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BIOGRAPHICAL APPENDIX.
 

BEDFORD COUNTY.

JOHN W. ADAMS is a son of Archibald Adams, who was born September 30, 1811, in Tennessee. He was married to Jane Ramsey who was born July 21, 1810, and our subject, John W., was born to their union December 26, 1836. The father died in 1850 and the mother in 1854. Our subject was their second child, and assisted in tilling his fattier's farm until twenty-one years of age. For two years he followed photography in Tennessee and Arkansas, and then joined the Confederate Army, Company H, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry. He was wounded at Murfreesboro, and was disabled from work two months, and was wounded in the foot at Petersburg, Va. After the close of the war he returned home and was engaged by R. L. Adams, of Lewisburg, Marshall County, as assistant county court clerk, and continued about two years. He then (in 1868), engaged in farmng, in which he has been fairly prosperous. He was elected magistrate in April, 1884, to fill an unexpired term. December 10, 1866, Mary H. Glenn, of Marshall County, became his wife. She is a daughter of Hugh K. and Lucretia E. Glenn, and has borne her husband three children. all of  who are dead. Mr. Adams is a worthy citizen of the county and is a Democrat, and taught school in 1865-66.

J. C. AKIN, proprietor of the Evans Hotel, was born July 2, 1827, in Granville County, N. C. His fattier, Thomas Akin, moved with his family from North Carolina to Maury County, Tenn., about 1830, and lived there till his death. He was a farmer and raised a large family. The genial subject of this sketch was reared on a farm. He came to Shelbyville in 1854, married and engaged in the mercantile trade for a short time. He then farmed till 1851, having bought a farm near Shelbyville. He then removed to McMinville, Warren Co., Tenn., and engaged in the grocery business there a short time, and then at farming till the war, in the meantime having bought two farms and stocked them. During the war he was in the drug business till early in 1865. He then went to Maury County and raised a crop of cotton; thence he returned to McMinnville, and remained till 1878, when he again moved to Shelbyville, and for six years ran the Barksdale House. Since then be has been running the Evans Hotel, the only first-class hotel in the city. He also runs a fruit evaporator in Shelbyville. He was married, September 18, 1854, to Mrs. America Lane, the widow of Robert Lane, of Marshall County. Her father was Isaac Holman, who was once a member of the Legislature. Mr. Akin and wife have been members of the Missionary Baptist Church for many years, and are among the leading members of the church at Shelbyville. Mr.Akin has been chairman and treasurer of the executive board of the Duck River Baptist Association for many years, and at one time was president of the Baptist Sunday-school Association. and of the Bedford County Sunday-school Association. He is a member of the K. of H. Politically he was formerly an old-line Whig, but is now a conservative Democrat. He is justly regarded as an enterprising and influential citizen of the county, who has always taken special and active interest in all charitable, religious and moral enterprises. The wife was the mother of four children by her former marriage, two of whom are now living.

D. M. ALFORD, publisher of the Bedford County Times, was born November 30, 1861, and is the son of A. J. and Margaret (Russell) Alford, both of whom are natives of Lincoln County, Tenn., though now living in Shelbyville, Tenn. Our subject is a practical printer, and as such has filled responsible positions on the Fayetteville Express, Shelbyville Gazette, Chattanooga Times and Murfreesboro News. In February, 1886, he engaged with William Russell in the publication of the Bedford County of Times, which paper he is publisher, and has succeeded in building up a good newspaper.

JOHN H. ALLEN, superintendent of public instruction of Bedford County, was born November 19, 1848, son of William and Elizabeth (Ray) Allen. The parents were born in 1824 and 1827, respectively. The ancestors of our subject emigrated from Smith County, Tenn., to Illinois, and after remaining there some time moved to Bedford County, where our subject was born. William Allen was a tiller of the soil and the father of five children--four of whom were reared to maturity. These are Isaac S., Sarah, James E. and John H. The father was a pious member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and a respected citizen of the county in which he lived. His death, which occurred in 1874, was universally regretted by all who knew him. Since the death of her husband Mrs. Allen has been living with the subject of this sketch. She is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Our subject, at the age of nineteen, left the farm and, having had the advantage of a good English education, chose school-teaching as his profession. He has given the best of satisfaction where he has taught, and is considered quite a success as an educator. In 1885 he was elected superintendent of public Schools of Bedford County, and by his energy and untiring zeal has done much to further the advancement of the schools of the county. November 10, 1881, he married Miss Susan E. Hobbs, and two children have blessed this union: Lora V. and Ewitt P. Mr. Allen is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, of which he has been a steward for eight for ten years.

A. E. ATKINSON was born in Marshall County, Tenn., January 23, 1817. His father, John Atkinson, was born in Virginia about 1774, and first married a Miss Dunn, who bore him seven children. His second wife was Nancy McClaren, and our subject is the fourth of their eight children. John Atkinson came to Tennessee about 1800, and was one of the first pioneers of the country, and was elected magistrate soon after his arrival. There being no other magistrate in the county, he was obliged to swear himself into office, and held the position until his death in 1829, with the exception of one year, when he was a member of the State Legislature. He also served as chairman of the county court several terms. Our subject has been a school-teacher for thirty-five or thirty-six years, teaching twelve months in the year a portion of the time. He also farmed, and June 5, 1838, he wedded Elizabeth C. Stem, and the following children are the result of their union: F. M., Mary A. (Mrs. A. S. Turrentine), Christina C. (Mrs. W. H. Clark), W. E. and J. R. Mrs. Atkinson died November 2. 1867, a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Atkinson married his second wife, Jane Edwards, April 6, 1870. Mr. Atkinson has a fair education. which he has obtained mainly through his own exertions. Up to the date of the late war he was an old-line Whig. Since that time he has been a Democrat.

JOHN A. BARRETT, farmer and stock raiser, was born July 11, 1843, son of Leroy W. and Lucy B. (Knight) Barrett. The father was born in Bedford County March 29, 1818,  and has been a merchant and farmer all his life. March 11, 1841, he was united in marriage and is the father of three children, all dead with the exception of our subject. The mother was born March 20, 1824, and had been a worthy member of the Christian Church for a period of thirty years. She died March 22, 1875. The father, Leroy W. Barrett, is living at the present time in Rome, Ga., and after the death of his first wife married Mrs. Mary Dolby, a native of Wheeling, Va. He is engaged in the mercantile business. Our subject was born in Bedford County, was given a fair education in the town of Shelbyville, and at the age of eighteen enlisted in the Confederate Army in the Forty-first Tennessee, Infantry, Regiment. He was in the battles of Vicksburg, Port Hudson, Rayaloud, Jackson, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, and numerous other important battles. After the war he came back to this county, and February 21, 1865, was married to Miss Jane B. Holt, of this county. This union resulted in the birth of three children: James L., Eugene A. and Charlie. Mr. Barrett has been quite successful in business, and owns 650 acres of fine land. He is considered one of the leading farmers of the county.

A. P. (DOCK) BAXTER, a native of Tennessee, was born September 1, 1844, son of James M. and Sarah R. (Grant) Baxter, both natives of Tennessee. Our subject's maternal grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812, and for services rendered received a pension for a number of years prior to his death. Our subject remained with his parents on the farm until he was twenty-one, andwhich received a limited education on account of the late civil war, which broke into his schooling. He has followed agricultural pursuits in which he has been moderately successful, the principal part of his life, August 26, 1866, he was united in marriage to Lucinda C. Stephenson, of this county, and to this union were born four children: William G., Effie, Mollie and Joseph C. He and family are leading members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a Republican in politics.

WALTER S. BEARDEN, a prominent attorney of Shelbyville, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., January 10, 1843, being one of two children (twins) born to the marriage of Dr. B. F. Bearden and Susan M. Blake. The father was a native of South Carolina, but lived and died in Lincoln County, Tenn. He was a man of great learning and breadth, and was eminent in the profession of medicine. He died in 1870 and five years afterward the mother died. He received a good early education and at the age of fifteen began teach- ing as an assistant in an academy. He entered the Emory and Henry College of Virginia and was in that school when the war broke out. He then enlisted in Company E, Forty- first Tennessee as second lieutenant, and remained in the service throughout the war. He was elected second lieutenant of the company upon its second organization, and commanded the company the last year of the war. he received three wounds, one of which was serious. Returning from the service he began the study of law, and in 1866 began the practice of his profession in Shelbyville, where he has made himself a leading member of the bar. He has never aspired to political honor till this year (1886), when he was announced as candidate for chancellor of his district. He was married, February 17, 1874, to Maggie C. Whiteside, daughter of Col. T. C. Whiteside. He has a family of four children by this marriage. Politically, he was reared a Whig, but is now a Democrat. Himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Knight Templar Mason and at one time was the youngest High Priest in Royal Arch Masonry of the State. As a citizen he is well known and highly respected.

ROBERT B. BIGHAM, farmer and trader, was born in Rutherford County. Tenn., July 4, 1828, son of Elihu H. and Mary (Lisenby) Bigham, and of Irish descent. The father of our subject was born in North Carolina in 1799, and his mother in Anson County, N. C., in 1805. They were married in Rutherford County, Tenn., about 1823, and became the parents of five children, of whom our subject is the third. The Bigham family were among the early settlers of Tennessee, having come to the State when the father of our subject was a small boy and settled in Rutherford County, Tenn. Elihu H. Bigham died on the old homestead in 1873, and the mother, who is eighty-one years old, is still living and enjoying good health and an unusual amount of activity for a person of her age. Our subject received a fair education in the common schools and remained with his parents until he reached his majority. Since then he has followed the business of farming. During the civil war he enlisted in the Confederate Army and was assigned a position in the commissary department under Maj.-Gen. James F. Cummings, where he served throughout the war. Our subject has been married twice, the first time, January 21, 1851, to Miss Mary J. Hoover, who was born October 6, 1833, and who is the daughter of William Hoover. To this union were born five children: William L., Granville H. Samuel B., Robert L. and Sallie A. Mr. Bigham was married the last time, February 15, 1883, to Miss Sue F. Burks, of Bedford County, Tenn., born April 13, 1853. To this union was born one son, Roy B. Mr. Bigham is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Christian Church. The grandfather of our subject, Samuel Bigham, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He participated in the battle of Camden, under command of Gen. Gates, where the American forces were totally defeated. There is a $2 bill of the old Continental issue still in possession of the family and in a good state of preservation, which he received from the government in payment for services in that war.

WILLIAM BLACKBURN, a well-to-do citizen of this county, was born in Tennessee May 30, 1831. His parents. Robert and Lucy (Ferguson) Blackburn, were born in the Old Dominion February 5, 1796, and June 25, 1799, and died December 28, 1874, and September 6, 1865, respectively. They were married in 1818, and to their union were born five daughters and two sons. Three of the children are yet living. Our subject has spent the greater part of his life on a farm and has followed farming from early boyhood. In 1859 his marriage to Mary M. Sutton was celebrated. She was born in Tennessee December 1, 1840, and is the daughter of John and Jane (Marr) Sutton. Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn have four children born to their union, as follows: Lucy J., born March 4, 1860; Elizabeth, born December 20, 1861; John, born June 13, 1864, died May 5, 1883; and Martha, born November 28, 1966. Our subject's farm consists of 270 acres, of good land. He deals quite extensively in tobacco, and although he began life a poor boy, he has accumulated considerable property. He has been a member of the Baptist Church for twenty years and his wife for over thirty years. In politics Mr. Blackburn is neutral.

JOHN N. BLACKWELL is a son of James Blackwell, and both are native Tennesseeans. The former was born October 5, 1828. The mother's maiden name was Delilia Darnall; he was a native of Illinois. John N. has farmed for himself since attaining his twenty-first year. He is a self-made man, and has accumulated a comfortable competency by his unaided efforts. In 1853 he was united in marriage to Miss Martha Wood, a native of Bedford County, and daughter of W. M. and E. Wood. This union resulted in eleven children. The following are those who are living: William N., John A., Thomas J., Samantha A. (Mrs. C. A. Shaw), Samuel J. and Charley D. Mr. Blackwell is an honest and respected citizen. He has never been before a court of justice or was in a law-suit in his life. He was a soldier in the late war, enlisting in Company G, Thirty-second Regiment Tennessee Infantry, in 1862. He was captured at Tullahoma in 1864 and took the oath of allegiance and gave bond for his appearance. He is, politically, a Democrat.

BENJAMIN W. BLANTON, a leading merchant of Wartrace, was born November 22, 1835, in Rutherford County, Tenn. He is the fifth of ten children born to Benjamin and Martha (Farmer) Blanton, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Tennessee, and both of English descent. In 1818 the father of our subject immigrated to Rutherford County, Tenn., and partly on his farm was fought the battle of Murfreesboro. During the battle his dwelling-house and other buildings were used as a hospital for the Federal Army, and the farm was completely devastated. In 1865 he sold this farm and moved to Unionville, Bedford County, where he lived until his death, which occurred in 1885. The mother of our subject died in 1869. Our subject was educated at Asbury Academy, near Murfreesboro, and at the high school in the latter place. He remained with his parents until reaching his majority, and then followed railroad bridge building until 1873, when he went into the mercantile business at Wartrace, where he still remains. He carries a large stock of goods and does a very successful business. In 1871 he married Miss F. E. Bray, of Lincoln County, Tenn., and the fruits of this union were three children: Lula, Annie and Robert Lee. Mr. Blanton is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows' fraternities and, with the exception of three years prior to the present year, he held the office of mayor of Wartrace ever since 1873. He is now president of the Wartrace Male and Female Institute, also of the Wartrace Hollywood Cemetery, and a member of the board of education, of Wartrace. He is secretary of the Democratic Executive Committee, of Bedford County, and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

EUGENE BLAKEMORE, the genial postmaster of Shelbyville, was born July 28, 1852, at Lewisburg, Tenn., being a son of George F. Blakemore, a native of Lincoln County, Tenn. The father read medicine in his native county, and commenced the practice of his profession at Flat Creek, Bedford County. He afterward practiced in Shelbyville for a time, and then removed to Lewisburg. He then again returned to Shelbyville, where he died in 1874. The mother of Eugene was Cassie E. Winston, a native of Marshall County. The father was married three times; his last wife is now living in Tullahoma, Tenn. Eugene was reared in Shelbyville, and had the advantages of the schools here. He married at the age of twenty, and engaged in farming near Shelbyville for four years. He then removed to Shelbyville, and for two years ran a dray line; he then farmed another year, and then bought and ran a grist-mill at Shelbyville for six months. After this he engaged in the livery and mule-trading business for three years, doing the leading livery business of the place. He sold Out that business in 1884, and has since been farming and trading. He was appointed postmaster March 29, 1886, and has filled the office with efficiency. He was married, in 1872, to Miss Ludie P. Newton, a daughter of James S. Newton, deceased, a farmer of this county. Two children have been horn to this union, viz.: Frank N. and Eugene W  Mr. Blakemore and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Democrat in politics, and is one of the enterprising and respected citizens of the county.

COL. GEORGE W. BOUNDS was born in Scott County, Va., September 25. 1818. His parents and grandparents were natives of the same State, and his maternal grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. Our subject learned the saddler's trade, serving an apprenticeship from thirteen to twenty years of age. He then worked at his trade in Estillville a short time, and came to Tennessee in order to vote for Gen. Harrison, as the right of suffrage was extended only to those who were householders or freeholders in their native State. He worked at his trade about six years, and then joined Col. Haskell's regiment, and served in the Mexican war as orderly sergeant and then as second lieutenant, participating in many of its bloodiest battles. He was mustered out of scrvicc, but at the call for more troops he again joined, and was elected lieutenant-colonel of the Fifth Tennessee Regiment, which was independent, George B. McClellan being colonel. During a short time while the latter was sick our subject acted as colonel in his place. He was discharged at Memphis in July, 1848. At the breaking out of the civil war he was not in sympathy with the Southern cause, and, although he was forced to join a company of militia, he was honorably discharged at the reorganization of the army. He then held aloof from the army as far as it was in his power to do, it being wholly against his will or desire to take up arms against the Government. Since the war he has voted the Republican ticket exclusively. He was married, November 18, 1853, to Mary A. Pope. Their union has resulted in six children: James C., born September 23, 1854, and died March 23, 1876; Bettie, horn April 30, 1856, wife of Thomas Joyce; John, born November 14. 1857; Fannie, born June 21, 1859; Ann, born July 3, 1860, and died April 23, 1878, and June, born July 6, 1863. and died July 13, 1863. Our subject has been a successful man throughout life, and was considered a brave and faithful officer and soldier in the Mexican war. He is a substantial citizen of Bedford County and a man of influence.

F. M. BOWLING, son of Josep and Elizabeth Bowling, was born eight miles east of Murfreesboro, Rutherford Co., Tenn., September 23, 1847. He resided with his parents near Bradyville, in the same county, till ten years old, then removed with them near Murfreesboro, where they are (1886) living. The first twenty years of our subject's life were spent upon the farm, devoting his leisure time to study, and caring for his disabled father and four brothers and one sister. In January, 1868, he entered Union University at Murfreesboro, Tenn., and remained there until June 12, 1873, receiving the degree of A. M. Previous to this he had chosen teaching as his profession, and in August, 1873, he took charge of a large school at Leeville, Tenn., and after successfully conducting it to its close he accepted a position with Prof. J. E. Nowlin in the Masonic Institute, Hartsville, Tenn., and afterward became a partner with him in the school. While in this school, August 26, 1874, he wedded Miss Susan E. Sanders, daughter of Jesse B. and Mary A. Sanders, who resided near Murfreesboro. To them were born three children: Herbert Manly, born July 9, 1875; Edna Frank, born June 29, 1877, and Mary Myrtle, born May 23, 1882. Mr. Bowling and Prof. Nowlin dissolved partnership by mutual consent, and in January, 1876, he took charge of Unionville High School, where he is now (1886) living. He has been principal of the school ever since, with the exception of the springterm of 1881, when he was associated with Prof. B. F. Hooker, as joint-principal of Milan College, Milan, Tenn. He has devoted himself earnestly and faithfully to the cause of education, and has taken part in many educational enterprises in the hope of elevating his chosen profession, and has been called upon to fill prominent positions in different educational institutions in the county. He follows no text-book in particular, but selects the best methods from different books. He joined the Missionary Baptist Church in the fall of 1865, and takes a deep interest in Sunday-school work, and is now superintendent of the Unionville Sunday-school, which has an average attendance of ninety-five. He is also a strong supporter of temperance.

JOHN A. BRAMBLETT was born August 13, 1813, in Georgia. His father, John Bramblett, was a native of South Carolina, and of Irish descent. He immigrated to Georgia when young, and there married Miss Jennie Couch, a native of Georgia. To this union were born twelve children, our subject being the ninth. About 1832 John Bramblett. moved from Georgia to this State, locating in this county, near Wartrace. He was a farmer by occupation, and died in 1861. The mother died in the same year. Our subject was educated in the country schools of Bedford County, and on reaching his majority was married to Miss L. C. Culley, a native of this county. To them were born these children: William E. (deceased), Mary T.. Elizabeth F., James M., Newton A., George D. (deceased), Ada B. (deceased), Walter T. and Melia. Mr. Bramblett is a farmer by occupation, and has 255 acres in District No. 2. In 1863 he was conscripted by the Confederate Government and held as a soldier six months against his will. He then left them and returned home inside the Federal lines. He was a strong Union man during the war, and fully believed and still believes that the best friends of the South were those who adhered to the union of the States. He is a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church.

JAMES P. BROWN is one of the family of children who were born to the marriage of William Brown and Jane G. Goodrum.The father was born in North Carolina in 1803, and about 1824 came to Shelbyville where he lived and died. He was a trader in live-stock, lands, etc., and became a well-to-do and prominent citizen of the county. He died in 1880. The mother was born in South Carolina in 1809, and died in 1882. The subject of this sketch was born July 30, 1838, in Bedford County. He was educated in Shelbyville, and remained with his parents until the war. He then enlisted in Company B, Forty-first Tennessee, and was in the service throughout the war. Returning from the war he engaged in the pursuit of farming, in which he continued very successfully till 1875. From 1868 to 1871 he lived in Texas, returning from there to Bedford County. In 1874 he went to Columbus, Miss., and engaged there in the brick-making and contracting business, and he yet continues that business here. In October, 1885, he opened his clothing trade, and carries a stock of about $8,000. He was married, in 1881, to Miss Kate Goodrum, a native of Forsyth, Ga. Two children have been born to this union, viz.: Paul M. and Annie L. Mr. Brown and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. Politically he is a firm Democrat. He has never aspired to office, but is a worthy and respected citizen of the county.

 MRS. MARY A. (CLARY) BROWN was born September 14, 1816, in North Carolina, daughter of William and Nancy (Wright) Clary, both natives of North Carolina. Our subject is the elder of two children born to her parents. May 23, 1834, she married J. R. Brown, a native of East Tennessee, born May 10, 1811. He was a tailor by trade, and worked at this profession about twelve years. He was married in Madison County, Ala., and while in that State was engaged in these different occupations: tailoring, merchandising and farming. In 1850 he immigrated to Tennessee, and engaged in the merchandise business at Unionville, and continued there several years. He then engaged in the saw-mill business, but at the same time continuing his farming interests, and was engaged in the latter business at the time of his death,  which occurred January 22, 1875. He was an exemplary member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. To our subject and husband were born thirteen children, seven of whom are dead. Those living are Nancy J., William C., Lucinda C., James P., Thomas D. and Joseph E. Our subject is a woman of considerable influence in this section. Her son, Thomas D., is living with her, superintending the farm. He is a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JAMES B. BROWN is a son of Henry Brown, a native of Wake County, N. C. The father received a limited education, and came to Tennessee in 1833, locating in Bedford County where he engaged in farming. He was married in 1830 to Miss Sarah K. Alston, whose ancestors were from North Carolina. To Mr. and Mrs. Brown were born the following family of children: Aley A., Comer N., S. L., L. S., J. J., A. S., J. B., Lucy F. and G. A. and one who died in infancy. Mr. Brown died at his residence near Shelbyville in 1875. He was a member of the order of Sons of Temperance, and he and his wife, who died in 1873, were members of the Missionary Baptist Church. James B., our subject was born May 1, 1848, and spent his boyhood days on a farm. He entered the United States Military Academy at West Point when but eighteen years of age, and remained there about one year. He finished his education at the Union University at Murfreesboro, Tenn., after which he served an apprenticeship at photography, and followed that occupation three years. He then turned his attention to farming and horticulture, and his farm is known as the "Home Nursery Farm." He was married December 15, 1875, to Sarah J. Hix, daughter of John C. and Emily Hix, and by her is the father of five children: Cora E., Abbie P., Maud M., Alice E. and Lula S., who is deceased. Mr. Brown is a member of the Masonic and K. of H. fraternities, and of the Missionary Baptist Church.

T. G. BUCHANAN, senior member of the firm of Buchanan & Woods, was born March 25, 1852, in Lincoln County, Tenn. His father was T. W. Buchanan, who moved to this county before the war and to Shelbyville about the close of the war. He was an extensive merchant of Shelbyville. In 1878 he was joined by the subject of this sketch, and the firm was then known as T. W. Buchanan & Son. He died November 4, 1884, leaving a family of five children and their mother, Sarah (Davis) Buchanan. T. W. Buchanan was a very prominent citizen of this county. He was a director of the National Bank, a director of the Sylvan Mills, and was prominently connected with the school interests of Bedford County. He was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a liberal supporter of all charitable and benign institutions. The immediate subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, and received a good early education. He clerked in his father's store five years previous to entering the firm (1878). Since then he has been very successfully engaged in merchandising. The firm now do a yearly business of about $50,000 and carry about $25,000 stock of dry goods, clothing, hats, caps, boots and shoes, gents furnishing goods, etc. Mr. Buchanan is a director in the Silvan Mills, and owns about 1,000 acres of land. He married. in 1878, C. S. White, born in this county. She is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Buchanan is an enterprising and influential business man of Shelbyville. J. A. Woods, junior member and buyer in the firm of Buchanan & Woods, was born November 8, 1861, near Wartrace, Bedford County, being a son of George B. Woods, who was a merchant of Shelbyville. The father was born in Coffee County, and in his childhood moved to Bedford County, near Wartrace, where he lived till 1863 when he came to Shelbyville. He was president of the Bedford County Temperance Association; he was also identified with the school interests of the county. He mar ried Miss Margaret Clark, who became the mother of three children, J. A. being the eldest. The father died August 12, 1880, and the mother is now living. J. A. was reared in Shelbyville, and clerked in his father's store. After his father's death he engaged with T. W. Buchanan & Son as salesman and buyer, continuing in that capacity till January 1, 1884, when he entered the firm of Buchanan & Woods. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church and of the Royal Arcanum. He is a member of the Y. M. C. A., and takes an active interest in Sunday-school work; he is now assistant superintendent of the Presbyterian Sunday-school here.

JOHN S. BUTLER, clerk and master of the chancery court of Bedford County, was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., March 13, 1832, being one of nine children raised by William S. and Nancy E. (Campbell) Butler. The father was a native of North Carolina and came to Shelbyville in 1816, and till 1830 pursued the carpenter's trade. In 1819 he removed to Rutherford County, where he married the mother, and followed farming after 1830. He died in 1873; the mother is still living.The subject of this sketch engaged at the age of eighteen on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, occupying various positions, among which were, conductor, telegraph operator, ticket and express agent, remaining in that employ for eleven years. He enlisted in Maney's First Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, and was captain on the first and second organization of Company F. He was appointed military superintendent of telegraph lines in 1863, of Bragg's division, and served in that capacity throughout the remainder of the war. After the war he lived one year in Nashville as agent of the Nashville & Northwestern Railroad. In 1866 he came to Shelbyville and engaged at farming and saw-milling and still continues farming. He was elected magistrate of the Twenty-first District about 1876, and September 5, 1883, was appointed to his present office. Politically he is a Democrat. In 1860 he was married to Mary A. Sims, a native of this county. Four children have been born to this union, viz.: Nancy J., Laura, Mary and John S.

CHARLES L. CANNON was born February 14, 1813, in Shelbyville, Bedford Co., Tenn.. and is now the oldest living person born in that town. His father, Clement Cannon. was a native of North Carolina, born in the latter part of the last century. He was of English descent and immigrated to Tennessee with his parents, locating in Williamson County, where he was reared and became a surveyor of lands. He afterward purchased a large tract of land in Bedford County, and in 1806 he donated 100 acres of this to the county where Shelbyville now stands for a county seat. He married Miss Susan Lock, a native of Virginia and a resident of Rutherford County. To this union were born six children. The father was a soldier in the war of 1812 and died January 19, 1860. Our subject was educated at Shelbyville and upon reaching his majority began the business of farming, which  he has always followed. December, 1842, Miss Mary A. Hooser, a native of this county and a daughter of William and Rebecca (Coots) Hooser, became his wife. To this union the following children were born: Susan R. (deceased), Maria L. (deceased), William H., Thomas C. (deceased), Lettie C. (now Mrs. Phillip Wilhoite), John H. (deceased), Mary R. (now Mrs. William H. Tilferd), Charles L. (deceased), Macon B. and Charles B. Our subject owns a farm of 550 acres about five miles east of Shelbyville, where he now resides. He is a Democrat in politics and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Cannon is a nephew of Gov. Cannon and also a nephew of Gen. Robert Cannon.

JOHN T. CANNON, the genial clerk of the Circuit Court of Bedford County, is a grandson of Clement Cannon, Sr., one of five brothers, who came from North Carolina to Williamson County, Tenn., in the first decade of this century. Clement Cannon, Sr., had five sons, the father of our subject. Henry Cannon, being one of them. Henry Cannon was born in 1812. He lived in this county till 1852, when he moved to Shelby County, Tenn., where he died in 1873, having been a farmer all his life. Of those five brothers, who came to Williamson County, four soon afterward came to Bedford County. Their father's name was Minos Cannon and their mother was a Thompson, of Scotch-Irish descent, The mother of John T. was Sallie C. M. Tillman, a descendant of the Martin family, so numerously represented in the county, and a descendant of the Clay family of Kentucky. She died when John T. was but two weeks old, and he was then reared with Col. Lewis Tillman and other relatives. At fourteen he began his own support and attended school on money earned by himself. He clerked in a store three years and then taught school about four years, having married at twenty-two. He then settled down to farming. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Twenty-third Tennessee, as first lieutenant, and served eighteen months. He has been farming very successfully since the war, and now owns nearly 400 acres of good land. He was elected to his office in 1878 and has efficiently served to the satisfaction of his constituents. His birth was December 7, 1835. He was married in 1857 to Narcissa Sutton, a native of Bedford County. Mr. Cannon has a family of four children, viz.: Sallie C. M. (the wife of C. J. Moody), Walter S., Lizzie 11. and Narcissa W. All the family are members of the Methodist Episcopal ,Church South. he is a Royal Arch Mason. His ancestors were old-line Whigs and be is a Democrat.

