Since his death the mother has lived with her children.

REV. THOMAS B. FISHER was born February 5, 1844, in Marshall County, and was of German descent from his paternal ancestors and Irish from his maternal. He was reared on the farm and received a common school education. In 1862 he enlisted in Capt. Miller's Company, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate Army, where he remained till the close of the war. He and four brothers served in that contest: one of them received a wound, from the effects of which he died several years after the war. Having returned home, our subject attended school in his own county and took a course at Union University, graduating from the literary department in 1869. He then joined the Tennessee Conference, and has been engaged in preaching the word of God ever since. In 1872 he married Sallie H. Roberts, who was born in Marshall County, August 81, 1847. This union was blessed by tile birth of four children; Wilson P., Fannie B. (deceased). John R. and Mary. Mrs. Fisher and her son Wilson are also members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In 1883 Mr. Fisher moved to the farm and has remained there ever since, but he still carries on his ministerial work. For seventeen years he has been actively engaged in the good cause, and his ability as a preacher is too well known to require comment. He is a son of John and Mildred (Stratton) Fisher. The father was born in North Carolina in 1806, and was the eldest of twenty-one children. The mother was born in November, 1810, in Maury County, and was the second wife of John Fisher. This union resulted in the birth of three children, all boys, two of whom are living. The father was a blacksmith and wagon-maker by trade until after he had passed the meridian of life, when he turned his attention exclusively to farming. He died in 1882 and his wife followed about three months later.

JOHN L. FITZPATRICK, a leading farmer of Marshall County, was born December 29, 1847, in Maury County. His youthful days were passed on the farm and in securing an education at the Mooresville school. At the age of twenty-five he left home and went to Texas on a grand buffalo hunt, and for five years was engaged in this pursuit. He killed some 3,000 buffalo and hundreds of deer, antelope and wolves. Having returned home he, in 1880, married Rebecca B. Grant, a native of West Virginia, born May 9,1850. This union resulted in the birth of two children: Samuel W. (deceased), and John P. Mr. and Mr Fitzpatrick are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a Democrat in politics and owns 465 acres of the best land in his district. He is a son of Col. S. W. and Mary D. (Love) Fitzpatrick. The father was born in 1812 in Giles County and the mother in 1814 in Maury County, where they were married in 1832. They lived in this county until 1859 and then moved to Marshall County. In 1873 they returned to Maury County and there passed the remainder of their days. The father, three years previous to his death, joined the Methodist Episcopal Church. The mother was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church from girlhood. During the days of militia he held the position of colonel. He was a farmer by occupation, owning some 3,000 acres of land and 150 negroes, besides abundance of stock, but the war swept away many thousands for him. When Grandfather Fitzpatrick came to this county he brought his wife and household goods on a pony, himself walking, accompanied by six bear dogs and his rifle. At the age of thirty-six he determined to go to work, and as a result, when he died at seventy-two years of age he was worth $325,000. January, 1880, the mother died, and in December of the same year he too passed away.

ROBERT M. FOLLIS, a prosperous farmer of Marshall County, Tenn., was born in Giles County, Tenn, November 18, 1830. His early education was almost wholly neglected, and while growing up he learned the blacksmith's trade with his father. After becoming grown he attended school until he had learned the three "R's" and then resumed working at his trade, In 1851 he wedded Sarah Compton, by whom he had six children, all sons. She died in 1872, and the following year he married Mary Jones. To them were born three children. In 1862 he volunteered in Capt. Gordon's Company, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, and served for nearly three years. He resumed his trade, and in 1882 abandoned work, owing to his right arm giving out. He has farmed since that time, and owns 326 acres of land, the most of which he has made by hard work. His parents, John and Elizabeth (Martin) Follis, were born in North Carolina and Kentucky, respectively. The father moved to Kentucky when young, and there married, and soon removed to Giles County, where he lived until his death. They were the parents of eleven children, and were members of tile Primitive Baptist Church. He was an old-line Whig in politics, and died in 1845. After his death the mother moved to Illinois, and there died in 1882.

A. S. FOSTER, farmer, was born May 9, 1816, in Lincoln County. While growing he strongly desired an education, but the opportunities were not afforded. In 1836 he wedded Martha M. Cunningham, and nine children blessed this union. In 1883 his wife died, and the same year he wedded Fannie L. J. Foster. Our subject is a Democrat and a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. He has been magistrate and deputy sheriff, and is an example of what a young man of industry and determination can do, having started to keeping house with less than $100 worth of property, he arose by hard work and close attention to business to one of the heaviest tax payers of his community. For about thirty-two years he has lived in this county, and is accounted a good farmer and an enterprising citizen. He is a son of Frederick and Sallie (Broadaway) Foster. The father was born in 1793 in Kentucky, and the mother in 1797 in North Carolina. They were married in 1313, and located in Lincoln County, but soon moved to Illinois, where they remained seven years. They then returned to Lincoln County, where they spent the remainder of their lives tilling the soil. The father was a soldier in the Creek war, and a Democrat in politics. He died in 1838, and the mother followed in 1857.

JAMES E. FOWLER is a son of Alanthas L. and Tennessee A. (Fowler) Fowler. The father was born in Virginia in 1822, and the mother in Tennessee in 1831. Alanthas Fowler came to Tennessee in 1829, and married our subject's mother in 1848. To them were born four children, James E. being the only one living. The father served in the late war in Capt. McCure's company, Forty-first Tennessee Confederate Infantry, and was one of the defenders of Fort Donelson. After his capture and imprisonment at Camp Morton, some seven months, he was exchanged at Vicksburg, and served no more, owing to Ill health. He has lived the quiet, independent life of a farmer, and casts his vote with the Democratic party. The mother died in 1860. He is now sixty-three years old, and has the confidence and respect of all who know him. James, his only child, was born August 25, 1851, in Marshall Connty. He was reared on a farm, and received a common school education. After taking a trip West for his health, he returned to the farm given to him, and in connection with his father is farming and raising stock. Anna M. Willis became his wife in 1882, and to them two children were born. Both husband and wife are members of the Christian Church, and James is a Democrat.

DR. F. FERGUSON, one of the leading practitioners of Marshall County, was born February 18, 1848, in that county, reared on the farm and had all the advantages that the common schools of those days afforded. He is a son of John F. and Amelia L. (Brittain) Ferguson. The father was a native of South Carolina and the mother of North Carolina. In early life they both came to what is now Marshall County, being among the early comers to that part of the State. For many years the father was a magistrate but his chosen profession was that of a farmer, being one of the most extensive in the community. After the death of the mother the father married Mary Brittain whose maiden name was Williams. In 1870 the father also passed away. In 1869 our subject began the study of medicine under Dr. J. B. Stephens of Nashville and late in the same year entered the medical department of the University of Nashville and graduated from that institution in 1841. He then opened an office in District No. 7, and has followed his profession there ever since. Besides what his practice brings him he has a good farm of 280 acres. In 1873 he wedded Sallie J. Robinson, who was born in this county August 21, 1855. To this union were born three children: John T., Maggie R. and James F. Mr. Ferguson is a Democrat in politics and he and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church. The patronage Mr. Ferguson has received and the financial advancement he has made render comments on his ability both as a farmer and a physician unnecessary.

GEORGE W. GARRETT. Levi Garrett, father of George W., was born in the "Palmetto State" in 1790, and when a small lad was taken to Virginia where he lived to be grown. He then came to Tennessee, having in his possession at the time of his arrival only a horse and 50 cents. He followed the occupation of farming and became the owner of 1,000 acres of land. He remained single until nearly fifty years of age, and then wedded Miss Davis, who was born in Tennessee in 1818, and to them were born eight children. The father was an 1812 soldier and in politics was an old-line Democrat. He died in 1867 and the mother nine years later. Jesse J. Garrett, son of Levi Garrett, was born in Marshall County, October 1, 1846. His school days were limited and at the age of eighteen he enlisted in Company E, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, being an escort of Gen. Hood for a time and was with Forrest until the close of the war. He has been a farmer and owns 240 acres of excellent land. In 1868 he married Mary Ferguson, by whom he has had four daughters. She died in 1880 and since that time he and his children have kept house. Mr. Garrett is a Democrat. George W. Garrett, our immediate subject and son of Levi Garrett, was born October 27, 1852, in Marshall County. Like his brother he received a limited education and at the age of nineteen became an independent farmer on the place where he now lives. In 1873 he wedded S. L. Neren, daughter of Isaiah and Amanda (Hall) Neren, and to them were born five children. Mr. Garrett owns 196 acres of fertile land and is a stanch Democrat in his political views. He and Mrs. Garrett are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

THOMAS E. GARRETT, dealer in stoves and tinware, is a son of Jacob and Mary A. (Morris) Garrett, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Maryland. The father died at the age of seventy-seven and the mother at the age of sixty-five. The fattier was a farmer, a Democrat, and he and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject was born September 23, 1842, in Sumner County, Tenn.; he passed his early days on the farm and attended the common schools. At the age of seventeen he began learning the tinner's trade with McClure, Buck & Co., of Nashville. After learning this trade, in 1877, he opened a store of his own in Lewisburg, and has been doing a good business since. In 1879 he wedded Elizabeth M. Brandon, and to this union were born two children. During the war he enlisted in Company F, Fifteenth Tennessee Cavalry, and served nearly two years. He then returned home and resumed his trade. Mr. Garrett is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Garrett has been a resident of Lewisburg for nine years, and is recognized as one of the wide-awake business men of the town.

ANDREW J. GRIFFIS, senior member of the firm of Griffis & Bro., of Robertson Fork, Tenn., is a son of  T. M. and Nancy E. (Carner) Griffis, natives of Tennessee, where they grew to manhood and womanhood and were married. They spent the greater part of their lives in what is now Marshall County, and here raised their family of ten children. They were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in politics the father was a Democrat. He served a short time during the late war and is now a prosperous farmer. The mother died in 1879. Andrew is of Irish-French descent and was born in Marshall County, July 22, 1847. He received a very limited education in his youth, but on reaching manhood he attended Cumberland University and afterward taught school a short time. He then began the mercantile business with A. D. Wallace. Since 1872 he and his brother have been in business together, and in connection with their store operate a large farm. Six children were born to his marriage with Bettie E. Tucker, which occurred in 1873. They are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat politically.

SAMUEL T. HARDISON, M. D., one of the leading practitioners of Lewisburg, was born in Maury County, Tenn., February 13,1841. He was reared on a farm and educated in country schools. At the age of nineteen he began the study of medicine under his father and in 1860 he entered the Reform Medical College, at Macon, Ga., where he took one course and then, in 1861, enlisted in Company G, Twenty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army. Early in 1862 he was promoted to a position in the medical department of the army, serving in all four years. In 1865 Dr. Hardison began the practice of medicine at Lewisburg and has ever since continued in that profession, graduating in 1877 from the medical department of the University of Nashville. He has also been interested in the drug business, hardware trade, house building, livery business, planing-mill, and at present is a director of the Bank of Lewisburg. He has once been president of Marshall County Medical Society, having been a member of that society since its organization. He has also filled the office of vice-president of the Medical Association of Tennessee. Dr. Hardison was married in 1868 to Georgia Davidson, daughter of Dr. I. S. Davidson, of Bedford County, Tenn., the fruits of this union being seven children. Both he and Mrs. Hardison are members of the Christian Church. Our subject is a relative of the American Gen. Howe, of Revolutionary fame. His parents, Dr. Joel and Jane (Long) Hardison, were natives of North Carolina; they were married in 1820, and eleven children, four of whom are living, blessed their union. The father was a Jacksonian Democrat; he died in 1873. The mother died in 1884.

HIRAM HARRIS, an old and prominent farmer, was born October 20,1806, in North Carolina, and is a son of James and Nancy (Thompson) Harris, both natives of North Carolina. They were married in this State, and in 1808 came to Tennessee and located in Bedford County, where they spent the remainder of their days. The father followed agricultural pursuits, and during Indian troubles he was captain of a company under Jackson. In 1863 he died, and about seven years later his widow too passed away, both living to a ripe old age. Our subject was educated in the old-time schools, and at the age of twenty-one bought a farm of his own and began his career as a free and independent farmer. In 1837 he came to Marshall County, and has made this his home ever since. In 1828 he wedded Jane P. Johnson, who was born in Davidson County, Tenn., July 3, 1807, and to them were born eleven children. Mr. Harris is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Protestant Church. He has a fine farm of over 200 acres. He has been a resident of this county for nearly thirty years and is a highly respected citizen. He and wife are enjoying good health and fifty-eight years of wedded life.

ROBERT C. HARRIS, merchant at Silver Creek, was born September 24, 1836, in Marshall County, reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. At the age of seventeen he began working at the mechanic's trade and followed this exclusively for five years. In 1878 he opened a store of general merchandise at Silver Creek, where he has been successfully engaged ever since. In 1880 be was united in marriage to Mary A. Perry, a native of Marshall County, born December 20, 1857. The fruits of this union were two children: Lula M. and Homer T. For eight years Mr. Harris has held the position of postmaster at Silver Creek. He is a Democrat in politics. He is the son of James G. and Susan I. (Hill) Harris. The father was born in Wilson County in 1811, and the mother in Maury County in 1818. They were married in the latter county and after a short residence there moved to Marshall County to make this their permanent home. Their family consisted of seven children--five boys and two girls. Only the boys are living. Two are merchants, one is a teacher, and two are farmers. The father was twice married, before he wedded Miss Hill. He was a farmer, but worked at mercantile arts of nearly all kinds. He was a Democrat and for several years was a member of the County Court of Maury County. In 1882 he was called from the toils of earth. Since the death of her husband the mother has lived on the old homestead with her son.

