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BIOGRAPHICAL APPENDIX.
 

GILES COUNTY.

CHARLES CLAYTON ABERNATHY, M. D., a successful practitioner, was born near Pulaski October 9, 1827. His early youth was passed on the farm and in attending the county schools. Later he attended the Wurtemberg Academy at Pulaski. He subsequently spent three years at Cumberland University at Lebanon. In 1848 he began the study of medicine under Dr. R. G. P. White, and in the spring of 1851 he graduated at the University of Pennsylvania. Located in Decatur County, West Tenn. In the same year he married Martha J. Stockard, of Maury County, and has two children by this union: Mary G. and Lizzie. After remaining five years in Decatur County, he moved to Pulaski, and here continued the practice until 1862, when he went on duty as a commissioned surgeon in the Army of Tennessee at the hospital at Chattanooga. In December, 1862, at his request, he was transferred to the Eighteenth Tennessee Infantry, Col. J. B. Palmer's regiment, Gen. John C. Brown's brigade, and served as the surgeon of this regiment until after the battle of Chickamauga, when he was transferred to the Third Tennessee Regiment, and continued to occupy that position until the close of the war. At the time of the surrender he was a prisoner of war at Fort Delaware, but was released July 19, 1865. In the fall of the same year he resumed the practice of medicine, and is still actively engaged in his profession. He is one of the leading physicians of this part of Tennessee. Mrs. Abernathy died in 1878, and the Doctor was married again, in 1880, to Mrs. Josephine C. McNairy, of Giles County. Mrs. McNairy was a Miss Wilkinson. Our subject is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a son of Charles C. and Susannah (Harris) Abernathy, and of Scotch-Irish descent. His father was born in Virginia in 1790, and his mother in Davidson County, Tenn., in 1800. The Abernathy family came to Tennessee in 1800, and settled in Davidson County, where the family resided until 1812. The grandfather died in 1835, and the father in 1876. The latter was clerk of the circuit court for twenty-four years. The mother of our subject died in 1845.

CHARLES ALFRED ABERNATHY, M. D., was born April 1, 1853, son of Alfred H. and Elizabeth T. (Butler) Abernathy, who were born in Giles County. The father for many years was one of the successful teachers of the county. Dr. Abernathy was educated in the common schools and Giles College, Pulaski. At the age of seventeen he quit farm work and began teaching, continuing for three years. During this time he was a disciple of Ęsculapius, and subsequently attended lectures at the University of Louisville, graduating from the institution as an M. D. in 1875. He practiced one year in Pulaski, and then went to Prospect, Tenn., and formed a partnership with Dr. Theo. Westmoreland, but a year later moved to Lewisburg, Marshall County. In 1880 he returned to Pulaski, where he has since practiced his profession. In May, 1885, he formed a partnership with Dr. C. C. Abernathy, one of the oldest physicians of the county. The firm is styled Drs. C. C. & C. A. Abernathy. In February, 1884, Dr. Abernathy married Mrs. Ella (Ezell) Flournoy. The Doctor is a Democrat, a Knight of Pythias, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mrs. Abernathy is a Presbyterian.

LEWIS AMIS, of the firm of L. Amis & Bro., dealers in groceries and general merchandise, at Vale Mills, Giles Co., Tenn., was born December 5, 1836, in Pulaski, Tenn. He is a son of John and Martha A. Amis, both natives of North Carolina. John Amis was the son of John and Pollie Amis, natives of Granville County, N. C., and Martha Amis was the daughter of Thomas and Pollie (Robertson) Wilkinson, natives of North Carolina. The parents of our subject were married August 14, 1823, in Williamson County, and to them were born eight children, named Mary A., Nancy, Martha J., John W., James F., Field R., Lewis and Nancy E. J. Our subject was educated in the district schools, and his occupation has been merchandising and farming from early boyhood. In 1866 he was married to Rebecca E. Summerhill, daughter of Horace and Parmelia Summerhill, of Lauderdale County, Ala. To our subject and wife was born one son, John L. The Amis Bros. are Democrats in politics, and our subject is a member of the F. AZ A. M. and also the A. L. of H. The Amis family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and in high standing. They have been successful men in all their undertakings, and are regarded as prosperous and industrious business men. The older members of the family came here at an early date and have been known in this State for nearly a century. They are of Scotch-Irish descent.