ALEXANDER CORTNER is a native Tennesseean, born December 20, 1827, and of Swedish lineage. He has always resided on a farm and by his energy has accumulated 145 acres of land on which is erected a neat residence, and also has two other tracts of land, containing seventy-five acres. November 16. 1852, he was united in marriage to Mary E. Landers, who was born December 22, 1836, daughter of Robert and Susan (Carter) Landers. To Mr. and Mrs. Cartner were born the following children: Susan M., born March 23, 1854, and died April 4,1878; Henry, born November 15, 1855, and died August 21, 1857; George R., born March 23, 1858; Letitia C., born January 24, 1860; Alexander F.. born June 3, 1863; William L., born March 11, 1866: Victor H., born October 27, 1867; Roy E., born October 21, 1871; Albert E., born July 1, 1876, and Sarah E., born March 24, 1879, and died July 13, 1879. Mrs. Cortner died May 11, 1879. In 1862 Mr. Cortner enlisted in the Confederate service under Gen. Forrest's escort and was in many hotly contested battles. He is a Democrat, and his parents, George and Delilah (Troxler) Cortner, were born in North Carolina November 15, 1801, and October 6, 1807, respectively. They were married in 1823 and became the parents of four sons and seven daughters. The father died October 7, 1884, and the mother in 1871.

JOSEPH H. CATES, son of John S. and Elizabeth (Himes) Cates, was born March 22, 1837. His father was born in 1808, near Knoxville, Tenn., and was given a limited education in the country schools. He chose farming for his occupation. He was also a. stone-mason and worked at this trade for a number of years in Bedford County. He was the father of eleven children, viz.: Mary A., John R., Martha J., Daniel E., Joseph H., James P., Giles P., Phenettie F., Sadie R., Jestinie E. and Caldonia C. James and Giles P. are dead. The father, John S. Cates, died June 1, 1880. He was a consistent member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and was highly respected by the community, being a man of high integrity. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, was educated in the country schools and is a farmer and stone-mason. In 1879 he was married to Miss. Levina Oakley, and two children blessed the union: John S. and Willam P., both living. Mr. Cates and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The family are well respected in the county.

JOHN CATNER is a native Tennesseean, born in 1805, son of Lewis and Polly (Smith) Catner, who were born in North Carolina. The father's birth occurred about 1795. He came to Tennessee in 1813 and located in Bedford County, where he lived until his death. Our subject was his second child and assisted his father on the farm until twenty-two years of age. He then worked as a farm laborer seven years and then purchased a small tract of land to which he has since added until he nows owns about 1,200 acres, which he has secured by his own exertions. He is worth about $75,000, and was married, in 1839, to Polly Ray, who bore him one child, Martha (wife of Samuel Wood), and died at her birth. In 1861 Mr. Catner married Mrs. Margaret (Smith) Hall. He is a man of limited education, but is abounding in common sense and wholesome doctrines. In politics he is a member of the Democratic party, and is a strictly honest and upright man.

PETER CATNER, born in 1819, in Bedford County, Tenn., was reared on a farm, and assisted his father until he was about twenty-four years of age. He, at that time, began relying on his own resources for a livelihood, and has prospered beyond his expectations. Through his own energy and economy he is at present worth about $6,000. He has been twice married-the first time to Sarah Ray in 1848. She died in 1830, leaving one child--Mary C., wife of Frank Johnson. In 1854 Mr. Catner wedded Susanna Helton, who has borne him nine children, three of whom are dead. Those living are John, William, Hannah M., Lewis, James and Thomas. Mr. Catner is one of the honest and worthy citizens of the county. His early advantages were very limited, but he is a strong advocate of the promotion of education. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal and his wife to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a Democrat.

J. W. CLARY, M. D., is a North Carolinian by birth, born July 28,1821. His occupations while in that State were school teaching, deputy county sheriff, deputy county clerk and hotel-keeping. In 1848 he became a disciple of Æsculapius, studying under Dr. Scroggs. In The spring of 1849 he entered the Medical College, of Castleton, Vt., from which institution he was graduated as an M. D. the same year. In the spring of 1850 he immigrated to Tennessee, and located at Unionville, where he successfully practiced his profession until 1870, and then took up the mill and merchandise business. The Doctor was married December 15, 1852, to Ann McCord, who died May 21, 1859, leaving two children: Allan and Thomas. Dr. Clary took for his second wife Mattie Ogilvie, and their union has resulted in these children: James D., Charley B., George, Emma and Irvin. Dr. Clary is a Democrat. His parents, Benjamin and Alla D. (Barnard) Clary, were born in 1778 and 1802, and died in 1860 and 1884 respectively.

J. C. CLAXTON'S birth occurred April 12, 1830, in Tennessee. He is a son of James and Temperance (Ratler) Claxton, born in 1802 and 1812, and died about 1866 and 1877, respectively. Our subject was the sixth of thirteen children. He assisted his father until twenty-one years of age, and up to the present time has followed farming. Annie E. Jones, who was born in Bedford County, Tenn., September 16, 1836, became his wife August 16, 1854. Their union has resulted in the birth of nine children: Temperance Mahala, Amanda Tennessee, Philander Priestly, Elizabeth Allen (who died in 1863), James Jonas, Minerva Jane, Melvina Jones, Ophelia Adaline and Alice Casander. Mr. Claxton is an enterprising farmer, and a man who wields much influence in the community in which he resides. Although his early education was somewhat limited, he has always taken considerable interest in the education of the rising generation. He has given all his children liberal educations, and his eldest son is completing his education in Europe--Leipzig College, Germany. Mr. Claxton is a Republican in politics, and up to the date of the late war was an old-line Whig.

THOMAS S. CLEVELAND was born April 25, 1840, in Bedford County, Tenn. His father, Jeremiah Cleveland was a native of Greenville, S. C., born March, 1806, and of English and German descent. About 1833 he immigrated to Bedford County, Tenn., and located on the farm where our subject is now living. He married Miss Sallie E. Stone, a native of Maury County, born about 1815, and of English descent. To this union were born six children. Jeremiah Cleveland was a merchant before his coming to this State, and a farmer afterward. He owned about 1,500 acres of land on Duck River, in this county, besides a large tract of 3,000 acres on the Mississippi River. He had about $50,000 of stock in the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, and was one of the first board of directors to locate the road. He died in 1878. The mother of our subject died in 1840. Thomas S. Cleveland was educated at the Cumberland University at Lebanon. and lived with his father until May, 1861, when he enlisted in Company G, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, and was elected as third lieutenant of his company, and as such served twelve months. He then joined the artillery of Gen. John H. Morgan's command, and was captured in Ohio in July, 1863, and retained until 1865. He then returned to Wartrace, Bedford County, where he has ever since remained engaged in farming. In 1867 he married Miss Annie E. Wright, a native of Floyd County, Ga., and a daughter of Moses R. Wright, and a niece of Judge Wright, who was a member of the United States Congress. To our ubject and wife were born five children: Sallie S., Lizzie H., Hattie D., Annie L. and Carrie C. Mr. Cleveland is a member of the Masonic fraternity, also of the R. A. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church, and live on the old homestead, consisting of 600 acres of land. Mr. Cleveland is a grandson of Capt. Robert Cleveland, and a grandnephew of Col. Benjamin Cleveland, both of whom served with distinction in the Revolutionary war.

B. F. CLEVELAND was born August 11, 1848, in Georgia. His father, Robert M. Cleveland, was a native of North Carolina, and married Miss Fannie L. Wight, a native of Rhode Island. To this union were born the following children: William C., Jeremiah, Vannoy, Caroline, Harriet D., B. F. (our subject), Georgia A. and Robert M., Jr. The father of these children was a manufacturer and capitalist, and moved to this State in 1866, locating at Wartrace, where he died in 1876. The mother is now in Marietta, Ga. Our subject was educated in the high school of Greenville, S. C. In 1864 he enlisted in the Second South Carolina Cavalry, and served with the command until the close of the war. He then returned home to this county and engaged in the business of farming, which he followed until 1882. He then opened a private bank in Wartrace, which he still continues to manage in a very successful way. In 1872 he married Miss Lizzie Pepper, a native of this county. The result of this union is a family of four children: Mattie W., William P., .Jesse F. and Eliza P. Mr. Cleveland is a member of the K. of H., a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

THOMAS H. COLDWELL was born in Shelbyville August 29, 1822. His father, John Campbell Coldwell, was born January 8, 1791, in Hawkins County, Tenn., and removed with his father, Ballard Coldwell, and family to Bedford County, January 1, 1807. John Campbell Coldwell served two campaigns under Gen. Jackson, one against the Creek Indians, in which he participated in the battle at Horse Shoe, and the other against the British, in which he was a participant at New Orleans, January 8, 1815. After this campaign he settled at Shelbyville, and was a merchant from 1818 to 1843, at which time he  retired to his farm, where he died July 17, 1867. Thomas H. Coldwell's mother was Jane Northcott, born in Fleming County, Ky., the daughter of Rev. Benjamin Northcott. Thomas was the eldest of two boys and two girls in this family. He was educated at Dixon Academy, Shelbyville, and studied law with Irwin J. Frierson, Esq. He was licensed to practice in January, 1844, and has ever since been in his profession at Shelbyville, and is one of the leading members of that bar. He first married Mary J. Hodge, at Murfreeshoro, November 24, 1844. After her death he married Sarah E. Goling, in Cincinnati, May  6, 1851. After her death  he married Mrs. Mary H. Bosworth, in Shelbyville, September 20, 1854, and after her death he married Carrie Hopkins, in Cincinnati, November 11, 1875. The last wife died December 4, 1884. For many years Judge Coldwell was an active worker in the Sons of Temperance, and was elected Grand Worthy Patriarch for the State of Tennessee in 1851. He was an unflinching Union man throughout the war. In 1864 he was commissioned by Gov. Andrew Johnson chancellor of the Fourth Chancery Division of Tennessee, but resigned in a short time. In October, 1865, he  was commissioned attorney-general of the State and reporter of the supreme court, and in May, 1867, was elected by the people to that office without opposition. While serving in this capacity be reported seven volumes of the decisions of the Supreme Court of Tennessee, and considers this the most pleasant part of his professional career. While attorney-general he entered a nolle prosequi in all eases that came to the supreme court, when persons were indicted for treason against the State--a class of indictments which grew out of the late civil war. the disposal of which in this manner won for him the earnest gratitude of his fellow-citizens. In 1868 he was the Grant and Colfax elector for the Fifth Congressional District of Tennessee. From 1965 to 1871 he served as one of the directors of the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad. He was a lay member of the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church at its session, held at Brooklyn, in 1872, and while there was the author of the resolution sending fraternal delegates from the Methodist Episcopal Church to the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He has always been a zealous worker in the church, giving most liberally to all of its enterprises, and always been an active Sunday-school worker. During 1871-72 he was president of the Bedford County Agricultural Society. He was instrumental, in 1869, in securing the building of the Bedford County Court House, and was chairman of the building committee. He has been one of the directors of the Shelbyville Savings Bank ever since its organization, and was president of that bank three years. He has been a member of the board of directors of the Central Tennessee College, in Nashville, ever since its organization, and for thirteen years has been president of the board. He is a fearless advocate of the education and Christianizing of the negro. For fifteen years he has been president of the board of school directors of the Seventh District, and at his last election he received every vote cast. In 1871 he was appointed by President Grant, at the recommendation of Gov. DeWitt C. Senter, as commissioner for the State of Tennessee to the Centennial Exposition, at Philadelphia, in 1871. He served till 1877.He was on many of the important committees and was elected first vice-president of the commission, being one of the most active participants in those measures that made the exhibition so great a success. Judge Coldwell has two children: Gen. Ernest Coldwell, the child of the third wife, who is his partner in law, and Carrie ("Sunshine") Coldwell, the child of his last wife. Judge Coldwell is an outspoken Republican. He is a friend to the poor and oppressed, a liberal supporter and patron of education and religion, and a leading and enthusiastic member of his party.

GEN. ERNEST COLDWELL was born at Shelbyville, November 12, 1858. He was educated at Shelbyville and at Carbondale, Ill. After reading law two years in his father's office he was licensed, by Judges Robert Cantrell and Peter Turney, to practice. In September, 1882, he was appointed special revenue collector, under A. M. Hughes, Jr. While a law student he was secretary of the Middle Tennessee and Bedford County Sunday-school Associations. He is a director in the Bedford County Agricultural Society, a director and secretary of the Bedford County Stock Breeders' Society and Register and a director and secretary of the Eakin Library Society. He was appointed, May 21, 1881, on Gov. Alvin Hawkins' staff, with the rank of brigadier-general. In 1884 he was elected Representative from Bedford County to the Forty-fourth General Assembly of Tennessee, overcoming a Democratic majority of 600 by 226 majority, he being a firm and outspoken Republican. His mother, nee Mary Henderson, was a lady of versatile accomplishments, and of marked firmness of character. She was born in New York, was raised in Ohio, and died in Tennessee in 1874, flfty-three years of age.

WILLIAM COLLIER is a son of Lockey Collier, who was born in Virginia about 1770 and died about 1840. The father came to Tennessee about 1789. Our subject was his only child and resided with his father until twenty-one years of age, and afterward followed the occupation of farming. He is a self-made man and is worth between $8,000 and $10,000, which he has made by his own exertions. He was married, in 1820, to Mary B. Garrett, who bore him twelve children, six of whom are dead. Those living are Martha (Mrs. W. W. Pennington), Nancy J. (Mrs. L. Madison), Don, Eliza F., Mary A. (widow of Morgan Drydaw) and Richard R. Our subject's son, Don, was born August 21, 1832, and was married March 28, 1854, to Martha Billington, who bore him one child that died in infancy. In 1854 he moved to Arkansas, where he lived until 1881, when he returned to the old homestead to provide for his father until his death. Both father arid son are influential citizens and Republicans. Don and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

MRS. IDA J. COLLINS was born October 6, 1837, daughter of David and Sarah (Harris) Williams, who were born in Tennessee in 1814 and 1818, respectively. Mrs Collins' paternal ancestry were originally from the. State of Virginia, and her mother's people were North Carolinians. Our subject was united in marriage, April 29, 1858, to W. J. Collins, who was born October 25, 1835. He was a merchant at Unionville up to the date of the late war. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church at the time of his death, which occurred July 21, 1866. His union with our subject resulted in the birth of six children: Spencer D., born March 19, 1859; Edward E. and John B. were twins, born October 25, 1860; Lycurgus F., born January 11, 1863; Emmet C., born December 15, 1864; Ellen J., born December 29, 1866. Mrs. Collins is an earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a woman who has won the respect and esteem of all. She has managed her farm successfully and is a credit to the county in which she lives.

JOHN JACKSON COMER. Samuel Comer was a native of England and came to the United States with his wife (formerly a Miss Randolph), a short time before the Revolutionary war and settled in Virginia. He served in the war against the mother country, and was subsequently killed by the Tories. Reuben D. Comer, son of Samuel Comer, was raised by a man named Abner Lea, of Johnson Comity, N. C. He married a daughter of Thomas Wright, who came from England to South Carolina. Her parents died when she was an infant, and she was raised by Col. Elliott Lee. After her marriage with Mr.Comer they came to Wilson County, Tenn., and became the parents of five sons and two daughters. John Jackson Comer, the subject of this sketch, was the fourth of their children and was reared on a farm and had charge of his father's mill and cotton-gin. His early education was limited, never having attended school after attaining his fifteenth year. About this time he professed religion. A short time after he began learning the blacksmith business of the Rev. D. B. Moore, with whom he lived three years. His father at this time moved to Warren County, Tenn., and there our subject worked at his trade. He was happily married to Miss Martha P. Parker. In 1845 he was licensed to preach, and in 1853 was received into the Tennessee Annual Conference, and he has followed his calling in Hickory Creek, Bedford, Smith Fork, Mill Creek, Harpeth, Wesley and Carthage. He was appointed presiding elder of thefollowing districts: Carthage, McMinnville, Savannah and Centerville. At the last conference he was appointed to the Unionville Circuit. In 1880 Mrs. Comer died. and after living a lonely life two years, Rev. Comer married Miss Ella Lacre. His first marriage resulted in four children: Sophronia A. (Mrs. J. P. Walton), Nannie J. (Mrs. Prof. S. V. Wall), John B., Moltie P. (died in 1880, wife of J. S. Keton). Rev. Comer is now past sixty years of age, but hopes to continue his good work many years. He is much loved and respected by all who know him and is an influential man where he resides.

J. B. COOPER, ESQ., was born January 25, 1831, in Bedford County, son of George and Sallie (Rutlege) Cooper. The father was born about 1796, and the mother about 1798. They both died when our subject was an infant and he was reared by his aunt, Matilda Rutlege, whom he assisted on the farm until her death, which occurred about 1871. He has been engaged in agricultural pursuits ever since. In 1870 he was elected to the office of magistrate and filled that position in an able and efficient manner. He then began the  study of law, and about 1876 the county court granted him license to practice law before the county court and before magistrate courts. He has been quite successful and has made quite a reputation as a lawyer. May 15, 1856, he wedded Rebecca F. Landers, of  this county, and this union resulted in the birth of thirteen children: Cicero W., Alice A.  (deceased), Lula S., Ella L., Callie T. (deceased), Maggie M., Eddie A. (deceased), Rebecca J.. Algie B., America L., Johnnie E., Lattie B. and William E. Mr. Cooper received a  common district school education in his early days, but having cultivated a taste for good reading while young, he acquired the major part of his education from the perusal of good books after having grown to maturity. In politics Mr. Cooper is a Democrat.

ALEXANDER A. COOPER was born January 12, 1832, in Rutherford County, Tenn., son of Micajah T. and Sarah (Vincent) Cooper. The father was a native of Rowan County, N. C., born December 28, 1806. When nine years of age he moved with his parents to Cannon County, this State, and in 1829 he was married. To this union were born twelve children, our subject being the second. The father of our subject died February 16, 1874, and the mother in May, 1864. Our subject was educated in the country schools and at Union University at Murfreesboro. After reaching his majority he followed various occupations, such as teacher. merchant and trader up to the late war, when he was appointed by the commissary-general and permanently detailed by the Secretary of War as general purchasing agent of the commissary department for theConfederate Army,  which position he held during the war. He then returned home and resumed merchandising  at Wartrace, which he continued for two years. He then located on the farm where he now lives. He also served as deputy clerk of the county court of this county for ten years. He has held several minor offices and has been magistrate of his civil district six years. October, 1862, he married Miss Mary E. Singleton, daughter of Dr. Robert L. Singleton, of Fairfield, now deceased. To our subject and wife were born the following children: Robert S., Henry V., Constance, Alexander A. and Sarah A., all living. Mr. Cooper is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows' orders, and owns a farm of 100 acres near Fairfield on the Wartrace & Beech Grove Turnpike. He is a member of the board of trustees of the Duck River Academy, and takes an active part in educational matters.

REV. G. W. COOK was born near Shelbyville, Tenn., November 14. 1833, son of William and Nancy (Lentz) Cook, who were born in 1802 and 1810, in North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father died of cholera in June, 1854. Our subject is the third of eight children. At the age of twenty years he became overseer for Thomas Shearren and then began farming for himself. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church when a boy, and when about twenty-six years old was licensed to preach. In 1870 he was ordained deacon at Pulaski. Tenn., and in 1874 he was ordained elder. He has had regular work since 1870, and has conscientiously fulfilled the duties of his calling. He was married December 20, 1855 to Mary E. Pickle, daughter of Major and Catharine Pickle. Rev. and Mrs. Cook became the parents of eleven children, four of whom are dead: William T. S., a minister of the gospel; Mary E. (Mrs. C. M. Spruce), Emily M. (Mrs. William Darnell), Rosanna (Mrs. E. Stalling), Henry C., Eliza and Nora A. Our subject acquired the most of his education by dint of hard study after acquiring his growth. He is a Democrat, but up to the date of the late war was an old-line Whig.

 J. P. COTHRAN, a successful farmer, was born in Person County, N. C., July 8, 1828, son of Samuel and Polly (Burton) Cothran, who immigrated to Tennessee in 1844, and settled in Williamson County. Our subject was the fourth child born to his parents. His educational advantages were limited, but notwithstanding this fact, he has always manifested a willingness and a desire to aid in any enterprise pertaining to the advancement of education. December 18, 1851, he was united in marriage to Mary R. Cothran, of Williamson County. The fruits of this union were eleven children, seven of whom are still living. Mr. Cothran is a self-made man, having accumulated his property by his own exertions. Politically he is a Republican, but up to the late war was a Democrat.

DR. ROBERT W. COUCH was born March 13, 1834, in Bedford County, Tenn,, and is the son of Joseph and Catharine Patton Couch. (For further particulars of parents see sketch of R. C. Couch.) Our subject received a practical education in the Duck River Academy at Fairfield, in this county, and his medical education at the University of Nashville, from which institution he graduated in 1855. He then began the practice of his profession, and was surgeon of the Tennessee Iron Works in Wayne County until the beginning of the late war. He then joined the Ninth Tennessee Confederate Cavalry as a lieutenant, and was afterward appointed surgeon of the regiment. He was captured at Fort Donelson and held as a prisoner until May, 1862, when he made his escape from Mound City, Ill., and walked to Corinth, Miss., and from there to his relatives in the county. Since that time he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. May, 1860, he married Miss Lucy Tucker, a native of Rutherford County, and daughter of Maj. Lewis and Harriet Tucker. To our subject and wife were born the following children: Robert, John R., Kittie, William, Lizzie and Mary, all living but John R. Mr. Couch owns a farm of 315 acres in District No. 2, all well cultivated and in a flourishing condition. He is an Independent Democrat in politics, a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

HON. REUBEN C. COUCH, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., January 13, 1830, son of Joseph and Catherine (Patton) Couch, and of Scotch Irish descent. The father was born in South Carolina October 9, 1787, and the mother in Buncomb County, N. C., July 10, 1796. They were married in 1813, and to them were born twelve children. The father was a soldier in the war of IS12 under Gen. Jackson. He was a farmer by occupation, and died March 19, 1861. The mother followed March 10, 1886. Our subject's maternal grandmother was a daughter of Rhoda Cunningham, who came from Ireland. She is living in Bedford County, Tenn., and is in her ninety-third year. She has at this time 306 living descendants, children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, even to the fourth generation. What is most consoling to the declining years of this most venerable matron, is that out of this long line of descendants none have yet done aught to detract from the character of an honest family. Our subject received his education in the common schools, and followed farming up to the time of the war. He enlisted with the boys in blue in the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry. He was commissioned as lieutenant, and afterward promoted to captain, in which capacity he served through the war. He participated in the battle of Stone River, and various skirmishes. After the war he was elected clerk of the county court, and served several years in the revenue department. He was a member of the lower house of the Thirty-eighth General Assembly. November 23, 1865, he wedded Miss Mary J. Dyer, daughter of William H. Dyer, and to them were born three children: Ruben C., Lester and Emily G. James Patton, our subject's maternal grandfather, was one of the pioneers of Tennessee. He reared a family of twelve children--eleven daughters and one son. All lived to be married. Among the daughters there were seven living at one time, all widows, and the youngest over seventy years of age. The mother of our subject, just before her death, had descendants to the number of 266, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Mr. Couch is a Republican, a Mason, and he and wife and daughters are members of the Baptist Church. He has a fine farm of 275 acres in a fine state of cultivation.

OLIVER COWAN & CO., dealers in hardware and farming implements, is composed of Oliver and Robert Cowan, brothers. Oliver Cowan was born February 13, 1831, in Londonderry, Ireland. The father, Alexander Cowan, died in Ireland, having been a farmer. The mother and six children came to Shelbyville in 1851, and the mother died in 1868. There are five of the lamily now living, Oliver being the youngest. He was reared on a farm, and received his education in an agricultural college in Ireland. Upon coming to Shelbyville he engaged as clerk in the dry goods trade for three years. He then entered a dry goods business with a brother, and continued successfully till 1874, when he sold out that business and entered the hardware business with his brother, Robert. The firm carries about a $10,000 stock, and transacts about a $20,000 business annually.  Mr. Cowan was married, in 1869, to Miss Sarah Bryson, of Lincoln County, daughter of the Rev. Henry Bryson. He has a family of two sons and two daughters, viz.: Henry B., William G., Jennie and Olive. Himself, his wife and two sons are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Knight Templar Mason. Politically he adheres to no party rigidly, but supports the man who he thinks is best qualified to fill public office. Robert Cowan was born September 24, 1813, in Londonderry, Ireland. He came from his native land to this county in 1851. He clerked in a store till 1874, at which time he entered the firm of Oliver Cowan & Co. In Ireland he followed farming. He was married, in 1836, to Miss Esther Buchanan, who bore him two sons, viz.: Alexander, who was killed in the Confederate Army in 1863, and William B., who is now a farmer of this county. Mr. Cowan has for many years lived a widower, his wife having died in Ireland in 1841. He is a devout member of the Presbyterian Church, and is one of Shelbyville's oldest and most highly respected citizens.

DR. THOMAS CHAPMAN McCRORY, an eminent physician, was born in Bedford County, November 13, 1834, and is the son of John and Annie (Wilson) McCrory. He is of Scotch-Irish extraction. The father was born in Mechlenburg County, N. C., February 5, 1788, and the mother in Georgia, October 11, 1791. They were married in Marshall County, Tenn., and were the parents of twelve children. The father died October 15, 1874, and the mother January 22, 1864. Our subject had the advantage of a good common school education, and afterward read medicine with Dr. Smith Bowlin. He then attended the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati and completed his studies, receiving his diploma from the Medical University at Nashville, from which institution he graduated in 1867. He enlisted in Company D, Second Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, and served as lieutenant of the regiment under Col. (now Gov.) Bate. Dr. McCrory was made assistant surgeon, but preferred a more active part and took his place in the regiment. He participated in the battle of the first Manassas, Murfreesboro, Shiloh, Chickamauga and the various battles between Chattanooga and Atlanta. He was captured during Hood's advance in Tennessee, and taken a prisoner to Fort Delaware, where he remained until Lee's surrender. Since the war he has followed his chosen profession, and has at this time a very large and lucrative practice. February 28, 1860, he wedded Miss Sallie J. Knott, daughter of Iverson Knott. This union resulted in the birth of eight children, only three of whom are living: Thomas F., Eugene and Alva. The Doctor is a Democrat and a Mason. Mrs. McCrory is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

J. M. CROWEL was born November 5, 1847, in Bedford County, Tenn., and is the son of Benjamin and Margaret (Anderson) Crowel. The father was born in the year 1815, in Bedford County, and died in the year 1865. The mother was born in North Carolina about 1817, and died September, 1885. Our subject was the youngest child and only son of his parents. He passed his youthful days on the farm, and after reaching the years of manhood began farming for himself. November 16, 1873, he wedded Susan A. Molder, of his county, who was born in 1857. The fruits of this union were three children: Thomas L., Jennie L., and Edwin Harper. Mr. Crowel is a self-made man, and is now worth about $5,000, which he has made in the last twelve years. He was never sued or had a lawsuit in his life. He is upright, honest and law abiding. His educational advantages were rather limited, but sufficient for all practical purposes. In politics he is a Democrat.

CYRUS W. CUNNINGHAM, dealer in books, stationery, wall paper, jewelry, etc., was born in Bedford County, January 28, 1850, being one of five children of Joseph A. and Elizabeth W. (Williams) Cunningham. The father was a native of Bedford County, his father having come here from North Carolina in the very early settlement of the county. The father was a farmer; his death occurred in 1880. The mother is a descendant of Virginia parentage, is a native of this county, and is now living. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm to the age of twenty-three, receiving a common school education. He taught school and clerked in a store for two years before leaving home. He then came to Shelbyville, and purchased a one-third interest in a book store, and in 1876 became sole proprietor. In 1876 he failed, but has paid out fully, and now does a thriving business, and owns a desirable and beautiful home in Shelbyville. He now holds the appointment of deputy internal revenue collector of the Fifth Revenue District of Tennessee. He was married, March 9,1875, to Miss Susan A. Cannon, grandniece of Gov. Newton Cannon. This union has been blessed in the birth of four children, viz: Kate T., Elizabeth, Jennie C. and Mary J. Mr. Cunningham and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the K. of H. and R. A., being a member of the Grand Lodge of the K. of H. He is a Democrat in politics. and an enterprising citizen of the county.

J. M. CUNNINGHAM, M. D., is a native of Marshall County, Tenn., born June 17, 1849, and is the second of six children of S. D. and Elizabeth (Armstrong) Cunningham. who are now living in Marshall County. Our subject spent his early days in tilling his father's farm, remaining until eighteen Years old, at which time he entered the high school at Lewisburg, then under the supervision of Calvin Dornal, and paid his own way for about three years, his father refusing to pay his tuition. He entered the Medical College of Nashville in 1871, and during the vacation in the summer of 1872 he taught school to enable him to take the course of lectures in the fall, which he did, and graduated in the spring of 1873. He began practicing his profession in April of that year at Bedford postoffice, seven miles west of Shelbyville, where he has successfully continued up to the present date. June 14, 1876, he married Lizzie T. Lock, daughter of James Lock. This union has resulted in six children: Vera C., Clare G. (deceased), Ewing B., Hattie S., Lillie R. (deceased) and Horace L. Dr. Cunningham is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

B. M. CURTISS is a native of Bedford County, born July 7, 1859. His father, J. H. Curtiss, was born November 12, 1803. in Connecticut, and died in August, 1866. The mother was Teressa (Moseley) Curtiss, who was born November 22, 1824, in Georgia. She is yet living. Our subject aided his mother until he was twenty-two years of age, and since that time has followed agricultural pursuits for himself, and is a prosperous farmer. In connection with his farming he carried on merchandising about three years. November 17, 1872, he wedded Sallie E. Dysart, who was born July 6, 1859, and is the mother of seven children: Alex, Nola T., R. Dennie, James R., Fannie, Polk and Tint. Mrs. Curtiss died June 3, 1886, an earnest member of the Presbyterian Church. Our subject was elected magistrate of his district in August, 1882, and has served as such up to the present date. He is a well educated man, and one who supports all enterprises for the public welfare. He is a Democrat politically.