VALENTINE O. HAYES, dry goods merchant, of Lewisburg, was one of seven children born to Hiram and Sallie (Webb) Hayes. The father was born in North Carolina and when young came to this State, and after marriage settled in this county. About 1856 he moved to Missouri, where the mother died. He was a blacksmith and a wood workman by trade. Our subject was born June 20, 1854, in Marshall County. After the death of his father, at the age of eight, he was bound out to a farmer, who gave him but little schooling though he furnished him abundance of work. On reaching manhood he worked for wages on the farm and spent the money in schooling himself. In 1874, he came to Lewisburg and entered the store of Montgomery Bro. as saleman, At the end of four years he opened a store of general mercandise. In 1874 he built the commodious brick building where he now conducts his business. For a short time he ran a hardware and a dry goods store, but having sold the former he made a specialty of the latter. In 1881 he wedded Zadie London, by whom he has two children. Mr. Hayes is a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is accounted one of Lewisburg's most enterprising citizens, and has erected three of the best buildings in the town. His building. where he is engaged in business, was the first business brick building erected in Lewisburg.

E. P. C. HAYWOOD, M. D., a resident of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of George W. and Sarah B. (Dabney) Haywood, who were born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1798 and 1809, respectively. The father was a physician and a highly educated man, having graduated from both a literary and a medical college. He was a skillful practitioner and in politics was a Whig. He died when about forty-nine years of age. His paternal ancestors were of English descent. The mother is of Scotch lineage and is yet living. Our subject was born in Marshall County September 5, 1845, and was reared on a farm and received an academic education preparatory to entering college, but the breaking out of the war changed his plans, and instead of attending school he, in 1864, enlisted in Gordon's Company, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, and served until the close of the war. He returned home and farmed until 1869, when he began studying medicine under Dr. Alfred White, and in 1870 entered the University of Nashville and graduated two years later. He practiced four years in Cornersville and then engaged in farming. Six children were born to his union with Isabelle Marsh, which took place in 1874. Both are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South and in politics he is a Democrat. He owns a farm of 1,000 Acres, and a one-half interest in a grist and flour mill.

 WILLIAM L. HILL, farmer, is a son of William and Elizabeth (Arnold) Hill, natives of Virginia. After marriage they came to Tennessee and located in the Maury fraction of Marshall County, where they lived about thirty years. They then moved to West Tennessee, where they both died. The family consisted of nine children, six of whom lived to he grown. Our subject was born February 14, 1822, grew to manhood on the farm,  and received a very limited education in the common schools of those early days. At the age of twenty-one he began farming. and has followed that occupation up to the present time. In 1851 he wedded Leanna Manire, and this union resulted in the birth of five children, three of whom are living: Amaca W., Lemuel R. and John R. The first is married to Catherine Wilson, by whom he has three children: Esther B., Eula R. and Maud. The other sons are living at home in single blessedness. Mr. Hill is a Democrat, and his wife. is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He has a fine farm of 248 acres, well stocked and furnished with abundance of running water. In fact there are few farms in the county superior to his. Mary A. R. Hill, deceased, was the wife of John F. Hill, by whom she had three children: Ida L., Rucker B. and Mary A. R., all living.

JOHN T. HILL, farmer, is a son of John R. and Elizabeth H. (Kennedy) Hill. The father was a native of Virginia, born in 1802, and when seventeen years old came with his parents to the Maury fraction of Marshall County. The mother was born in Kentucky in 1807, and when young also came to this county. They were married in 1829, and lived all their lives in what is now Marshall County. They were the parents of ten children. The father was a member of the Pleasant Hill Missionary Baptist Church, being named in honor of him. He is a Democrat in politics, and four years was deputy sheriff in Maury County and six years sheriff in Marshall County, being the first sheriff ever elected in that county. He was an energetic, industrious farmer, and was worth some $200,000 previous to the war. In 1878 the mother died and two years later the father passed away. Our ancestors on his father's side were of English-French descent, and on his mother's of English. The father was a second cousin of Gen. D. H. Hill, of Virginia, and a cousin of Ben Hill. of Georgia. "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was based on the run-away of one of our subject's great-grandfather's (Kennedy) slaves. Our subject was born September 6, 1846, in this county, passed his early days on the farm and received a good English education. In 1884 he wedded Missie McLean. a native of Rutherford County, born June 3, 1851. Mrs. Hill is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Hill is a Democrat and a thrifty farmer, owning 240 acres of good land. For forty years he has been a resident of Marshall County, and is considered one of the county's best citizens.

 PERSIS D. HOUSTON, dentist, is a son of Benjamin F. and and Necie B. (Usery) Houston, both natives of North Carolina, the father born in 1805, and the mother in 1814. They were married in Marshall County in, 1834. and to them were born ten children, seven of whom are living. Both parents were active members ha the Christian Church. Until forty-five years of age he was an infidel, but after his reformation he became zealous in the cause of Christianity. He had been a school-teacher in his early days, but of late years was a successful farmer. For many years he filled the office of magistrate, and during his entire life he was an industrious, energetic worker. In politics he was a Democrat. He died in 1861, and the mother in 1878. The father was a relative of Gov. Samuel Houston. The subject of this sketch was born January 8, 1843, in Marshall County, was reared on the farm and received an academic education. At the age of seventeen he began teaching in order to raise sufficient means for taking a course in college. But these plans were frustrated by the breaking out of the war. In 1861 he volunteered in Capt. R. C. Williams' company, and four years was engaged in the war's bloody struggles. After returning home he engaged in the mercantile business and later farmed for five years. Having studied and practiced the dental profession for a number of years he graduated from the dental department of Tennessee University in 1881. Previous to this, in 1868, he wedded Medora A. Pickens, by whom be had seven children, five of whom are living. Mr. Houston and wife are both members of the Christian Church. He has been alderman of Lewisburg for three terms. For twelve years Mr. Houston has successfully practiced his profession in his town.

JOHN W. HUTTON, a leading farmer of Marshall County, is a son of John and Susan (Watkins) Hutton, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Virginia. The father was a Presbyterian and the mother a Methodist. In the bloody strife with the Indians in Kentucky the father took an active part. In 1809 they came to Tennessee when the woods were a mat of vines, and wild animals found their homes in the dense canebrake. The father died at the age of thirty, and in 1860 the mother followed him. Our subject was born August 6, 1809, in Franklin County, Ky., and spent the principal part of his time on the farm, and until eleven years of age had very good opportunities for schooling. At the age of eighteen he began to battle his own way in the world. After "overseeing" for four years, he purchased a tract of fifty acres in Rutherford County, and by hard work and good management is now one of the heaviest tax payers in the county. In 1883 he married Frances Moore, a native of Williamson County, born October 13, 1810. Fifty-three years of happy wedded life and ten children have blessed this worthy couple. Six of the children are living; all save one are married and pleasantly situated in life. Mr. Hutton had the honor of furnishing three brave boys for the war: Thomas, Williaim and Polk. William sacrificed his life for home and State. Mr. Hutton is a stanch Democrat; and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. For thirty-six years he has held the office of magistrate. Mr. Hutton has lived in this county for thirty five years, and has gained a reputation beyond reproach.

THOMAS C. HUTTON, a leading farmer of Marshall County, and a son of J. W. and Frances (Moore) Hutton (for further particulars of parents see sketch of John W. Hutton), was born in Rutherford County November 19, 1835, on the field where the battle of Murfreesboro was fought. He received a good practical education, and when only fifteen years old superintended the moving from Rutherford County to this. At the age of twenty-one he began "overseeing" for his father, and this he continued until the breaking out of the war. In 1861 he volunteered in Company F, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army, and served for three years in that company. He then joined a company of cavalry, and continued with this until the close of the war. During four years of faithful service he was in eight hard-fought battles and many skirmishes. He had three horses shot from under him, and was never captured or wounded. The third day after his return home found him at work tilling the soil. In 1865 he wedded Margaret E. Robinson, by whom lie had four children, only one of whom, Sallie, is living. In 1884 his wife died, and the following year he wedded Mary. C. Crowel, whose maiden name was Gordon. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mrs. Hutton is a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. Mr. Hutton has a fine, large farm, well stocked, and he is a man who takes an active part in all the enterprises of his community.

WILLIS M. HOPWOOD was born on the farm where he now resides February 1, 1813. His parents, Willis and Penelope (Moore) Hopwood, were born in the "Old Dominion," and in 1810 came to Tennessee, locating in Marshall County. The father was a minister of the gospel, and was among the first to accept the new doctrine that the Bible alone is the standard by which to measure Christian character. His labors were fully rewarded in this world by seeing many souls converted. He died in 1850, after a long and useful life. The mother died in 1868. Willis M. inherits Scotch-lrish blood from his ancestors. He received a good rudimentary education, and at the age of nineteen began earning his own living. He clerked in a store for two years, and for four years followed merchandising in Lewisburg, and has followed that and farming off and on ever since. He has filled the offices of constable, deputy sheriff and sheriff, serving in all about sixteen  years, to the general satisfaction of the people. Julia A. Bills became his wife in 1846. Nine children were born to their union, seven of whom are living. Mr. Hopwood
has been a Republican since the war; previous to that time he was a Whig. He is now seventy-three years old, and has never lived outside the county, nor more than seven miles from the place of his birth. Mrs. Hopwood is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JAMES N. HUNTER, a leading farmer of Marshall County, is a son of Ephraim and Mary (Elliott) Hunter. The father was a native of North Carolina, and when a boy came with his parents to Tennessee. About 1808 they removed to this county, and here Ephraim was married. His family consisted of eleven children, only one of whom is living. The father was a Democrat and served many years as magistrate. He followed farming and merchandising, besides running a carding machine and cotton spinner. The father died in 1857, and the mother in 1864. She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The subject of this sketch was born November 15, 1815, in Marshall County and while growing up worked in the factory and had very poor opportunities for schooling, attending the old subscription schools. At the age of twenty-two he began clerking in his father's store, where he remained for ten years. He then engaged in farming and this he has continued to the present time. In 1848 he wedded Cynthia Hays, by whom be had nine children. The eldest son, R. H., is a rising young physician of Texas. In politics Mr. Hunter is a Democrat and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In the days of militia, he held the position of colonel.

WILLIAM P. IRVINE, grocery and grain dealer, was born August 1, 1845, in Elkton, Giles County, where he grew up and received a common English education. His parents were Nathaniel and Narcissa (Davis) Irvine. The father was born in North Carolina, and the mother in Lincoln County, Tenn. After marriage they settled in Giles County, where they remained until 1852. They then moved to Georgia, where the father died. After his death the mother returned to Lincoln County, Tenn., and married H. N. Cowden. They located in this county, where they have lived ever since. The mother was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In 1861 our subject volunteered in Company I, Thirty-second Tennessee Infantry, and remained in that company till 1864. He then joined Gen. Forrest's command, and served till the surrender at Gainesville, Ala.. a period of over three and one-half years. He was imprisoned seven months at Camp Morton and Lafayette, Ind.. and was exchanged at Vicksburg. He then returned and engaged in farming. In 1865 he wedded Eliza Garrett, and to them were born two children: Roy and Mamie. He is a stanch Democrat in politics, and is commissioner of this taxing district, and also one of the directors of the Bank of Lewisburg. In 1883 Mr. Irvine came to Lewisburg and opened the business in which he is now engaged. He is a good business man and has met with good success.

WILLOUGHBY A. JACKSON, a leading business man of Marshall County, was born October 7, 1834, in Wilson County, Tenn. He was a farmer boy and received a limited education, never having attended school more than nine months altogether. At the age of eighteen he left home, and after spending a year at Charleston, S. C., came to Marshall County and worked a short time in a livery stable. He then learned the saddler's trade an bought out the man for whom he worked, but at last he turned his attention to farming. In 1857 he married Margaret Phiper, by whom he had nine children, five of whom are living. He is a member of the Christian Church, and she of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he votes for the man rather than the party, though he holds to Republican principles. At present he is the owner of 700 acres of land, three stores and two saw-mills, besides he is engaged in stock-trading. He is a resident of Marshall County, and is accounted one of the most stirring, energetic, successful business men of the county. He is a son of James and Martha (Evans) Jackson, both of whom were reared and married in North Carolina. In 1830 they came to Wilson County, and after living there fourteen years returned to North Carolina. In 1869 they returned to Tennessee, and after several moves they went to West Tennessee, where they passed the last years of their lives. They were both Baptists. The father served in the Seminole war and four years in the late war. In the first he held the position of orderly sergeant and captain, and in the last held the position of captain and colonel. The mother died in 1871, and two years later the father followed.