HON. WILLIAM F. BALLENTINE, one of the county's most highly respected and influential citizens, was born August 24, 1832, in Pulaski, Tenn., and is the son of Andrew M. Ballentine, who was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1791, immigrated to America in 1816, and in 1818 settled in Giles County, Tenn. In 1824 he married Mary T Goff, daughter of John and Isabella Goff, natives of Virginia. In 1825 Andrew moved to Pulaski and engaged in the dry goods business. By this marriage He became the father of eight children, named John G., George W., Margaret J., William F., Andrew J., James H., Adilade and Virginia O. The father of these children died in 1863, and the mother is still living. Our subject was the fourth child born to his parents. He received a liberal business education at the Wurtemburg Academy, in Pulaski, and at the age of fifteen he withdrew from school and entered into active business as a dry goods merchant with his father and brother (George). In 1856 he purchased the tract of land where he now resides, and settled upon it in 1857. Here he followed agricultural pursuits until 1861, when he entered the army as captain in Col. Biffle's regiment of cavalry; afterward he was on detached service with the Second Kentucky Cavalry until the close of the war. Previous to the war, October 11, 1853, he married Sarah E. Leatherman, daughter of Charles and Eliza Leatherman, natives of Rutherford County, Tenn. Mrs. Ballentine was born April 5, 1835. In 1865 our subject moved back to Pulaski and engaged in mercantile pursuits, which be followed until 1868. He was one of the incorporators of the Pulaski Savings Bank in 1879, and was president of the same until 1880. At that time he moved back to his farm, where he now resides on 500 acres of valuable land, known as the Glenn Gower Stock Farm. Fe also has 800 acres of land in the Twentieth District, Giles County. In 1882 he was elected to the State Legislature from Giles County and served one term. He is a Democrat, a member of the K. of H., and A. L. of H. and R. A. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, at Mount Pisgah.

ANDREW J. BALLENTINE, farmer of Giles County, Tenn., was born in Pulaski, December 30, 1834, and is the fifth child born to the union of Andrew M. and Mary Ballentine. He received a liberal education in the Wurtemburg Academy and at the ageo of nineteen began clerking in his father's dry goods store, in Pulaski. He remained in this capacity a number of years and then began farming, which was interrupted by the breaking out of the war. He joined Gen. Logwood's Battalion of Cavalry, but was soon transferred to Gen. Gordon's staff. After the war he again began farming and has followed that and merchandising up to the present time. In 1869, he wedded Amanda Kennedy, daughter of John and Pattie Kennedy, natives of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Ballentine have four children: Orlean, Sallie W., Hick and Lady. Mr. Ballentine gives considerable attention to fine stock-raising, and owns some fine land south and north of Pulaski, both portions being well improved. Mr. Ballentine is a Democrat, and of Irish descent.

THOMAS W. BARBER'S birth occurred on the 23d day of May, 1843, in Giles County, Tenn. His parents, Isaac J. and Eliza A. (Gordon) Barber, were born in Virginia, in 1814 and 1815, respectively. They were Tennessee pioneers, and did much to clear and settle the State. The father died September 29, 1885, and the mother in October 1858. At the age of eighteen, our subject enlisted in the Confederate Army in Col. Wheeler's First Tennessee Cavalry, and served until the close of the war, participating in many of the most important and bloodiest engagements. January 20,1867, be married Maggie A. Reid, born January 12, 1849, daughter of John P. C. Reed, of Giles County. Their children are named Henry R., Thomas Guy, Sammie C., T. Wesley, John I., Shellie M. and Lena M. Mr. Barber was raised under Whig influences, but since the war has not been identified with any party. He is a Mason, and owns a farm of 150 acres, cotton being the principal production. Mrs. Barber's parents were of Irish extraction. The father was a Tennesseean by birth, and was magistrate of Giles County for about thirty years and represented his county in the State Legislature one term. The mother's maiden name was Sarah A. Hazlewood.