I. S. DAVIDSON, M. D., was born near Fairfield, Bedford Co., Tenn., April 25, 1816, son of Andrew D. and Sarah (Muse) Davidson, who were natives of Wales, England. The paternal grandparents of our subject were born in the "Emerald Isle." Andrew D. and his first wife came to America at an early day. During his absence from home at one time the Indians, which were very numerous at that time, seized his wife and two children, and a young man and woman living with them, and made their escape to their camp. After a long and seemingly fruitless search he found his wife, but his children were both dead, and his wife shortly afterward died from fright and exposure. Our subject assisted his father in clearing their farm, and labored under many disadvantages. His education was limited, owing to poor school facilities, at that time, but after he began earning his own living he attended school several sessions, and in this manner acquired a very good education. For over two years he was a medical student of Dr. Barkesdal, of Shelbyville, and attended lectures at Louisville, Ky., in 1841-42. March 27, 1843, he located at Richmond, Tenn., where he successfully practiced his profession up to the present time. May 16, 1844, he wedded Martha R. Smith, daughter of Reason and Sarah Smith. To Dr. and Mrs. Davidson were born eight children, two dying in infancy and one (Barkesdal) was killed in the late war. Those living are John R., George H., Sarah A., Alice, Mary A. and Maud. Dr. Davidson has accumulated all his property since he began his practice, and deserves much credit for the same, as he started in life for himself with nothing. The family are church members. The Doctor is a Democrat, and previous to the war was an old-line Whig.

ELNATHAN G. DAVIS, farmer and trader in live-stock, was born in Bedford County. Tenn., on the farm where he is now living, December 29, 1825. His father, Elnathan Davis, was born in South Carolina in 1795, and in 1817 was married to Rebecca (Sivley) Davis, who was born in Tennessee in 1791. Of this union there were eight children reared to maturity. The father died August 12, 1856, in Bedford County, Tenn., and the mother November 6, 1885. Our subject received a practical education in the common schools, and has followed farming as his chief occupation. He has been married twice, the first time February 20, 1851, to Miss Mary E. Wilson, of Marshall County, Tenn. The fruits of this union were two children: John W. and Cleopatra. January 13, 1870, he took for his second wife Miss Jeffie E. Norton, daughter of H. W. Norton. To this union was born one child, Eugene G. Our subject, from physical disability, was exempt from the army,  but the Davis family was represented by other members. Mr. Davis is an old-line Democrat, and a member of the I. O. O. F. He has 300 acres of as fine land as the country affords, all well cultivated, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

WILLIAM G. DAVIS, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., November 12, 1837, son of Elnathan and Rebecca (Sivley) Davis, and of Irish-German descent. (For further particulars of parents see sketch of Elnathan G. Davis.) Our subject was reared on the farm and received a rudimentary education in the common schools. He subsequently attended Fairfield College, at Fairfield, Tenn., and October 28, 1858, he wedded Miss Mollie J. Norvell, daughter of Dr. A. S. Norvell, of Coffee County, Tenn. The fruits of this union were five children: Charles E., born October 1, 1861; Willie J., born February 13, 1864; Frank P., born July 8, 1867; Emma Smith, born November 18, 1869, and Lena Bell, born October 28, 1871. Mrs. Davis was born in Shelbyville, Bedford Co., Tenn., March 22, 1842. Her father, Dr. A. S. Norvell, was born June 8, 1813, and her mother was born July 13, 1819. The former died in Coffee County, Tenn., February 29, 1876, and the latter died in the same county April 28, 1886. They were married in the year 1839. Mr. Davis has a farm of 140 acres in a fine state of cultivation. He is a Democrat  in politics, and he and wife are worthy members of theMethodist Episcopal Church South.

J. B. DICKENS is a son of Daniel and Matilda (Putnam) Dickens, who were born in 1814. The father died October 13, 1874. The mother was drowned June 20, 1870, while crossing Duck River in a canoe. Our subject was the youngest of their eight children. He was born in Bedford County, Tenn., October 13, 1852. The names of the children are Jasper N.. Andrew J., Nellie F., William C., Nancy J., Elizabeth  C., Newton and our subject, who was married December 12, 1872, to Jennie Foster, who was born November 21, 1852. To them were born a family of four children: Malcolm A., born in 1873; Clara A., born in 1876; Matilda F., born in 1880, and Sarah G., born in 1884. The mother was the youngest of seven children, their names being Eliza J., Almira M., Malcolm A., Sarah G., Caldonia T., Mary A. and Jennie. Our subject has been a fairly successful financier, and is one of the few men who have made their property through their own exertions. He and wife are members of the Methodist Church, and he is a Republican.

HENRY C. DICKERSON was born June 13, 1854, in Bedford County, Tenn. His father, Capt. James W. Dickerson, a native also of Bedford County, was born October 15, 1815. He married Miss Nancy Young, a native also of Bedford County, born in 1822. To this union were born nine children, of whom our subject is the sixth. Capt. James W. Dickerson, our subject's father, held several county offices, and since the war has followed agricultural pursuits, and now lives near Wartrace. The mother died October 12, 1871. Our subject was educated in the country schools, and lived with and assisted his parents on the farm until he reached his majority. when he was elected to the office of constable of his civil district, and served four years. In 1884 he was the Democratic nominee for sheriff of his county, but was defeated by a very few votes. July 11, 1885, he was appointed deputy internal revenue collector by Col. John T. Hillsman for the Fifth Collection District of Tennessee, which office  he now holds. On December 30, 1885, he married Miss Mary E. Shofner, a native of Bedford County, and a daughter of P. W. and Nancy Shofner, born January 1, 1860. He is a member of Shelbyville Lodge of F. & A. M. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject has two brothers, William J., a prominent business man of Union City, Obion Co., Tenn., and John W. Dickerson, a prominent farmer of this county. This is one of the prominent families of Bedford County.

REV. A. G. DINWIDDIE, D.D., was born July 12, 1840, in Montgomery County, Tenn. His father, William Dinwiddie, was born October 15, 1810, in Kentucky. He was by profession a local minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and was also a farmer. He died April 4, 1872. The mother, nee Mary Cole Alexander, was born in Kentucky, June 15, 1814, and is yet living in Montgomery County, Tenn. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and received fair early educational advantages. He was principally educated under Prof. L. E. Duke, of Chapel Hill, N. C., then conducting all academy at Asbury, Montgomery Co., Tenn. At the age of nineteen he engaged in the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and has since been so engaged. He joined the Tennessee Annual Conference in October, 1839, and was appointed junior preacher to the Wesley Circuit, where he remained one year. Thence in 1860 he was appointed junior preacher to the Dover Circuit, and at the close of that year he was ordained deacon by Bishop Early. His third year's work was on the Bellefonte Circuit in northern Alabama and on November 19, 1861, he was married to Miss Rachael Odil, of Columbia, Tenn. In 1862 he was appointed to the Trinity Station, Alabama. After the war, in 1865, he was appointed to the Santa Fe Circuit, in Maury County, Tenn. Thence, in 1866, he was appointed to the Duck River Circuit, which pastorate he held two years. In 1868 he organized the Culleoka Institute and was appointed principal of the same, also retaining the appointment of junior preacher on the Duck River Circuit. In 1869 he was relieved of the pastoral charge and appointed to the full principalship of the Culleoka Institute which he held until May, 1810. In October following he was appointed to the Savannah District and remained there four consecutive years. He then took pastoral charge of Pulaski Station for four years. Thence he was appointed to Cedar Hill, Robertson Co., Tenn., for one year. In 1879 he was appointed to the Lebanon Station, which he held until 1882, when he was appointed to the Murfreesboro Station, and June 7, 1885, received the honorary degree of D. D., from the Soule College of Murfreesboro. In October, 1885, he was appointed to the Shelbyville Station, where, as elsewhere, he has enjoyed great success in his work. He has a family of five children: Emma, Willie H., Mary B. Maggie L. and Frank G.

JAMES N. DRYDEN, a native of Tennessee, was born January 6, 1835, son of David and Malinda (Guest) Dryden, natives, respectively, of Tennessee and Georgia. The father was born in 1800 and was by occupation a farmer. The mother was born Angus 27, 1806, and is still living with our subject at the extreme old age of eighty. Our subject like the average country boy, assisted his father on the farm and attended the district school. At the age of twenty-one he began farming for himself on the farm where he is now living. September 27, 1855, he married Nancy C. Stephenson, of this county, an this union resulted in the birth of four children: William J., Martha M. B., Lucinda E. M. and David O. Mr. Dryden is a very influential man in this section of the country He is also a man of strong religious sentiments although he is not a member of any church. Mrs. Dryden is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Dryden is a Republican.

NATHANIEL L. DRYDEN was born January 22. 1839, and is one of three children born to the union of Thomas and Mary H. (Dickson) Dryden. The father was born in Virginia in 1796, and when a youth he, with his father, immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Bedford County. He was married in 1824 and became the father of eleven children. The father and mother of our subject were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. The former died in 1863 and the latter in 1876. Our subject was born in Bedford County, Tenn., and was given an education in the country schools of the day In 1867 he wedded Miss Sarah J. Llewellyn, a native of Indiana. To this union were born eight children: Hubert E., John W., Mary L., Annie, Maggie H., Daniel D., Thomas F. and Nathaniel L., Jr. Daniel D. died March 31, 1884. Mr. Dryden owns 375 acres of land in the Twentieth District, and deals in cattle, sheep, etc. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a leading man in the county. The family is of Scotch-Irish descent.

BENJAMIN F. DUGGAN, M. D., is a son of John and Sarah A. (Burroughs) Duggan, and is of Scotch English descent. The father died a few weeks before our subject was born. Benjamin F. was born January 22, 1820, in Martin County, N. C., and was apprenticed to learn the tailor's trade at the age of ten years. Six years later he began business as a journeyman, and at the age of eighteen he immigrated to Tennessee and began working at his trade at Beech Grove, and while here was ordained as itinerant minister of the Methodist Protestant Church. In 1883 he received the degree of D. D. from the college located at Westminster, Md., and was one of the commissioners that formed the basis of union of the Methodist and Methodist Protestant Church in 1875-77 at Baltimore, Md., and has been a member of the general conferences of his church at Baltimore in 1850; Lynchburg, Va., in 1858, and Montgomery, Ala., in 1867. About 1850 he began the study of medicine, and entered the Nashville University in the fall of 1853 and graduated in 1877, and located in Unionville. He was married, October 23, 1838, to Nancy A. Elliott, who has borne him five children: Benjamin F., Solon S., Algie A., Sarah A. and Salome J. Our subject has been successful in life, but has also met with many adversities. In December, 1861, he became commander of Company A, Fifty-fifth Tennessee, Infantry, and was acting colonel from February until the fall of Fort Donelson. When the regiment was organized our subject was made surgeon, and continued in this capacity until the battle of Shiloh.

H. C. DWIGGINS was born October 8, 1844, in Alabama. His father, R. S. Dwiggins was born in this State about 1820 and died about 1880. The mother was Ann (Wadkins) Dwiggins. Our subject was the eldest of two children born to their union. When about fifteen years old he began milling for his father at Shelbyville. His father built the first three steam-mills ever erected in Tennessee. In the fall of 1862 he enlisted in Company D, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and served until the close of the war. He was in several noted battles, but was not wounded or captured during service. After his return he followed the milling business for his father until 1871 when he erected a mill at Branchville, which he has conducted in connection with merchandising ever since. He was the founder of the village of Branchville, and succeeded in getting a postoffice in 1876. He has done much to assist in the prosperity of the county, and is a man of influence and a highly honorable gentleman. October 8, 1873, he wedded Mary Curtiss, of Richmond, Tenn. She is a daughter of James H. and Teresa Curtiss, and was born in 1854. They have six children: Cassie C., Ethel E., Robbie E., Mamie L., Harry C. and one unnamed. Mr. Dwiggins is a Mason, an Odd Fellow and a Democrat. He has been school director for twelve years, and is still holding the same office.

JAMES H. DYER, son of William and Harriet (Brown) Dyer, was born April 8,1841, in Bedford County. He received a good, practical education in the schools of the county, and followed agricultural pursuits. In 1872 he was married to Miss Belle Arnold, who bore him seven children: Annie H., James H., Thomas, Roy, Grace B., Harry and Ernest G. Harry died April 26, 1873. and Ernest G. died June 4, 1880. Mrs. Dyer is the daughter of Thomas and Nancy A. Arnold. Mr. Dyer owns 600 acres of fine land in the Twentieth District of Bedford County. He is respected as a man of sound judgment and good sense. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and is one of the leading farmers and stock raisers of the county. His farm is well adapted to the raising of corn, wheat, hay and clover.

HENRY C. DYER was born October 25, 1844, and is the son of William H. and Harriet (Brown) Dyer. The father was born in Bedford County in 1817. He was a farmer and stock raiser and a successful man in business. He was the father of seven children, four of which are living: James H., Mary J., Henry C. and Emily. Mrs. Harriet Dyer died in 1856, and in 1874 Mr. Dyer was married the second time. Mr. Dyer was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and died October 1, 1880. Our subject was born in Bedford County, and educated in the common schools. His first employment was farming, and this, in connection with stock raising, he has always followed. In 1871 he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Evans, daughter of Nathan Evans, of this county, and one child has blessed their union, Mary B. Mr. Dyer owns 705 acres of good land, and is a leading farmer of the county. He and wife are worthy members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

J. F. ELLIOTT, a native of Rutherford County, Tenn., was born April 24, 1824, son of B. and R. (Freeman) Elliott. The father was born about 1784, in Virginia, and immigrated to Tennessee in about 1804. His death occurred in 1869. The mother was also a native of Virginia, and lived to be very old. Our subject worked for his father on the farm till he was twenty years of age. He soon went to West Tennessee and engaged in agricultural pursuits. He remained there about ten years, after which he returned to Middle Tennessee and engaged in the same business. In 1861 he entered the Confederate Army, Forty-fifth Tennessee Infantry, under Capt. Lytle, and was discharged at Shiloh on account of bad health. After returning home he engaged in agricultural pursuits agrain. In 1867 or 1868 he moved to Kentucky and remained there but one year, after which he moved back to Tennessee and has lived there ever since. In 1846 he wedded Harriet C. Daniel, of Rutherford County. This union resulted in the birth of seven children: Tennessee, Rebecca C., James M., Sarah K., Josie, Albert J. and Harriet L. Our subject is a good, substantial citizen and is so considered by his neighbors. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Elliott is a Democrat in politics.

REV. ASA W. ELKINS was born July 10, 1821, son of Eli and Nancy (Riggins) Elkins. The father was born in North Carolina, and when a young man immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Bedford County in about 1816. He was a farmer by occupation and in early life was married to Miss Nancy Riggins, a native of North Carolina. The fruits of this union were ten children: Deletha, William S., Mary, Asa W., James, Sarah, Nancy K., Evaline, Eli and Richard, who died during the late war. Eli Elkins immigrated to Alabama in 1833 and settled in Jackson County, where he died in 1835. After his death Mrs. Elkins married Lewis Page, and to them were born one child, Nancy W., who died during the war. Mrs. Page died about 1876. The Elkins family is of English descent. The grandfather of our subject was in the Revolutionary war and was a gallant soldier. Our subject was born in the present limits of Coffee County. The  eductional advantages at that early day were not what they are now, consequently the education that he acquired at school was rather limited. By his own efforts he has gained considerable information, and is considered a man of sound judgment and good sense. In 1846 he married Miss Lucinda Stafford, a native of this State, and one child blessed the union, Mary A. Mrs. Lucinda Elkins died in 1848, and in 1849 Mr. Elkins married Miss Angeline Hufman. The results of this union were eight children: Sarah J., Nancy V., John W., Martha E., Margaret A., Lafayette, Robert E. and George T. Sarah J. died July 26, 1850; Nancy V. died June 12, 1875: Lafayette died March 19, 1885, and one died in infancy without being named. Mr. Elkins was licensed to preach the gospel in 1868 and has since been a local preacher. He was ordained deacon by the annual conference. He and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

 MARTIN EULES, a worthy citizen of Bedford County, Tenn., is a son of Adam and Dorothea (Shofner) Eules, who were born in North Carolina in 1775 and 1778, respectively. They were married about 1803 and immigrated to Tennessee in 1810. To them were born eleven children, four of whom are living. The father died in 1843, and the mother in 1872. On the 8th of November, 1843, our subject was united in marriage to Miss Casander Bobo, who was born December 10, 1825, and a daughter of Elisha and Lucy (Dean) Bobo, natives of South Carolina, and who died in 1860 and 1830, respectively. To Mr. and Mrs. Eules were born eleven children: Eli S., born in 1845 (deceased); Mary E., born in 1846 (deceased); Elisha A., born in 1848; Allen F., born in 1850; John M., born in 1852 (deceased); Harriet E., born in 1855; Ella J., born in 1857 (deceased); Minnie A., born in 1860; Lula B., born in 1862 ; Della C., born in 1865, and Lucy T., born in 1867. Martin Eules started in life for himself almost penniless, but by energy and perseverence has accumulated considerable property. His farm, consisting of 500 acres, is about eight miles from Shelbyville, besides this he owns seventy acres in Coffee County and forty acres in this county. He and wife are members of the Lutheran Church and their children belong to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. Eules is neutral.

DR. ROBERT F. EVANS, a prominent and leading physician of Shelbyville, was born August 24, 1821, in Caroline County, Va., being the only son of a family of eight children born to the marriage of David S. Evans and Judith Bowlware, both natives of Virginia, of Welsh and English descent, respectively. The father came with his family to Bedford County in 1832; and followed farming until 1840, when he bought the Evans House and began the hotel business, which he continued till the war. He died in 1869, the mother surviving him one year. Dr. Evans was eleven years old when coming to this county, and was reared on a farm. He assisted his father in the hotel business a short time and then studied medicine for several years. He graduated in the University of Pennsylvania in 1847, and then returned to Shelbyville, where he has been successfully engaged in the practice of his profession ever since, except in 1850-51, when he was on a. western tour. He was married, December 24, 1867, to Mrs. Mary C. Fite, who was the mother of two children by her former marriage, viz.: Dr. C. C. Fite, assistant physician at the East Tennessee Insane Asylum, Knoxville, Tenn.; and Jennie M. Fite, now the wife of Surg. A. M. Moore, of the United States Naval Service, Washington, D. C. The marriage of Dr. Evans has been blessed in the birth of two children, Stella and Mary F. He, his wife and youngest daughter are members of the Episcopal Church, and his eldest daughter of the Presbyterian Church. He has been senior warden of the church ever since its organization. He is it Knight Templar Mason. He is a member of the Tennessee Medical Society, and was elected president of that body in 1878. Politically he was reared a Whig, but is now a conservative Democrat.

W. L. FARIS, a native of Franklin County, Tenn., was born June 17, 1864, son of G. W. and Eliza (Tucker) Faris. The father was also a native of Franklin County, and died June 5, 1882. The mother was born about 1838 in Bedford County. Our subject assisted his parents on the farm until he was about twenty-two years of age, after which he worked for himself at farming. At the end of three years he began the mechanics trade in connection with farming and still follows that business up to the present date. December 21, 1815, he wedded Amanda R. Kirk, of this county, who was born August 3, 1856. She was the daughter of Edwin Kirk, who was born in 1809, and died November 22, 1883. To our subject and wife were born five children: E. E., Julian L., Lee G., S. I. and Cassie B. Mr. Faris is a self-made man, having made his property by his own unaided efforts, and is consequently a good substantial citizen. He and wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Democrat in politics.

J. C. FISHER'S ancestors were from North Carolina. His father, George W. Fisher, was born in August, 1812, and was brought to Tennessee by his parents when only four years old. George W. Fisher married Elizabeth Helm who was born in North Carolina, in 1814, and died in Tennesse in 1846. Our subject was born in Marshall County, Tenn., January 16, 1838, and is the third of seven children and of Irish descent. At the age of twenty years he began clerking for W. S. Hurst, at Hurst's Cross Roads, Murray County, continuing two years. When the war broke out he joined the Confederate Army, Company D, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, but after serving faithfully for some time was compelled to abandon the service to some extent. For about two years after the war he farmed and stock-traded and then engaged in the merchandise business in Verona and followed that business four years with good results, the style of the firm being Fisher & Robinson. In 1871 he sold his interest and moved to Fayetteville where he was a partner of W. S. Hurst in the merchandise business two years. The firm then divided their stock, and for three years longer Mr. Fisher followed that occupation in that place and in 1877 moved to Shelbyville. Since 1885 he has been exclusively engaged in farming. May 1, 1872, he wedded Mattie Bell (daughter of G. W. and E. Bell), who has borne him six children: Oscar B., Stella (deceased), Elbert H., James D., Hugh C. and George B. Mr. Fisher has accumulated his property by his own exertions and is perhaps the most thoroughly self-made man in this section of the county. The greater part of his education has been acquired through self-exertion. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and his wife of the Christian Church. politically he is a Democrat.

B. F. FOSTER, ESQ., was born Janurary 10, 1829, in Rutherford County, and was the son of James and Celia (Gentry) Foster. The father was born April 22, 1800, and was a very successful farmer for his day. The mother was born in 1803, in Georgia. Our subject received a practical education in the district schools, and at the age of nineteen engaged in the saw-mill business. This he continued for about two years and then began teaching school. At the end of fifteen months he gave this up and engaged in farming. In 1870 he was elected magistrate, and served in this capacity for twelve years. January, 1877,  he was elected chairman of the county court and held this position for about six years. Prior to this, in 1851, he wedded Nancy A. McBride, of this county, and the fruits of this union were three children: James J., Charles R. and the eldest, Harriet M., who died in infancy, The mother of these children died June 11, 1862. Mr. Foster was married to Frances Hoover, nee Rankin, August 27, 1871. This union resulted in the birth of one child, Lela G. Mrs. Foster was the mother of two children by her former husband: they were named Thomas R. and H. C Hoover. Mr. and Mrs. Foster are members in good standing in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, he is also a member of the Masonic fraternity and also a Chapter member of the same. He represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge in Nashville five years in succession. He is a Democrat in politics.

H. R. FREEMAN was born in Bedford County, Tenn., December 25, 1835. From twenty-one years of age until 1861 he farmed for himself, and at the latter date enlisted in Company F, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, and fought in many of the most noted battles. He was commissary sergeant during the latter part of the war. After his return he farmed until 1874, and then began merchandising in Unionville. He has been very successful. October 13, 1867, he wedded Salome Duggan, who died November 28, 1878. March 9, 1882, he married Emma Barker. They have one child, Enid Freeman. Mr. Freeman is a Democrat and Prohibitionist. His parents, Hartwell and Nancy (Harris) Freeman, were born in North Carolina in 1797 and 1801, respectively. The father was a well-to-do farmer, and died in 1871. The mother is yet living. and is eighty-five years of age.

JOHN G. FROST is a son of John E. Frost, a minister of the Primitive Baptist Church, who was born April 7, 1825, in Alabama. His mother was Alsie D. Hicks, daughter of D. D. and Malinda Hicks. John G. Frost was born in Bedford County, October 13, 1859, and was the eighth of nine children. He assisted his father on the farm until twenty-one years of age, and then began tilling the soil on his own responsibility. In 1882 he went to Missouri, where he farmed one year, but the same year traveled over the State of Kansas and the Indian Territory. Since that time he has been engaged in the farming interests in Tennessee. November 30, 1882, he was married to Mattie J. Coleman, daughter of N. A. Coleman. She was born January 12, 1861. They became the parents of three children, two of whom died in infancy. Joshua Wright is the child living. Mr. Frost has been a church member since the fall of 1878. He belongs to the Democratic party, and is worth about $2,500.

WILLIAM D. FROST, M. D., was born in Madison County, Ala., August 12, 1830, and is one of six children born to Ebenezer and Nancy (Wright) Frost. The father was born in North Carolina, and in 1827 immigrated to Alabama where he remained until 1835, and then removed to Bedford County, Tenn. He was one of the successful farmers, of the county. In 1837 he was employed by the Government to aid in removing the Indians to the territory to which they were assigned, and during one of these trips he died. He reared a family of which the county is proud. All of them are prominent citizens of the county. The subject of this sketch passed his boyhood on the farm, and received a fair education in the county schools. In 1850 he began the study of medicine, and in the same year entered the Ohio Medical School of Cincinnati, where he remained one term. He then went to Obion County, Tenn., and began the practice of his profession, remaining there eight years, after which he went to Mississippi, where he remained nine years. He then came back to Tennessee, and has since that time been a faithful practitioner of Bedford County. In 1854 he wedded Miss Martha L. Brown, of Obion County, Tenn., a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, who died in 1874. Mr. Frost was a soldier in the late war; was in the Thirtieth Mississippi Regiment, and was severely wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, which rendered him unfit for general service. After this he acted as assistant surgeon of the regiment until the close of the war. Mr. Frost has a family of four children: William A., who is editor of the Shelbyville Gazette, Walter C. who is editing a paper at Murfreesboro, Clarinda E. and John W.

WILLIAM A. FROST, editor and proprietor of the Shelbyville Gazette, was born September 30, 1855, in Troy, Obion Co., Tenn., being the eldest of five children of William D. and Martha L. (Brown) Frost. The father is a physician and resides at Flat Creek in this county. The mother died September 24, 1874. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm in Moore County, Tenn., and in Mississippi. He remained with his parents to the age of nineteen, when he entered Mulberry Institute, Lincoln County, Tenn., in which he took a two years' course. He then was appointed deputy clerk of the Circuit Court of Moore County. After one year as deputy he was appointed clerk of the same court and held the office three years. In December, 1878, he bought the Lynchburg Sentinel, and published that paper till December 4, 1884, at which time he was burned out. In 1880, June 30, he was appointed clerk and master of the Chancery Court of Moore County, and served four years. January 1, 1884, he took charge of his present enterprise. He has refitted the office with an entirely new outfit and made his the leading paper of the country, and he is regarded as the most successful county newspaper man in the State. He was elected alderman of the Second Ward of Shelbyville in October, 1885, and is chairman of the finance committee. He is justly regarded as a prominent and enterprising citizen. He was married, May, 4, 1880, to Miss Katie Whitaker, of Lincoln County. This union has been blessed in the birth of one son, William W. Politically Mr. Frost is a firm Democrat.

ALFRED D. FUGITT, farmer, was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., November 8, 1813, son of Townsend and Jane (Campbell) Fugitt, and of Irish-French descent. The father of our subject was born in North Carolina in 1780, and the mother was born about 1784. They were married in North Carolina about 1799, and to them were born eight children. The father emigrated from North Carolina to Kentucky in 1804, and owned the land where Danville, Ky., now stands, but concluding the land was too poor for successful farming, moved to Tennessee in 1806. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died November, 1878, at the advanced age of ninety-eight, the mother died in 1837. Our subject received a fair education and followed farming and merchandising ever since. He was married, January 10, 1837, to Miss Jane M.Norvell; of this alliance there were born ten children--three sons: Glodolphus C., John N. and Alfred  T., and seven daughters: Sallie E., Mattie J., Maggie N., Cassie M., Mollie B., Ada J. and Annie N. Mr. Fugitt was formerly an old-line Whig, and while he entertains no particular love for the name of Democracy he votes that ticket. He has 600 acres of good land, which he devotes almost exclusively to stock raising. Mrs. Fugitt, wife of our subject, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., September 5, 1814. Her father, John Norvell, emigrated from North Carolina about 1806, and was among the pioneers of the State. Our subject had two sons in the late war, Glodolphus C., who was a captain in the Second Tennessee Regiment under Col. Bate, was killed at Shiloh. The second son was a member of the same regiment and was killed in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1863. While our subject was too old to partake of active service in the army, he displayed his liberality and State pride in contributing the amount of $1,000 a mouth to Capt. Fugitt's company. The grandfather of our subject, Benjamin Fugitt, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war and served seven years.

JOHN A. GANNAWAY was born in Tennessee May 17, 1824, son of John and Mary W. (Robertson) Gannaway, of Virginia. The father was born in 1788, married in 1811 and came to Tennessee in 1814. He was a farmer and mechanic, and died July 12, 1851. Our subject's ancestors on both sides were from England. He was the fifth of eleven children and resided with his parents on the farm until twenty years of age. He then became overseer of a cotton factory at Murfreesboro, and worked the first year for $60, the second for $100, the third for $200. At the expiration of this time he started to school, attending about five months. He clerked for a short time in Murfreesboro, and then sold goods for A. J. Wood. He then began traveling for a saddle and dry goods firm, continuing five years, and then began the mercantile business at Wartrace, Tenn., with a very small capital. At the end of eight years he had accumulated considerable money and in the fall of 1858 sold out and purchased a farm near Bellbuckle, which he managed about seven years. Since the war he has been postmaster of Unionville, and was a merchant of that place for some time. In 1877 he retired from active business life. September 14, 1853, he married M. R. Tarpley, of Bedford County, and daughter of Edward Tarpley; she was born October 25, 1832, and has borne her husband twelve children: Emma D., Maggie E., John E., James W., Josephus, Nannie R., Mary C., Elijah T., Cora L., Clarence E., Horace B. C. and Cornelius V. Mr. Gannaway was elected magistrate of his district November 8, 1870, and held the office about six years. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

BRADLEY GAMBILL was born April 17, 1820, in Tennessee, son of Aaron and Elizabeth (Cannady) Gambill, natives of Tennessee and Maryland, respectively. Our subject was the youngest of twelve children born to his parents, all dead but three. The father was a farmer and a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He received land warrants for services rendered during that war. Our subject worked on the same farm with his brother till he was twenty-two years of age.. He is a successful farmer and has followed that occupation the principal part of his life. December 24, 1840, he wedded Sarah C. Anderson, of Tennessee, and this union has been happily blessed by the birth of a large family of children. In 1848 our subject was elected to the office of constable and served the people in that capacity for six years. In 1854 he moved to Mississippi and engaged in the cotton business, but the late Rebellion swept the greater part of his property away. He moved back to Tennessee during the war and was elected to the office of magistrate in 1866, and was elected the two following terms, making a total of sixteen years in all that he served the people in that capacity. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is also a member of the Masonic order. In politics he is a Democrat. He was a major in the militia before the war.