RICHARD T. JOHNSON. William Johnson, father of our subject, was born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1814, and was married to Eliza J. Mourton, who was born  in  Bedford County in 1819. They resided for a short time in Lawrence County, and then took up their abode in Giles County, where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father was an extensive farmer and stock raiser, and for many years filled the office of magistrate. He was married twice, and died in 1883. The mother's death occurred in 1867. Richard inherits English blood from both parents. He was born in Lawrence County, September 20, 1840, and his early schooling was limited to a few terms. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Second Tennessee Confederate Infantry. At the battle of Perryville, Ky., he received six wounds from one volley of the enemy, and although seriously wounded escaped with his life. He was in eighteen of the bloodiest battles of the war, and after serving two years was promoted to second lieutenant. In 1865 he wedded Laura A. Cochran, by whom he has had six children. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson are Methodists, and he, like his father, is a stanch Democrat. He owns a fine farm in Marshall County, and has been a resident of the county twenty-one years.

HON. A. JONES, M. D., one of the leading physicians of Cornersville, Tenn., and son of John R. and Martha A. (Lane) Jones, was born in Marshall County, May 15, 1839. His boyhood days were spent on a farm and in attending the common schools; later he attended the school of Pascal, at Nashville, and for some time studied medicine under Dr. Thomas Lipscomb. He graduated from the University of Tennessee in 1858, and later took a course of lectures at New Orleans, and another at Belleview Medical College at New York. In 1859 he opened an office in Cornersville, where he has since resided, with the exception of four years during the war. He served in Company H, Third Tennessee Infantry, as lieutenant, and after a short service was made surgeon of the Seventeenth Regiment. In 1862 he wedded Maxie Harris, by whom he had four children, three of whom are living. The Doctor is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. and his wife is a Presbyterian. In 1871 lie represented Marshall County in the State Legislature, and filled the position ably for one term. He is a Democrat, and owns and operates a farm of 235 acres. His parents were born in North Carolina, and were married in Tennessee. The father was a physician, but not liking that profession he took up farming, and eventually became one of the most successful farmers in the county. He was a Democrat, and died of the cholera in 1865. The mother died in 1885. She was of Welsh descent and the father of English.

JAMES F. KENNEDY, merchant of Cornersville, was born in Green County, Tenn., October 4, 1830, son of Daniel and Margaret (Kennedy) Kennedy, who were also born in Green County. They were the parents of seven children and were members of the Presbyterian Church. The father was a tanner and merchant, and quite an extensive farmer. He was magistrate a number of years and was a Whig in politics. He died in 1861 and the mother in 1877. Our subject assisted his father in the tan-yard, store and farm, and at the age of twenty-one began earning his own living. He worked for about ten years for wages, and in 1861 opened a store in his native county, but was compelled to abandon it, owing to the war. In 1866 he opened a store in Cornersville, Marshall County, Tenn., where he has carried on the business successfully ever since. His marriage with Hannah C. McGaughey was celebrated in 1852. They have had six children, five of whom are living. Mr. Kennedy owns a farm of 200 acres, and as a business man has met with good success. He is a stanch Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

M. D. KELLEY, M. D., is a son of Cary T. and Nancy (Wilkins) Kelley, who were married in Giles County, and soon after settled on a farm, where they spent the remainder of their lives. They were Methodists and the father was a soldier in the war of 1812. He became a very prosperous farmer and was one of the first to introduce Berkshire hogs and Durham cattle into Marshall County. He was an old-line Whig and died in 1854. The mother lived until 1885. M. D. Kelley, our subject, was born September 6, 1832, in Giles County. At the age of seventeen he entered the Cumberland University and graduated in 1853. He then took a course in medicine at the University of Nashville and received the degree of M. D. in 1857. He spent some time in the State hospital and after three years' practice at Spring place in Marshall County, came to Cornersville in 1861, where he has since resided. In 1856 Margaret J. Gordon was united to him in marriage. To them were born three children--two sons and one daughter. The eldest son is a farmer and the other is studying for the ministry. The Doctor and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is conservative in politics, and is a successful physician of the county. He belongs to the Masonic, I. O. O. F., K. of  H., K. of G. R., and Good Templar fraternities, and People's Mutual Life Insurance Company.

JOHN T. KERCHEVAL, a leading groceryman of Lewisburg, was born April 24, 1850, in Lewisburg, where he grew up and was educated. He is the son of Peter and Susan C. (Ewing) Kercheval, natives of Tennessee. They were married in this county and to them were born nine children. The father was a lawyer, being one of the ablest attorneys in his county. For many years he was clerk and master of the chancery court. He died in 1867 and the mother in 1883. The Kerchevals are of French descent. The name was formerly Cheval--a French word, meaning horse--and in some unknown way the Ker became prefixed. Dr. J. M. and Mayor Kercheval, of Nashville, are descendants of that name. Having prepared himself for Yale College, our subject had his plans frustrated by the death of his father. He then engaged in the dry goods business, as a salesman, where he remained for seven years. He then opened a grocery store in 1883, in which he has done a thriving business ever since. Having studied law under his father, he was admitted to the bar in 1871 and practiced three years. He was a promising young lawyer and had a good practice, but had not learned the art of economizing, consequently, at the end of three years, he found himself considerably in debt. He then began to retrieve his fallen fortunes and concluded to try merchandising. For ten years he has been engaged in that business at Lewisville, and has been quite successful.

WILLIAM M. KILLGORE is a son of Thomas Killgore, who was a native of Cocke County, Tenn., and there married Jane Cooper. who was born in the same place, and became the mother of five children. The father was a farmer until late in life, and then kept hotel for some time. About 1846 the mother died, and he afterward married Julia Smith, who bore him five children. Her death occurred in 1883. Previous to the war Mr. Killgore was a Whig. He is now a Republican, and is seventy-eight years of age. William M. Killgore was born in Cocke County, December 19, 1839, and was pursuing his studies at the breaking out of the war. In 1861 he volunteered in Company C, Thirty-first Tennessee Infantry, and during four years of service was in many hard-fought battles, but received only one slight wound. After the siege of Knoxville his regiment was mounted. In 1865 he came to Marshall County, where he has since resided and farmed. Penelope J. Blackburn became his wife in 1867 and died in 1874, leaving two sons. In 1877 he married Woodly Fain, and to them were born five children. Both Mr. and Mrs. Killgore are members of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

ALFRED J LANE, farmer, was born February 8, 1848, on the farm where he now lives. While growing rip he received a fair practical education in the common schools, and, like a dutiful son, remained with his parents until he was twenty-two years of age, when be went to Pulaski to clerk in a cotton factory. Two years later he returned to the farm, and in 1873 he was married to Mary A. Overton, a native of Texas, born February 19, 1853. Of this marriage three children was the result: John F., Mary D. and William J. Mr. Lane is a Democrat, and he and wife and eldest child are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He has an excellent farm of 308 acres well stocked. He has been a resident of this county for twenty-one years, and is accounted a good farmer and an enterprising citizen. He is a son of Joel and Susan H. (Carter) Lane, both natives of Tennessee. They were married in Maury County, and settled on the farm where Alfred now lives. Both parents were members of the Missionary Baptist Church. The. father's chief occupation was farming, though he worked at blacksmithing, shoe-making, carpentering or whatever his inclinations suggested. Mechanical ingenuity runs through the Lane family. He died in 1854. The mother is still living, the wife of M. E. C. Overton, by whom she had ten children.

COL. JAMES HENRY LEWIS, attorney, of Lewisburg, was born September 17,1837, in Maury County, Tenn. His grandfather, John C. Lewis, was a native of Virginia, and moved from that State to North Carolina, where he married a daughter of Nathan Forrest, near Orange Court House, at which place Fielding Lewis, father of the subject of this sketch, was born. Subsequently John C. Lewis, with his family, immigrated to Middle Tennessee. Fielding Lewis married Lydia Preston, in Sumner County, Tenn. Her father was a captain of Tennessee Volunteers, under Jackson, at New Orleans in 1815, and died soon after his return home from this campaign of disease contracted in the service. He was a member of the Preston family of Virginia and Kentucky. The grandmother, Lewis. was a member of the same family of which Gen. N. B. Forrest was a descendant, all at one time residents of Bedford and Marshall Counties. Lydia Lewis died in 1860, and Fielding Lewis in 1876. They were both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The husband was a farmer and mechanic, and was a relative of Gen. Meriwether Lewis, of the "Lewis and Clark Expedition" fame. Col. J. H. Lewis worked on a farm and in the shop until attaining his majority. His opportunities at school were limited, so that his education is almost entirely the result of his own efforts. At the age of twenty-one he began the study of law, and in October, 1859, was admitted to the bar. In 1861 he married Victoria J. Sims, who lost her father in the Mexican war. Her grandfather was John O. Cook, of Maury County, of whose family she was a member, being an orphan girl. Her other grandfather was Gen. Winn, of South Carolina. The result Of this union is four children, three of whom are living. Both husband and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a firm Democrat. A short time before his marriage lie enlisted in Company I, Second Battalion Tennessee Cavalry, Volunteers, as a private, and within a year was made captain of the company. After the consolidation of the Second and Eleventh Battalions the command was known as the First Regiment Tennessee Cavalry. He served as lieulenant-colonel of the regiment, and commanded the regiment for more than a year of the war. In the latter part of the war he commanded a brigade, including the command at the battles of Averysboro and Bentonville, N. C. After four years' service he returned home, located in Lewisburg and engaged in the practice of law, and served in the Legislature of the State--session 1871-72--as joint representative from Marshall, Giles and Lincoln Counties. Col. Lewis was largely instrumental in building the Duck River Valley Railroad, and served as president of the company two years prior to its lease to the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad, having been a director before, and has been connected with the road ever since its building. He threw all of his energy and influence into the building of the road, and succeeded wherein most men would have failed. For twenty years he has practiced his profession, with ex-Gov. John C. Brown as his partner a portion of the time, and later with his brother, and now himself. He is now the attorney for the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad in Maury, Marshall and Lincoln Counties. His ability as a lawyer is too well known to need comment, and he is a public-spirited citizen of the county, having done much for the schools, churches, and all other benevolent organizations of the county and State. The firm name, Lewis Bros., was dissolved in 1885, and Capt. Thomas F. Lewis, the junior member of the firm, is now a member of the bar at Jackson, Tenn.

BENTLEY A. LONDON, a prosperous young farmer of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of N. B. and Cynthia A. (McConnell) London, both born in what is now Marshall County in 1825 arid 1832. Soon after marriage they began farming, in which they were very prosperous. The father was a stanch Democrat, and died in 1869. The mother afterward married P. Fox and is still living. Bentley A. inherits English blood from his father and Irish blood from his mother. He was born October 4, 1855, in Marshall County. His early educational advantages being limited, when nineteen years of age he began his career as a farmer, and before reaching a legal age made several land trades. At the age of twenty he married Mattie A. Fox, by whom he has two children--Bettie M. and Bentley D. Mrs. London is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. London is a stanch Democrat, and is the owner of 140 acres of fertile land. In February, 1886, he and W. D. Fox purchased N. S. Hopwood's general merchandise store, and have been doing a good business ever since.

WILLIAM A. LONDON, a leading livery man of Lewisburg, Marshall Co., Tenn., is a son of Nathan B. and Cynthia A. (McConnell) London, who were born, reared arid married in Marshall County. The father was a successful farmer, and served a short time in the late war, under Forrest. He was a Democrat, and died in 1869. His widow married Pervines Fox, Jr., by whom she has two children. Our subject was one of nine children, and was born November 23, 1837, in Marshall County. He was educated in the common schools, and at the age of nineteen began to do for himself. Since 1878 he has been engaged in the livery business in Lewisburg in partnership with different men, but since  1885 he and S. D. Davis have done business together, and are securing comfortable competencies. He also, in connection with McAdams & Sons, has done an extensive business in buying and selling horses and mules. In 1878 he wedded Mary E. Braly, by whom he as two daughters. Both Mr. and Mrs. London are members of the Christian Church. In politics our subject is a Democrat.

WILSON G. LOYD, clerk of the Circuit Court of Marshall County, is a son of Alexander M. and Louisa (Blackwell) Loyd. The father was a merchant, having sold goods in Bedford County for some time. In 1838 he removed to Texas for the purpose of surveying public lands. He was called from this world of toil at the early age of twenty-nine. Our subject was born April 26, 1838, in Lewisburg, but, his mother having died when he was but an infant, he was left to the care of an aunt at Shelbyville till nine years of age, after which he went to live with an uncle in Louisiana. At the age of seventeen he returned to this State and attended school three years, completing his education at Franklin College in 1859. He then went back to Louisiana and engaged as salesman in Alexandria till 1861, when he enlisted in Company B, Second Louisiana Infantry in the. Army of Northern Virginia. At the battle of Gettysburg lie received a slight wound, and it was the only one he received during the entire four years he was in service. In 1865 be wedded Victoria C. Meadows, and by this union became the father of eleven children, all living. Both Mr. and Mrs. Loyd are earnest workers in the Christian Church. In politics Mr. Loyd is a Democrat. In 1878 he was elected circuit court clerk, and has filled that position in a satisfactory manner. In 1885 he became book-keeper of the Bank of Lewisburg.