JOHN L. BAUGH, an enterprising farmer, residing five miles south of Pulaski, in the Eighth District of Giles County, was a native of Williamson County, Tenn., born in 1841, and of German descent. His parents, Philip and Elizabeth Baugh, were natives of Tennessee, and were considered first-class citizens. Our subject secured a good education, and has been from early boyhood actively engaged in farming. In 1867 he was married to Mary D. Wilkins, and to them was born one child, a daughter, Annie. The mother of this child died in 1869, and in 1871 he wedded Docia Reed, who died in the fall of the same year. In 1874 he was again married to Lucy R. Grigsby. and this union resulted in the birth of two children. The family are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Baugh is a Democrat and a member of the F. & A. M. fraternity. In 1869 he moved to where he now resides, on 310 acres of excellent land, well improved. He is a rather succesful man in all his undertakings, and is regarded as a prosperous and industrious farmer.

JOHN A. BEASLEY, a practical and successful farmer, was born within one mile of his present residence October 14, 1822, being the fifth of eleven children of William M. and Elizabeth (Anthony) Beasley, who were natives of North Carolina, and were early settlers of Giles County, Tenn. Here they were married and raised their family. The father died in Madison County, Miss., in 1832, and the mother at the old homestead, in Giles County, in January, 1852. Our subject received a somewhat limited early education, and through life has followed farming. He served in the late war in the First Tennessee Cavalry, and served seventeen months. He was opposed to secession, and used his influence and votes to keep his State in the Union, but after secession became a fixed fact he followed the fortunes of his State. He was at Corinth, Iuka, and Thompson's Station, and at the battle of Iuka his horse was shot dead under him. He became exempt from service in 1863. October 24, 1844, he wedded Sarah C. Wells, born in Giles County July 28, 1828, daughter of Jesse Wells, an early settler of the county, born in Virginia in 1797, and to them were born eleven children: Jesse Fendle, William J. E., John E., Reble L., Dayton, Ann E., Sarah J., Eudora M. M., Ida J., Louella, and Daisy V. Mr. Beasley was formerly an old line Whig, but is now a Democrat. He is a Mason, and he and wife own 350 acres of land, and he is called one of the open-handed and honorable citizens of the county. He and his oldest daughter are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, while his wife and the rest of the family belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

HENRY L. BOOTH, trustee of Giles County and a native of that county, was born in 1844, near Bethel of said county. His father, Charles Thomas Booth and Mahala E. Jones, of Giles County, were married in 1843, and to their union were born six children: Henry L., Dewit M., Thomas M., Virginia A., Richard H. and Brown A. Booth. The father died in 1857. The mother is still living. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of Giles County. In 1862 he volunteered in the Thirty-second Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, and served until the close of the war. He then attended school at the academy at College Grove, Williamson County, Tenn., leaving school in 1867. He then joined the Tennessee Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, serving the appointments of Rogersville, Moulton and Montevallo Station, Ala., and Savannah Circuit. Lawrenceburg and Carthage, Tenn. After which failing health compelled him to suspend active labors. He then alternated between the occupations of farming and teaching until he was elected trustee of Giles County August 7, 1884, which office he still holds. he was married October 6, 1873, to Ella Cullom, of Carthage, Tenn., daughter of Gen. William and Virginia A. Cullom, who were of Kentucky origin. To this union have been born three children: Henry Cullom, Virginia Ella and Leslie Ewell Booth. The subject of this sketch, in politics, is a Democrat, and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