THOMAS J. GAMBILL, an excellent farmer and the son of Bradley and Sarah C. (Anderson) Gambill, whose sketch appears above in this volume, was born December 14, 1852. He assisted his parents on the farm and secured a fair practical education in the district schools. In 1874 he began to fight life's battles for himself as a farmer. In 1877 he led to the altar Lucy Templeton, daughter of Newton Templeton, and the fruit of this union was an interesting family of four children: Minnie E., Marvin E., Joshua Cleveland and Newton E. Mr. Gambill is one of the enterprising and successful citizens of the Twenty-third District. He has a farm well watered and in a fine state of cultivation in Coffee County, and an interest in a tract in this county. He and wife are exemplary members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

N. C. GAMBILL, JR., was born May 28, 1846, in Tennessee, son of N. C. and Minerva (Phillips) Gambill, both natives of this State. The father was born in 1812 and was a tiller of the soil; his death occurred in 1861. The mother was born in 1815, and died in 1866 or 1867. Our subject remained on the farm with his parents until their death. He then began farming for himself in 1867, and has successfully continued that occupation up to the present date. November 29, 1866, he wedded Nancy L. Ladd, of Williamson County. The result of this union was five children: Sallie J., Jesse C., James B., Nannie E., and one who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Gambill are leading members in the Christian Church, and Mr. Gambill is a Master Mason. His education was rather limited, but he has always manifested a willingness to aid in any or all enterprises pertaining to the advancement of education. He is a Democrat in politics and a strong temperance man and an advocate of Christianity in all its phases, sects and denominations.

R. C. GARRETT was born February 11, 1844, in Bedford County, and is the son of Darington and Nancy (Gentry) Garrett, both natives of Tennessee, and both died when our subject was quite small. R. C. Garrett, our subject, enlisted in the Confederate Army in the fall of 1862. He entered as Gen. Forrest's escort, and sustained this relation to the army throughout the entire war. He was wounded in the right arm just above the elbow during the battle of Chickamauga, which disabled him from active duty for about six months. He was again wounded at Plantersville, Ala., was hit by a spent ball on the left jaw, but this disabled him for only a short time. At the close of the war he came home and began tilling the soil on the farm where be is now living. November 30, 1865, he led to the altar Martha L. Jackson, of this county. She was the daughter of John and Rebecca (Lytle) Jackson, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Virginia, and of Irish and English lineage. To Mr. and Mrs. Garrett were born ten children: Ella N., William T., John J., Robert C., Robecca G., Lizzie L., Fannie C., Darlington J., Fane S. and the tenth, a daughter, died unnamed. Mr. Garrett received rather a limited education, but enough for all practical purposes. He is a Democrat in politics, and Mrs. Garrett is a member of the Baptist Church.

L. T. GAUNT was born March 15, 1852, in this State, son of Lewis and Mary S. (Shearen) Gaunt, both natives of Tennessee. The father was born December 28, 1803, and died February 20, 1860. The mother was born May 2, 1816, and died in 1873. Our subject assisted his mother on the farm and received a rather limited education in the common schools. At the age of seventeen he began farming on his own responsibility and continued this occupation until the fall of 1884, September 29, 1869, he wedded Margaret M. E. Stallings, of this county, and by her became the father of six children: Mollie E., Mattie E., James L., John T., Joe U. and Dan S. In 1882 Mr. Gaunt was elected constable in the Eighteenth District, and served two years. In 1884 he was appointed deputy sheriff under the present sheriff, which position he now holds. In 1885 he engraged in the merchandise business at this place, and is at present engaged in that occupation. In the fall of 1885 he was appointed United States deputy marshal. which office he now holds. He is a Democrat in politics.

JOHN J. GILL, farmer and stock raiser, was born May 26, 1841, and is one of five children born to the union of Winston W. and Sarah A. (Whitaker) Gill. The father was born in Kentucky March 10, 1809. In 1831 or 1832 he immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Lincoln County. He was for the greater part of his life a merchant, and sold goods at Gill's Store. In 1840 he was married, and became the father of these children: John J., Mary R., Martha C., Sallie J. and Winston W. Martha Gill died in 1851; Sallie J., in 1860, and Winston W., in 1878. In 1846 our subject's father moved to this county and bought a tract of land in the Twenty-second District. Mrs. Gill died in 1855, and Mr. Gill married a Miss Moore, and after her death he married a Miss Wiley, of Alabama. The Gill family were originally from Maryland, and are of English descent. Our subject was born in Lincoln County, and was given an education in the county schools. In 1870 he was married to Miss Susan S. Riggs, a native of Maury County and a daughter of Adam S. Riggs. To this union were born two children: Sallie R. and Winston W. Sallie R. died in 1874, and Winston W. February 11, 1879. Mr. Gill owns one of the finest farms of Bedford County. It contains 650 acres lying five miles south of Shelbyville. He is president of the agricultural society of Bedford County.

J. S. GILLIS, a leading merchant and enterprising citizen of Shelbyville, was born April 12, 1840, in New York State. He was the younger of two children born to the marriage of James Gillis and Isabella Stalker, natives of Scotland. His parents removed to Canada from New York, and he was reared there, receiving a common school education. In 1859 he went to Trenton, Ky., and engaged in the pursuit of farming till 1871. He then removed to Shelbyville and opened his merchandising establishment, which he has continued very successfully. He now carries a stock of about $20,000 and does an annual business of about $35, 000 to $40,000. He was married September 25, 1864, to Eliza Bradley, the result of this union is one son--George D. Mr. Gillis is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and has been superintendent of the Sunday-schools for about twelve years. His wife is also a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Gillis is of old-line Whig ancestry, but he is now a Democrat. He is one of the leading citizens of Shelbyville, and bears the highest esteem of his fellow-citizens.

JAMES B. GREEN, of the firm of Green & McGill, dealers in groceries and provisions, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., January 20, 1856, being a son of Blount G. and Salina F. (Stewart) Green. Blount G. Green was born October 14, 1815. His father, William Green, came to Bedford County in 1808 with his parents. William Green was married in 1811 to Miss Sarah Phillips. Blount G. has always been a farmer and hag been very successful, now owning 1,121 acres of land in Bedford County. He was married, in 1841, to Miss Salina F. Stewart, the result of this union being eleven children, viz.: Canzada P., Mary E., Nancy C., Susan C. E., Emily J., Lewis D., Samuel E., James B., Harriet F., Tennessee A. and Thomas B. Three of the family have died, viz.: Canzada, P., Thomas B. and Emily J. Mr. Blount Green is one of the prominent farmers of the county, and has been identified with the public offices of the county, James B. was reared on a farm and secured a common school education. At the age of twenty-one he began farming for himself, and continued till 1881, when he engaged at clerking in a grocery store for a short time. He then went back to farming. In December, 1885, he began his present occupation, and has since done a good business in the grocery line. He was married, May 10, 1883, to Mrs. Tennie (McGill) Gallaher, daughter of W. M. McGill, Esq., of this county. The wife is the mother of one child, Mary Gallagher, by her former marriage, and has borne two children to her union with Mr. Green, viz.: Jessie B. and James F. Mr. Green and wife are members of the Christian Church. He takes no very active interest in political affairs, but is an energetic and respected business man.

B. T. GREGORY, the photographer of Shelbyville, was born August 17, 1847, in Shelbyville, being one of a family born to the union of Joseph P. Gregory and Elvira Jones, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Alabama. Joseph P. was brought to Bed- ford County when Young by his father, Thomas Gregory. He was a dentist by profession. He practiced his profession in Shelbyville, and thence removed to Stevenson, Ala., which place he named in honor of V. K. Stevenson, a prominent railroad man. He (the father) returned to Shelbyville, where he died in 1881. The mother died at Stevenson, Ala., when our subject was young. B. T. received a common school education. At the age of twenty-two he started out in life for himself, having learned and practiced dentistry prior to this time. He then learned the photographer's art, and has ever since been engaged in that art. He permanently located in Shelbyville in 1876, since which time he has done a good business in his line. He was married, December 26, 1881, to Miss Annie Calhoun, daughter of N. J. and Elizabeth Calhoun. Her father was a stonecutter and marble dealer. One son has been born to this marriage--Benjamin T. Mr. Gregory is a Democrat in politics. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church.

JOHN H. GRIDER was born December 27, 1844, in Jackson County, Ala. His father, Ananias A. Grider, was born in Putnam County, Tenn., in 1812. He married Miss G. Bullington, a native of the same county. To this union seven children were born, our subject being the fifth. Ananias A. Grider died August, 1856, and his wife died in the same month. Our subject was educated in the country schools of his native county. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Seventeenth Tennessee Regiment, and served with this command up to and including the battle of Chickamauga. During this time he never was absent from his command a single day. The principal battles were Wild Cat Mountain, Fishing Creek, Perryville, Stone River and Chickamauga. At the latter place he was captured and taken to Camp Douglas, at Chicago, Ill., where he remained until March 23, 1865. He was then taken to Point Lookout, Md., where he took the oath of allegiance, was released and returned home. He then worked two years on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, and ever since then has followed farming in Bedford County, where he now resides. On July 1, 1866, he married Mrs. Sarah J. Mooney, and to this union were born five children. Mr. Grider owns a farm of 135 acres in District No. 3, and he and wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

SAMUEL B. GORDON, one of Bedford County's old and respected citizens, was born February 14. 1813, in Bedford County. He is one of seven children, the fruits of the marriage of David Gordon and Mary Reynolds, natives of South Carolina. The parents came to this county about 1809 and the father followed farming all his life. He died when Samuel B. was quite small. The mother died in 1836; she was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Gordon, our subject, was reared on a farm and secured a common school education. At the age of twenty-three he married and settled to farming four miles east of Shelbyville. He afterward moved to Flat Creek, in this county, and lived there eighteen years; thence he moved to where he now lives. He owns about 190 acres of fine land, having been successful as a lifetime farmer. He was married, October 20, 1835, to Amelia Eules, a native of this county, born in 1817. Twelve children have been born to this union, all of whom have lived to be grown, but four of whom have since died. viz. Mary C. (wife of Thomas Hutton, a farmer of Marshall County); George W. (deceased); Harriet E. (wife of J. R. Burrow, a farmer of this county); Adam E. (deceased); Amzi C. (deceased); William J., a labor superintendent in Alabama; Mitchell S., a merchant in Texas; Martin L. (deceased); John A., a States district attorney in Texas; Samuel B., Jr.; Margaret E. and Amelia E. (wife of G. S. Sanders). Mr. Gordon, his wife and several of the family are members of the Lutheran Church. He is a Master Mason in Blue Lodge Masonry, and a Republican in politics. He was trustee of Bedford County for about three terms about the close of the war.

RICHARD D. GORDON was born February 8, 1834, and is the son of Dr. William J. and Louisa B. (Hix) Gordon. The father of our subject was born in North Carolina February 16, 1813, and when a young man immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Bedford County. He received his medical education at the medical school of Gainesville, Ala., and began the practice of his profession in Bedford County. He was very successful as a physician, and won distinction in the county where he resided. In 1846 he was narried to Miss Louisa B. Hix, and to this union were born four children: Dosia, Richard D., and two who died in infancy that were not named. Dr. Gordon died at his home in Bedford County August 20, 1875, beloved by all. Our subject had the advantage of a good practical education in his native county. In 1875 he was married to Miss Callie Burrow, and five children blessed this union: Euphus A., William F., Clawson R., Albert P. and Anna B., all living. Mr.Gordon has made farming a success. He owns 160 acres of land in the Twenty-third District, and is esteemed by all his acquaintances.

N. W. HALEY is a son of E. T. and Susanna (Pratt) Haley, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. The father was born in 1779, and received a fair education. When about seventeen years of age he went to North Carolina and engaged in farming, and was there married in 1804, and became the father of these nine children: Anderson, James, Mary B., Nancy, Martha, William S., George, E. T. (Jr.). and N. W. Mr. Haley came to Tennessee in 1806, and located in Rutherford County, but in 1829 came to Bedford County, and in 1841 moved to the farm known as "Oak Grove," where he died March 23, 1858. He was an 1812 soldier. Mrs. Haley died March 26,1844. Our subject was born in Bedford County February 1, 1824, and his early days were passed in laboring on his fattier's farm. His educational opportunities were limited, owing to his services being required at home, but by contact with business life he has gained a fair business education. He is a farmer and stock raiser, and a Democrat in his political views. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JOHN V. HALL was born March 31, 1841, in Bedford County, Tenn., and is the elder of two children born to Joshua and Margaret (Swift) Hall, both natives of Bedford County. The father was born about 1801, and died in 1854. The mother Was born September 14, 1815, and is still living. Flower Swift, our subject's maternal grandfather, was a native of North Carolina, born June 3, 1787, and died in January, 1851. His wife Catherine Swift, was also born in North Carolina, October 16, 1791, and died in 1861. The paternal grandparents of our subject were born about 1775 or 1776, in the State of North Carolina, and immigrated to Tennessee at a very early date. Our subject was reared on the farm, and remained on the same until the breaking out of the war. He then entered the Confederate service in Company F, Forty-first Tennessee Infantry, and was captured together with the entire regiment at Fort Donelson. He was taken first to Lafayette, and after remaining there about three weeks was taken to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Ind., where they remained about seven months. They were then exchanged at Vicksburg, Miss. Mr.Hall was in but two battles in Tennessee: Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge. After these battles his regiment was ordered to Georgia and Mississippi. He was discharged at Dalton, Ga., in 1864, on account of his health. He then came home and bought a half interest in the mill property that he now owns, known as "Hall's Mills." In 1874 he bought the entire interest of the mill, and since that time he has operated the mill on his own responsibility. April 6, 1871, he wedded Ella F. Turrentine, of this county. She was born November 24, 1854. This union resulted in the birth of five children: William J., Emmett E., John T., Joseph E. and Sammy B. Mr. Hall was elected to the office of magistrate in the year 1871, and has served in that capacity for the last fifteen years. He is magistrate at the present time, and fills the office in an able manner. lie received a comparatively good education, and is a Democrat in politics.

HIRAM HARRIS, ESQ., was born September 17, 1814, in Roane County, N. C., and is the son of John Harris, a native of Harrisburg, Penn., born about 1775. That city derived its name from our subject's great-great-grandfather, John Harris, who donated the  property where Harrisburg now stands to the State of Pennsylvania for the purpose of building that city.  Our subject passed his early days on the farm, and after reaching  years of discretion began farming for himself. He also partially educated himself, and chose school-teaching as his profession.  May 5, 1842, he wedded Lucy A. Tillford, of this  county. In 1850 he taught ten months in Texas, and in 1862 taught five months in the State of Mississippi. Since then he has been teaching exclusively in this State.  In 1844 he was elected to the office of magistrate in the Sixth District, but resigned the office at the end of two years, and was elected magistrate of the Eighteenth District in 1873 and re-elected the following term. In 1880 Mr. Harris was one of the delegates to the convention in Nashville. to nominate a candidate for governor. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members in good standing in the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JOHN HART is a son of James and Sarah (Fossett) Hart, who were born in North Carolina, and became the parents of nine children: Stephen, Thomas, Susan, Rachel, John, Lucretia, Nathaniel B., Mary A. and William G. Mr. Hart came to Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1816, and in 1827 moved to Bedford County, where he died December 10, 1856. Mrs. Hart died August 30, 1860. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject was born April 29, 1819, in Rutherford County, and the major part of his life has been spent on a farm. He began doing for himself as a merchant, and clerked in the store of William G. Cowan, of Shelbyville. He was married in December, 1842, to Virginia Holder, daughter of John W. Holder, and by her is the father of four children: James H., Catherine E., John W. and Carrie B., all of whom are dead save one. For his second wife Mr. Hart took Narcissa (Phillips) Jennings, daughter of Garrett Phillips. They have one child, Lillian C. In 1847 he removed to his present place of abode, on the Murfreesboro Pike, five miles from Shelbyville. Mr. Hart served in the United States Army for about one year in the late war. He is a Republican in politics and is a member of the, Masonic fraternity. Both he and Mrs. Hart are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

W. R. HAYNES, furniture dealer and undertaker, was born June 29, 1844, in Williamson County, Tenn., being a son of R. R. and Sarah A. (Merritt) Haynes. The father was born in Rutherford County. Tenn., about 1808, was a cabinet-maker by trade and died in Williamson Comity, Tenn., in 1867. The mother was born about 1810 and is yet living, The subject of this sketch was reared at Triune, Williamson County, and learned his father's trade. He served throughout the war in Company F, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and received a wound at Wartrace in a skirmish. He was in all the important battles of the southwest with Forrest's brigade. For a time he then earned his living at manual employment and then for two years he conducted a furniture and undertaking business at Triune. In October, 1872, he came to Shelbyville and opened up his business and has been very successful ever since. He was married May 31, 1876, to Mollie E. Summers, the result of this union being four children: Mary B., Kate S., Sadie and William R., Jr. All the family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, Mr. Haynes being a steward in the church. Politically he is a Democrat, and he is an enterprising citizen of this county.

W. G. HIGHT, proprietor of the National Livery Stable, was born March 27, 1845, in Bedford County, being a son of W. G. and Naomi (Patterson) Hight, both natives of Bedford County. The father was a farmer; he was born in 1818. He was a successful farmer and trader, and was prominently connected with public affairs of the county. He died in 1881 in Arkansas, where he had moved in 1867. The mother died about 1875; now but two of the family are living in the county. Our subject was reared on a farm; at the age of twenty he married and began farming, and continued to farm till 1871. He then engaged in merchandising at Rover, Bedford Co., Tenn., till 1878, and also owned in interest in a mercantile trade at Wartrace from 1876 till 1878. He then ran a mill and stock business at Rover till 1884, when he went to Bellbuckle, and for a short time sold goods there. He then engaged in the livery business in Shelbyville, now doing an extensive trade. He also owns a farm of 140 acres and a saw-mill. He was married in 1865 to Miss Lucy J. Taylor, the result of this union being six children, five of whom are now living, viz.: Eula R., Naomi E., Mary N., William E. J., Alice (the one who died) and Nola P. Mr. Hight and family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a member of the F. & A. M. Politically he is a Democrat. He is one of the enterprising citizens of Shelbyville, and takes special interest in securing to his children good educational advantages.

WILLIAM S. HIX, farmer, was born May 14, 1825, and is the son of Demarcus D. and Malinda (Stewart) Hix. The father of our subject was born in Halifax County, Va., in 1801, and when only five years of age he, with his father, immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Bedford County. He was a farmer and stock raiser, and was married when quite young. He was the father of twelve children, all of whom were reared to maturity. He died September 19, 1872, a pious member of the Primitive Baptist Church. His wife followed him April 30, 1874, and was a member of the same church. Our subject has always been a farmer, and in 1847 was married to Miss Martha A. Word, a native of Bedford County. The result of this union was twelve children, viz.: John A. (deceased), James H. (deceased), Benjamin F., Asenith M. (deceased), Demarcus D., William W., Martha W. J. (deceased), Ailsey C., Louisa F. (deceased), Mary E., Joseph J. and Lillie A. Mr. Hix owns 474 acres of land in the Twenty-third District of Bedford County, is a member of the Primitive Baptist Church and a leading citizen.

J. H. HIX was born August 15, 1855, in Bedford County, being a son of J. L. Hix, a retired farmer, living in Shelbyville. The father was born and raised in Bedford County, as was the mother, nee Hulda Holt, also. She died in 1883. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm to the age of fifteen, when he began clerking in the grocery business. In 1880 he opened up the bar and confectionery business, which he has ever since very successfully continued. He was married, January 27, 1881, to Miss Ada Harmon, a native of Warren County, Tenn., then living in Nashville. One son, John, has been born to this union. Mr. Hix is a member of the Republican party. He has never aspired to any public office, but he does a thriving business in his line.

BERRY D. HOLT was born March 4, 1824, in Bedford County, Tenn., on a farm adjoining the one where he now resides. His father, Henry Holt, was a native of Orange County, N. C., and immigrated with his parents to Tennessee when a small boy. He was born in 1792, and married Miss Elizabeth McGuire a native of Kentucky, who came to this State when a child, and who was of Irish descent. Henry Holt was of German descent, and a farmer by occupation. He died in 1864. The mother still survives. Our subject was educated in the country schools of his native county, and lived with his parents until reaching his majority. For a number of years after this he followed farming and trading in stock. About 1860 he began railroading as a train conductor on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, and on the accommodation train between Nashville and Wartrace for about fifteen Years. After that, and up to the year 1885, he ran a through train between Hickman and Chattanooga, and superintended his farm. In 1885 he quit railroading on account of failing health, and now devotes his attention principally to farming. In 1848 he married Miss Lucretia Hart, a native of this county, and to them were born five children: Bettie, William T., John W., Mattie and James B. The mother of these children died May, 1863, and in 1869 their father married Mrs. Mary Roundtree, formerly Mary Kubley, a native of Switzerland. She is the mother of one child--Maggie--by her first husband, Maj. William Roundtree. Our subject was a colonel of the militia during the fifties, and during the late war, while acting as railroad conductor, his railroad was held by the Federal Army. He is one of the trustees of the Wartrace Male and Female Institute, and owns a fine farm of 290 acres. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JOHN W. HOLT was born February 22, 1855, in Bedford County, Tenn.; son of B. D. and Lucretia (Hart) Holt, natives also of this county. The father is one of the prominent farmers of the county. The mother died in 1863. Our subject was educated at the Wartrace High School, and lived with and assisted his father on the farm until he was about seventeen years of age. He then took a course in the telegraphing department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn. In 1875 he took charge of the telegraph office at McEwen, Tenn., and remained there seven months. He was then assigned the office at Johnsonville, which he declined, and in 1877 took charge of the office at Christiana and remained there three years. He then took charge of the agency of the railroad and telegraph office at McMinnville, where he remained but a short time. He then went to Nashville and entered the general book-keeping office, where he remained eight months. He then took charge of the Western Union telegraph office at Bowling Green, Ky.; in five months he left, and in 1880 took charge of the ticket, telegraph and Southern Express office at Wartrace, where he now resides. In 1882 he married Miss Blanch Halbach, a native of Virginia, and this union was blessed by two children: Cecil R. and Herbert F. Our subject is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and be and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JAMES HOOVER was born July 29, 1814, in Rutherford County, Tenn., son of Christopher and Elizabeth (Lotspeech) Hoover. The father was born about 1776, in Germany, as also was the mother of our subject. James Hoover was the eleventh of thirteen children born to his parents. He worked on the farm until he was twenty-three years of age after which he engaged in farming for himself. He has lived in this and the two adjoining counties (Rutherford and Coffee) all his life. December 26,1837, he was united in marriage to Susan Moore, a native of Virginia, born about 1820. This union resulted in the birth of nine children: Robert W., Clementine F., Calladona J., Martha A., Mary E., Elizabeth E., Susan O., Charles M. and Hugh L. The mother died about 1859 in the full fruition of the Christian's hope. In February, 1862, Mr. Hoover was married to M. J. Winn, of this county. This union resulted in the birth of eleven children: Alice D., Effie M, George C., Edward O., Harvey F., Cleopatra, James F., Benjamin, Nancy E., Albert A. and Anna M. Mr. Hoover was elected to the office of magistrate several years ago, but only served a short time. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and is politically a Democrat.

SYD HOUSTON, mayor of Wartrace, was born January 18,1850, in Bedford County, Tenn. His father, C. P. Houston, was a native of North Carolina, born in 1809, and immigrated to this State when about twenty years of age. Here he married Miss Jane Worke, who was also a native of North Carolina. To this union nine children were born, of whom our subject is the sixth. The parents of our subject are still living, and his father is one of the leading farmers of the county. Our subject lived with his parents until he was sixteen years old, and then went to Shelbyville and clerked in the store of his brother, C. P. Houston, Jr. He attended school at this place for three years, and then taught school for twenty months. He then read medicine and took a full course of lectures in Louisville, Ky. In April, 1878, he opened a drug store in Wartrace, where he still continues the business, and has a large and successful trade. In 1881 he married Miss Lilian Shealey, a native of Georgia. Our subject is a member of the K. of H., and is serving his first term as mayor of Wartrace. In politics he is a stanch Republican.

JAMES B. HUNTER, farmer and teacher, of Bedford County, Tenn., is a son of E. W. Hunter, who was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee with his father when a mere lad. He was married in 1830 to Susanna Wilson, and by her is the father of six children: Sarah M., Robert P., Emily, Margaret M., Thomas H. M. and. J. B. Mrs. Hunter's death occurred in 1848, and in 1849 Mr. Hunter wedded Margaret B. Jones, and to them were born three children, only one of whom is living. Mr. Hunter died in 1876 at his residence in Marshall County. James B. Hunter was born April 27, 1838, and was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. He began teaching when quite young, and then clerked in a dry goods store until the breaking out of the Rebellion, when he enlisted in Company F, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry. He was lieutenant of his company and acted about half the time as adjutant of the regiment. In 1862, when the army was reorganized; he enlisted in the Twenty-second Tennessee Cavalry and was captured near Montgomery, Ala. He was a participant in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Knoxville, Franklin and numerous lesser engagements. At the close of the war he returned home and in 1867 was married to Mary C. Cooper, who bore him the following family of children: Ida L., Sarah E., Frank W. and Charles P. Mr. Hunter resides near Bellbuckle, and he and his wife are members cf the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

GEORGE C. HUFFMAN, farmer, born April 13,1830, in Bedford County, Tenn.; son of John and Mary (Cortner) Huffman, natives of North Carolina. The father was born in 1800 and moved to Tennessee in 1819. He was of German descent and one of the best farmers of the county. He died in 1877, and his wife preceded him in 1875. Our subject received the rudiments of his education in the county schools, and subsequently at Fairfield. He began teaching at the age of twenty-one and taught two sessions. He then bought a farm near where he is at present living. In 1858 he married Miss Eliza Phillips, a native of Bedford County, and the fruits of this union were Mary A., Mattie J., Sallie A., Thomas L. and Alice, all living. The eldest, Mary A., is now Mrs. William Bennett, and they reside in California. He owns a large farm of 480 acres of as good land as lies in the county. It is in a most excellent state of cultivation and is known as Adams' Bottom. He has most excellent buildings, well located, and his house, lawn and premises are kept in a neat and tasteful manner. He is of the Cumberland Presbyterian faith and his wife is a member of that church. In politics he is a Democrat.

A. J. JARRELL, one of Shelbyville's best business men, was born March 15, 1845, in Davidson County, Tenn., being a son of Wesley and Martha (Lovell) Jarrell. The father was a native of Kentucky. He died about 1854. The mother was born in 1812, and is now living. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm. In 1860 he came with his mother to Shelbyville, and farmed a short time, and then worked about in different vocations till 1866. He then learned the tinner's trade, and in 1868 opened up his business, dealing in stoves and tinware. He has been quite successful, and carries on farming also, now owning a fine farm adjoining Shelbyville. He carries about $5,000 stock, and does the leading business of the kind in the county. In 1867 he married Miss Helen Givens, who bore him six children. This wife died in 1881, and in 1882 he married Miss Lina Givens, a sister of the former wife. One child has been born to this union. Mr. Jarrell, his wife and eldest daughter are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Jarrell is a Blue Lodge Mason and a member of the I. O. O. F. Politically lie is a Republican. He served one year in Company A, Fourth Tennessee Mounted Infantry, United States Army. He is thoroughly a self-made man, and one of the very prominent citizens of the county.

JAMES D. JEFFRESS was born August 18, 1841, in Bedford County. His father, Thomas B. Jeffress, was born in Virginia in 1803 and came to Tennessee in about 1836. While in Virginia he wedded Pollie H. Carter, who was born about 1805. They died in 1876 and 1856, respectively. James was the fifth of their seven children. He entered the Confederate Army in 1861, in Company C, Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment, and was through the entire war, but was not wounded. He was in many of the principal battles, Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro and Knoxville being examples. Since the war he has farmed, and since 1878 has tilled the old homestead, which he purchased, March 7, 1867, he was united in marriage to Frances A. Clay, born in Bedford County, February 16, 1846. Three children were born to this union: Annie Lee, Sallie H. and Thomas Ewing. Mr. Jeffress has a comfortable competency and is a man of intelligence and education. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and he is a Democrat politically.