JOHN B. LUNA is a son of James G. arid Rhoda C. (Stevens) Luna, native Tennesseeans. They were members of the Primitive Baptist Church. The father was a Democrat, and died in 1846, at the age of thirty-nine. The mother lived until 1880. John B.'s birth occurred in Marshall County August 29, 1844. At the age of fifteen he began earning his own living, receiving a common school education. For about eleven months he served in Company I, Eighth Tennessee Infantry, and then returned home and resumed farming. In 1864 he wedded Mattie Yowell, who died the following year. In 1870 Maggie Vaughn became his wife and seven children blessed their union. Both Mr. and Mrs. Luna are members of the Primitive Baptist Church, and, like his father, Mr. Luna is a Democrat. They possess 235 acres of land, and he is considered one of the best farmers of Marshall County. He gives much attention to raising fine stock and owns the two horses, Tom Hall and Chieftain, the latter of Black Satin stock. For forty-two years be has been a resident of Marshall County, and no man has been more intimately connected with the progress of the county than be.

SHELBY B. MARSH is a son of Simeon and Elizabeth (Shelby) Marsh, who were born in North and South Carolina, respectively. In 1812 they came to Tennessee and located in Marshall County, where the father became an extensive farmer and land speculator. The father was a Democrat, and died when about seventy years old. His ancestors were Revolutionary soldiers from the "Nutmeg State." The mother was related to Shelby, the second in command at the battle of New Orleans, and governor of Kentucky. Shelby B. Marsh was born in North Carolina. At the age of fifteen lie began clerking in a store, and after following that occupation for a few years he began trading in negroes, making some $10,000 thereat. Seven children were born to his marriage with Elizabeth Jones, which took place in 1837. Two of the children died in infancy and Robert J. and Simeon were killed in the late war. Mr. Marsh is a stanch Democrat and has been remarkably successful in his business career. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.

WILLIAM T. MARSH is a son of Shelby and Elizabeth J. (Jones) Marsh, and was born June 24, 1843, in Giles County, Tenn., and was reared by a father who, though very wealthy, was a believer in honest toil, and taught his sons to work. He acquired a good rudimentary education, and later attended Cumberland University. He then returned home, and has followed the free and independent life of a farmer up to the present time. He owns 930 acres of very fertile land, and is extensively engaged in stock raising. In 1871 Amelia Jackson became his wife. She is a daughter of Thomas R. and Elizabeth S. (Madry) Jackson, who were born in North Carolina and Missouri, respectively. They both came to Tennessee when young, and became the parents of ten children. The father was a Democrat, and died in 1883. His widow still lives, and has attained the age of seventy-two years. To Mr. and Mrs. Marsh were born three children-two sons and one daughter. Our subject and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is a stanch Democrat.

JOHN L. MARSHALL, of the firm of Cowden & Marshall, of Lewisburg, is a son of James G. and Margaret J. (Bullock) Marshall, both natives of Tennessee. In early life the father was a teacher, but later engaged in the occupation of a farmer. Both parents were church members, the father being an elder for many years in the Presbyterian Church, and the mother an active member in the Methodist Episcopal Church. She died in 1863 and the father followed in 1871. He was a Democrat in politics. Our subject was born January 30, 1850, in Marshall County, and inherited Scotch-Irish blood from his father and English blood from his mother. He passed his youthful days on the farm and received an academic education. In 1869 he entered Cumberland University, where he completed his education. Having taught two terms he commenced the study of law and was admitted to the bar in 1875. He then became a partner of P. C. Smithson, and two years later dissolved partnership, practicing alone till 1883. He then became one of the firm to which he now belongs. In 1876 he wedded Mrs. M. L. (Swanson) Lyle, who died in 1881. Five years later he married Martha Steele. Mr. Marshall is an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and his wife belongs to the same church. He is a conservative Democrat, and is considered by all as an able and successful young lawyer.

JAMES M. MARTIN is a son of Henry and Maria (Tankersley) Martin. Henry Martin was born in North Carolina in 1802, and when young came to Tennessee and located in Bedford County, where he married Miss Tankersley, born in 1808. They were the parents of eighteen children, seven of whom are living. The mother was a member of the Christian Church, as was also the father until the last few years of his life, when he became a Universalist. He held the position of constable six years and that of deputy sheriff two years. During the late war he supported the Confederacy although too old to take an active part. The mother died in 1842 and two years later Air. Martin married Mrs. Delilah Lamb, by whom he had six children. His death occurred in 1864. James M. was born September 6, 1822, in Williamson County, and secured a practical education. At the age of twenty he began working by the month and in 1845 married Nancy McGee, who was born February 21, 1826, in North Carolina, and died in 1856, having borne one child who died. In 1857 Mr. Martin took for his second wife Mary Stanfield, and seven children blessed their union. Husband and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is a stanch Democrat in politics and for some eight years has held the position of magistrate and has been constable nearly four years. He owns 260 acres of land and is known to be a thrifty farmer and an honest man.

HARDIN MAYBERRY is a son of Gabriel Mayberry, who was a Virginian by birth and married Rosanna Hardin, of South Carolina, by whom he had four children. They came to Tennessee when quite young and when Nashville was a small collection of cabins. The father was a Democrat and a prosperous farmer and lived to be seventy-five years of age. His widow outlived him but a few years. Grandfather Mayberry was a Revolutionary soldier at the age of seventeen, and was intimately associated with Gen. George Washington. Hardin, our subject, was born in Hickman County July 14, 1826, and was reared on a farm, receiving a common school education. Since attaining his twenty-first birthday he has farmed, and now owns a well stocked farm of 1,000 acres. In 1847 he married Cornelia E. Galloway, who died in 1856, leaving four children: Mary M., Harriet C. and two infants, deceased. Mr. Mayberry's second wife was Mrs. A. P. Blair, who bore him six children: Lawreston H., Emma P., Lula L., Harvey, Cora and Gabriella. Mr. Mayberry was a soldier in the late war, serving in Company A, Forty-eighth Tennessee Infantry, and was one of the defenders of Fort Donelson. After a two months' imprisonment at Camp Chase and five months' imprisonment at Johnson's Island he was exchanged at Vicksburg, and failing health caused him to be released. He served as first lieutenant about one year.

JOSEPH McBRIDE, clerk of the county court, was born December 27, 1827, in Lincoln (now Marshall) County, Tenn., and is of Scotch-Irish descent. He is a son of G. W. and Mary H. (Cook) McBride, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Virginia. The father was a farmer, a Democrat in politics, and occupied the office of magistrate the greater part of his life. He died at the age of sixty-two and the mother  at the age of sixty. Our subject  grew to manhood on the farm and received a practical education in the common schools. In 1853 he wedded Mary A. V. Palmer, by whom he had ten children, seven of whom are living. Mr. McBride, like his father before him, is a stanch Democrat, and be and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. For nearly twelve years he has served as magistrate, and was also chairman of the county court a term. In 1882 he was elected to the position he is now occupying, and has filled that office in a highly satisfactory manner.

COL. W. L. McCLELLAND was born in North Carolina in 1815, and when a boy came with his parents to what is now Marshall County, Tenn. On reaching manhood he married Mary Chambliss, by whom he had three children. His wife died in 1854, and he wedded Sarah Chambliss, a sister of his first wife, by whom he had two children. He and both his wives were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In early life he was a merchant, and later he took himself to farming, in which he was more than ordinarily successful. He twice represented his county in the State Legislature, and was chosen delegate to the Charleston and Baltimore Convention in 1860. During his life he was one of the most enterprising and energetic business men in his section. He died in 1883, leaving a widow and five children to mourn their loss. John R, is a lawyer of Nashville, Fernando, a farmer of Marshall County; Mattie, the wife of Capt. A. E. Read, of Louisiana; Ada lives at home, and Zana is the wife of W. W. Ogilvie, who has an interest in and charge of the old McClelland homestead. He was born in Maury County May 15, 1856, and attended Webb's school at Culleoka, and later the Tennessee University, completing the freshman year. He first opened a hardware store in Lewisburg, and in connection handled grain. His marriage with Miss McClelland was consummated in 1881. Mr. Ogilvie belongs to the, Methodist Episcopal Church South, and in politics is a Democrat. In 1885 he moved to the farm, and is now extensively engaged in stock raising

 FERDINAND S. McCLELLAND may be mentioned as one of the prosperous farmers of Marshall County, Tenn. He is a son of Col. W. L. and Mary (Chambliss) McClelland, and was born February 7, 1841, in what is now Marshall County. His educational advantages were above the average, and he, had reached his senior year in Cumberland University when the war broke out and he volunteered in Capt. Walker's company, Third Tennessee Infantry. He served four years and the last year and a half was lieutenant in the ordnance department. In 1866 he wedded Mary Y. Plattenburg, a native of Alabama, and to them were born seven children. At the close of the war he located in Alabama, where he was engaged in the culture of cotton four years. In 1870 he returned to Marshall County, Tenn., where he owns 150 acres of fine and well improved land. He is
a conservative Democrat in Politics and is a man of recognized ability. During the agitation of the Slate debt question he made many public addresses in favor of its payment in full. For thirty-seven years tic has been a resident of Marshall County, and by his upright conduct and geniality has won the respect and esteem of all.

 FREDERICK B. McCLURE, farmer of Marshall County and son of John and Sarah (Cooper) McClure. The father was born in North Carolina and there married Miss Jameson, who bore him five children. They came to Tennessee about 1811 and located in Rutherford County. His wife died and he then wedded Mrs. Cooper. To them were born four children. Both husband and wife were members of the Cumberland Presyterian Church. The father was a tanner by trade and worked thereat in early life. Later he betook himself to farming. The mother died in 1845 and the father in 1848. Our subject was born in Rutherford County, August 15, 1827, but attended school very little in boyhood, owing to poor health. At the age of twenty he began farming and later purchased a farm in Marshall County. In 1862 he volunteered to serve in the commissary department continuing until the close of the war. In 1866, after his return, he wedded Miss McAfee daughter of Green and Elizabeth (Scales) McAfee, and to their union were born five children, three now living. Mr. McClure is a stanch Democrat and is the owner of 163 acres of land in the garden spot of Marshall County.

HENRY G. McCORD was born August 12, 1817, in Williamson County, and is of Scotch-Irish descent. He received the rudiments of his education in the common schools and subsequently attended Cumberland University, and graduated from the literary department in 1873. He taught school for about three years, and then turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. Ili 1877 he married Lillie V. Ogilvie, who was born May 13, 1856. The fruits of this union were five children: Marks W., Harris 0., Manella M., Joseph C. and Chamilla S. In 1864 Mr. McCord went out in Company C, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate Army, and served until the close of the war. He has a good farm of 269 acres, well watered and furnished with good buildings and is considered a first-class farmer. He is a Democrat in Politics, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is a son of Cowden and Sallie A. (Williams) McCord. The father was born in Williamson County in 1809, and the mother was born on the farm where Henry now lives in 1826. They were married in Marshall County in 1844, and to them were born eight children, seven of whom lived to be grown, and six are living now. The father was a Democrat in politics, and for one term served as magistrate. He was also a farmer and an extensive one at that. The mother died in 1863, and in 1879 the father died also.

ROBERT A. McCORD, JR., member of the hardware firm of Woods & McCord, was born March 10, 1859, in Marshall County, son of Cowden and Sarah (Williams) McCord. (See sketch of Henry McCord for further particulars of parents.) Our subject was reared on the farm, and received a good common school education. At the age of twenty-two he began to battle his own way in life. In 1882 he came to Lewisburg, and in connection with Coffey & Woods engaged in the grain and agricultural business. In two years he transferred his line of business to hardware, in which he has succeeded remarkably well. In 1881 he was united in marriage to Bettie Whittsitt, and this union resulted in the birth of three children. In politics Mr. McCord is conservative, voting the Democratic ticket when good men are presented. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He has, in the short space of four years, won a place among the first business men of the city.

 HON. DILLISTON S. McCULLOUGH is a son of Richard and Nancy (Posey) McCullough natives of Virginia and South Carolina, respectively. The father was born in 1803 and the mother in 1807. They were married in Rutherford County, Tenn., and were the parents of ten children, five of whom are now living. The father was a tiller of the soil and was quite successful in that occupation. In politics he was, respectively, a Whig, Know-nothing and Democrat. In 1878 the mother died and four years later the father died, too. Our subject was born May 11, 1838, in Rutherford County, and is of Scotch-Irish descent. He passed his youthful days on the farm and received his education in the district schools; later he took an academic course at Union Hill, and finished at Union University, where he graduated in 1860, with the degree of A. B. After teaching a term
he volunteered, in 1861, to lead Company D, Eighth Battalion Tennessee Cavalry, which afterward became Starnes' regiment. Having served about twelve months he resigned his commission and joined the Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry. After the war he taught two terms, but not liking the nomadic life of  a teacher, he turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, in which he is still engaged. In 1865 he married Martha J. Jordon, and to them were born three children: Ruben J., William R. and Dilliston. Mr. McCullough is a Democrat in politics and has not escaped public notice. In 1880 he was elected senator of the Thirteenth District, representing Marshall, Lincoln, Moore and Franklin Counties, and in 1883 he was elected to the same position by the Sixteenth Senatorial District, composed of Marshall and Williamson Counties. Mr. McCullough has been a resident of
Marshall County for seventeen years. has a good farm of 180 acres, and is one of the county's best men.