JOSEPH W. BRADEN, circuit clerk. was born in Giles County February 14, 1846, son of Jacob G. and Harriet (Johnson) Braden, and is of Scotch-Irish origin. The parents of our subject died when he was a mere boy, and at an extremely early age he was com pelled to light life's battle for himself. He attended the country schools, and at the age of fifteen cast his lot with the Confederate States Army, in Company E, Eleventh Tennessee. he was captured twice, and both times made his escape. For one year after the war lie attended school, his instructor being Edward Paschall, Jr. After this he clerked for some time in the store of Stacy, Morris & Co. In 1875 he was appointed deputy clerk and master under Maj. J. B. Stacy, and that continued for four years. He then farmed for for four years. Ili 1880 he married Miss Anna Bell Johnson, of this county. The fruits of this union were two children: Bessie and Rebecca S. Mr. Braden is a thorough Dem ocrat, and in 1882 was elected circuit court clerk of Giles County. He has been one of the best officers the county has ever had, and is a highly respected citizen. Mrs. Braden is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

HENRY M. BRANNON, merchant, is a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Carson) Brannon, and was born in Franklin County, Tenn., October 21, 1842, and is of Scotch-Irish origin. Robert Brannon was born in Tennessee in 1795, and Elizabeth Brannon, his wife, was born in the same State in 1798. The former died in 1854, and the latter in 1849. Our subject received a fair education and came to Pulaski in 1859, where he remained until the breaking out of the war. In 1861 he enlisted in Company C, First Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, and was in the leading battles fought in Virginia. He was captured at Petersburg, Va., in 1865, and was a prisoner two months in Fort Delaware. In 1867 he began merchandising in Pulaski, where he is still engaged in that business. In 1872 he wedded Mattie M. Bugg, daughter of Hon. R. M. Bugg, and to them were born six children: Annie L., Robert B., Pattie C., Thomas F., Lizzie M. and an infant not, named. Mr. Brennon is one of the leading merchants of this portion of Tennessee. At the time of the organization of the Peoples National Bank he was elected one of the directors, and now holds that position. he is one of the prominent men of the city, and he and wife are exemplary members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

CHARLES BUFORD, of the firm of Buford & Carter, in Pulaski, Tenn., dealers in hardware and agricultural implements, was born March 3, 1839, and is a son of Nicholas C. and Elizabeth W. Buford, who were Tennesseeans by birth, and were married in 1838. To them were born the following family: Charles, Richard B., Elbridge G., Lewis C., William A., Irene, Lucretia, Thomas, Mark, Sallie, Lucy, Lena, May and Claud. Nicholas C. Buford died in 1869. Charles is the eldest of the family, and received a liberal education in Giles College, at Pulaski. In 1861 he enlisted in the Third Tennessee Regiment and served until 1864, when he was wounded at Resaca, Ga., and retired from active service. After his return he farmed, and in the fall of 1866 moved to Nashville and engaged in clerking and book-keeping until 1870, when he returned to Giles County, and until 1875 was a tiller of the soil in that and Shelby County. At the latter date he moved to Pulaski, and has since been engaged in his present business. In 1870 he and Rosa Carter were married. To them was born one child-Mabel. Mrs. Buford died in 1872, and in 1884 Ella Stokes became Mr. Buford's second wife. They have one daughter-- Martha S. Our subject is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and his wife of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Buford is a Democrat and a member of the F. & A. M. fraternity.