L. E. JONES is a native of Tennessee, and was born in the year 1816. His parents were North Carolinians by birth, and his maternal grandfather served his country faithfully in the Revolutionary war. The subject of our sketch was reared on a farm by one of his uncles, Isaiah Hammond, and lived with him until after attaining his twenty-first birthday, and then began the battle of life for himself, and has been a tiller of the soil up to the present time. In January, 1840, he united his fortunes with Miss Nancy Bryant, of Bedford County, and their union resulted in the birth of twelve children, seven of whom are now living, Our subject has been quite prosperous in his farming enterprises, and is now living in sight of the first house that was ever built in Bedford County. He received limited educational advantages, but has always manifested a willing ness to aid in any and all enterprises pertaining to the advancement of educational interests. His political views are Democratic, and he gives his support to that party. He has always been scrupulously honest in all his business transactions, and is considered one of Bedford County's most substantial citizens.

THOMAS J. JONES was born November 2, 1842, in Lincoln County, Tenn., near Petersburg, being one of the family of children born to the union of Minos C. Jones and Fannie Melson. The father was born and raised in Bedford County. At the age of eighteen he went to Lincoln County, where he married, lived and died, being a farmer by occupation. Thomas J. was reared on a farm with his parents to the age of twenty-one, when he married and moved to Bedford County and farmed a short time. In February, 1867, he came to Shelbyville and opened a bar and confectionery business. He removed to Richmond, Bedford County, in a short time, and in 1870 he returned to Shelbyville, where he has remained ever since in the bar and confectionery business. He was married April 14, 1864, to Mary E. Harrison, a native of this county, who has borne to him eight children, five of whom are now living, viz.: William H., Fannie E., Katie E., Samuel R. and Albert B. Politically Mr. Jones has always been a Democrat. His wife is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and his eldest daughter is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He has been very successful in his business, and is a substantial business man of Shelbyville.

THOMAS J. JOYCE was born August 20, 1847, in Bedford County, and was the eldest of twelve children born to Anderson and Elizabeth Joyce. The father was born December 24, 1820, and died November 17, 1881. He was a successful farmer and at the time of his death was worth about $8,400 that he had accumulated by his own unaided efforts. The mother was born about 1830 and is still living. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, and at the age of seventeen enlisted in the Confederate Army, Company A, Col. Hill's cavalry regiment. He was in but one battle before the surrender--the battle of Franklin. At the age of twenty-two he and his eldest brother engaged in the stock business, buying and selling horses and cattle, and this they continued very successfully up to 1882. September 24, 1874, he wedded Bettie Bounds, of this county. The results of this union were two children: C. A., born February 7, 1876, and L. P., born December 12, 1879. Mr. Joyce is a good citizen and is scrupulously honest in every particular. He is a law-abiding man; never was sued or had a lawsuit in his life. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is politically a Democrat and a member of the Masonic lodge, which body he joined about 1870.

SAMUEL F. KNOTT, a genial and enterprising citizen of Shelbyville, is a son of Anderson B. and Elizabeth (Tune) Knott. The father is now residing in Chattanooga, where he follows the carpenter's trade. He came to Shelbyville in his childhood and remained here till about 1876, when he removed to Chattanooga. The mother died in 1871. The subject of this sketch was born September 3, 1848, in this county. He secured only a common school education. At the age of fifteen he began clerking in a drug store and continued in that vocation for fourteen years. He then went to Nashville and traveled for William Litterer & Co., wholesale druggists, for nearly five years. He then returned to Shelbyville, and established the drug trade, in which lie has met with well deserved success. He carries a stock of about $7,000 and does a large business. He was married in 1870 to Julia B. Steele, a native of this county. Three children have been born to this union, two of whom are living, viz.: Willie and Annie. He is an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and his wife and daughter are also members of that church. For four years he has been an elder of the church, and was a deacon for ten years previous. Politically he is a Republican. He is one of the highly respected, energetic business men of the county.

C. M. KINCAID was born December 24, 1830, in Anderson County Tenn. His father, Clingan Kincaid, was also a native of that county. His paternal grandparents were both natives of Ireland and his maternal grandparents were natives of England, the grandfather serving in the Revolutionary war and when peace was declared took the oath of allegiance to the United States. Our subject was reared on the farm and worked on the same till he was twenty years of age, after which he began working for himself at the same business until the beginning of the late war. He entered the Confederate Army in 1863. enlisting in Company B, Fifth Tennessee Cavalry. At the close of the war he returned home without a wound or without ever having been captured during the time he was in service. Up to the time of the war he had been quite prosperous but that fearful catastrophe swept away nearly all his property. Since that time he has met with many reverses but the scale of fortune finally turned in his favor, and he is now in comparatively good circumstances. Previous to the war, in 1850, he wedded Elizabeth Barnard, of Tennessee. Her father was one of the first settlers of Barnardsville, the town deriving its name from him. To our subject and wife were born eight children: Louisa, Syrene, Sarah G., Clingan, Alta, Erie, Cilena and Albert J. Mr. Kincaid and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church, and he is a Democrat in politics.

WILLIAM L. KIMBRO, a merchant of Singleton, Tenn., was born February 8, 1856, and is one of three children born to Riley J. and Martha A. (Span) Kimbro. The father was born and reared in this State, and was by occupation a farmer and mechanic. He was married twice, our subject's mother being his first wife. She was the mother of these children: William L., James and Frederick D., and died in 1861. Mr. Kimbro took for his second wife Mrs. Margaret Raney (nee Robertson), and six children blessed this union: Charles H., Henry, Minnie, Walter. Ira and Zannie. Riley Kimbro was a member of the Lutheran Church, and died October 4, 1885. Our subject had the advantage of a good practical education, and in 1879 was joined in the holy bonds of matrimony to Miss Tennie J. Coleman. The result of this union was four children: Marvin L., Roy E., Argie L. and Hoyt. Roy E. died in 1883. In 1882 Mr. Kimbro engaged in the mercantile business at Singleton, Tenn., and has since that time continued the business at that place. He carries a stock of $1,500, and is doing a business of $3,500, and also runs a blacksmith shop in the same town. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and is a leading and highly respected citizen.

JACKSON G. KIMERY, a prominent farmer of the Twenty-third District of Bedford County, was born January 30, 1854, son of Edwin and Caroline (Greer) Kimery. The father was a native of North Carolina, and in 1828 he, in company with his father, inimigrated to Tennessee, settling on the place where they now reside. Edwin Kimery was the father of nine children, having been twice married. His first wife was Miss Bettie Kiser, and there were four children born to this union. After her death, which occurred some time in 1840, Mr. Kimery married Miss Caroline Greer, our subject's mother, and five children were born to them. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm. At the age of twenty-two he was married to Miss Harriet Parks, daughter of Dr. Parks, and five children blessed their union: Edward L., Alice, Joseph W., Leona and Frederick. Leona and Alice died in 1880 and 1884, respectively. Mr. Kimery has always been a farmer, and has been quite successful in this occupation. He owns 100 acres of good land in a fine state of cultivation.

HENRY H. LANDESS is a native of Tennessee, born July 22, 1818. He resided in Lincoln County, Tenn., until 1851, when he moved to Bedford County. He traveled considerably in Missouri and Arkansas in early life, being absent about six years. Shortly after moving to Bedford County he located on his present farm, consisting of 212 acres of fertile land, furnished with a neat cottage. December 3, 1850, he was married to Lucinda S. Hix, who was born October 6, 1832, and died July 8, 1852, leaving one child--Henry D., born in 1851 and died July 16, 1852. May 24, 1853, Mr. Landess wedded Susan C. Campbell, daughter of Alfred and Sallie (Reeves) Campbell. Mrs. Landess was born May 10, 1835, and has borne her husband the following children: Sarah M., born in 1854; Alfred G., born in 1856; George W., born in 1860; Mary F., born in 1862; Grace C., born in 1865; William G., born in 1867; Mittie M., born in 1872, and Henry H. born in 1875. Mr. Landess is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are church members. His parents, Henry and Grace (Thompson) Landess, were born in North Carolina and Kentucky in 1777 and 1778, respectively. The father moved to Kentucky in 1789, and there married our subject's mother in 1798, and became the fattier of thirteen children. They came to Tennessee at an early period, and died in Lincoln County in 1863 and 1801, respectively.

GEORGE L. LANDIS, M. D., was born in Bedford County March, 31, 1817, son of Bryant and Margaret (Ogilvie) Landis. His early days were spent in laboring on his father's farm and in attending the common schools. October 5, 1865, he began the study of medicine with his brother, Dr. J. A. Landis, of Kentucky, and in September, 1869, he entered the Medical University of Nashville, Tenn. He practiced a short time and continued to read under Dr. W. F. Clary, and in the fall of 1870 again entered the University of Nashville, and graduated in March of the following year. Since that time he lifts practiced in Marshall and Bedford Counties, and since May 7, 1881, has been a resident of Unionville, and is one of the leading physicians of the place. He attended the New York Polyclinic of Medicine and Surgery in the fall of 1885. He was married, November 4, 1875, to Mrs. Carrie Locke, and by her became the father of five children, two of whom are dead. Those living are Alice, Florence and Robbie. Since eleven years of age the Doctor has been a church member, and is now a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In politics he is a Democrat.

CHARLES W. LEFTWICH, although not long a resident of Bedford County, is one of the enterprising dry goods merchants of Shelbyville. He was born in Moore County, Tenn., April 16, 1850. His father, Littleberry Leftwich, was born in this State. He has been a farmer and merchant most of his lifetime, and is now conducting a mercantile trade for Charles W. at Talley, Marshall Co., Tenn. The mother died in 1854. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm. He received his education mainly in Mulberry Academy of Lincoln County, Tenn. He then taught school about four years. In 1879 he, engaged in merchandising in Moore County, Tenn., and continued successfully until the spring of 1885, when he established his business at Talley, which is now conducted by his father. In December, 1885, he began his business here and has continued successfully ever since, with a stock of $10,000 or $12,000 of dry goods and notions, boot and shoes, hats and caps, clothing, etc. He was married, in 1875, to Miss Maggie Morring, of Alabama. This union has been blessed in the birth of five children, four of whom are now living, viz.: Clayton W., Thomas E. Nina P. and Littleberry. Mr. Leftwich and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Politically he has always been a Democrat.

JAMES M. LENTZ was born in Bedford County February 15, 1828. His father, Benjamin Lentz, was born in 1800 in North Carolina, and immigrated to Tennessee in 1818, settling five and a half miles southwest of Shelbyville, and lived there to the date of his death, which occurred in 1878. Our subject's mother, Penelope (Bussy) Lentz, was born about 1808, and is still living. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, and received his education in the common district schools. At the age of twenty-one he went to New Orleans, and engaged in the lumber business, remaining there about six or seven years. He then engaged in the carpenter's trade, and continued this business about six or seven years, after which he began farming, and has successfully continued this occupation up to the present time. He was married, February 14, 1861, to Elizabeth Lawell, a native of Tennessee, born April 15, 1837, and to them were born nine children: John H., Samuel J., Robert M., Ethan A., Babe, Mary L. A., Necy, Eddie E., and one died unnamed. Mr. Lentz is politically a Democrat. He is a self-made man, having accumulated his wealth by his own unaided efforts.

DR. THOMAS LIPSCOMB, one of Bedford County's oldest and best citizens, was born in Louisa County, Va., July 22, 1808, to the marriage of William Lipscomb and Ann Day Cook, natives of Spottsylvania and Louisa Counties, Va., respectively. The father was killed by a falling tree in January, 1829, having been a farmer. The mother attained the ripe age of ninety years, and her old age was marked with great vitality. With her own hands she knit over 100 pairs of socks for the Confederate soldiers after she had passed eighty years of age. She lived nearly forty years a widow. The subject of this sketch was reared with his parents on a farm, and received a common school education. At the age of twenty-one he went to Winchester, Tenn., and began the study of medicine. Thence he attended the Medical University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, whither he proceeded and returned the most of the way on horseback. After one course of lectures he returned to Franklin County, Tenn., where his parents had moved in 1826. In 1831 he came to Shelbyville, where he has spent a lifetime in the practice of medicine, surgery and obstetrics, and has attained eminence in his profession. He has been president of the Medical Society of Tennessee, of the Bedford County Medical Society and of the Female Institute at Shelbyville. Since entering into the practice of his profession the honorary title of M. D. has been conferred upon him by the University of Louisville and by the University of Tennessee. He has been successful financially. Since 1855 he has carried on farming. He is the president and largest stockholder of the Victor Mills, of Shelbyville, and was the president of the Branch Bank of Tennessee at Shelbyville at the opening of the war. The advancement of the schools and churches is due greatly to him. For two years he held the Shelbyville postoffice, the emoluments of which he allowed to the widow of a former postmaster. He is not now actively engaged in the practice, but at the age of seventy-three he successfully performed the difficult ovariotomy operation for the first time in his life. He was married, May 22, 1832, to Rebecca Stevenson, who bore him ten children, all of whom were raised. This wife died December 6, 1880, and he then wedded, October 26, 1882, Miss Mary A. Cowan. Dr. Lipscomb and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, as was his first wife. Politically he is a Democrat, and wields large influence as a worthy citizen of the county.

JACOB LYNN, farmer, was born in Warren County, Tenn., December 23, 1827, son of Andrew J. and Isabella (Hawes) Lynn, and of English extraction. The father of our subject was born in Warren County, Tenn.. in 1805, and the mother in Virginia about 1808. They were married about the year 1826, and reared a family of seven children. The fattier died in Coffee County, Tenn., February 13, 1850, and the mother died in Arkansas in 1865. Jacob Lynn, Sr., the grandfather of our subject, and Benjamin Stinnett, the grandfather of the last Mrs. Lynn, the wife of our subject, were both in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans. Our subject received a practical education in the common schools, and at the age of twenty-one he began business for himself. During the civil war he enlisted in the Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment Infantry, and served eighteen months, participating in the battle of Shiloh, and was discharged at Tupelo, Miss., on account of his age. He has been married four times. The first marriage occurred in 1847 to Miss Sarah Stroud, of Coffee County, Tenn., and resulted in the birth of one son, John A., who was a' soldier in the late war. Our subject was married the second time, October 13, 1859, to Mrs. Mary E. L. Giles, daughter of Noble L. Majors. Of this alliance there were two children, one son and one daughter, named, respectively, Joseph T. and Louise Jane. Mrs. Lynn was born July 4, 1820, and died in the same county October 15, 1876. Mr. Lynn was married the third time, September 14, 1877, to Mrs. Mary A. Moses, a native of Tennessee, born March 2, 1832, and died January 26, 1884. His last marriage occurred April 23, 1885, in Bedford County, Tenn., to Miss Rebecca Hill, daughter of Jacob Hill. This lady was born November 24, 1841. Mr. Lynn is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

LEVI MADISON'S birth occurred July 1, 1822, in the State of Kentucky. His parents James and Minnie (Loyd) Madison, were also born in Kentucky, and died when our subject was quite young. He made his home with Samuel Thompson until he was fourteen years old and in 1839 went to Texas, where he lived one year and then returned. He worked at the blacksmith's trade in Shelbyville four years and then farmed one year, and then continued his trade seven years. In 1852, he purchased the Ransom Stephens farm, where he lived up to 1883. He then moved to his present place of residence. William D. W. is a son born to his union with Nancy J. Collier, which took place March 22, 1849. She was born in Bedford County, and is a daughter of William and Polly Collier. Our subject has accumulated a comfortable. competency by his own unaided efforts, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Republican, and up to the date of the late war was an old-line Whig.

GABRIEL MAUPIN is a native Virginian, born September 7,1810, and son of Blan and Sallie (Brown) Maupin, who were born in the "Old Dominion" in 1770 and 1772, respectively. They were married about 1790, and became the parents of five sons and five daughters, our subject being the only one living. The family came to Tennessee about 1811, and here the father died in 1829 and the mother in 1852. Our subject has followed farming from boyhood, and in early life was engaged in stock trading. He owns a farm of 500 acres on Duck River, also some valuable property near Shelbyville. His business career has made him well known throughout the county, and he is considered one of its worthy citizens. He was married, September 1, 1844, to Miss Sallie Hickerson, who was born January 2, 1820, daughter of Joseph and Nancy (Russeau) Hickerson. Mrs. Maupin died July 27, 1884, having borne these children: Nancy R., born September 5, 1846; Blan, born November 22, 1847, and died September 7, 1884; Sarah Ann, born March 10, 1849; Joseph H., born August 21, 1851; Gabriel, born September 12, 1853, and died April 15, 1879; Thomas H., born December 18, 1855; Marietta, born Dcember 23, 1858, and Thornton P., born December 23, 1861. Mr. Maupin is a member of the Methodist Church, and is a life-long Democrat.

T. S. MAYES. James Mayes was born about 1788 in Georgia. and came to Tennessee in 1816. He married Polly Sparks, who was a native of Georgia, and our subject was born to them December 16, 1814. He resided on his parents' farm until twenty-one years of age and then began farming on his own responsibility, and has continued very successfully up to the present date. He served the people of his district in the capacity of constable for six years, being first elected in 1840, and in 1852 was elected to the same office for two years. Since that time he has farmed exclusively and has accumulated a good property through his own exertions. Anna Catner became his wife, January 4, 1848, and this union has resulted in ten children, seven of whom are living: Mary E. (Mrs. J. D. Blackwell), Eliza J. (Mrs. W. R. Woodard), William W., John A., Martha A. (Mrs. J. A. Woodard), James L. and Harriett F. Mr. Mayes is a man of great decision of character and is strictly honest and exact in his business transactions. He and Mrs. Mayes are members of the Christian Church and he supports the Democratic party.

WILLIAM McGILL, a prominent farmer and stock raiser of Bedford County, was born May 14, 1820. He is the son of James and Sallie (Parker) McGill. The father of our subject was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1787, and at an early day immigrated with his father to the United States and settled in Virginia, where he remained several years. He then moved to Rutherford County, Tenn. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was in the battle of New Orleans. He was married in 1816, and was the father of seven children: Nancy, William, Lucy, Elizabeth, Sallie, Priscilla and James. The father died in 1860 and the mother in 1884. Our subject was reared on the farm, educated in the country schools, and in 1840 was married to Miss Mary Gardner. Eight children were the resuit of this union: John A., Sarah J., Robert P., Thomas B., Franklin, Lewis Cass (who died September 28,1874), Bedford and Tennessee. In 1874 Mr. McGill was elected trustee of Bedford County, which office he held for two terms in a very able manner. He is member of the Christian Church, owns a fine tract of land in the Twenty-third District, and is one of the representative men of the county.

JOHN A. McGILL is the oldest child born to William and Mary (Gardner) McGill--(For particulars of parents see sketch of William McGill). Our subject was born November 1, 1841, and had the advantage of a practical education in the common schools. When the war broke out he enlisted in the Confederate Army in the Seventeenth Tennessee Regiment under Col. Newman, and participated in most of the battles of the war. During the battle at Drury's Bluff he was wounded, and this disabled him for service. He was given a furlough and went to Alabama, where he remained one year. He then came back to Tennessee, and in 1867 was married to Miss Mary E. Terry. To this union one child was born, viz.: Ida I., born January 23, 1870. Mr. McGill and family are consistent members of the Christian Church, and are one of the leading families of the county.

THOMAS B. McGILL, son of W. McGill, whose sketch appears in this work, was born December 15, 1848, in Bedford County. He was reared on a farm and remained with his parents to the age of eighteen. He then engaged as a clerk in a dry goods store in Shelbyville till 1875. He then went to Nashville and clerked in a wholesale dry goods store for about a year. He then traveled in Kentucky for the Nashville Nursery one year. He then returned to Shelbyville and dealt in live-stock, etc., till 1881, when he established a mercantile trade in the Twenty-third District and secured the establishment of the postoffice at Singleton, and held the office in connection with his store three years. In September, 1883, he sold out and farmed for one year. In December, 1885, in connection with James B. Green, he opened the grocery and provision trade in Shelbyville, and the firm does a thriving business. He was married, June 4, 1884, to Miss Kittie Elliott, the result of this union being one son, Robert S. Mr. McGill is a member of the Christian Church, and his wife is a member of Methodist Episcopal Church South. Politically he is a Democrat. He is one of the enterprising and respected citizens of Shelbyville.

E. H. McGOWAN was born and reared in Rutherford County, Tenn. His birth occurred September 26, 1842. At the age of nineteen he entered the Confederate service, enlisting in Company C, Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment, and served out his term of enlistment (twelve months). From that time up to 1869 he farmed, and then engaged in the merchandise business at Poplins' Cross Roads, where be has done well, from a financial standpoint. November 8, 1863, Nancy A. Crowell became his wife and the mother of nine children: Robert F., Henry C., William C., Margaret J., Nancy F., Rebecca W., Florence, Isabella and Eddie. Mrs. McGowan was born in 1844 and died August 30, 1885. Mr. McGowan is a Democrat and is a son of Samuel G. McGowan, who was born in Tennessee, and who married Rebecca Balts. They died, respectively, in 1853 and 1852.

DR. JOSEPH H. McGREW was born February 13, 1826, in Bedford County, Tenn., being the youngest of eleven children of William McGrew. The father was a native of Kentucky, and when young went to South Carolina, where he married Nancy Goodwin. In 1811 they came to Bedford County, where they lived and died, the father being a farmer. The father's death occurred in 1852, and the mother's in 1860. Our subject was reared on a farm. When seventeen years of age he came to Shelbyville, and began the study of medicine in 1844. He attended lectures in Louisville in 1845-46, and in Philadelphia in 1846-47, graduating in March, 1847. He then returned to Shelbyville, and has since been engaged in the practice of medicine successfully. He was married, in 1851, to Letitia Cannon, who bore him two children: James H. and Samuel J. The wife died in 1857, and January 31, 1866, he was married to Mary B. Evans. Himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a member of the F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F. fraternities. Politically he is a firm Republican. Dr. McGrew is examining surgeon in the pension service, and ranks among the able practitioners of the county. He is now practicing with his younger son, Samuel J., who was born December 11, 1854. He (S. J.) studied medicine with his father. He attended lectures in the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1881, and has proven himself well-informed in his profession. He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Politically he is a Republican.

JAMES W. C. MITCHELL, a merchant of the Twenty-fourth District of this county, was born January 29, 1842, son of T. F. and Margaret (Binkley) Mitchell. The father was a native of North Carolina, and in early life immigrated to Alabama and settled in Huntsville, where he was married. He was the father of eleven children; Sarah A. (deceased), John (deceased), Mary, Martha, James W. C., Joseph (deceased), Robert H., Bates, Nancy, Logan and Elizabeth. Joseph Mitchell was killed in the battle of Franklin and was buried at Columbia. Our subject's father is still living at the advanced age of eighty-six. James W. C. Mitchell was reared on the farm, given an education in the country schools and when in his eighteenth year entered the Confederate Army in the Thirty-seventh Tennessee Infantry; was in the battles of Perryville, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Murfreesboro, Franklin and others, and was wounded twice. After the war he came back to this county and has since that time resided here. In 1873 Miss Catharine Bomar became his wife. The results of this union were four children: Oscar L., James W., Bibbie B. and one not named. In 1875 Mr. Mitchell went into the mercantile business in the Twenty-fourth District, and in 1881 went into the distillery business at the same place, making about sixty-five gallons of whisky per day, and is doing a $3,000 business.

ROBERT S. MONTGOMERY was born November 30, 1829, in South Carolina, and is a son of Thomas Montgomery, who was born in 1808 and is of Irish parentage. He came to Tennessee in 1844, locating near Palmetto and in 1854 erected a dwelling-house, in which our subject now lives. Robert S. began to reside permanently in the State in 1855, and the same year engaged in merchandise business with Samuel Carpenter, continuing up to the date of the late war. After its close they again resumed business and, in 1874, T. S. Montgomery purchased Mr. Carpenter's interest, the style of the firm being then changed to Montgomery Bros. In 1885 they sold out to J. O. Montgomery, a cousin. March 13, 1855, he married Miss Susan Dysart, daughter of James P. and Leah Dysart. To Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery were born eight children: Alice E. (Mrs. J. F. Tillman), Mary (deceased), Jimmie (deceased), Thomas A., Lillie (wife of Dr. W. C. Ransom), Danny, Gertrude Inez and Robert H. Mrs. Montgomery died April 19, 1881. He is a Republican and a strict member of the Presbyterian Church.

T. S. MONTGOMERY was born March 30, 1843, in the "Palmetto State. " At the age of fifteen he left home and engaged in the dry goods business, clerking for his brother Robert S. at Palmetto. He entered Union Academy at the end of eighteen months, where he remained about ten months. He then returned and remained with his brother until the war. At its close he again resumed his clerkship and at the end of two years commenced farming. From 1868 to 1874 he was in the mercantile business at Farmington, but then returned to Palmetto, and in 1885 he and his brother sold out to their cousin. Since 1882 he has served as magistrate of his district. September 27, 1866, he wedded Magie L. Hagle, daughter of Peter and Esther Hagle. They have five children : Flora Esther, T. Clarence, Ethel, Susie and Hoyle. Mr. Montgomery is a Republican and a member of the United Presbyterian Church.

DR. GEORGE W. MOODY, a leading physician of Shelbyville, was born November 5, 1848, being a son of Samuel S. Moody (see sketch of C. J. Moody). He was reared with his parents to the age of twenty-one, and had begun the study of medicine. In 1869 he graduated in the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia. He then located in Shelbyville, where he has met with justly-deserved success in the practice of his profession. He was married, March 16, 1861, to Miss Georgie Strong, a native of this county. Her parents were from northern Alabama, and her mother is thedaughter of Gen. Moore, of Tullahoma, Tenn. Dr. Moody's married life has been blessed in the birth of two children, viz.: Winston G. and Samuel S. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is steward and trustee of the same. He is a member of the Medical Society of Tennessee, a Democrat in politics, and is a worthy and highly respected citizen of the county.

CLEMENT J. MOODY, one of Bedford County's prominent attorneys is a son of Samuel S. and Letitia (Cannon) Moody. The father was born in Henry County, Tenn. He was a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church and was a member of the general conference of 1844, when the churches divided and he adhered to the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He was one of the most eminent ministers of the church and for many years was presiding elder of this district conference. He held very prominent positions in various places. His death occurred May 7, 1863. The mother was a niece of Gov. Newton Cannon, and her father was one of the most prominent pioneers of this county, and gave the land whereon the town of Shelbyville was built. She died July 24, 1880. The subject of this sketch received a good early education, graduating at the Centre College, Kentucky, in 1865. He then read law in Shelbyville and in 1867 graduated in the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn. He was then admitted to the Bedford County bar and has been justly successful in the profession, ranking among the leading criminal lawyers of the State. He was married January 18, 1881, to Miss Sally C. M. Cannon, daughter of John T. Cannon, whose sketch appears in this work. Mr. Moody and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Moody is a Royal Arch Mason and Past Grand Master of the Shelbyville Lodge. Politically he is a firm Democrat, and is one of the leading spirits in his party.

JOHN R. MOON, M. D., is the eldest of seven children born to the union of Pleasant B. and Mary Ann Moon. His birth occurred November 12, 1853. He received good educational advantages, and attended the Unionville Academy. He began studying medicine when quite young, and in October, 1876, entered a medical college, from which he graduated in March, 1878. He practiced his chosen profession about three years with average success, and in May, 1882, he located in Poplin's Cross Roads, where he has since lived and established a good practice. William U., born November 26, 1877; Bertha Erie, born January 6, 1880; James P., born November 1, 1881; John R., born September 1, 1883, and Mary Myrtle, born May 29, 1885, are the children born to his union with Mattie M. Dryden, which took place May 7, 1876. Dr. Moon and wife are members in good standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and in his political views he is a Republican ,

Q. E. MORTON was born September 25, 1835, in Bedford County, Tenn., and is the son of Jacob and Annie (Fisher) Morton. The father was born February 17, 1787, in North Carolina, immigrated to Tennessee about 1814, and engaged in the blacksmith trade. He was the first alderman of Shelbyville. The mother was also a native of North Carolina, and her marriage to Jacob Morton, September 12, 1815, resulted in the birth of fourteen children. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, and at the age of twenty began farming for himself, and this he continued very successfully up to the time of the late war. In the spring of 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate Army, in the Twenty-third Tennessee Infantry, remaining but thirteen months in the regular service, when he was appointed sutler of his regiment. He was soon captured, and upon being released returned home and engaged in agricultural pursuits, which he has continued up to the present time. Previous to the war, in 1855, he wedded Nancy M. Jackson, of this county. To them were born seven children: John J.; Martha E., wife of E. C. Barnes; Mark J., a practicing physician of Center Grove, who was born September 8, 1864, and graduated from the medical department of the State University, of Nashville. Prior to entering the university he had studied medicine for three years. He has at present quite a good practice, which is constantly increasing. The fourth child of our subject is Q. Emmet; sixth, Rufus H., seventh Nannie R. and eighth James L. Mr. Morton is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church. He was elected magistrate in 1882, and this office he filled in a highly satisfactory manner.

EDWARD A. MOSELEY, JR., farmer, is a son of Thomas G. and Mary T. (Sikes) Moseley, and was born in Bedford County, Tenn., February 17, 1850, of English and Welsh descent. The father was born in Limestone County, Ala., December 13, 1824, and was married December 16, 1846. To them were born nine children. Thomas G. Moseley served in the commissary department of the Confederate Army under Maj. James F. Cummings. He served one term in the Confederate Legislature of Tennessee as a member of the House of Representatives. He was a member of the Senate in the Thirty-ninth General Assembly representing Bedford and Rutherford Counties. He was a Henry Clay Whig prior to the war but has been fully identified with the Democratic party since that time.  Our subject's early days were spent on a farm and in attending the common schools, after which he took a business and commercial course in Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College, at Nashville, Tenn. June 30, 1869, he wedded Miss Mattie Thomas, born August 12, 1852, daughter of William Thomas, born in 1807 and died in 1861, and Jane (McCrary) Thomas, born in 1816 and died in 1882. To them were born the following interesting family: Jesse T. L. P., Mary S., Maggie E., Janie T., Carrie Drue, Mattie Louise and Bessie. Mr. Moseley is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity. He and wife and three eldest daughters belong to the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Moseley is the owner of 200 acres of land, and the most of his attention is given to raising Norman and Clydesdale horses, of which he has many fine specimens.