 COLEMAN R. McCULLOUGH, an enterprising farmer of' Marshall County, and a  son of Richard D. and Nancy (Posey) McCullough, was born February 25, 1842, in Rutherford County. He received a good practical education in the common schools, and  in 1862 volunteered in Company C, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate Army.  During nearly three years of faithful service he was engaged in eight hard-fought bat tles, but was never wounded or taken prisoner. After the war he engaged in farming, and in 1868 was united in marriage to Margaret R. born October 21, 1844. This union was blessed by the birth of six children--two boys and four girls. Mr. McCullough is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. For four years our subject has filled the position of constable in a capable and satisfactory manner. He has a good farm of 300 acres, well stocked, and has been a resident of tile county for twenty-eight years.

COL. CHRISTOPHER C. McKINNEY was born December 10, 1825 in Lincoln County, Tenn. He was reared on the farm and attended the old-time subscription schools. His parents were James and Temperance (Rowe) McKinney, natives, respectively, of Virginia and South Carolina. When young they came to this State, the father in 1808 and the mother two years later. After marriage they settled in Lincoln County where they passed the remainder of their days. The father was a member of the Methodist Church and the mother a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. Their family consisted of seven children, six of whom are living. The father was a farmer and carpenter and a soldier in the war of 1812. The father died in 1862 and the mother in 1880. Our subject after reaching twenty-one years of age began working for himself at $5 per month. After farming and milling for several years he opened a grocery store in Petersburg in 1854. He then changed to the dry goods business and this he continued till the war. In 1849 he wedded Mary Luna, and this union resulted in the birth of seven children, six of whom are living. In 1861 Mr. McKinney enlisted in Company B, Eighth Tennessee Infantry, sharpshooters, as first lieutenant and from that arose to lieutenant-colonel of his regiment. At the end of four years' faithful service he returned and engaged in merchandising as salesman and book-keeper at Richmond, Tenn. In 1884 he opened a grocery store in this place where he has had a lucrative practice ever since. Mr. and Mrs. McKinney are active members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he has been an elder for twenty-nine years. He is a Democrat, a good business man and a highly respected citizen.

G. A. McLANE, one of the firm of McLane & Co., proprietors of a saw and planing-mill, is a son of Jesse and Flora (Patterson) McLane, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Virginia. They came to Tennessee at an early day, and were married in Marshall County, and there reared their family of seven children. Previous to this union the father had been married to Nancy Paton, by whom he had nine children. He was a Whig in politics. His ancestors were of Irish descent and his wife was of Scotch lineage. G. A. McLane was born August 14, 1836, in Marshall County. He only attended school about six months during his life, and when of age could scarcely write his own name, but by energy and ambition he overcame his deficiencies, and was a school-teacher for about three years, following farming at the same time. During the war he followed merchandising with Alfred McGahey at Shelbyville, but about three years later returned to the farm. In. 1874 he engaged in his present business, and in 1885 moved to Lewisburg and became one of the above named firm. Eliza Whitsett became his wife in 1870. To them were born five children, only four of whom are living. Mr. McLane was a strong Union man during the war, and was strongly opposed to slavery. He was one of the men in his district to vote for the Union. In politics he is a stanch Republican. Mr. McLane has prospered in worldly goods, and owns a good farm, besides a saw and planing-mill.

JOSEPH A. McRADY, a native of Maury County, was born January 18, 1827, and is a son of Ephraim McRady. The father was born in Kentucky in 1800, and as his parents died while he was yet quite young, he was reared by an uncle. After reaching man's estate he wedded Sarah Wingfield, a native of Maury County, Tenn., born in 1806, and by this union became the father of two children: Joseph A., our subject, and Susan. Both parents were leading members of the Presbyterian Church. The father was a house carpenter by trade, but spent the latter part of his life in farming. In politics he was a stanch Democrat. In 1838 the mother died, and the father then married Margaret White, who was also a member of the Presbyterian Church. The father died in 1871. Our subject, during his youth, had the best of opportunities for an education. After finishing the common school course he entered Jackson College, Maury County, and graduated from that institution in 1846. After teaching a year he began to read law under Judge Dillahunty, and, in 1849, opened an office in partnership with Robert Payne, at Lewisburg. Here he
continued five years. In 1852 he married Margaret E. Ewing, who was born February 14, 1833. This union resulted in the birth of nine children, seven of whom are living. The second son, Flarins S., is a rising young physician of Petersburg, Giles County. Our subject and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat in polities. In 1861 he volunteered in Capt. Holden's company of the Fifty-third Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army. He was soon appointed to the commissary department, and served in that capacity until the close of tile war. He was captured at Fort Donelson and soon removed to Johnson's Island. Being sick when the roll for exchange of prisoners was called, a bushwhacker answered to Mr. McRady's name, and thus escaped. Our subject remained in prison twelve months. Since the war he has followed agricultural pursuits.
He has a large farm of 430 acres, and has had reasonable success.

NEWTON McQUIDDY, farmer, born September 26,1819, in Woodford County, Ky.. was of Scotch-Irish descent on his father's side and English on his mother's. His parents were John and Achsah (Dale) McQuiddy, both natives of Kentucky. The father was born in 1790 and the mother in 1793. They had nine children, six of whom lived to be grown: three are living at the present time. The father was a farmer, though for several years, both in Kentucky and Tennessee, he ran a rope and bagging factory. He was a Whig, and a man who made the most of everything he undertook. At the time of his death, which occurred in 1863, he had over 1,500 acres of land. The mother died in 1881. Our subject grew up on the farm, and was educated in the schools of those early days. At the age of twelve he went to work in his father's factory, where he remained for about twelve years. In 1843 he married Nancy A. Shofner, a native of Lincoln County, born January 6, 1823. The fruits of this union were eleven children, nine of whom are living. Two of the boys, W. B. and J. C., are promising young ministers in the Christian Church. Mr. McQuiddy is a member of that church, and his wife a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. McQuiddy was a strong Union man during the war, and now votes with the Republican party. He has a farm of 1,200 acres, and is widely known and highly respected.

ROBERT MONTGOMERY, SR., usually called "Uncle Robin," a retired farmer of Marshall County, was born September 5, 1810, in South Carolina. He passed his youthful days on the farm in the summer months, and attended the common schools in the winter season. He was the son of Robert and Esther (Spence) Montgomery. The father was born in Ireland in 1784, and was of Scotch-lrish descent. He came to this country with his parents when but a lad and settled in South Carolina. After reaching the years of maturity be was married, and was living in South Carolina at the time of his death, which occurred in 1825. In 1830 the mother and her children came to Tennessee. Here the mother, after living a long and useful life, died in 1859. Our subject was married, June 5, 1855, to Margaret P. Ormand, of Alabama. The fruits of this union were three children: Mary E., now Mrs. Mount; John O. and Jane S., now Mrs. Wiggs, all living. Mr. Montgomery is a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church. His son-in-law, I. T. Wiggs, was born October 21, 1846, in Marshall County, and received a fair education in the common schools. By his marriage to Jane L. Montgomery he became tile father of one child, yet unnamed. He is a carpenter by trade, but has also followed the occupation of a farmer to some extent. Politically he is rather conservative, but inclines toward the Democratic party. He is the son of Needham B. and Elizabeth G. (Radford) Wiggs. The father was born in North Carolina in 1812 and the mother in Tennessee in 1815. The former died in 1876 and the latter in 1856.

JAMES J. MORGAN'S birth occurred in Maury County, Tenn., July 28, 1848, son of William B. and Martha L. (Huggins) Morgan, Tennesseeans by birth and residents of Maury County, after their marriage. Their children are James J., Lizzie C., David E. and Ella P. The father was a soldier in the late war in Capt. Holman's company, Fifty-third Tennesee Cavalry, and served nearly two years. He was captured at Fort Donelson and imprisoned at Camp Morton about seven months, but lived only a few weeks after being exchanged. After his death the mother lived with her children until 1877, when she, too, died. The father's people were Scotch-Irish, the mother's French Huguenots, who came to America at an early day. James J. Morgan's early education was limited, owing to the breaking out of the war. He resided with his mother and cared for her until her death. In 1879 he married Belle Davis, who was born in Marshall County, July 29, 1854, and four children have blessed their union: Mary E. (deceased), William C., Scott D. (deceased), and Alice. Mr. Morgan belongs to the Presbyterian Church and his wife to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is a Democrat and owns a one-third interest in a well stocked farm of 260 acres.

ELISHA G. MORRIS, a leading miller and farmer of Marshall County, and a son of Allen and Margaret E. (Sawson) Morris, was born February 14, 1843, in Marshall County, and is of English descent. His parents were natives of North Carolina and South Carolina, respectively. The father was a farmer, and in connection with this ran a still-house. Later he followed the trade of blacksmithing and milling. He died in 1862, and in 1886 the mother, too, passed away. Our subject received a good practical education in the common schools, and subsequently attended Chapel Hill Academy, but the breaking out of the war cut short all his plans. In 1861 he enlisted in the Fifty-fifth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Array, and at the battle of Shiloh received a severe wound. At Petersburg he was captured, and after remaining in prison eight months was paroled and entered the service no more. In 1867 he wedded Chlora A. Hopkins, and this union was blessed by the birth of ten children, seven now living. The eldest son, William A., is a student at Goodman's Business College, the rest being at home  Both Mr. and Mrs. Morris are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a Democrat in politics, and has made this county his home all his life.

JAMES J. MURRAY, one of the oldest attorneys of Lewisburg. Tenn., is a son of Henry and Matilda (Denney) Murray, born in North Carolina and Ireland, respectively. They both came to Williamson County, Tenn., when young, and were there married. This family consisted of eight children. The father was a farmer and Democrat, and died at the age of fifty years. The mother lived to the ripe old age of ninety-four. James' ancestors on his father's side were of English-Irish descent, and on his mother's Scotch-Irish. He was born in Williamson County June 20,1830, and received a common English education. He was salesman in the mercantile business several years, and became a student of Blackstone under R. K. Kercheval. In 1857 lie entered the Lebanon Law School and the same year was admitted to the bar and opened an office in Lewisburg, where he has since successfully practiced. In 1865 he wedded Mary A. Carothers, by whom he has five children. Mr. and Mrs. Murray are members of the Christian Church. In 1861 Mr. Murray enlisted in Company B, Fifty-third Tennessee Infantry, and rose to the rank of first lieutenant. He was slightly wounded at Atlanta and severely at Franklin. After his return he followed his profession and farmed on a limited scale. He made a Specialty of raising fine jacks and also kept a fine horse of No. 1 pedigree. Mr. Murray is a talented lawyer and a Democrat in politics.

S. J. MURRELL is one of the twelve children of Richard and Sarah (Hale) Murrell, who were born in Sullivan and Washington Counties respectively. After their marriage they settled in Sullivan County, where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father held the office of magistrate for many years, and died at the age of forty-five. The mother lived to be about fifty-five years of age. Our subject was born and reared on a farm in Sullivan County. He was born March 9, 1820, and after attending the common schools completed his education in Holston College and Washington college, Tennessee. Caroline F. George became his wife in 1843, and to them were born six children, two of whom are dead. In 1862 he joined the Southern Army, serving in Trivet's company, and was out twenty-six months, twenty-two months of that time being spent as a prisoner at Johnson's Island. He served as second lieutenant. In 1865 he came to Marshall County, and is now one of the heaviest tax-payers of the county. He is a Democrat. Mrs. Murrell's death occurred in 1879. She was a second cousin of Lewis Cass, and also of Caleb Cushing. Since her death Mr. Murrell and his daughter Josephine have lived on the old home farm.

LAMBERT C. NEIL, horse trainer, of Marshall County, was born March 28, 1839, in this county. He was reared by his grandmother and received a limited education. At the age of fifteen he went to Texas and engaged as an overseer of a cotton plantation. In 1859 he went to California, and, after residing there three years, returned with a single companion on pack-horses. In 1862 he went out as an independent soldier in Capt. Carter's company, and later acted under Forrest. While transmitting an order from one fort to another he was captured and taken to Nashville, then to Louisville, and while being transported in a box car to Camp Chase, he cut out two planks and made his escape. In 1867 he married Letitia Talley, and to this union was born one child, Edgar. Mr. Neil is a Democrat and his wife is a member of the Christian Church. He has a good farm of 121 acres and his principal business since the war has been training horses for the turf. He owns some well bred racers and trains for others on a fine half-mile track on his farm. He has trained of his own a pacing stallion, "Bay Tom" that makes his mile in 2:23; sold him for $1,500. Mr. Neil has also a trotting gelding "Blue Jay" that makes the distance in 2:29¼; sold for $1,450. "Sumicks," trial in 2:32, a bay gelding, "Fred. Neil" makes the mile in 2:29¼. Our subject has also trained for others a bay stallion, "Nettle Keyman," that makes the mile in 2:26½, trial 2:21; sold for $1,500. Mr. Neil has a wide reputation as a horse trainer.