GEORGE P. MUSE, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., January 29, 1844, and is the son of Orville and Malinda M. (Ross) Muse. His father was born in Virginia November 13, 1806, and his mother was born in South Carolina April 26, 1809. The Muse family are among the early settlers of the State, coming here when Tennessee was but a wilderness. Our subject lives on a farm adjoining the one his grandfather settled on after immigrating to this State. Our subject is the sixth in a family of ten children born to his parents. He was reared on the farm and received a fair practical education. He enlisted in the Second Regiment Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, under Col. (now Gov.) Bate, at the youthful age of sixteen, and served throughout the entire war. He participated in the battles of first Manassas, Shiloh and Richmond, Ky. He was severely wounded in the latter engagement, captured and paroled within the Federal lines. After recovering sufficiently he was taken to Camp Douglas, where he was held three months and then exchanged. He then joined his regiment in Tennessee. After this he was clerk in Cleburne's commissary department, and was again captured while retreating from Dalton. He was held in Rock Island, Ill., until near the close of the war. Since the war our subject has served the public fourteen years; six years in the capacity of constable, four years as sheriff and four years as deputy-sheriff. November 8, 1866, he wedded Miss Mary J. Wright, of Bedford County, Tenn., and the daughter of Whitfield Wright. Their children are seven in number--four sons and three daughters. Mr. Muse has a fine farm of 110 acres, and be is a Democrat, an Odd Fellow, a Knight of Honor and a Royal Arcanum. Mrs. Muse and one son are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

WILL J. MUSE, clerk of the County Court of Bedford County, was born December 5, 1844, near Shelbyville. The Muse family originated in the United States from two brothers, James and George Muse, who came from England to North Carolina, George went to Virginia and James remained in North Carolina. Our subject is a descendant of the latter. The father of Will J. was Jo C. Muse, and the mother was Mary A. Muse, the parents being cousins. The father was a farmer and mechanic, and was identified with the public interests of this county. The maternal grandfather, John T. Muse, was, when quite young, among the first settlers of this State. He was an able minister of the Missionary Baptist Church, and founded the first church of that denomination in this county. He died suddenly while in the preparation of a sermon, having eloquently preached away a lifetime. Will J. was reared on a farm and had limited educational advantages. At the age of seventeen be entered Company B, of Turney's First Tennessee and served throughout the war. He was promoted from a private to the captaincy of his company. He received eleven wounds, three of which were very serious. Returning from the army he attended school three years and taught one year. For three years he then clerked in a store. Subsequently he and a brother engaged in merchandising till 1882. He was elected to his office in August, 1882, and has filled it with general satisfaction to his constituents. He was married in 1872 to Nannie Russell, the results of this union being two children: Henry Kirk White and Georgie Avva. Both Mr. Muse and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. In politics he is a firm Democrat.

THOMAS NANCE is a son of Clements Nance, of Bedford County, Tenn., who was born in 1810 and spent his boyhood on a farm. He received a practical education, and wedded Mary Tune, daughter of William Tune, of Virginia, and to them were born William T., Thomas, Mary, Reuben and Clement. Three of the children are now living. In 1826 Mr. Nance immigrated to Tennessee, locating near Shelbyville, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1833 Mr. Nance went to Missouri and died in Ray County in 1841. Thomas Nance, our subject, was born October 17, 1837, in Missouri. He came to Tennessee when he was but seven years of age, and his early days were spent in laboring on a farm and in attending the common schools of his neighborhood. He began blacksmithing and followed that occupation for about twenty years. In 1872 he moved to where he now resides. December 14, 1859, he wedded Miss Sarah B. Coates, daughter of P. H. Coates, and six children have been born to their union: Thomas H., James E., Julia E., Carrie E., William G. and Martha E., all of whom are living. In 1883 Mr. Nance was elected magistrate of his district and is filling the duties of that office at the present time. Mr. Nance is a Mason, and he and Mrs. Nance are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

P. W. NORMAN was born June 20, 1818, and spent his boyhood days on a farm, receiving a common school education. He began life as a farmer, and was married in 1840 to Miss T. E. Webb, daughter of Isaac Webb, of Rutherford County, and six children have blessed their union: Elizabeth A., Catharine J., Sarah G., Amanda R. and James L., and one wbo died in infancy. Mrs,. Norman died in 1874, and Mr. Norman took for his second wife Mrs. Fannie E. (Smith) Webb. Her father, Morgan Smith, died at his home near Shelbyville, October 4, 1875.  He was a Democrat. Mr.Norman's last marriage occurred November 2, 1884. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and be belongs to the Masonic fraternity. His father, Henry Norman, was born in the "Palmetto State," and came to Tennessee with his father when he was but nine years of age. He was married when quite young to Elizabeth Aubery, and by her became the father of seven children, only two of whom are now living. Mrs. Norman died in 1850, and her husband took for his second wife Mrs. Sallie White, in 1851. She died in 1854, and he then married, in 1857, Mrs. Becky Caldwell. Mr. Norman died in 1867.

W. C. ORR and family reside in the Eighth Civil District of Bedford County, Tenn., six miles north of Shelbyville, their home being located on the Middletown road. The family consists of the father, above named, born February 14, 1829, and four children: William M., born November 6, 1854; David F., born June 6, 1859; Mary A., born March 18, 1862, and Minnie J., born August 3, 1866. There are two vacancies in the family, caused by the death of the mother, Temperance Orr (nee Miller), born in August, 1830, and died May 14, 1876, and John Fain, the eldest child, who died in infancy. W. C. Orr is of Scotch-Irish descent, and is a son of John and Penelope (Morgan) Orr, who were early settlers of Bedford County, being emigrants from the Carolinas. Mr. Orr is a farmer, and served as magistrate of his district from 1870 to 1876. His wife was a daughter of Nathaniel Miller, of Rutherford County, and married our subject in 1854. She was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. Mr. Orr obtained a fair education in the common branches, and became an adept in penmanship, which he taught a few years. In 1878 he began the study of medicine under Drs. Evans & Fite, of Shelbyville, and the same year attended lectures in the medical department of the Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., and read and practiced at home until the fall of 1881, when he attended his second course in the same institution and took his degree at the close of the spring term of 1882. Returning home he located with his father, where he has since practiced his chosen profession. D. F. Orr, son of W. C. Orr, received a common school education, and attended the Shelbyville Normal and High School for three years, and graduated in 1879. He afterward taught in the various public schools of Bedford and Rutherford Counties, and in the fall of 1884 attended his first course of lectures in the Vanderbilt University. He returned home and taught school eight months, and then returned to college and graduated at the close of the session in 1886. Mary A. Orr also received a good education, having attended the Shelbyville Normal and High School, the Soule Female College at Murfreesboro and the Winchester Normal College. For several years she has been teaching in Bedford and Rutherford Counties. Minnie J. Orr attended school two years at the Winchester Normal, and is now teaching her first school.

ISAIAH PARKER, farmer and stock raiser, was born June 5, 1830. He is the son of Joseph and Fana (Howard) Parker. The father was a native of South Carolina, born in 1805. In 1819 he immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Lincoln County, where he remained until 1828. From there he went to Bedford County and bought land in the Twenty-second District. He was a farmer and stock raiser, and at his death, which occurred in 1885, he was worth a large amount of property, owning a large number of slaves before the war. He was a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. The mother was born in Virginia August 12, 1812, and died August 12, 1859. The family is of English-Irish descent. Our subject was born in Lincoln County, received a limited education, and was married to Miss Mary Razier, a native of this county. To them were born eight children: Charles G., B., A. F., Edward, Joseph, Lizzie, Dora and Willie. Mr. Parker is one of the substantial farmers of the county, owning about 1,200 acres of fine land, He is a firm Democrat and a leading citizen. From 1854 to 1859 he was postmaster in Lincoln County. He was also colonel of the militia in 1858, and was justice of the peace about the same time.

GEORGE W. PARSONS was, born in 1821 in the State of Tennessee. His father, G. W. Parsons, was born in Virginia in 1788 and came to Tennessee in 1807, and here married our subject's mother, Margaret Fisher, in 1809. They became the parents of thirteen children--four daughters and nine sons. The father was a farmer and millwright by trade, and served in the war of 1812. He died in 1842 and the mother in 1854. Our subject began farming for himself at the age of twenty years, and in 1843 purchased part of his present farm, which he has increased to 247 acres. In 1857 he was elected justice of the peace of his district and held the office until 1870. In 1882 he was again elected, and has held the office up to the present time. He has been a director of the Shelbyville & Unionville Pike for the past twelve years, and is a stockholder in the same. he is well known throughout the county and has been a member of the Lutheran Church since 1849. He belongs to the Masonic lodge, No. 315, and in politics is in old Whig-Democrat. He was married in 1843 to Elizabeth Allison, who was born in Tennessee in 1825 and is the daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (White) Allison. To them were born these children: Mary F., born in 1844; Anna L., born in 1846; Michael F., born in 1850; William J., born in 1848 and died in 1866; Volney S., born in 1852; Sarah E., born in 1854; Cynthia J. born in 1856; John C., born in 1860; Safrone A., born in 1862; George N., born in 1865. and Bunie C., born in 1868.

JOHN W. PARSONS is a son of George W. and Margaret (Fisher) Parsons (see G. W. Parsons for father's sketch), and was born in Bedford County, Tenn., January 3, 1824, and has spent the greater part of his life on a farm. At the age of twenty-two he left home and began the battle of life for himself, and by his energy and perseverance accumulated considerable property. In 1846 he located on his present farm of 343 acres, and erected a neat residence. He lost considerable property in the late war, but did not participate in that struggle. October 6, 1846, he married Ruth C. Allison, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (White) Allison. She was born August 12. 1818. and bore her husband the following children: George A., born in 1848; Robert, born in 1850; William C.. born in 1853; Sarah J., born in 1854; Mary E., born in 1856 and died in 1873; Newton H., born in 1858. June 20, 1881, Mrs. Parsons died, and Mr. Parsons then led to Hymen's altar Catharine Sanders, daughter of Alexander and Jane (Robinson) Sanders, who were born in Kentucky and Tennessee, respectively. Mrs. Parsons was born August 10, 1838, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Parsons is a stanch supporter of Democracy.

GRANVILLE C. PEARSON, farmer, was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., July 20, 1831, son of Hiram and Matilda B. (Wilson) Pearson, and of English descent. The father was horn in Pittsylvania County, Va., April 9, 1797, and in the year 1819 he wedded Matilda Wilson, who was born in Sumner County, Tenn,, May 12, 1802. The father died November 29, 1876, and the mother February 14, 1877. To this worthy couple were born ten children, our subject being the sixth. The Pearson family was among the early settlers of Tennessee, the father of our subject having settled in Rutherford County in 1818. Our subject received a fair education in the common Schools, and at the breaking out of the late war he enlisted in the Confederate Army, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, under Col. Starnes. He took an active part in the battles of Chickamauga, Knoxville, Resaca and other actions. He was with Gen. Forrest when he captured the large Federal forces under command of Gen. Straight, and was a member of Jefferson Davis' escort from Raleigh, N. C., to Washington, Ga. He has now in his possession eighteen Mexican silver dollars of the coinage of 1861, which were paid to him by the order of President Davis, for services in the army. These he prizes very highly as relics of that memorable struggle. Our subject has a fine farm of 110 acres, on which he lives, surrounded with the general comforts of life. He devotes the principal part of his time and attention to raising fine stock-horses, cattle and mules. The father of our subject was among the most enterprising stock raisers of his locality, owning at one time 500 acres of land, but lost heavily  in the war.

THOMAS B. PHILPOTT, son of Charles T. and Rebecca (Hix) Philpott, was born in Bedford County, December 7, 1847. His father was a native of Virginia, immigrating to this State with his father when quite young, and settled in Bedford County. He was a saddler by occupation, and worked at his trade forty-five years in this county. He is now living at the advanced age of eighty-four years, and is the father of ten children: William, John H., Sarah (deceased) Joshua A. (deceased), Demarcus (deceased), Elisha C. (deceased), Nancy A., Charles N. (deceased), James and Thomas B. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, and was educated in the common schools. In 1864 he was married to Miss McFarland, and nine children blessed this union: Rebecca E., Charles N., Edward L., Nancy A. James, Jacob, Ernest, Minnie and William, all living. Our subject has all his life followed agricultural pursuits and has been quite successful. He now owns 360 acres of finely improved land in the Twenty-third District, and is a leading man of the county.

M. P. PICKLE was born August 24, 1838, in Farmington, Marshall Co., Tenn. His father, Maj. Pickle, a native of Bedford County, was born in 1813, and was a successful farmer. He died in March, 1862, in this county. Our subject's mother, Catherine Pickle, was born in Williamson County in 1813, and is still living at the advanced age of seventy- three. Our subject remained with his parents on the farm until he was twenty years of age. He then engaged in farming for himself. In 1869 he engaged in the merchandise business in this county, which he continued for about six years. He then moved his business to Rich Creek, Marshall County, where he sold goods for about two years, after which he sold his interest and again returned to agricultural pursuits, together with stock raising. Since 1884 he has been engaged in the lumber business, shipping cedar lumber exclusively. July 29, 1859, he was married to Mary Ann Frances Atkisson, of this county, who was born April 23, 1837. This union resulted in the birth of nine children, two of whom Andrew and Murry F., are dead. The names of the seven living are, respectively, Major A., James M., George W., Sarah E., Henry J., Annie C. and Minerva P. Our subject's educational advantages were not of the best, consequently he received but a district school education. Owing to this he has always felt a deep interest in all enterprises pertaining to the education of the rising generation. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, of which he was ordained deacon about 1868. He has always been a peaceful, quiet man, and has never been summoned before the court for any misdemeanor whatever. He is a Republican in politics.

M. A. PICKLE, a native of Bedford County, Tenn., was born April 11, 1859, son of P. Murry and Mary Ann Frances (Atkisson) Pickle. (For further particulars of parents see sketch of M. P. Pickle.) Our subject worked on the farm with his father and received a rather limited education. At the age of nineteen he entered the high school at Palmetto, Tenn., and continued there two years. He then engaged in farming in connection with school-teaching, working on the farm in the spring and teaching in the fall. This he continued for about four years, after which he engaged in the merchandise business at Bedford with very flattering prospects. January 5, 1881, he wedded Ella Dryden, of this county, and to this union was born one child--William Franklin. Our subject is a good citizen and an honorable man. He is a member of the United Brethren Church, and Mrs. Pickle a member ef the Methodist Episcopal Church North. In politics he is a Republican, but strictly speaking he is not a party man.

C. B. RANEY, farmer, of Bedford County, was born June 18, 1838, son of John W. and Catharine (Rolinson) Raney. The father was a native of Virginia, born in 1806, and  immigrated to this county at an early day, settling in Bedford County. He was the father of a family of eight children, six of whom lived to be grown. John W. Raney was a  farmer, and was accidentally killed in 1841. he was a worthy member of the Free-Will Baptist Church. The mother is still living. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm, and in 1865 began working for himself. Previous to this he had enlisted in the Confederate Army, in the Forty-first Tennessee. Regiment, and in 1861 was elected lieutenant in the company, but gave up his position to make harmony in the ranks, and acted as orderly sergeant. He was again elected lieutenant, and was soon made second lieutenant of the company. He was captured at Fort Donelson and carried to Camp Morton. where he remained eight months. He was then exchanged, and went back into service, and was in the battles of Vicksburg, Jackson, Raymond, Port Hudson, Corinth, Chickamauga and numerous other important battles, as his regiment was never in any important engagement without him. In 1878 he was married to Miss Victoria Campbell, and to this union two children were born: Eunice and William. In politics he is a stanch Democrat.

GEORGE W. READ was born in Dyer County. Tenn., November 29, 1824. and is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Gentry) Read. The father was born October 28, 1796, in Virginia, and immigrated to Tennessee about 1802. He remained in this State up to the time of his death, which occurred in December, 1883. The mother was born in 1802 and died about 1841. Our subject's educational advantages were rather limited. but, notwithstanding, he is considered a man of sound judgment and good sense. September 30, 1846, he wedded Ann E. Brooks, of Rutherford County, Tenn., and the result of this union was the birth of eleven children: Sarah E., Robert C.. Mary J., Martha W., Ann E., James C., John B., William L., Lou H., Aldora and George S. The five eldest died within ten days of each other, of scarlet fever. The tenth died in early childhood. Mr. Read has been very successful in his businesss transaction,. He is scrupulously honest and honorable in every particular. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. he is a Democrat

J. C. READ was born February 3, 1859, in this State. He is the son of G. W., and Ann Eliza (Brooks) Read. (For further particulars of parents see sketch of G. W. Read.) Our subject was reared on the farm and assisted his father until he was twenty-two years of age. In 1882 and 1883 he was sight seeing, traveling over Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, Mississippi, Alabama and Kentucky. Upon returning home he engaged in agricultural pursuits and this he continued until 1885 at which time he engaged in the merchandising business at Center Grove, in partnership with his brother. W. L. Read. December 18, 1881, our subject wedded Callie J. Bullock, of this county, and to them were born three children: Richard L., Robert A. and George W. Mr. Read is an energetic and active young business man, and has the power and determination to make his mark in the world. Politically he is a Democrat.

ROBERT REAVES, a farmer and stock raiser, of the Twenty-third District of Bedford County, was born November 14, 1833, and is the son of Isom and Rachel (Morgan) Reaves. The father was a native of North Carolina and when a young man immigrated to Bedford County, Tenn., and settled in the Twenty-third District. He was a farmer and stock raiser, and was successful in all his undertakings. He was worth considerable property at the time of his death, which occurred January 1, 1871. He was the father of five children: Benjamin, John, Robert, Frances M. and Jane. Isom Reaves was twice married, his first wife being a Miss Chaney Coggens; three children were born to them, all dead but one, named William. Our subject was reared on the farm and received a limited education in the common schools. In 1855 Miss Martha Morgan became his wife, and this union resulted in the birth of five children: Bettie F., Mary J., Robert A., Dulcenia and Emmet. Mary J. died in 1869 and Robert A. died the same year. When the war broke out our subject acted as escort to Gen. Forrest. He was under Capt. Little and participated in all the battles in which his command was engaged. He owns a fine tract of land and is one of the leading citizens of the county.

WILLIAM RUSSELL, editor of the Bedford County Times, was born April 27, 1852, being the son of B. L. and Ermine (Clark) Russell, natives of Kentucky. The father is a  retired citizen of Shelbyville, Tenn., and during active life was a merchant tailor by avocation. Mr. Russel is a practical printer, and has held position on the following papers: The American Union, American Reserve. Commercial, Gazette, of Shelbyville, and on the Rural Sun, of Nashville, the Clarksville Tobacco Leaf, Pulaski Citizen, Fayettville Express and Chatanooga Times. The Bedford Times was established in February, 1886, and  is in a flourishing condition.

ROBERT COLUMBUS RUSS, editor and proprietor of the Shelbyville (Tenn.) Commercial, was born in Fayetteville, N. C., September 5, 1824, being one of twelve children--six boys and six girls-born to James and Eunice (Steeley) Russ, both natives of North Carolina; the former being born June 29, 1790. and the latter October 17, 1791, and both of whom died in Shelbyville, Tenn. Our subject's paternal grandparents were William and Hannah Russ, the former being a native of Russia, and the latter of Scotland; and his maternal grandparents were William and Lexy Steeley. Only three of the twelve children born to our subject's parents are living, viz.: Our subject, his brother, A. J. Russ, and his sister, Mary Jane Fausett. Our subject set in to learn the " art preservative " in 1840 with his brother James and William L. Berry. in Fayetteville, and began editing and publishing a paper in Shelbyville in 18__, and has continued in that capacity to the present, having published eight papers altogether. Our subject was married to Euphamie M.. daughter of John Crawford, at Cedar Springs, Marshall Co., Tenn., December 14, 1848, and to them have been born twelve children--six boys and six girls-all of whom have died except four boys and one girl. The Commercial is the oldest newspaper in Shelbyville, is Democratic. and wields considerable influence as a local and party paper.

L. H. RUSS was born in Lewisburg, Tenn,, March 3, 1843. His father, James Russ, was a printer and publisher. He came to Bedford County in 1847 and established a newspaper and continued to publish papers until his death in 1869. The mother was Margaret E. Laird. She, died in 1857. Our subject was reared in Shelbyville and learned the printer's trade. In 1869 he, with a brother, established the Shelbyville Commercial and published that paper one year. He then engaged in the grocery business a short time. From 1870 to 1873, he was not settled in any regular business. In 1878 he established the wagon and buggy manufactory which he  yet runs. He manfactures the New South wagons, buggies, carriages, etc. He has a stock of about $6,000, and does about $12,000 annual business. He was married in October, 1869. to Theodosia H. Hobbs, daughter of George _W. and Sarah Hobbs, residents of this county. Five children have been born to this union, three of whom are now, living: George H., James L. and Lucy E. Those who died were Harry L. and Thomas B. Mr. and Mrs. Russ are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and Mr. Russ is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the I. O. O. F. He was one, of the "boys in gray," serving in Forrest's escort from 1863 till December, 1864, when he was captured and held a prisoner till the close of the war. He was fourth corporal of the escort.

JOHN W. RUTH, the clever and enterprising  jeweler of Shelbyville, was born February 27, 1839, in Shelbyville, being a son of George W. Ruth. The father was born in Granville County, N. C., in 1799. A short time before George Washington died, when on his last Southern tour, he passed by the house where George W. Ruth was born only a short time before. He stopped and lifted the infant in his arms, and then and there it was named George Washington Ruth in remembrance of the incident and of the great man. The father came to this county in 1822. He married, lived and died here, being a jeweler by occupation. He was a very prominent citizen of the county, and for many years was a magistrate. He was mayor of Shelbyville two terms, and was identified with the public interests all his life. He was a leading member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for many years was a steward. Politically he was a Democrat. His death occurred in August, 1858. His father was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. The mother of John W. was born in Baltimore County, Md., and came to Shelbyville when quite young. She was born in 1804 and died in 1863. The ancestry of John W. were of Scotch-Irish descent, predominating in Scotch blood. The immediate subject of this sketch was reared in Shelbyville and learned his father's trade, which has been his life time business. he is also joined by his son in the business now, the name of the firm being John W. Ruth & Son. He was elected to the office of mayor of Shelbyville in 1873, and served till 1875.In 1885 he was re-elected to the same office, and is now the incumbent. He was married, in 1865, to Miss Fannie E. Newton, who bore him three children, viz.: Albert H., Anne C. and Weakley D. Mr. Ruth and his two oldest children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Knight Templar Mason and a Knight of Honor. Politically he is a Democrat, but conservative in his views. He is a popular, genial and enterprising citizen of Shelbyville.

JOHN W. RUTLEDGE. SR., one of Bedford County's farmers, was born January 12,1823, in Bedford County, being a son of John and Sarah Davenport Rutledge, natives of South Carolina. The parents were married in their native State and came to Bedford County in the very early settlement of the county. John W. was reared on a farm and secured but a common school education, the schools then being in an undeveloped condition. He began farming for himself when grown, and at the age of twenty-seven married. He continued to farm and deal in live-stock extensively. He now owns 108 acres of land, with seventy-five acres under cultivation. He was married November 22, 1849, to Eunice M. Warner, daughter of John and Eunice (Dixon) Warner, natives of North Carolina. They came to Sumner County, Tenn., when small, and thence to Bedford County, where they lived and died. The father was born in 1783, and the mother in 1792; they were married November 11, 1810. The father was a sheriff of Bedford County for many years; he was a farmer by occupation. He died May 17, 1834, and the mother died October 2, 1852. Mr. and Mrs. Rutledge are parents of four children, viz.: John G., who died young; Warner G.; Eunice M., the wife of Thomas L. Thompson, and John W. All the family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. and all are Democrats in politics. Warner G. Rutledge was married December 4, 1874, to Miss Julia L. Phillips, who died January 16, 1876, after becoming the mother of a child, Julia L., who also died July 16, 1876. He is store-keeper and gauger in the revenue service in the Middle and West Divisions of Tennessee.

RUTLEDGE & THOMPSON, dealers in a general line of groceries and provisions in Shelbyville, do a leading business in the town. The firm is composed of John W. Rutledge, Jr., and Thomas L. Thompson. John W. Rutledge, Jr., was born July 20, 1860, being a son of John W. Rutledge, Sr. He was married, December 26, 1884, to Katie Nease, the result of this union being one son, John H. Mr. Rutledge is captain of the Shelbyville Hook and Ladder Company and an enterprising young business man. Thomas L. Thompson was born August 4, 1850, to the marriage of Thomas Thompson and Tranquilla Stephens. Both parents were natives of Bedford County, the mother being of North Carolina ancestry. The father was a farmer and Thomas L. was reared on a farm. He was married, February 25, 1875, to Miss Eunice M. Rutledge, daughter of John W. Rutledge, Sr. Four children have been born to this union, viz.: Thomas L., Mary A., John W. and Hiram S. The firm of Rutledge & Thompson was established October 24, 1878. They were burned out October 22, 1885, and are now preparing to build a commodious brick building. They also deal in mules and fine horses.

ALBERT P. RYALL, M. D., son of Thomas C. and Elizabeth (Scudder) Ryall, was born March 30, 1840. His father was a native of New Jersey, born in April, 1809. Eight children were born to him, viz.: Johnston S., Albert P., Walter S., Thomas, Henry C., Elizabeth R. (deceased), Juliet S. and William (deceased). Mrs. Elizabeth Ryall died in August, 1836. She was a worthy member of the Episcopal Church. Thomas C. Ryall, our subject's father, had the advantage of a good education, and in early life began the study of law. He entered the law school at Trenton, N. J., and graduated from that institution. He then began the practice of law at Freeholm, N. J., but remained there but a short time, as his health was failing. He then traveled extensively in South America, and is now living in Bedford County, and is one of its most highly respected citizens. Our subject had the advantage of a good education in Shelbyville, and in 1860 began the study of medicine. The war coming on broke into his studies, as he enlisted in the Confederate Army in the Twenty-sixth Tennessee Regiment, and was assistant surgeon of that regiment, which position he held thirteen months. He was then assigned surgeon in the hospital at Montgomery. Ala., where he remained ten months. From there he went to Columbus, Ga., in the same capacity. After the war he returned to his county, and in 1865 entered the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia, graduating with honors from that institution in 1867. He then went to Augustine, Fla., and began the practice of medicine. At the end of two years he came to Bedford County, and has been practicing his profession here ever since. He has an extensive practice, and is one of the progressive and leading men of the county. He now owns a finely improved farm of 400 acres, and is quite successful in a financial sense.

THOMAS C. RYALL, SR., a prominent retired citizen of Bedford County, was born April 19, 1809, in Trenton N. J., his parents being natives of New Jersey, and of English descent. He read law and at the age of twenty-one began the practice of that profession, which he continued in New Jersey for five or six years, He then, on account of his health, accepted an offer from Post Capt. David Deacon, United States Navy, who was ordered to command of the United States Frigate "Brandywine," to accompany him on a cruise three years to the Pacific Coast. In this expedition he served as captain's clerk, judge advocate on court martial and officated pro tempore as secretary to Com. Wadsworth, the commander of the squadron. On his return, in reward for his services, he was presented with a written request signed by all the officers of the squadron to the proper authorities, to procure a pursership in the naval service, but in New Jersey he met Miss Elizabeth Scudder, of Nashville, and granddaughter of Dr. John Scudder, the famous East Indian missionary. He soon came to Nashville and married her. He has ever since lived in Tennessee and followed farming until about 1880, when, on account of his age, he retired from active business life. He owns about 800 acres of land and a very fine fruit orchard. Mr. Ryall's married life was blessed in the births of nine children; six of whom are living, viz.: Johnston S., a farmer and merchant in Alabama; Dr. A. P. Ryall, a physician, of this county; Walter, growing oranges in Florida; Thomas C., merchandise broker of Shelbyville; Henry C., lumberman, of Shelbyville; and Juliet, wife of Brom R. Whitthorne, cashier of the National Bank of Shelbyville. Mrs. Ryall departed this life August 13, 1857. Politically, Mr. Rydall was a Whig, but is now a Democrat. He is now one of the prominent and highly respected citizens of the county.

THOMAS C. RYALL, JR., son of Thomas C. Ryall, Sr., was born October 5, 1843, in Bedford County. He was reared on a farm. At the age of sixteen he enlisted in the Forty-first Tennessee Regiment in the late war. He was in the service about three years, making his escape from Camp Morton prison, Indianapolis, Ind. He then returned home and remained for three or four years. He then lived in Alabama for about three years, engaged in farming and merchandising. He then returned to Shelbyville, where he has been engaged in merchandising and the brokerage business. His main line of brokerage is in tobacco. He was married, January 11, 1881, to Miss Mattie Baldwin, of Canton, Miss., the fruit of this union being one daughter--Ellie. Politically he is a Democrat, and, as are the other members of the family, he is highly respected for his enterprise.

REV. G. C. SANDUSKY was born January 25, 1834, in Wayne County, Ky., being one of a family of ten children born to the union of Jacob Sandusky and Elizabeth Burnett, natives of Kentucky, where they now live. Our subject was reared on a farm. At the age of twenty-four he immigrated to Tennessee and followed farming till the war. He then raised Company H of the Third Tennessee Confederate Cavalry, and was in the service nearly throughout the war. After the battle of Stone River he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel of his regiment. Upon returning from the war he had lost his property and his health. He then began the study of dentistry, and has practiced that profession ever since. In 1870 he located at Shelbyville, and has lived here ever since, and does a thriving business in his profession. He was married, September 7, 1856, to Miss Ellen T. Rogers, a native of Meigs County, Tenn. Eight children have blessed this union, all of whom are living: John A., a dentist in Southern, France; Mary E., wife of W. S. Tipton, editor of the Cleveland Herald, Cleveland, Tenn.: Annie, wife of Walter Craigmiles, a hardware merchant of Chattanooga; Dick, a clothing merchant of Shelbyville; Frederick R., clerk in it dry goods store; Fannie, Cecil and Nellie. Dr. Sandusky and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, and he has pastoral charge of a congregation near Shelbyville. He is a Royal Arch Mason. He is a member of the Democratic party, having been a Whig before the war. As a citizen he is enterprising, and commands the respect of his fellow citizens.

REV. WILLIAM M. SHAW, one of Bedford County's old and prominent citizens, was born July 5, 1806, in Orange County, N. C., and immigrated to Bedford County, Tenn., in the year 1816. He was the son of John and Elizabeth (Scott) Shaw, natives, respectively, of South Carolina and Maryland. The father was born November 8, 1771, and died November 4,1845. The mother was born in the year 1778 and died February 26, 1842. Our subject was reared on a farm and engaged in the farming interest till the year 1853, at which time he joined the Methodist Conference South, but was licensed to preach as a local preacher previous to this in the year 1845. In 1827 he wedded Kahala Wilson, of this county. She was born January 9, 1809. This marriage resulted in the birth of nine children only six of whom are living: John W., William S., Alexander M., Ambrose D., Ann E. and Mary L. In 1849 Rev. Shaw was ordained deacon at Shelbyville by Bishop Capers and retained this position until October, 1853, at which time he was ordained elder at Franklin, Tenn., by the same bishop. October, 1854, he joined the conference and has been a traveling minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church South up to the present date. Mrs. Shaw died July 31, 1885; she was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Up to the time of the late war Rev. Shaw was an old-line Whig, but since that time he has been a Democrat.

WILLIAM S. SHAW is a native of Bedford County, Tenn.., and a son of William  and Mahala (Wilson) Shaw, natives of North Carolina. Our subject was born May 26, 1834, and was reared on a farm, and received limited educational advantages. At the age of twenty-two he began farming for himself, continuing until 1862, when he entered the Confederate Army, Company G, Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, but served only a short time. He resumed farming, and December 16, 1858, was married to Nancy Clark, who was born September 1, 1839, and who died March 27, 1864, leaving one child--Martha H. September 12, 1867, our subject took for his second wife Julia Haskins. Mrs. Shaw died October 7, 1871, and for his third wife Mr. Shaw took Susan O. Steen, December 1, 1872. She was born March 26, 1852, and became the mother of three children: John Rufus, William Marvin and Edward Driskill. Mr. Shaw is a Democrat, and prides himself on never having been sued or in a lawsuit.

WILLIAM J. SHOFNER was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., May 3,  1819, and is a son of Christopher and Elizabeth (Jenning) Shofner, who died in 1826 and in 1845, respectively. To them were born four daughters and four sons, three of whom are yet living. Our suject resided with his widowed mother on a farm until her death, and about four years later located on his farm of 480 acres. He has been very successful in his business ventures and has given his five married sons a good farm each. In 1846 he married Rhoda Boone, who was born May 19, 1828. She and husband became the parents of the following family: Jeptha B., born in 1847; James B., born in 1849; Christopher H., born in 1851; George F., born in 1854; William H., born in 1856; Albert, born in 1859, and died in 1861; Elizabeth M., born in 1861; Daniel W., born in 1864, and Newton M., born in 1868, and died in 1871. Mrs. Shofner's parents were William and Sallie (Howard) Boone. The father was born in Kentucky, and is a distant relative of Daniel Boone. Her mother was born in 1803 and died in 1843. Her father then married Margaret Moore. He died in 1854 and the stepmother in 1873.

MONROE SHOFNER was born in Tennessee September 16, 1833, son of Austin and Rebecca (Cook) Shofner, natives of North Carolina, born August 16, 1801, and April 21, 1798, respectively. The father was brought to Tennessee in 1807, and in 1818 married our subject's mother and became the father of eight children: Plummer W., Mitchell D. (killed in the battle of Chickamauga), Henderson, Catherine (deceased), John (deceased), Martin (deceased), Monroe, Purline and Isom (deceased). Our subject's father was reared on a farm and followed farming and stock trading, accumulating considerable wealth. He operated a distillery for about six years, and was well known throughout the county as a dealer in fine horses. He died October 18, 1852, and his wife October 10, 1875. Monroe spent the life of a farmer's boy and is now residing on the farm settled by his grandfather, Martin Shofner. which consists of 200 acres. In 1863 he entered the Confederate service, and remained one year. He followed pedagoging sixteen years, but discontinued that in 1878. Mr. Shofner takes much interest in laudable public enterprises, and gives them his support and patronage. He believes in Republican principles and he is a devout supporter of temperance, and has on divers occasions delivered temperance lectures.

BENJAMIN FORSYTH SMALLING was born in what was Bedford County but now is part of Marshall County, Tenn., November 24. 1825. He is the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Bostic) Smalling, and is of German lineage. His father was born in Sullivan County, Tenn., about 1800, and his mother was born in Wilkes County, N. C. about the same year. They were married in early life and from this union were born three children. Our subject was reared on the farm and received a practical education in the common schools. Farming has been his chief occupation, although he has spent some time in trading, saw-milling, etc. During the civil war he was commissioned enrolling officer of his district and afterward as an officer of the commissary department in the Confederate Army, where he remained during the war. While he participated in no battles he was often exposed to the dangers incident to war. October 5, 1847, he was married to Miss Ann F. Morton, who was born in Hardeman County, Tenn., January 13, 1830. To this union were born nine children, six of whom are living; these are Forsyth, James M., Constantine W., Benjamin, Mary C. and Elizabeth B. Mr. Smalling has a farm of 100 acres of fine land which he manages in a profitable way. He is a Democrat and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Our subject's grandfather, Col. Benjamin Forsyth, was a commanding, officer in the war of 1812, and was killed in a skermish near Lake Champlain. He wore a sword at the time of his death which he had captured from a British officer. He made the remark when putting the sword on that be would " fight them with their own weapons." He was killed soon after this occurence. The sword was labeled with its full history by Gen. Scott and sent to the widow of Col. Forsyth and may be seen at this time at the home of James M. Smalling, four miles east of Nashville, Tenn., on the Lebanon Pike.

 GEORGE SMITH was born December 12, 1831, in Bedford County, Tenn., son of John E. and Nancy (Mayfield) Smith, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father was born in 1801 or 1802 and died about 1840. He was a successful farmer. The mother was born about 1806. Our subject was the second of five children born to his  parents. He was reared on the farm and remained there until he was eighteen Years of age. He then attended school at Chapel Hill, Tenn., and continued there about fifteen months, after which he returned home and engaged in farming as well as in stock and  negro trading up to the time of the late war. He enlisted in the Confederate Army in 1861  in Col. Starnes Cavalry Company B, He remained with this company about two years  and was then transferred to the Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, Company G. He was wounded at the battle of Murfreesboro which disabled him from active service about fifteen months. He again returned to service and remained throughout the entire War.  Previous to the war, in 1852, he was married to Martha Rainey, a native of this county,  born August 29, 1832. This union has resulted in the birth of eight children: Nancy  A.. Emmet, Andrew J., John M., Sallie C., Mattie G., Robert E. and Emma. Our subject  has been quite successful and has accumulated the greater part of his property since the  late war. He and wife are members in good standing in the Missionary Baptist Church.

JOHN A. SMITH, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., October 27, 1855, son of Jasper N. and Sarah E. (Carrothers) Smith, and of English extraction. The father was horn in Bedford County, Tenn., November 7, 1828, and the mother was born in the same county December, 1839. Our subject is first of eleven children born to this worthy couple. He was reared on the farm and received a fair education in the common schools. October 4, 1882, Miss Mattie Chambers, of Bedford County, Tenn., became his wife. She was born December 23, 1863, and by this union with Mr. Smith became the mother of two children: Jasper E. and Anna M. The Smith family originally came from North Carolina, and were among the very earliest settlers of the State of Tennessee. Our subject is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Baptist Church. Mrs. Smith is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

W. B. SNELL was born February 2, 1850, in Bedford County, Tenn. He is a son of J. C. Snell, who was born in 1817, and is a native of the county. The mother's name was Sarah H. Snell. Our subject was reared on a farm, and worked on the same with his father until he was twenty-five years of age, at which time he began farming for himself, and has continued successfully up to the present date. He was married, October 29. 1874, to Virginia C. Carlyle, of Bedford County, and daughter of James and Elizabeth Carlyle. They have two children: Jasper B. and Thomas Kelly. In his political views Mr. Snell favors the Democratic party and gives it his support on all occasions. He takes an active interest in all enterprises pertaining to the public good, and is a man who commands the respect of all.

W. T. SOLOMON was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., May 18, 1855. His father, W. C. Solomon, was born in 1818, in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee when quite small. About 1853 he wedded Sallie C. Tarver, born in Columbus, Ga., in 1824. The father died in 1880. At the age of sixteen our subject became a clerk in the merchandise business for J. C. Fisher, of Fayetteville. Two years later he engaged in the grain and produce business at the same place, the style of the firm being Bryson & Solomon. Two years later Mr. Solomon began work for Anderson, Green & Co., of Nashville, as traveling salesmen, and has successfully continued tip to the present date. Sue B. Thompson became his wife October 23, 1879. She is a daughter of Newcomb Thompson, and the mother of two children: Alice Cary and William Tarver. Our subject is a man of influence in the community in which he resides, and received a good education in his boyhood days. He and wife are church members, and he is a member of the K. of P. and the Democratic party.

RICHARD HENRY STEM, ESQ., was born Feburary, 11, 1822 in North Carolina, Granville County. He immigrated to the State of Missouri in the fall of 1843. where he remained about fifteen months. He then came to Tennessee, and settled a mile and a half east of Unionville. He was the son of Jacob and Mary (Primrose) Stem. The father was born about 1763 and died about 1828. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and moved to North Carolina in his juvenile days, where he lived until the time of his death. The mother was born about 1788 and died about 1865; she was a native of North Carolina. In July, 1839, our subject wedded Sallie Garrett, of North Carolina, who was born February, 1822. On his arrival in Tennessee Mr. Stem engaged in agricultural pursuits and about ten years later engaged in the cattle trading business in connection with farming. He was elected magistrate of the Tenth District in this county a number of years ago, and has served every term since. He was elected as chairman of the county court in 1874 and served in that capacity four years, and was also associate justice two years prior to this election. He is now officiating justice of peace. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, professing faith about 1856. Mrs. Stem is also a member of the same church. Our subject is a Master Mason and is also a Chapter member. He is a Democrat in politics and since his childhood days has traveled over these different States: Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky, Illinois and Missouri.

FELIX TURRENTINE is a Tennesseean, born May 12. 1811, son of James Turrentine, who was born in Virginia in 1773. The father came to Tennessee in 1807. His wife, Eleanor Neily, was born in North Carolina. Our subject has always been a farmer. May 12, 1842, he married Martha Ann Orr, who was born January 26, 1822. To them were born seven children, all of whom are dead except David A. and Eleanor F. Mrs. Turrentine died February 1, 1882. Mr. Turrentine was an old-line Whig, but since the war has been a Democrat. His son, David A. Turrentine, was born February 14, 1847. Up to June, 1880, he was a farmer. Since that time he has been engaged in the merchandise business at Hall's Mills. February 24, 1875, he married Mollie F. Shearin, who was born October 21. 1851. To them were born four children: Alice R., Sallie A., Lucy J. and Felix. Mr. Turrentine has been prosperous in his business enterprises. He is a Democrat, and was elected to the office of constable in 1878, and served about ten months. He has also been a delegate to the Democratic Convention from his State several times. William H. Stephens, partner in the merchandise business with David A. Turrentine, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., February 24, 1840. He was reared on a farm, and when twenty- one years of age entered the Confederate Army, enlisting in Company G, Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro. Chickamauga, ,and others. He served throughout the war and was not wounded. After his return he engaged in farming and has followed that occupation to the present time. In connection with this he has been in the merchandise business since 1880. In February. 1886, he was married to Martha Ray, born February 8, 1838. They are the parents of Robert H., Etta, Thomas and Pearlie Lee. Mr. Stephens and Mr. Turrentine are doing a good business in the mercantile line. Mr. Stephens is a very firm Democrat in politics.

HENRY H. STEPHENS was born in the year 1818, in the State of North Carolina and in 1836 immigrated to Tennessee and settled in this county on the farm where he is now living. He was the youngest of nine children born to the union of Hardie and Mary Stephens. He is a mechanic by trade and built the bridge on the Chattanooga Railroad when the road was first laid off. After this he followed the business of a millwright for about five years. He has also carried on farming in connection with his other occupations. May 27, 1839, he was married to Nancy Mullens, of this county, who was born September 21, 1818. This union resulted in the birth of ten children, two of whom are dead. The eight remaining are living in this county. Our subject has been quite successful and has accumulated considerable means. In politics Mr. Stephens is a Democrat and he and wife are leading members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. His health has been quite poor for a number of years. and he has not been able to see to any out-door business for about six years.

J. M. L. STEPHENS is a son of John and Martha A. (Gulley) Stephens, who were born in North Carolina in 1776 and 1796, and died in 1831 and 1879, respectively. The father was an early pioneer farmer of Tennessee, and was a soldier in the war of 1812, and received land grants for his services. Our subject was born February 28, 1831, in Bedford County, and worked on a farm to support his mother until he attained his majority, when he began farming for himself, and in the winter season taught school for several years. He entered the Confederate service in 1862, in Company F, Forty-first Tennessee Infantry, and was in the battles of Chickamauga, Raymond, Jackson and others, but was not wounded or captured during service. After his return home he resumed farming, and in 1866 was elected constable and served two years. November 22, 1858, he wedded Margaret F. Robinson, of Bedford County, and their union has resulted in the birth of six children: Ransom, Kate, Joseph, John, Lizzie and Hiram. Mr. Stephens is a man well versed in the affairs of the times, and he and family are church members. His eldest son is preparing for the ministry. Mr. Stephens is a Mason, and a Democrat in his political views.

WALTER W. SUMMERS was born January 5, 1819. in Fleming County, Ky. His father, Lewis Summers, was a native of Culpepper County, Va.; about 1796, he immigrated to Kentucky, where he married Miss Mary Armstrong, a native also of Virginia. He was of English descent, and she of Scotch-Irish. To this union were born fourteen children, our subject being the eleventh. The mother died in 1859, and the father died in 1865. Our subject was educated in the common schools of his native county, and remained with his parents on the farm until he reached his majority. He then followed merchandising for about a year and a half, and then devoted his attention to trading in stock, which he followed about thirty years. In 1847 he married Miss Mary Gore, a native of Nelson County. Ky., and to this union three children--Lewis (deceased), Henry and Thomas--were born. The mother of these children died in 1858, and in 1861 our subject married Miss Hettie Armstrong, a native of Bedford County, Tenn., and to this union two children have been born, both of whom are dead. In 1877 our subject took for his third wife Miss Kincannon, a native of Rutherford County, Tenn., and to them were born two children: Otie P. R. and Wattle R. M., both living. At the breaking out of the late war, Mr. Summers left Louisville and ran a large distillery at Chattanooga until it fell into the hands of the Federal authorities. After the war he returned to Louisville, and in 1867 purchased and moved upon the farm where he now lives, which consists of 3-10 acres. In 1876, Centennial year, he exhibited the largest steer and largest mule perhaps ever reared, and a three-legged cow. Mr. Summers is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows orders, and is independent in politics.

WALTER FINLEY SUTTON, a resident of the Fourth District, Bedford Co., Tenn., born in the district in which he now resides, November 25, 1840, son of John and Elizabeth A. (Harris) Sutton, and is of English-Scotch descent. His father was born in Prince William Comity, Va., March 5, 1775, and died August 5, 1855. His mother was born in Bedford County, Tenn., in 1813, and died in the same county in 1879. His father was ma ried twice, the second time to the mother of our subject, Miss Elizabeth Harris, a relative of Gov. Harris, of Tennessee. Our subject received a common school education, and has followed farming as his chief occupation. He enlisted in the Confederate service in the Twenty-third Tennessee Infantry and was afterward transferred to the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, where he served three years. He was in the battle of Stone River, Chickamauga, besides various cavalry skirmishes during the Georgia campaign, and was finally discharged at Atlanta just prior to the general surrender. In the fall of 1865 Mr. Sutton was elected magistrate of his district, which position he has held ever since. December 27, 1858, he was married to Miss Bettie Hicks, of Bedford County, Tenn., born March 13, 1842, and to this union was born one child, William, whose birth occurred October 8, 1868

WILLIAM B. SUTTON, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., July 12, 1834, son of John and Elizabeth (Harris) Sutton, and of English-Scotch descent. (For further particulars of parents see sketch of Walter Finley Sutton.) Our subject received his preparatory education at Triune, Williamson Co., Tenn., under Prof. E. B. Crocker, and completed at the Union University, Murfreesboro, Tenn. For several years prior to thewar he was engaged in the mercantile business as salesman. When the war broke out he enlisted in the Confederate Army and was assigned duty under Maj. James F. Cummings, commissary for the Confederate Army, with headquarters at Atlanta, Ga. Here he remained until the close of the war. Our subject has been married twice; the first marriage occurred July 10, 1860, to Miss Kate Suttle, daughter of Richard Suttle. To this union were born two sons: John L., born August 1, 1865, and Ernest, born January 29, 1875. The second marriage occurred November 17, 1885, to Miss Elizabeth Alexander. Mr. Sutton is a thorough Democrat, an Odd Fellow, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He has 665 acres of land, 400 of which are in a fine state of cultivation. He gives considerable attention to the raising of live-stock.

C. N. TAYLOR, a native of Bedford County, was born December 1, 1850, and is the son of James P. and Margaret A. (Ransom) Taylor. The father was born about October, 1820, and died January 9, 1880. The mother was born in 1826. Our subject's educational advantages were comparatively good, and at the age of twenty-seven he engaged in farming on his own responsibility. December 19, 1877 he wedded Mary O. Wood, of this county. She was born April 18, 1860, and was the daughter of Johnson W. and Louisa F. (Jordon) Wood; the former born in 1886 and the latter in 1829, and died in 1884. To our subject and wife were born two children; their names are, respectively, Annie R., born December 18, 1879, and John W., born October 8, 1882. Mr. Taylor is a mail of' good standing in his community, always willing to aid in any enterprise pertaining to the advancement of the educational or moral interests. He is a Democrat in politics.

JOHN W. THOMPSON, chairman of the county court of Bedford County, is a son of Newcomb and Amy (Fisher) Thompson, natives of North Carolina. The parents moved to this county in about 1809. The father was a carpenter and he built the first houses of Shelbyville. He afterward engaged in farming two and one-half miles west of Shelbyville and there raised his family and became wealthy, but the war involved him. He died in 1879 at the age of seventy-five. The mother died at eighty-one, in 1886. Our subject was born January 8, 1831, and was reared on a farm. He remained with his parents till April, 1846, when he engaged at clerking in a store. After several years he opened a family grocery trade which he continued until the war. During the war he was engaged in the Adams Express office at Nashville. In 1857 he was elected recorder of Shelbyville and held the office till 1866. In that year he was elected register of Bedford County. In 1868 he was appointed deputy circuit court clerk, which office he held till 1882. He was elected magistrate in 1870, and in 1882 was elected chairman of the court. He was mayor of Shelbyville from 1872 to 1877, having been an alderman for five years previous. He was elected recorder of Shelbyville, in 1885, without his knowledge or consent, and now holds that office. He was united in marriage, in December, 1849, to Miss M. J. Pannell; a native of this county. Five children have been born to this union, four of whom are now living. For thirty years Mr. Thompson was a member of the I. O. O. F. He is now a member of the K. of H. and A. O. U. W. fraternities.

GEORGE W. THOMPSON, one of the old and highly respected citizens of Bedford County, was the oldest son and second child of Newcom and Amy (Fisher) Thompson. He was born February 1, 1823, near Shelbyville, and was reared on a farm, his father being a wealthy farmer and manufacturer. At the age of eighteen he engaged in the tanner's trade, and continued till he was married, when he moved to Shelbyville and served as constable, then a lucrative office, for two years. He then ran a saw-mill for four years and also bought a large tract of timber land. He then returned to Shelbyville and served as constable or collecting officer again for four years. He then engaged in the family grocery business till 1861. During the war he was a Union man and was not engaged in any special avenue of business. In 1866 he was elected to the Legislature and attended the regular and call sessions of 1866 and of 1868. During this time, and ever since, he has been a farmer. He was married, May 18, 1843, to Martha M. Cannon, who bore him five children, three of whom are now living, viz.: Amy F., the widow of C. A. Warren, Sr.; Letitia, the wife of C. A. Warren, Jr., and Mollie G. Mrs. Thompson departed this life July 14, 1874. Mr. Thompson is a member of the Masonic fraternity and I. O. O. F. Politically he is a firm Republican, and he is and always has been an enterprising and energetic citizen of Bedford County.

W. THOMPSON, one of the numerous members of the Thompson family of Bedford County, is a farmer living about four miles west of Shelbyville. He was born August 20, 1842, in Bedford County. His father, John F. Thompson, was born in Bedford County, being a son of one of those Thompsons who came to Bedford County from North Carolina in the very early settlement of this part of the State. He was a farmer all his life, his death occurring August 23, 1883. The mother is now living five miles northwest of Shelbyville. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm. At the age of twenty-two he married and continued farming, which he has successfully followed ever since, now owning 300 acres of good land well improved. He was one of the boys in gray, serving from July, 1861, till June, 1862, in Blanton's company of the Twenty-third Tennessee. At the battle of Shiloh he lost a leg and in June, 1862, returned home. He was married in 1864 to Hulda B. Wilhoite, the results of this union being ten children, seven of whom are now living, viz.: Eunice, Richard, Lydia, Warner, Charles, Purdey and an infant. Mr. Thompson is a Democrat in politics. He, his wife and eldest daughter are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

THOMAS C. THOMPSON was born February 8,1843, in Bedford County, Tenn., son of W. F. and Harriet P. (Hall) Thompson. The father was a native of North Carolina, born September 9, 1816, and of English descent. The mother was of Irish descent, and by her union with W. F. Thompson she became the mother of four children. She died in 1850, and in 1857 the father married Mrs. Mary Muse, a native of this county. To this union were born four children. The father was a tiller of the soil. He died in 1865 and his widow is still living. Our subject was educated in the country schools, and assisted his father on his farm until December, 1861, when be enlisted in the Twenty-third Regiment, Tennessee Confederate Infantry, and served with that command nineteen months. The principal battles in which he was engaged were Shiloh, Perryville and Murfreesboro. In 1866 he married Miss Achsah King, a native of this County, and a daughter of C. B. and Mary C. King. To our subject and wife were born the following children: Mary B., Hattie V., Charles F., James B., Sarah E., Robert E., Thomas E. and George E., all now living with the exception of Sarah E. The mother of these children died May 9, 1882, and in 1885 Mr. Thompson married Miss Maggie A. Rankin, a native of Ohio, and a daughter of Rev. Alexander F. and Mary Rankin. Our subject is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and at present is a magistrate of his civil district. He owns a farm of over 200 acres, all under a good state of cultivation. Himself, wife and four eldest children are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat in politics.

ZACH THOMPSON was born July 7, 1841, at Lebanon, Wilson Co., Tenn. His father, Col. Robert E. Thompson, is a native of Bedford County, Tenn., born in 1822 and of Irish descent. He moved to Williamson County with his parents when a small boy and subsequently was educated at Lebanon, Wilson County, and began the practice of law at that place. He has been a member of the Legislature several times and is a prominent lawyer of Lebanon. He married Miss Mary Tolliver, a native of Lebanon, and to this union nine children were born, of whom the subject is the eldest. Zach Thompson was educated at Cumberland University, Lebanon, and upon passing sixteen years of age he enlisted in the Seventh Tennessee Confederate Infantry. He served in that regiment about eighteen months and was then transferred to the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry and with that command served until the close of the war. He then returned home and read law and practiced at Lebanon until 1873. November 21, 1872, Miss Lettie Cannon, a native of Bedford County, became his wife. To this Union were born two children: Robert E, and Mary L., both living. In 1873 they moved upon the place where they now reside, which is about six miles northeast of Shelbyville. The farm consists of 320 acres, all under a good state of cultivation. In connection with farming Mr. Thompson has run a distillery for the last three years. In politics he is a stanch Democrat.

W. E. A. THOMPSON, A. B., a native of Bedford County, Tenn., was born Nov. 28, 1848. His father was a licensed preacher in the Methodist Church, but having an affection of the throat was obliged to give up his ministerial duties and engage in farming. His mother was Ellen C. (Williams) Thompson. Our subject remained with his parents on the farm until he was twenty-one years of age, attending school when he could be conveniently spared from the farm. In the fall of 1869 he taught school at Mount Zion, Bedford County, and in 1870 clerked in a dry goods house at Unionville. The spring of 1871 he spent in school at Chapel Hill and spent the fall at Unionville in the same manner. Early in 1872 he entered the Tennessee University, where he graduated in 1874 with the degree of A. B. He chose teaching as his profession and began work at Unionville, his native village. In the summer of 1875 he left Unionville and taught five months at Middleton, Rutherford County. In the spring of 1876 he accepted the principalship of the Center Grove High School, where he is engaged at the present writing. December 26, 1876, he wedded Nannie Floyd, of this county, and by her became the father of four children: Benjamin H., Mary G., Annie E. and Ellen F. Our subject is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and is a man of good social standing and influence in this section.

COL. LEWIS TILLMAN (deceased) was born in Bedford County, August 18, 1816, being a son of John and Rachel P. (Martin) Tillman, natives of South Carolina. Both parents immigrated to this county when young. The father was born February 5, 1786, and came to Bedford County about 1810. He was a farmer, and was one of the prominent early citizens of Bedford County. He was a member of the State Legislature of Tennessee in 1820, but would never accept further political honor. His death occurred October 3, 1854. The mother was born May 16, 1789, and attained the age of ninety-two, dying in 1881. Both the grandsires of our subject were soldiers of the Revolutionary war. Col. Lewis Tillman was reared on a farm, and secured but a limited early education because of the rude accommodations of the schools in his boyhood. At the age of twentyfive he married, and settled where he pursued farming till his death. In 1836 he served in the Florida war in the campaign against the Creek and Seminole Indians. He has held the commission of major, lieutenant-colonel and colonel in the Sixty-first regiment of State Militia of Tennessee. From 1852 to 1860 he was clerk of the Circuit Court of Bedford County, and for a few years immediately following the war he was clerk and master of the Chancery Court of Bedford County. Throughout the war he was a firm Union man. In 1868 he was elected to represent the Fifth Congressional District of Tennessee in the Forty-first Congress of the United States of America, without any solicitation on his part. Since then he never would accept any public office. He was married, in 1840, to Mary Catharine Davidson, daughter of James Davidson, one of the early citizens of the county. Mrs. Tillman's mother is still living, aged eighty-two years. Mrs. Tillman was born March 1, 1823. Col. Tillman's married life was blessed in the birth of eleven children, seven of whom are now living, viz.: James D., a prominent attorney at Fayetteville; Lewis, a prominent attorney of Knoxville; Samuel E., professor of chemistry, mineralogy and geology in the West Point Academy, of New York; George N., United States marshal of the Middle District of Tennessee; Hattie A., residing with her mother; Edwin H., in the United States Naval service on the coast of Japan, and Abram M., a law student and clerk in the Internal Revenue Department at Washington, D. C. Col. Lewis Tillman's private and public career was one of unimpeached integrity, undismayed energy and unsurpassed hospitality. The poor, especially, received bountifully from his hand, and no charitable institution went unaided by him.

MICAGER TROXLER is a native Tennesseean, born January 25,1839, and is residing in the home of his birth, where he owns 110 acres of good land. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate Army under Bushrod Johnson and served until December, 1863, when he was taken sick and captured. He was paroled and sent home but never returned to service. November 20, 1860, he married Mary A. Shofner, who was born December 3, 1842. She was a daughter of Frederick and Mary (McKaig) Shofner, and died April 11, 1864. Mr. Troxler then wedded, in 1865, his second wife, Mary A. Dean, a daughter of John and Sarah (Shofner) Troxler, who were born in 1791 and 1796 and died in 1871 and 1869, respectively. Mrs. Troxler was born October 20, 1838. Our subject is a member of the K. of H., and is also a member of Freemason lodge No. 308. He and Mrs. Troxler are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and he is a stanch supporter of Democratic principles. His parents, Isaac and Elizabeth (Payne) Troxler, were born in North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, in 1803. The father was brought to Tennessee by his parents in 1810, and November 2, 1825, he wedded our subject's mother and became the father of ten children. His death occurred March 15, 1866, and the mother's June 20, 1848.