DAVID NIX is one of fourteen children born to the marriage of Robin and Fannie (Arnold) Nix. The father was born in Georgia, and was married to Miss Arnold in Marshall County. He was a Democrat and farmer, and after his wife's death he married Vicey Cheak. He died in 1880, lacking sixteen days of being one hundred years old. David inherits English blood from both parents. He was born in what is now Marshall County, April 20, 1818. He was allowed to have his own way in regard to attending school, and not knowing the value of an education he preferred working in the cotton fields to attending school, consequently, his education is none of the best. He began earning his own living at the age of eighteen, and after working as a farm laborer five years be purchased 100 acres of land largely on credit, which he paid for and increased to 500 acres. In 1843 he wedded Fannie Glenn, by whom he had ten children. Mr. and Mrs. Nix are members of the Christian Church, and in polities he is a Democrat.

HON. J. L. ORR is the son of John and Emily (Bagley) Orr, both natives of Marshall County (then called Bedford and Lincoln Counties); the former was born in 1811 and the latter in 1813. They were married in 1830 and were the parents of three children--two girls and one boy. The father followed the occupation of a farmer and served as colonel in the State militia. He was a Democrat in polities. His death occurred April, 1849. The mother died January, 1886. Our subject was born November 9, 1836, in Marshall County, and passed his early life in assisting on the farm and in attending the public school. He completed his education in Erskin College, graduating from that institution in August, 1860. January 29, 1874, he wedded Sally S. Williams, and this union resulted in the birth of four children: Julia, Daisy, Sallie and Robert Williams. In 1861 Mr. Orr enlisted in Company A, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, commanded by Col. Baxter Smith, and was all through the war. He surrendered at Charlotte, N. C., May 1, 1865, and returned home. He held the rank of first lieutenant and was wounded slightly. He was in all the principal engagements of the southwestern army (except Shiloh). He served two terms in the State Legislature and is a Democrat in polities. He is a self-made man, and at one time taught in the common schools and worked for his father-in-law ten years. He is now doing business for himself as merchant and grain dealer, stock raiser, grain farmer, and is doing a successful business.

 THOMAS A. ORR, farmer, was born February 9,1827, in Williamson County, Tenn., and is a son of Robert and Mary A. (Cummins) Orr, natives of Williamson County, Tenn. In 1835 they moved to Giles County and five years later to Marshall, and here spent the remainder of their days. They were both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject was reared on the farm and received a practical education in the common schools. Like a dutiful son he remained at home until he was twenty-two years of age. In 1848 he led to the hymeneal altar Minerva Vincent, a native of Marshall County, born July 17,1830. The fruits of this union were twelve children, eight of whom are living. The eldest son, Joseph C. is a stock trader. The second, Robert A., is a rising young physician of Mooresville; William R., is a practicing physician at home. The rest of the boys are at home farming. Our subject has a fine farm of 500 acres and has been a resident of this county for a period of forty-seven years. Mr. Orr is a Democrat in polities and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

ROBERT J. ORR is a son of Robert and Leah (Polk) Orr. The father was born in Maryland, May, 1765, was married in 1790 and immigrated to Williamson County, Tenn., 1800. In 1808 he moved to Marshall County, then known as Bedford County. The mother was of English descent and was born in 1768 and died in 1830.The father died January 5, 1855, and was of Irish lineage. The subject of this sketch was born February 11, 1813, it the old homestead. He worked on the farm until the death of his father, after which he worked for himself. He received a rather limited education in the district schools. and September 25, 1849, he was married to Sarah E. Laws. This union has been blessed by the birth of eight children: David L.. Leah C., John M. (deceased). Martha M., Catherine O., Alfred D., Nellie M. and Robert J. Mr. Orr served as captain and colonel in the Tennessee militia until the Rebellion, but did not take an active part in the war. He held the office of magistrate for eighteen years to the entire satisfaction of the people. He is a Republican and a member of the Presbyterian Church and is a strong advocate of the cause of temperance. Mrs. Orr is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Her father advocated the cause of the South, serving in the State Legislature before and after the war.

 WILLIAM H. OGILVIE. Richard Ogilvie, father of William H., was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee about 1796, locating in Williamson County, where he farmed and eventually became the owner of 500 acres of land. He married Cynthia M. Wilson, a native of Georgia, and became the father of seven children. Williamson County was almost an unbroken Canebrake at the time of his settlement, so that he bad great difficulty in clearing his farm. He died in 1822 and the mother resided with her youngest son on the old homestead until her death. William H. Ogilvie was born in Williamson County December 17, 1818, and in his youth attended the old-time subscription schools, his studies extending to geography and grammar. At the age of twenty he married Elizabeth N. Demumbrane, born in Williamson County December 29, 1820. To
them were born eight children, only two of whom are living. In 1853 Mrs. Ogilvie died, and the following year he was united in marriage to Mary R. Gentry, also a native of Williamson County, born December 16, 1825. They are the parents of three daughters. Mr. Ogilvie was a Whig until the war. Since that time has been a supporter of Democratic principles. He is a Royal Arch Mason and owns 700 acres of land.

MOSES PARK, an early settler of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son, of Moses and Mary (Wier) Park, who were born in North Carolina, the father in 1780 and the mother in 1779. They came to Tennessee in 1804 and located in Williamson County first and Marshall County about 1812. They were the parents of eight children and members of the Curnberland Presbyterian Church. The father was an old-line Democrat and a hatter by trade, but the greater part of his time was spent in agricultural pursuits. The mother died in 1859 and he in 1864. Moses, our subject, inherits Irish blood from his mother: He was born in the county March 16, 1818, and his days have been passed as a tiller of the soil. He attended the common schools, and while in his "teens" learned the cabinet-maker's trade. He worked in Missouri for some time, and then returned and worked at his trade until his shop was consumed by fire, and then engaged in farming. Eight children were born to his marriage with Mary A. Davis, which occurred in 1842. His son, Jerome, died from exposure at Fort Donelson. Mr. Park is a Democrat, and by hard work and good management has become the owner of 800 acres of good farming land. He has also been quite extensively engaged in raising fine stock.

GEORGE M. PARK is one of six children and was born February 9, 1844, in Marshall County, Tenn. His parents, Hill and Nancy (Hayes) Park, were born in Tennessee and after marriage settled on a farm in Marshall County, where they are spending their declining years. Hill Park is a Democrat. George M. was educated in the common schools, and at the breaking out of the war between the North and South he enlisted with the Southern cause in Company H, Forty-first Tennessee Infantry. He was captured at the fall of Fort Donelson and was imprisoned at Camp Morton, Ind., and Chicago, and was exchanged at Vicksburg and immediately re-enlisted in the service, but was again taken prisoner, at Jonesboro, Ga., and held until the close of the war. During his four years service he was only twice wounded, once at Chickamauga and once at Jonesboro. By his energy and good management he has become the owner of 150 acres of land, where he now lives. He was married, in 1867, to Mary J. Alexander, by whom he is the father of eight children--six sons and two daughters.

  DR. THOMAS J. PATTERSON'S birth occurred June 18, 1828, in Marshall County, Tenn., on the farm where he now resides. He followed the plow in his youthful days, and received an academical education. He began the study of medicine under Dr. M. H. Scales after attaining his twenty-first birthday, and after reading about two years entered the medical department of the University of Louisville, from which he graduated in 1851. He entered upon his practice in Maury County, and after two years moved to Marshall County, where he has since lived. In 1856 he married Louisa H. Hardin, born December 29, 1832, in Maury County, and educated at Columbia, and eight children  blessed their union. He acted as assistant surgeon for about eighteen months during the late war, and since that time has been a Democrat in politics. He is also a Mason, and the owner of 418 acres of land, well stocked. He devotes the most of his time to farming, but still practices, among his old patrons. His parents, John and Sarah (Wilson) Patterson, were born in the "Palmetto State." The father moved to Kentucky when young, and finally to Marshall County, Tenn., in 1820, where he was married about five years later. The mother died in 1830, leaving two children. and the father wedded Sarah Lavender, who bore him four children, two daughters living. The father was an extensive farmer of his day, and is now in his eighty-fourth year. Our subject's wife is a daughter of Pleasant and Tabitha (Gentry) Hardin, born and married in North Carolina. They moved to Maury County, Tenn. at an early day, and became the parents of six children, all girls. The father died while in the prime of life, and after his death the mother and her daughters managed the farm. She died in 1873.

HON. JAMES M. PATTERSON, M. D., a leading physician of Marshall County, is a son of James and Mary (Reed) Patterson, born in South and North Carolina in 1794 and 1791, respectively. They were brought to this State when children, and after reaching years of maturity were married in 1818, and became the parents of nine children. They resided in Maury County until 1833, and then came to Marshall County, where the father carried on farming and stock raising on a rather extensive plan. The father was a Whig, and served as magistrate many years. He died in 1875, and his wife the year previous. James M. Patterson was born in Maury County, January 8, 1829, and secured a good early education. At the age of twenty-four he began the study of medicine under Dr. S. J. Rice, and about two years later entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, from which he graduated in 1858, among the first in his class. He began practicing in Maury County. and during the war was part of the time engaged as physician and surgeon. In 1860 he married Margaret S. Hardison. who was born November 10, 1836, and ten children were born to their union. Dr. Patterson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and his wife of the Christian Church. He was a Whig previous to the war, but has since been a Democrat. In 1870 he represented Bedford and Marshall Counties in the State Senate, and filled that position very ably. He came to Marshall County in 1864, where he has followed his profession, and also farmed for twenty-two years.

DAVID B. PHILLIPS is a native of Lincoln County, Tenn., born February 11, 1842, and after having passed his youth on his father's farm, obtaining a common school education, he, in 1861, enlisted in Capt. Walker's company of Third Tennessee Infantry. During four years' service he was in over fifty battles and skirmishes, but was not wounded during his entire service. He was one of the defenders of Fort Donelson, and after being captured there was imprisoned at Chicago. Having bribed a guard with $5, he made his escape and rejoined his command at Granada, Miss. After the close of the war he engaged in farming, and in 1866 was united in marriage to Nancy V. Gordon, by whom he had two children, only Hallie now living. Mr. Phillips is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in politics is conservative, although on most occasions he supports the Democratic party. He owns ninety-four acres of land in the most fertile portion of Marshall County, Tenn., and is considered one of its prosperous farmers. His parents, John H. and Elizabeth H. (Parham) Phillips, were born in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1804, and Virginia in 1806, respectively. They were married in Lincoln County in 1828, and there resided until 1852, when they came to Marshall County. They became the parents of three children and were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The father was a Whig, but later became a Democrat. He followed blacksmithing and farming and continued the latter occupation until his death in 1876. The mother has since resided with her children.

DAVID B. PICKENS, farmer, is a son of William H. and Hannah (Moore) Pickens. The father was born in South Carolina, in 1792, and when young came with his parents and settled on the farm where David now lives. The mother was a native of Kentucky, born in 1795. They were both members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he was a Democrat in politics. He died in 1872 and after his death the mother lived on the old homestead until 1882, when she too passed from life. She had been blind for nearly twenty years. Our subject was born August 9, 1816, on the farm where he now lives; while growing up he received a very limited education, and at the age of twenty-three he began working for himself. In 1842 he led to the altar Mary A. Meador, a native of Williamson County, born August 14, 1824, and nine children blessed this union; all with the exception of two are married and settled in visiting distance of home. Mrs. Pickens is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Pickens is a Democrat and one of the most successful farmers of this county. For seventy years he has been a respected and honored resident of what is now, Marshall Connty.

THOMAS M. PORTER is a farmer and native of Marshall County, Tenn., born December 8, 1845. He attended school and assisted his parents on the farm, and in the latter part of the war, although only eighteen years of age, volunteered in Company A, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and although in many severe engagements, was not wounded or captured. Since the war he has made agriculture his chief business and is the owner of a well stocked farm of 225 acres. He is a son of Thomas N. and Mary F. (Hardin) Porter, who were born in Rutherford and Williamson Counties, Tenn., in 1820 and 1827, respectively. They were married in Maury County, but the greater part of their days were spent in what is now Marshall County. They became the parents of two sons--our subject and John N. The father was a Whig, and died in the prime of life. His widow returned to Maury County and married E. H. McLean, by whom she bad seven children, After his death she married William Reagen, who also died. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church and is fifty-nine years of age.

JOHN N. PORTER, the youngest son of Thomas N. and Mary F. (Hardin) Porter was born in what is now Marshall County, Tenn., September 24, 1847. While a youth, his opportunities for obtaining a schooling were exceedingly limited, owing to the breaking out of the war. At the age of sixteen he volunteered in Company C, Ninth Battalion of Cavalry, and was perhaps the youngest soldier that went out from Maury County. During eight months' service he was neither wounded nor captured. After the war he rented land about four years and then purchased a farm of his own, which now consists of 454 acres. Mary R. Rucker became his wife, in 1868. She was born June 13, 1851, in Hickman County. Their children's names are as follows: M. Frances, Melville E., James R., Emma P., Lucy A., Thomas H., John A., Hardin Q. and Tabitha G. Both husband and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in politics Mr. Porter is a Democrat.