JOHN C. TROXLER was born January 5,1840, in Tennessee. His parents, Anthony and Sarah (Cortner) Troxler, were born in North Carolina in 1802 and 1810, respectively. The father came to Tennessee about 1817, and died in 1843. The mother's death occurred in 1886. Our subject has followed farming from early boyhood. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate service and remained until 1863, when he was captured while making a visit home, was paroled, and never returned to the service. He was constable of his district two years, and served as deputy sheriff one year. In 1866 Mr. Troxler was married to Margaret A., widow of Gilbreth Chambers. She was born in Tennessee in 1848. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Troxler, named George R., born in 1867; William T., born in 1870; Nancy D., born in 1872; Sarah, born in 1874; John A., born in 1876; Daniel M., born in 1878; Edward, born in 1880; Polly, born in 1882, and Ambrose, born in 1884. In March 1876, Mr Troxler was elected justice of the peace in his district, and has held the office up to the present time He owns 126 acres of land, and is a member of the K. of H. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat politically.

WILLIAM T. TUNE (deceased) was a son of John Tune, one of the first settlers of Bedford County, Tenn. He was born in 1818, in Smith County, and was reared on a farm. He was married, in 1844, to Miss C. E. Morton, and thirteen children were born to them: Mary A., James C., Mattie J., Eliza F., Sallie., Charles W., Emma S., John M., Will R., Thomas C., Louis T., Horace G., and Bettie E. Mr. Tune was a farmer of Bedford County for many years. He died March 5, 1871. Mrs. Tune is still living at her residence, "Cottage Home," and is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. William R. Tune, fourth son of William T. Tune, was born October 12, 1860, and spent his boyhood days on a farm. He finished his education in the schools of Shelbyville, and then took a traveling tour over the greater part of the United States. At present he is living with his mother, and he is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

KESTER L. TUNE, farmer, of Bedford County, Tenn., was born in this State December 6, 1829. His parents, John and Mary (Cooper) Tune, were born in Virginia d Tennessee in 1791 and 1797, respectively. They were married September 12, 1816, and fifteen children were born to their union. The mother died in August, 1853, and the father in 1881. After attaining his majority our subject began the battle of life on his own responsibility, and by industry and economy became the possessor of 465 acres of well cultivated and fertile land. He gives considerable attention to stock trading also. September 1, 1858, he was united in marriage to M. C. Wells, born May 8, 1838, and died January 13, 1862, having borne two children: Joseph E., born April 27, 1860, and died November 1, 1861, and Susan E., born October 13, 1861. For his second wife Mr. Tune married Eliza J. Landers, born October 19, 1835. They have three children: Thomas O., born December 29, 1865; John C., born November 14, 1868; and William S., born March 28, 1872. Mrs. Tune's parents were Thomas and Elizabeth (Thomas ) Landers, who were born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1812 and 1814, respectively. They were married December 20, 1834, and became the parents of twelve children--eight daughters and four sons. The father died May 5, 1879. Mr. Tune's first wife was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His present wife is a member of the Methodist Protestant Church. Mr. Tune was a Whig until the death of that party; and since that time has been identified with the Republican party.

JAMES L. TURNER was born July 8,1823, in Sussex County, Va., son of Littlebury and Mary (Winn) Turner. The father was born April 28, 1788, and died June 18, 1869. The mother was born September 28, 1787, and died February 25, 1879. Our subject's educational advantages were not of the best, but, notwithstanding, he is considered a fine mathematician, and has acquired the major part of his education without a teacher. At the age of twenty-one he engaged in the farming interest with his father, and so continned until about 1851. Previous to this, in 1848, he was elected to the office of constable, which position he held for about eleven years. In 1850 he wedded Margaret N. Murphy, who was born August 12,1830, and to them were born nine children: Sarah J. James W., William F., Margaret F., Elizabeth A., Nancy F., Tennessee M. (deceased), Joseph H. and Lavinia. Mr. Turner was elected to the office of deputy sheriff in 1858, and held that office one term, and again in 1868 he was deputized to fill the same office. In 1876 he was elected magistrate of the Eleventh District, and has held that office up to the present time. He has also carried on his farming interest, and has been quite successful in that occupation. He is a Republican in politics.

JAMES VANNATTA was born February 9, 1811, in Williamson County, Tenn., and was reared and educated in the country. January 12, 1831, he was united in marriage to Miss Martha Watson, and by her became the father of three children: Samuel, Hibernah K. and John S., only one of whom is living. Mrs. Vannatta died in 1839, and for his second wife Mr. Vannatta took Mrs. Jerusha (Clardy) Nash, and to them were born the following children: Delphia A., Joseph R., George W., Charity A., Eliza F., Christopher C. and Nannie D. In 1850 Mr. Vannatta moved to Bedford County, where he engaged in farming and stock raising. Both he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Vannatta's parents were C. C. and Nancy (Louder) Vannatta, born in North Carolina and Kentucky, respectively. The father came to Tennessee at an early day, locating in Williamson County, near Triune. To him and wife were born the following children: Maria, James and Katie; only one, James, is now living. The father was in the war of 1812, and was with Jackson at New Orleans. He died on his way home; from that place. His widow died in 1839. Both were earnest workers in the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

WARREN WAITE, a prominent farmer of District No. 2, was born June 9, 1827, in Bedford County, near Wartrace. His father, George Waite, was a native of Person County, N. C., born November 18, 1790, and was of English lineage. Our subject's paternal grandfather, Robert Waite, emigrated from England to North Carolina during colonial times, and was a surveyor of lands. George Waite, when a boy, moved with his parents to Tennessee, first to Williamson County, and subsequently to Bedford County, where his parents died, He married Miss Nancy B. Warren, a native of North Carolina, born November 30, 1796, and of English-Irish lineage. To this union six children were born. The mother died December 5, 1838, and the father December 21, 1857. The father was a natural mechanic in wood and iron work, and was also a farmer. Our subject received a practical education in the country schools, and remained with his parents until he reached his majority, when he began merchandising, which he continued about twenty years; also carried on farming at the same time. In 1853 he married Miss Rutha S. Yell, a native of Coffee County, Tenn., and to this union were born the following children: George E., Nancy A., Warren S. and James W., all living. Mr. Waite owns a farm of 600 acres, all under a good state of cultivation. He was formerly a Whig, but is now a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

PROF. SIMEON V. WALL was born in Williamson County, Tenn., August 22,1844, son of John B. and Martha E. (Wilson) Wall, and of Scotch-Irish descent. The parents were born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1799 and 1803 and died December 31, 1870, and April 15, 1859, respectively. They were married in 1819 and were the parents of thirteen children. The father was a soldier in the Confederate Army notwithstanding the fact that he was over age. He was an old-time Whig, although an intimate friend of James K. Polk. He was a soldier in the Indian war of 1836. His father, Clement Wall, came to Williamson County, Tenn., in 1804. Our immediate subject, Simeon Wall, was a student in Harpeth Academy before the war. He enlisted in the Twentieth Tennessee Regiment and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Chickamauga and Franklin and was in many of the battles of the Georgia campaign. Of his war record the Review and Journal of Franklin, Tenn., said: "It is well known that when a mere boy he left this county to serve in the Southern Army and he was recognized all over the army as a brave and gallant soldier." After the war, owing to the financial embarrassment of his father, he completed his education through his own exertions. He has been professor in academies and colleges for nearly twenty years and is one of the successful educators of Tennessee. He is proprietor of the Bedford Academy at Bellbuckle, Tenn., but is soon to sever his connection with this school and take charge of the Culleoka Academy as co-principal. July 28, 1868, our subject married Miss Nannie J. Comer, daughter of Rev. J. J. Comer of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. and Mrs. Wall are the parents of nine children--seven sons and two daughters. Prof. Wall is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. South.

CAPT. JAMES A. WARDER, a leading member of the Bedford County bar, was born September 24, 1843, at May's Lick, Ky. His father, Walter Warder, was a native of Kentucky, and was an eminent physician of that State. He died when James A. was but about thirteen years of age. The mother now lives in her native State, Kentucky  Capt. Warder was reared Dear Maysville, Ky., and received his education at Maysville and at Centre College, Kentucky. When eighteen years of age, in 1861, he enlisted in Company L, Second Kentucky Cavalry, as a private. He was subsequently made first lieutenant of the company and afterward was made captain of Company C, of the same regiment. He held that commission till the close of the war, actively serving in most all the important battles throughout the southwest. Returning from the war he read law, and in October, 1866, was licensed to practice, since which time he has been successfully engaged in that profession, ranking among the ablest lawyers of the State. In 1867 he was commissioned attorney-general of a judicial district, but declined the nomination. He was on the Hayes electoral ticket in 1876, and under the administration of Hayes held the office of United States district attorney. He was nominated by his party for the congressional race in 1884, but the Democratic party being largely in the majority he was not elected, he being a Republican and one of the leading men in his party in this part of the State. He was married, January 2, 1865, to Laura D. Gosling, a daughter of William Gosling, a manufacturer in Shelbyville. Two children have been born to this union, one of whom, Inda Artus, is now living. Mrs. Warder is a member of the Episcopal Church. Capt. Warder's name has frequently been connected with all the important offices of the State. A wide-spread desire existed to nominate him for the Republican candidate for governor, but owing to the time neccessarily required from his profession to make the race against so great a Democratic majority, he discouraged the movement. Just now he is being instructed for, by a number of counties, for one of the supreme Judges of the State.

THOMAS W. WARNER, dealer in a general line of groceries and provisions, was born October 26, 1838, in Shelbyville, being a soil of William D. and Mary (Swift) Warner, both natives of Bedford County. The father was killed when our subject was but one year old, and the mother is still living, having been married three times. Thomas W. was raised by his grandmother, Swift, on a farm, and secured but a common school education. At the age of fifteen he began his own support. He has been engaged as a clerk and merchant for about twenty-five years. He also owns 143 acres of fine land and carries on farming, his residence being one and three-quarter miles west of Shelbyville, on the Fish ing Ford Pike, in an excellent location. He was married May 20, 1866, to Emma R. Trail, a native of Franklin, Ky. Six children have been born to them, viz. : Hugh, Frazer, William F., Thomas W., Henry W. and one who died. Mr. Warner and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a member of the Democratic party. He has in his possession a $1 United States coin, bearing the date of 1798, which his father and grandfather each carried. Mr. Warner is a member of the I. O. O. F. and K. of  H.

CHARLES A. WARREN (deceased) was  born May , 21, 1820, in Blount County, Tenn., His father, Thomas S. Warren, was born and partly raised in Virginia. He immigrated with his parents to East Tennessee when young. He was married in 1809. The mother, Susan Sevier Snyder, was born in Nashville. When she was quite young she was taken  to Clarksville, where her parents were murdered by the Indians and she was the only one of the family who escaped. She was then reared by her grandfather, Valentine Sevier, and also lived a great part of her time with Gov. Sevier. The parents of our Subject  moved to Bedford County in about 1828. The father died in 1856, having been born in 1782. The mother was born in 1791, and died in 1863. There is now but one of the family of ten children raised by them living: Mrs. Jennie Ivie, the widow of C. D. Ivie, of Rutherford County. She was born December 27, 1821. Charles A. Warren was reared on a farm. He served as deputy sheriff of Bedford County for many years in his younger days. He carried on farming all his life and was one of the most extensive business men of the county. He was engaged in stock dealing, merchandising, etc. He was noted for his public spirit and public enterprise and charity to the poor. He was a Democrat in politics. He was married May 2, 1865, to Miss Amy Thompson, daughter of G. W. Thompson. Mrs. Warren died October 29, 1883, leaving a family of three children: George, Josephine and Stanley S. Five children have been born to the union but two, Mattie Lee and William S., have died.

MADISON H. WEBB, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., February 5, 1836, and is the son of Benjamin and Elizabeth W. (Reeves) Webb. The father was born in Sevier County, Tenn., June 16, 1792, and died in Bedford County, June 18, 1884. The mother was born July 18, 1796, in Orange County, N. C., and was married to Benjamin Webb September 16, 1821. To this union were born six sons, of whom our subject is the youngest. He was reared on the farm, educated in the common schools, and assisted his parents on the farm until twenty-one years of age. He was a lieutenant in the Confederate Army, enlisting in the Eighteenth Tennessee Infantry, but was afterward transferred to the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, under Col. Starnes. He participated in the battles of Fort Donelson, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and some actions in the Georgia campaign. He was captured at Fort Donelson and held a prisoner at Lincoln Barracks, Springfield, Ill., for the space of one month, when he escaped. December 11, 1867, he wedded Miss Elnora Elam, daughter of James A. Elam. The fruits of this union were five children--three sons and two daughters. Our subject has a fine farm of 600 acres. He is a Democrat; a Mason (Knight Templar), and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JOHN W. WELLS was born May 15, 1843, in Rutherford County, Tenn. His father, Thomas P. Wells, was a native of Virginia, born in September, 1811. When a young man he moved to Williamson County, where he married Miss Susan Smith, a native of this State. To this union six children were born, of whom our subject is the fourth. The mother of these children died when our subject was about nine years old, and the father afterward married Miss Frances Tune and by her he became the father of two children on and daughter. Thomas P. Wells moved to Illinois in 1866, where he now resides; he is a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and is also a farmer. Mrs. Frances (Tune) Wells is now dead. Our subject came to this county with his parents when but eight years of age, and here he was educated at the Flat Creek Academy. In October, he enlisted in the Forty-first Tennessee Confederate Infantry and served in that command about two years. He was then left at Jackson, La., on account of illness, and was there captured and paroled by the Federal Army. He had been captured with his regiment at Fort Donelson and held as a prisoner of war until September, 1862, when he was exchanged. In September, 1866, he married Miss Sarah E. Shoffner, a native of this county and a daughter of Col. L. Shoffner. To this union were born two sons, Othniel D. and Willie S., both living. The mother of these children died September 4, 1873, and in 1874 their father married Miss Margaret C. Jenkins, a native of this county and a daughter of Rev. William Jenkins. To this union the following children were born: Susan M., Thomas E., Edgar J., Ethel and Herbert, all living. Our subject owns a farm of 235 acres on Duck River, all rich bottom land. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and belongs to Shelbyville Benevolent Lodge, No. 122, and he takes an active interest in educational matters. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.

WILLIAM D. WHEELER is a son of W. W. Wheeler, who was born in Tennesse in. 1809, and died in April, 1855. His mother was a Mrs. White; she was born in 1811 and died November 7, 1857. William D. was the eldest of their seven children. He was born in Rutherford County March 12, 1836, and assisted his father on his farm until twenty-one years of age. He followed farming up to the date of the late war. He enlisted in Company G, Forty fourth Tennessee Infantry in 1861, but owing to ill health only remained in service three months. After his return home he engaged in farming, and has been a prosperous " tiller of the soil." Martha L. Maxwell became his wife January 22, 1861. She was born August 21, 1840, and is the mother of the following family: Mary Ann, Etta Valonie, Malissa Alice and John Watson. Our subject received a common school education and is a supporter of Democratic principles.

ROBERSON A. WHITAKER, farmer, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., November 9, 1859, son of Dr. Philander and Rebecca M. (Moseley) Whitaker, and supposed to be of English descent. The father was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., October 19 1826 and November 12, 1850, he wedded Rebecca Moseley, who was born November 12, 1833. To this union were born six children--four sons and two daughters. The father died July 3, 1869, and the mother July 3, 1885. The Whitaker family were among the early settlers of the State. Our subject was a farmer boy, was educated in the common schools, and at the age of seventeen began working for himself. February 3, 1880, Miss Bettie S. Thomas, daughter of William Thomas, became his wife, and by her he became the father of two children: William T. and Mattie M. Mrs. Whitaker was born in the house where she now resides September 9. 1857. Her father. William Thomas, Sr., was born January 31, 1807, and died March 29, 1861. Her mother, Mrs. Jane (McCrory) Thomas, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., May 28, 1816, and died December 1, 1882. The ancestors of Mrs. Whitaker on her mother's side were formerly from Ireland, and in an ancient Bible, whose leaves are yellow with age, was found the following statement: Hugh McCrory (the great-great grandfather of Mrs. Whitaker) was born in May, 1759, in the county of Antrim, Ireland He sailed to America in April, 1775. He joined the regular army, and served as colonel under Gen. Washington, and was killed at Alexandria in October, 1777. Our subject is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

THOMAS A. WHITE, farmer, was born May 15, 1819, and is one of seven children born to the union of Thomas and Margaret (McGarrah) White. The father was born in Jefferson County, Va., in 1780, immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Maury County. He remained there until 1825 when he moved to Shelbyville and followed the hatter trade. He also kept hotel in Shelbyville several years. In 1801 he was married and became the father of these children: James R., Joseph, Elizabeth. Nancy, John, Susan and Thomas A.  Thomas White, Sr., and wife were worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. The former died in 1846 and the latter in 1850. The subject of this ketch was born in Columbia, Tenn., and is of Scotch-Irish descent. He received a limited education in the Bedford County Schools, and in 1841 was married to Miss Ary A. Williams, a native of this county. Five children blessed this union: Mary, Robert, Isaac H., Margaret and Julia. Three of these have died: Robert, Margaret and Julia. Mrs. White died in 1853, and in the same year Mr. White married Margaret Dryden, of Bedford County, and to this union were born nine children: Ary (deceased), Julia, Lida, Thomas C. William D., James L., Anna, Walter C. and Susan. Mr. White was a tailor for twenty years of his life but in 1853 turned his attention exclusively to farming. He owns 200 acres of land, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

DR. WILLIAM H. WHITTEMORE, of Haley, was born October 6, 1853, in Davidson County, Tenn. His father, William B. Whittemore. was a native of the same county and is of Scotch-lrish descent. He is a prominent farmer of that county, and married Nancy E. Hays, a native of Davidson County and daughter of John Hays. To this union were born ten children, our subject being the eldest. The father and mother are both living. The Doctor was educated at Franklin College, near Nashville, where he graduated in 1869. He received his medical education in the medical department of the University of Tennessee, from which institution he graduated in 1878, and then commenced the practice of his profession at Antioch, Davidson Co., Tenn. Here he remained two years and then moved to Nashville, and was elected as county health officer, and held this position three years. He then moved to Haley, Bedford Co., Tenn., where he continues the practice of medicine and has already established an extensive practice. November 8, 1882, he married Miss Georgia M. Tolmie, a native of the city of Nashville and daughter of Alexander McD. Tolmie, a prominent citizen and machinist of that city, who ran the first engine that was run on the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, and was for a long time master mechanic of that road. To Dr. W. H. Whittemore and wife was born one child, Maggie T. The Doctor is a member of the K. of H. and the Iron Hall. He is a Democrat and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mrs. Whittemore is member of the Presbyterian Church.

JOHN W. WIGGINS, a successful farmer and stock raiser, was born December 26, 1812, in North Carolina. He is the son of Harrel and Sallie (Royster) Wiggins. The father was born in North Carolina in 1788, and when quite young immigrated to Indiana, where he remained but a few months. He then went to Kentucky, and from there to Coffee County, Tenn., where he remained until 1830, when he immigrated to Bedford County, and settled in the Twentieth District. He reared a family of seven children, three of whom are living at the present time: John W., David and Harbert. Harrel Wiggins was a member of the Missionary Baptist Church and died in 1851. Mrs. Wiggins died in 1873. Our subject was given a fair education in the common schools. In 1835 he was married to Miss Mary Greer, a native of North Carolina. To this union seven children were born, only two of whom are living: Mary A. and Hundley. Mrs. Wiggins was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and died September 15, 1885. Mr. Wiggins has always been a tiller of the soil, has been rather successful and owns 450 acres of good land.

J. GREER WIGGINS, a farmer of Bedford County, was born December 29, 1842. He is the son of Benjamin F. and Jane H. (Greer) Wiggins. The father was born in North Carolina. and in the early part of his life immigrated to Tennessee and settled in Bedford County. He left and went to Mississippi, but in a short time returned to Bedford County. He was a farmer, and reared a family of eight children: J. Greer, John S., Sarah E., Mary J., William J., Benjamin F., Thomas H. and Fannie E. Sarah E. and Mary J. are both dead. Benjamin F. died in 1883. Mrs. Wiggins died about 1880. Our subject was a country boy, and received a good practical education in the common schools. In 1871 he was united in marriage to Miss Emily V. Evans, daughter of Hampton Evans. To this union were born four children: Bessie F., A. F., Edward H. and Hampton Evans. Mr. Wiggins has always been a farmer, and is also a carpenter by trade. He owns 149 acres of land, and is one of the leading farmers of the Twenty-second District. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

DAVID WILLIAMS is a native of Bedford County, Tenn., born in May, 1815. His father. Joseph Williams, was born in North Carolina, in 1777, and came to Tennessee at a very early period. He was a farmer, and a soldier in the war of 1812, participating in the battle of New Orleans. In 1813 he wedded our subject's mother, Charity Turrentine, who was born in North Carolina in 1791. The father died in 1876, and the mother two years later. David Williams and Sarah T. Harris were united in marriage in 1836. Mrs. Williams was born in 1816, and her parents, James Harris and Nancy (Thompson) Harris, were born in Pennsylvania and South Carolina, respectively. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams are Almeda, born in 1837; Lou, in 1839; Elvira, in 1841; James H., in 1845; Lafayette, in 1854; Mollie J., in 1859, and Samuel K., in 1861. Our subject was reared on a farm and has followed farming from early boyhood. He was postmaster of Hickory Hill for several years, before and after the war, and in 1869 located on his present farm of 230 acres. He has a neat frame residence, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In politics he is a Democrat.

THOMAS W. WOOD, M. D., of Shelbyville, Tenn., is a son of James and Eliza (Oberall) Wood, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Virginia. The father was born February 10, 1798, and the mother May 13, 1806. They were married September 17, 1829. Ten children blessed their union: John A., William J., Melissa J., Thomas W., Sarah A., Horace O., Nancy P., Martha H., Eliza T. and James G. Mr. Wood came to Tennessee about 1810, and located in what is now Cannon County, where he remained about two years, and then moved to near Woodbury, where he died November 16, 1865. He had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South for nearly forty years. The mother died September 11, 1874. Thomas W. Wood was born in Cannon County, where he received a good common school education, and attended the Lawrence Academy at Woodbury Station. At the breaking out of the war he joined the Eighteenth Tennessee Infantry, and participated in the battle of Shiloh and numerous skirmishes, and was selected as the one to receive the banner for his company, presented by the young ladies of Woodbury. Owing to ill health he was soon compelled to abandon active service, but was given a position in the commissary department and served as commissary sergeant until the close of the war. He was paroled at Macon, Ga., and after his return home engaged in farming and school teaching. He began his medical studies in 1867, and attended his first course of lectures in the medical department of the University of Nashville in 1868, 1869 and 1870, graduating the latter year. He has since practiced in Bedford County, and has built up an extensive practice. Dr. Wood was appointed by the county commissioner as physician for the poor asylum, and has held that position ten years. He was twice appointed deputy county clerk of Cannon County, and at one time lacked only a few votes of being the nominee of the Democratic party for representative of Bedford County. He was at one time salesman in a wholesale hat house in Philadelphia.

J. P. WOOD. William Wood was born in North Carolina in 1802, and was married to Elena Meris, also of that State, and our subject was born to them September 20, 1838, in Orange County, N. C. He has always followed the life of a farmer, and at the breaking out of the late war be entered the Confederate Army, in the fall of 1862, enlisting in Company G, Thirty-second Tennessee Infantry. At the battle of Chickamauga be was wounded in the left thigh and was compelled to abandon service. August 15, 1861, he led to Hymen's altar Miss Martha C. Woodward, who bore him nine children, only five now living: Mary L., Nora W., William W., Joseph O., Winnie L. Mr. Wood is a self-made man, and has been fairly successful in his business undertakings. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and his wife of the Christian Church. Mr. Wood is a Democrat.

MOSES WOODFIN, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., March 7, 1829, and of English-Irish lineage. His father, Samuel Woodfin, was born in Buncomb County, North Carolina, in 1791, and about 1815 married Maria Barnhill, a native of South Carolina, born December 9, 1798, and to them were born fifteen children. The father died April 29, 1863, and the mother in the same county March 8, 1863. Our subject received a good practical education and has followed farming as his chief occupation. He learned the trade of wheelwright which he followed in a regular way for over fifteen years. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in the Confederate Army, Forty-fifth Tennessee Infantry, and participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge. At Chickamauga he was wounded and at Missionary Ridge he was wounded again, captured, and taken to Rock Island, Ill., where he remained a prisoner until the end of the war. September 11, 1856, he was married to Miss Rachel A. Clark, daughter of William Clark, and the fruits of this union were eight children--three sons and five daughters; the sons are William J., Samuel N. and James A. P.; the daughters: Mollie E., Emma L., Alice, Ida and Maggie L. Mr. Woodfin is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and wife and five children are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Woodfin, our subject's wife, was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., August 9, 1835. Her father was born in North Carolina, in 1807, and her mother in 1817. Her father died October 20, 1881, and was of Irish lineage. Our subject's grandfather, Nicholas Woodfin, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and was distinguished for his gallantry and bravery on many occasions. Our subject's father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans.

JAMES C. YELL, a native of Coffee County, Tenn., was born December 31, 1842, son of Francis M. and Judia (Short) Yell, both natives of Tennessee. The father was born near Wartrace, and is of English extraction. He has been a merchant, but at present is engaged in agricultural pursuits on a farm of nearly 200 acres. During the late war he was a guide for the Federal Army between Nashville and Chattanooga, from 1862 to the latter part of 1863, and was a stanch Union man. The mother is also living. Our subject received a practical education in the country schools and at Tullahoma. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the Fifth Tennessee Federal Cavalry, and served in that command until the close of the war. He was in the battle of Murfreesboro. His regiment was mostly engaged in contending with guerrillas and Confederate cavalry. When the war closed he returned home and sold goods at Normandy for about a year. He then moved to the farm where he now resides, and engaged in tilling the soil. He owns a farm adjoining that of his father, consisting of nearly 200 acres, and another a mile distant of 114 acres. December, 1879, he married Miss Ada Waite, a native of Coffee County, and this union was blessed by these children: Gordentia W., Warren S. and Frances M., all living. Mr. Yell is a Republican in politics, and member of the Masonic fraternity and also K. of H. He and wife are worthy members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

BENJAMIN B. YELL, farmer, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., July 25, 1829, son of James and Jerusha (Barton) Yell, and of English descent. The father was born in 1791, and he and his brother Archibald Yell were volunteer soldiers in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans. Archibald Yell was at one time governor of the State of Arkansas, and, on a monument, erected to his memory at Fayetteville, may be seen the following: "Born in North Carolina, August, 1797; A volunteer in the battle of New Orleans; District Judge of Arkansas Territory in 1832; First member of Congress from the State; Governor, 1840; Again elected to Congress in 1844; Resigned and accepted a Colonelcy of Arkansas for the Mexican war in 1846; Killed at Buena Vista, February 22, 1847; A gallant, soldier, an upright Judge, a fearless champion of popular rights, a sincere friend, and an honest man." The father of our subject died at his residence in Coffee County, Tenn., November 20, 1839. The mother was born in Georgia, in 1797, and was a member of the Methodist Church South. Our subject was reared on the farm and educated in common schools, January 12, 1848, to Miss Ann B. Waite, and the result of this union was four children: George C., Abner W., Bettie A., and Edith N. Mr. Yell is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Separate Baptist Church. He has a farm of 280 acres of fine land, which he devotes to the cultivation of cereals and the raising of stock.

JOSHUA YELL is a son of James Yell, who was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee with his father when young, locating in Rutherford County. He was married to Jerusha Barton, daughter of William Barton, and by her became the father of twelve children, only seven of whom lived to maturity. Archibald Yell, brother of James Yell, was governor of Arkansas two terms previous to the Mexican war, and was killed in that war while commanding the Arkansas troops. The subject of this sketch was born September 15, 1832, and spent his boyhood days on a farm and in attending the common schools. He was married October 2, 1852, to Miss Rebecca A. Waite, and ten children were born to them: Nancy B. (deceased), A. D., James A., Annie, Benjamin, G. E., Bettie, Joshua, Adah and Charley. In 1879 Mr. Yell removed to his present farm of 200 acres. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are church members.

PROF. JOHN S. YOES is a son of Thomas Yoes, who was born in Tennessee in 1819. He was a farmer, and married Sallie Perryman, who was born in Tennessee about 1825, and by her became the father of fourteen children. Our subject was their sixth child, born October 9, 1849, and began doing for himself at the age of twenty. He chose school-teaching as his profession, and has continued with good success up to the present time. Margaret E. Hopkins became his wife March 14, 1871. She was born May 29, 1847, and has borne him six children: Marzie S., William T., Margaret E., Joseph W., Rebecca A. and John S. Prof. Yoes has been a teacher in Turrentine's Academy since January, 1886. His early educational advantages were limited, but by much desultory study and reading has acquired an excellent education. He has mastered several of the sciences without a tutor, and in every particular has been the architect of his own fortune. He belongs to the Democratic party.


Source: The Goodspeed History of Maury, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson, Bedford, Marshall Counties of Tennessee. Reprint from The Goodspeeds History of Tennessee, 1886.
Transcription 15 Jun 2000 for PeaRidge Relations