WILLIAM N. PYLAND, farmer. is a son of Hardin and Nancy (O'Neal) Pyland. The father was born tn Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1813, and the mother in Marshall County, Tenn., about 1826. The father was a blacksmith by trade till the breaking out of the war, after which he engaged in agricultural pursuits. Both are members of the Missionary Baptist Church and both are still living. Our subject was born March 15, 1842, and received his education in the common schools. He inherited English blood from his father and Irish from his mother. At the age of nineteen he volunteered in Company D, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and remained in service nearly four years. He returned home and engaged in the free and independent life of a farmer. In 1867 he wedded Elizabeth Bills, a native of Marshall County, born August  29, 1848, and the fruits of this union were an interesting family of five children. Mr. Pyland is a stanch Democrat and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Pyland has been quite successful in agricultural pursuits, owning at the present time 233 acres of good land. For thirty-four years he has been a resident of this county and enjoys the respect and esteem of all who know him,

DR. THOMAS E. REED, a leading physician of Lewisburg, is a son of Andrew J. and Virginia E. (Nelson) Reed, both natives of Tennessee, where they grew to years of maturity and were married. Shortly after the latter event they moved to Giles County. The father was a farmer and in addition carried on merchandising for some time. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and the mother a member of the Presbyterian Church. The mother died in 1860 and afterward the father married Mary E. Scott, who became the mother of four children, two of whom are living, Our subject was born July 15, 1860, in Giles County, Tenn., and was reared on a farm. In boyhood he attended the country schools and afterward Giles College and Fayetteville Academy. In 1874 he took a course of lectures in the University of Virginia and in the spring of 1876 graduated from the medical department of Vanderbilt University. In the same year he commenced practicing his profession in Lewisburg. Dr. Reed married Virginia J. McRady and this union resulted in the birth of two children. For ten years Dr. Reed has practiced his profession in Lewisburg and the extensive patronage he has received says more for his ability and popularity as a physician than mere words can do. Dr. Reed, like his father, is a Democrat, and he and Mrs. Reed are members of the Presbyterian Church.

JOHN G. REYNOLDS was born July 21, 1858, in Marshall County, Tenn., and received a good common school education; son of John G. and Victoria (Liggette) Reynolds, both natives of Tennessee, he of Williamson County and she of Marshall County. After marriage they settled in Williamson County, where the father died. To them was born one child, our subject. The father was a Whig in politics, and his chief business was trading, being shrewd and successful at that. Besides he owned a good farm. In 1858 the mother removed to this county and wedded Capt. J. C. Cundiff, by whom she had seven children. At the age of twenty-one our subject began working on a farm of his own. In 1880 he was united in marriage to Ada W. Wilson, a native of Williamson County, born February 5, 1860. By this marriage two children were born: John T. and Clarence B. Mr. Reynolds is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are worthy members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He has a good farm of 125 acres, and as a farmer has met with very fair success. He is very fond of bird hunting, and is a sure shot.

JOHN D. ROBERTS (deceased) was born March 27,1824, in North Carolina, and was the son of Bright and Mary (Silar) Roberts. When but an infant our subject was brought to Tennessee by his parents and grew upon the farm. He received his education in the common district schools, and, his father dying when our subject was but three years old, he was left an orphan at thirteen by the death of his mother. He then went to learn the tailor's trade of his brother-in-law, William B. Holden. After working a short time he gave it up and turned his attention to the free and independent life of a farmer. In 1842 he wedded Susannah M. Wilson, who was born January 4,1824, and who is a daughter of Aaron J. and Hannah (Martin) Wilson. To Mr. and Mrs. Roberts were born eleven children, seven of whom are living. The eldest son is a rising physician of Texas. During the late war our subject went out to serve his country, but failing health prevented his carrying a musket. He worked at his trade in the hospital when able. In 1860 he moved to Arkansas, where he owned nearly 1,000 acres, but in 1873 returned to this county. In 1884, after an active, useful life, he was summoned to lay down his burden and pass to that realm where toil, sorrow and death are not known. He was a Democrat in politics. Mrs. Roberts is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and is living on her large farm of 450 acres, which is being conducted very successfully by her son, Sidney J., who is a stirring young business man, and promises to make one of the leading farmers of his community.

CAPT. W. M. ROBINSON, farmer, is a son of James and Maria (Mayfield) Robinson, who was born in Williamson County, Tenn., in 1805, and Bedford County, Tenn., in 1814, respectively. They were farmers and the parents of four children. The mother died in 1838, and the following year the father moved from Bedford County to Marshall County, and in 1844 married Mrs. Anna A. Wilhoite, whose maiden name was Warner. The father was a man of fine intellect and was a teacher for many years. He was a wideawake and successful business man, and died when only forty-one years of age. Our subject is of Irish-English descent, and was born August 30, 1831. After receiving an academical education, he, at the age of eighteen, began to make his own way in the world by merchandising and lumbering, continuing almost continuously until the present time. Mary C. Orr became his wife August 26, 1841, and eight children were born to their union seven of whom are now living. In the late war he served in Company D, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and arose to the rank of first lieutenant, and was afterward commissioned captain of his company, being on staff duty the most of the time. He owns a fine farm of 550 acres, a saw-mill in Alabama, and an interest in a store at Farmington. He is a Democrat and a man who has made life a success financially.

C. J. SHEFFIELD, a leading farmer of Marshall County and a son of J. B. and Martha M. (Falwell) Sheffield, was born January 27, 1832, on the farm where he is now living. He attended the common schools, and afterward completed his education at Chapel Hill. At the age of eighteen he began farming. but soon turned his attention to school teaching, which he followed for several terms. In 1859 he began the mercantile business as salesman for King, Powell & Co. and before the close of the year had bought out Powell, and soon after he and Col. T. C. H. Miller purchased King's interest. In 1861 he volunteered in the Confederate Army, in Col. Haynes' company Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and was wounded three times, but never captured during four years of service. About eighteen months after enlisting he was appointed sergeant, and soon after arose to second lieutenant, holding that position till the close of the war. He then returned home and engaged in farming, which occupation he has followed ever since. In 1874 he wedded Laura Dobson, a native of Williamson County, born November 23, 1850. This union resulted in the birth of three children: Samuel, Henry and Ephraim. Mr. Sheffield is it Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He has a good farm of 430 acres, the greater part of which he has made by stock raising and close attention to business.

NEWTON. J. SMILEY, trustee of Marshall County, is a son of H. B. and Sarah (Lowry) Smiley, natives of Kentucky and South Carolina. respectively. The father's chief occupation was farming, though in early life he worked at the carpenter's trade. He was a soldier under Jackson in the war of 1812, and having lived to see the return of seventy-five winters was called from the trials and tribulations of earth. The mother was in her ninety-third year when she died. Our subject was born August 9, 1833, in the Bedford fraction of Marshall County, and was of Irish-Scotch descent. He was educated in the country schools, and having farmed until 1861, he volunteered in Company G, Thirty-second Tennessee Infantry as a private, and was one of the brave boys who defended Fort Donelson. After his capture and imprisonment at Indianapolis, Ind., he was exchanged at Vicksburg and re-entering the service was promoted to first lieutenant. After nearly four years of faithful service he returned home and soon after engaged in the mercantile business in which he was successful, though twice burned out. Previous to the war, in 1857, he wedded Catherine E. Hall, by whom he had seven children, all living. Both he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Like his father before him he is a warm Democrat. In 1884 he was elected to the responsible position that he is now occupying. In connection with his office he is engaged in tilling the soil.

THOMAS M. SMITH, farmer, is a son of Thomas S. and Lucinda (Blackwell) Smith, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Kentucky. They were married in Williamson County, Tenn., whither they immigrated when children. The father had been married previous to his union with Miss Blackwell, and by that union had one child, Merritt. By the second marriage he became the father of four children: Thomas M., Emeline F. (deceased), Susan A. and Sarah C. The father was a tiller of the soil, and quite a successful one at that. He died in 1843 and the mother followed in 1880. Our subject was born November 24, 1835, in Davidson County, Tenn., where his father had moved for a few years, to superintend a farm. His education was rather limited, but not enough to prevent him from having sufficient knowledge for all practical purposes. He farmed for his mother till 1879, when they bought the farm where he now lives. In 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Alexander's independent company, and after a year's service joined the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate Army. He served all through the war without receiving a wound or being taken prisoner. Since that time he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits, and at the present has a farm of 235 acres. He is a Democrat in politics and has been a resident of this county for thirty-two years, and is considered an honest, upright citizen.

A. LAFAYETTE SMITH is a son of George W. Smith, who was born in 1822 in McNairy County, Tenn., and was married to Mrs. Martha (Fowler) Wilson (widow of Mark H. Wilson and the mother of five children). Mrs. Smith was born in 1818 and to her union with Mr. Smith were born five children. They were members of the Christian Church and the father was a well-to-do farmer and a Democrat. They came to Marshall County about 1853. After the mother's death Mr. Smith married Mrs. McDowery, to whom two children were born. The father died in 1884. Lafayette Smith was born December 25, 1846, and his educational advantages were such as could be obtained in the common schools. He began earning his own living at the age of nineteen, and in 1870 wedded Sarah T. Collins, and their union was blessed with seven children. His wife died in 1885 and the following year he married Margaret E. Goodrum. Mr. Smith is a Democrat and owns a fine tract of 350 acres of land.

PEYTON C. SMITHSON, one of the prominent attorneys of Lewisburg, is a son of John G. and Ann (Ladd) Smithson, both natives of Virginia, the former born in 1820 and the latter in 1818. They were married in Williamson County, this State, and became the parents of fifteen children, all of whom lived to be grown. Five of the boys are lawyers. Both parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the father being a local minister there, though his chief occupation is farming. He is a Republican in politics. Our subject was born in 1851, in Williamson County, and was of English descent on his father's side and Irish on his mother's. He assisted his father on the farm, and acquired sufficient education in the common schools to enable him to teach. After following this occupation for some time he entered Giles College and there completed his education. In 1874 he commenced reading law in his brother's office, and the following year was admitted to the bar. He subsequently opened an office in Lewisburg, where he has had a good practice ever since. In 1878 he wedded Ellen McClure, and to this union were born four children. Mrs. Smithson belongs to the Presbyterian Church. For two years Mr. Smithson held the office of mayor of Lewisburg. He is a Republican, though conservative in his views. For eleven years he has followed his profession in Lewisburg, and is one of that city's best attorneys.

 JAMES C. SNELL, farmer, is a son of John A. and Mahala (Bills) Snell, who were natives of North Carolina. The father was born in 1809 and his wife in 1814. They were brought to Tennessee when young, and were married in Marshall County. Of their ten children eight are living. They were well-to-do farmers, and in former days raised cotton on the gronnd where the court house of Lewisburg stands. The father was constable four years, and was a Democrat in politics. He died in 1869, and his widow has since resided with her children. James C. was born July 22, 1833, in Marshall County, and received such education as could be obtained in his day. He began renting land at the age of twenty-one, but at the end of twelve years purchased 137 acres of land where he now lives. In 1857 he married Fannie Elliott, born in Marshall County in 1832, and died in 1877. In 1878 Mr. Snell was united in marriage to Melissa Ewing, who was born May 6, 1851, in Marshall County. Our subject has no children by either marriage.

JOHN STAMMER is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Wadley) Stammer. The father was born in Alabama in 1805, and the mother in Rutherford County, Tenn., where they were married by Squire Nash. Both parents were professors of religion. The father was a farmer and died in 1837, leaving a wife and four small children. The mother would go to the field with her children to hoe corn, pick cotton, or whatever else she could do toward making an honest living. While she succeeded in that she did vastly more--she sanctified honest toil with the sweat of a mother's brow, and taught her little ones the lesson of self-reliance. After three years she married J. R. Haskins, and is still living at the ripe age of seventy-seven. Our subject was born January 27, 1827, in Rutherford County, Tenn., and had very meager chances for schooling. At the age of eighteen he wedded Margaret A. Bigger, and to them were born three children, only one of whom is living,. Three years later his wife died and in 1851 lie was married to Letitia Bigger, sister of his first wife. by whom she had seven children. In 1874 his second wife died, and in the same year he wedded Mrs. Lucinda Joyce, widow of D. F. Joyce, and this union resulted in the birth of four children. Mr. Stammer is a Democrat, and in 1862 enlisted in Company F, Twenty-third Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army. He was captured and confined for nearly a year, but was at last released. He acted for some time as quartermaster-sergeant. Since the war he has farmed, and has 265 acres of good land. He is a Mason, and treasurer and superintendent of Eagleville & Chapel Hill Turnpike.

 ALBERT B. STILLWELL, proprietor of the " Stillwell House," of Lewisburg, is a son of Osburn B. and Deborah L. (McCord) Stillwell, both natives of this State, where they grew up and were married. Their family consisted of three children, only one of whom, our subject, is living. One child died in infancy, and the other enlisted in the war and was captured at Fort Donelson. After lying in prison but a few days at Lafayette, Ind., he died from a relapse of the measels caused by exposure. The father was a tiller of the soil, and died while in the full strength of manhood. The mother then married John J. Elliott, by whom she had three children. She died in 1883. Our subject was born October 31, 1842, in Marshall County. His ancestors on his mother's side were Scotch-Irish, and on his father's probably Irish. He passed his boyhood days in assisting on the farm, and received a limited education. owing to the financial circumstances in which the family were left at the death of the father. In 1866 our subject began the mercantile business at Verona, and this he continued until 1878. Two years later he was elected trustee, and for four years filled that office in an able manner. In 1868 he wedded Mary K. Collins. Mr. Stillwell is a member of the Christian Church, and Mrs. Stillwell of the Methodist Church. In 1882 our subject purchased the hotel that he is now conducting.

CORNELIUS T. SWANSON, attorney, was born December 8, 1832, in Williamson County. His youthful days were passed in assisting on the farm and in attending common schools. His education was completed in an academy. In 1858 he began reading law with John Marshall, of Franklin, and the following year was admitted to the bar. He then began the practice of his profession at Troy, Tenn. In 1861 he volunteered in Company H, Ninth Tennessee Infantry, as first lieutenant, and served a short time in the war when he was disabled by sickness for several months. After the reorganization of the army he joined the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and remained with that until the close of the war. After returning home he located in Franklin, and in 1868 wedded Emily C. Orr, and by her became the father of one child, Annie B. Two years after locating in Franklin he went to Mississippi to take charge of a cotton plantation, where he continued about six years. Finding that this was not a very lucrative business he returned to Tennessee and opened a law office in Lewisburg in 1877, where he has received his full share of patronage. In 1875 Mrs. Swanson died. Mr. Swanson is a Democrat in politics and has practiced his profession for nine years in Lewisburg. He is one of the first attorneys of Marshall County. He is a son of James and Anne M. S. (Zollicoffer) Swanson. The mother is a sister of Gen. Zollicoffer. Both parents are natives of this ate. The father was born in 1802, and the mother in 1808. The father was a farmer and died in 1869, the mother died fourteen years previous to his death. The Swansons are of Scotch-Irish descent, and the Zollicoffers of Swiss.

 WILLIAM P. THOMAS may be mentioned as one of the prosperous farmers of Marshall County, Tenn. His parents, T. W. and Lucy (Pierson) Thomas, were born in Virginia, and were there married, and soon after came to Tennessee and located in Rutherford County, where they lived until the death of the father, and then the mother and her five children located in Bedford County, and about 1850 came to Marshall County. The father was a stock trader and while on a tour in Alabama sickened and died  William P. was born in Rutherford County, September 7, 1832, and as he was obliged to assist in supporting the family his school days were limited. He has acquired a practical business education, however, and is well to do in worldly goods, being the owner of 400 acres of land, which he has acquired by hard work. In 1861 he volunteered in Col. Haynes' company of
cavalry and after a short service was discharged on account of rheumatic trouble. In politics be is a stanch Democrat, and is a Master Mason of Chapel Hill Lodge. He is a bachelor.

 JOSEPH PERCIVAL THOMPSON is a son of John and Mary (Snell) Thompson, who were born in North Carolina. The father came to Tennessee with his parents when Nashville was a mere village. He spent the greater share of his life in Bedford County, where he farmed and practiced medicine. He served as surveyor and magistrate and represented his county one term in die State Legislature. He was a Democrat up to 1835 and then became a Whig. He died in 1857 and the mother in 1861. Joseph P. was born in Bedford County January 16, 1812. At the age of sixteen he began working as salesman, and in 1833 wedded Prudence Allison, by whom he had five children. Site died in 1844 and the following year he married Myra Wallis. To them were born four children, two of whom lived to be grown. In 1850 his second wife died and two years later Margaret E. Fowler became his third wife. Since his first marriage Mr. Thompson has farmed. He is conservative in politics. Robert C. Thompson, his son, was born to his first marriage. He was born June 30, 1836, in Bedford County, and there lived until sixteen
years of  age and then came to Marshall County. He taught school for some time, although farming has been his chief calling through life. In 1858 he wedded Frances S. Wilson, by whom lie had three children: Flora A., Thomas L. (who graduated with the class of 1886 from Vanderbilt University), and Minnie B. In 1861 Robert C. volunteered in Company H, Forty-first Tennesee Infantry. He was captured at Fort Donclson and imprisoned at Camp Morton, but re-entered service after being exchanged, but was so severely wounded at Atlanta that he was disabled from further service. He attained the rank of econd lieutenant. Since the war he has farmed. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a man who takes deep interest in enterprises for the public weal.

JAMES A. WOODS, senior member of the firm of Woods & McCord, of Lewisburg, is a son of Francis B. and Margaret S. (Morrison) Woods, both natives of this State. After marriage they settled in this county, on the farm where they are still living. Their family consisted of eight children, six of whom are living. Both parents are members of the Presbyterian Church. For a number of years the father served as constable, though he was not an aspirant to places of public trust. He is now seventy-seven years old, and his wife is seventy-five. They have lived together fifty-four years. Our subject was born August 4, 1848, in Marshall County, and received his education in the country schools. Having prepared himself at Union Academy, of this county, in 1869 he entered Ann Arbor University and graduated in the classical course of the literary department in 1872. He then taught school one year, and began reading law under Walter S. Bearden, of Shelbyville, but failing health drove him from the profession of law, and after clerking for a short time he engaged in business at Lewisburg. In 1880 he wedded Nannie J. McCord, by whom he has two children: James W. and Bedford M. Mr. Woods is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Woods has been alderman and commissioner of this taxing district for six years, besides he has been president of the Marshall County Temperance Alliance since its organization. He also holds a large interest in the firm of Coffey, Woods & Co.

WILLIAM H. WOOD, undertaker and dealer in furniture, is a son of William and Amy (Smith) Wood. They were married in Massachusetts and came to Maury County, this State, between 1834 and 1840, to take charge of a large cotton factory. By trade the father was a machinist, being a first-class man in the business. For the last twentv-five years he has operated a chair factory. He has been magistrate for fourteen years, and since the war has been a Democrat. He is still living at the age of seventy-two. His wife is sixty-eight. Our subject was born September 20, 1841, in Maury County, was reared in town, and received a good practical education. While growing up he had learned the cabinet-maker's trade in his father's shop, and after reaching manhood he entered a book store as salesman, and two years later, in connection with R. D. Blum, opened a dry goods and clothing store in Columbia. Having bought out his partner, he sold the whole stock and engaged in the manufacture of chairs with his father and brother. He then sold out and worked in the cabinet shop of Lamb & Boyd, and later became superintendent of the water-works of Columbia. In 1866 he wedded Mary L. Bynum, and to this union were born six children--three of whom are living. Both Mr. and Mrs. Wood are active members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Twice Mr. Wood has been elected alderman, and is now president of the corporation. In politics he is conservative, supporting the Democracy. For nine years he has been in business in Lewisburg, and the trade he has succeeded in getting speaks well for his ability as a business man.

 JAMES M. WELBORN, farmer and stock raiser, is a son of Johnson and Elatia (Knight) Welborn. The father was born in Bedford County in 1814, and the mother in Rutherford County about 1822. After marriage they settled in Henderson County, and after a short residence came to this county in 1849. About twenty years later lie moved to Texas, where they both died, the father in 1870 and the mother in 1880. The father was a Democrat, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He was a farmer and stock raiser and owned about 600 acres of land. Our subject, James K. Welborn, was born Feburary 12, 1841, in Henderson County, passed his youthful days in aiding his father on the farm and in attending the common schools, where he received a good English education. He was preparing for a course in the higher schools when the stirring events of the war broke into his plans. In 1861 he volunteered in the Confederate Army, Company F, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, and after eighteen months' service was transferred to Company A, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry. He received but one slight wound and was never captured during the four years he was in service. In 1865 he married Rosa L. Hutton, who was born August 31, 1843, and five children blessed this union. Mr. Welborn is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are zealous workers in the Missionary Baptist Church. He has a fine farm of 100 acres lying on the pike. In the line of flue stock, he keeps a fine horse of Traveler & Brooks stock, and two first class jacks.

JAMES W. WHITMAN, farmer, is a son of Rev. R. M. Whitman, a native of Boston, Mass., born in 1804. When a mere boy R. M. Whitman went with his parents to Virginia, where he lived quite a number of years. They then immigrated to Bedford County, and here he married. Almedia Sanders (the subject's mother), and a native of Bedford County, born in 1815. To them were born nine children. After her death the father was married twice; first to Mrs. Jane Reed, who died in 1857, and then to Mrs. Ann Edwards, who still lives. The father died in Texas in 1873. He was an extensive farmer and stock trader, and in early life practiced medicine. He was also a preacher of the gospel. Our subject was born November 28, 1838, in the Moore fraction of Lincoln County. He was reared on the farm and received a poor education, owing to the demand for his labor at home. In 1861 he volunteered in Company K, Eighth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate Army, and went through four years of service without being wounded, and was only captured once, when be succeeded in making his escape in a few days. He served twelve months as captain of Company A, Twenty-eighth Tennessee Cavalry. After the war he went to Texas to engage in the mercantile business, where he remained ten years. In 1874 he returned to Tennessee and engaged in farming. In 1877 he married Ann E. Hutton, a native of Rutherford County, born August 14, 1841.In 1882 she died, and the following year he married Jennie P. Grigsby, of Giles County. This union resulted in the birth of one child, Robert G. Mr. Whitman is a stanch Democrat and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. His present wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has a good farm of 497 acres, and as a farmer and stock raiser has been quite successful.

JOHN B. WILHOITE, farmer and stock dealer, is a son of William and Anna A. (Warner) Wilhoite, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father was a miller, running successfully an old-style mill during his life. He was a Democrat, an attendant and his wife a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He died at the age of thirty. In 1835 the mother came to this county, and soon afterward married James Robinson, father of Capt. Robinson. Her second husband died three years later. She died in 1876. Our subject was born December 23, 1830, in Bedford County, and did not have the best advantages for an education, but made the most of what he did have. After leaving the common schools he completed his education in Chapel Hill Academy. At the age of fifteen he took charge of the home farm, and a year later planned and superintended the construction of the grist and saw-mill at Fishing Ford, which he has run ever since. He is also the constructor of the dam furnishing water to the mills. In 1862 he volunteered in the Confederate Army in Capt. Miller's company of Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, and after three years of faithful service returned home. In 1869 he wedded Lizzie T. Bullock, of Williamson County, born in 1846; the fruits of this union were three children, all living--Jacob, Mary and Addie. Mr. Wilhoite is a Democrat, a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mrs. Wilhoite is a member of the Methodist Church. Our subject has considerable of this world's goods, and has lived in Marshall County for forty-six years.

WILLIAM E. WILKINSON, a prosperous young farmer of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of Mack and Jane (Palmer) Wilkinson. The father was born in Giles County, Tenn., in 1816, and the mother in Virginia in 1819. To her marriage with Mr. Wilkinson were born six children. Mack Wilkinson was a soldier in the Seminole war, and for two terms filled the office of constable. He was a Democrat, and died in 1881. The mother is still alive and is sixty-seven years of age. Our subject is of Scotch-Irish and German descent, and was born in what is now Marshall County March 14, 1856. He was reared on a farm, and at the age of nineteen years began teaching in Arkansas, but failing health caused him to return to Tennessee. He was elected and served two terms as constable. In 1880 he wedded Mollie Cooper, by whom he had three children, all girls. Mrs. Wilkinson belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Since 1883 Mr. Wilkinson has resided on the farm where he now lives. He gives his support to the Democratic party, and is a prosperous farmer of the county.

HON. EWING A. WILSON was a prominent citizen and native of Marshall County, Tenn. He was born in 1818 and always resided in the county, and was prominently connected with its growth and prosperity. His early education was somewhat limited, but he acquired a good education through self-application and contact with business life. He held the positions of captain, major and brigadier-general of militia, and during the late war major of the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, but failing health caused him to give up his army career. He represented his county three terms in the lower house of the State Legislature and was senator two terms. He was very public-spirited and assisted in every enterprise for the good of the county. He was president of the Marshall County Fair Association, and in the days of the Grange movement he was on the side of honest toil. As a financier he has been almost without a peer, and by good management became the owner of about 2,000 acres of land, which he distributed liberally among his sisters' children. For forty years he was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He died in 1883, beloved and respected by all. As a Christian he was faithful, kind-hearted and true, wise as a legislator, and as a citizen had few equals. His parents were Aaron J. and Hannah (Martin) Wilson. The father was born in North Carolina and when young came to Rutherford County, where he married and became the father of seven children. The mother died in 1827 and he in 1831. They were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JASPER A. YARBROUGH, register of Marshall County, is a son of George and Nancy E. (Gibbons) Yarbrough. The father was born in North Carolina and the mother in Tennessee. They were married in Tennessee, and their family consisted of ten children. Jasper's maternal grandparents had twenty-six children and his paternal had fourteen. Both our subject's parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The father was a well-to-do farmer and had the honor of furnishing three brave boys for the war, one of whom was killed. The father lived to be about seventy-six and the mother about seventy-four. Our subject, who was born November 7, 1839, in Marshall County, is a man three feet and nine and a half inches in height. He was reared on the farm and received a practical education in the common schools. Having picked up the shoe-maker's trade he worked at it for about eight years, besides teaching school. He was always a very handy workman and could make a suit of clothes, knit a pair of socks, or almost anything he turned his hand to. In 1874 he was elected register, and has held that position ever since with ability and to the satisfaction of the people. In 1881 he wedded Lizzie McKee. The fruits of this union were three children, two of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Yarbrough are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has been a citizen of Marshall County for forty-six years. In politics he is a warm Democrat.


Source: The Goodspeed History of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford, Marshall Counties of Tennessee. Reprint from The Goodspeeds History of Tennessee, 1886.
Transcription 17 May 2000 for PeaRidge Relations times