FRANK G. BUFORD was born near where he now lives December 13,1851, son of Hon. Thomas Buford, who was also born in Giles County, Tenn. He was the first president of what was formerly known as the Nashville & Decatur Railway, and was a member of the Tennessee General Assembly for a number of years. He was one of the most prominent men of Giles County at the time of his death, which occurred here in 1860. The Buford family is of English origin. The paternal grandfather of our subject was an extensive land-owner. Our subject is the fourth of seven children born to his parents. His mother, Mary Ann (Gordon) Buford, was a daughter of Thomas K. Gordon. Our subject was educated at the common schools and at the Washington and Lee University, in Virginia. He graduated from this institution in 1878, and after returning home engaged in teaching school for some years. Later he turned his attention to farming and stockraising. Since 1876 he has been engaged in the breeding of trotting and pacing horses, but now gives his undivided attention to the breeding of pacing horses. He owns the famous pacer, "Tom Hal," sire of "Little Brown Jug," who has made the three fastest straight heats of any horse in America; time, 2:11¾, 2:11¾, and 2:12½. Among the famous sires that have been at Rockdale Farm are "Almont, Jr.," 2:29, sire of "Annie W., " 2:20; "Prince Pulaski," sire of "Mattie Hunter," 2:12¾; Gen. Hardee, sire of "Thunder," 2:22¾, and Buford's "Tom Hal." Mr. Buford is making a success in breeding pacing horses, and deserves the credit of being the first man in the United States to give his whole attention to and make a specialty of breeding pacers. In 1879 Mr. Buford married Lavina Childress, of this county, and by her has one child-Amanda. Mrs. Buford died in 1884. Our subject is a Democrat and one of the leading stockmen of Tennessee.

ADRIAN D. BULL, a retired merchant of Elkton, Tenn., is a native of the "Buckeye State," born in Greene County in 1815. His parents, John and Katherine Bull, were Virginians, who were married about 1793, and moved to Ohio in 1798. They became the parents of the following ten children: Benjamin F., William, Elizabeth, Arthur, Susan A., Katherine, Mary A., Adrian D., Richard R. and Caroline. The father and mother died in Ohio in 1825 and 1833, respectively. Adrian D. attended the common schools of the "Buckeye State," and in that State learned the saddler's trade. He came to Giles County, Tenn., in 1837, and located in Pulaski, where he worked at his trade. In 1838 he was married to Ursla Williams, daughter of John and Mildred Williams, and in 1843 moved to Elkton and worked at his trade until the outbreaking of the war. He then retired from active business until 1865. at which time he engaged in the dry goods business, continuing until 1881, when he sold his interest and retired from active life. He is essentially a self-made man, and is considered an estimable citizen. To him and wife were born the following children: Caroline, Julia A.. John W., Ann L., Charles O., Evaline. Susan, and Mildred. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and Mr. Bull belongs to the F. & A. M.

JAMES H. CAMPBELL, M. D., (deceased) was a leader in the society and every good work, and came of the pioneer family of John and Sarah Campbell. He was born in Maury County, Tenn., February 7, 1820, and spent his earliest days on a farm. His early education was liberal, and when young in years began the study of medicine, and graduated from the Kentucky School of Medicine, and as early as 1843 located at Campbellsville, Giles Co., Tenn., and began practicing his profession. He was twice married the first time in 1843, to Sarah M. Hunt, who died in 1863 leaving three children: John E., Mary E., and Anna M. Two years after his first wife's death the Doctor wedded Mary S. Alexander, born in Giles County, in 1842, and his widow and the following six children survive him: Alexander, Clarence, Colon, Sallie, Reece and Lillie. He was a Democrat and Mason, and a leading member of the Christian Church. He was an honest and respected citizen, and in his death the county lost one of its truest and best men. His death occurred in 1884. His widow yet resides on the homestead at Campbellsville. She is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and is a daughter of D. A. and Saphronia Alexander, born in Tennessee in 1811 and 1817, and died in 1882 and 1851, respectively.

H. TAYLOR CAMPBELL, M. D., Lynnville, Tenn., is a native of Hickman County, Tenn., born February 9, 1848, son of Hiram H. and Susan (Sisco) Campbell, and is of Scotch-Irish origin. His father was born in Williamson County, Tenn., January 17, 1814, and his mother in Hickman County, Tenn., January 18, 1818. Our subject's grandfather was William Campbell of North Carolina. The family came to Tennessee about 1800, and here Hiram Campbell died October 18, 1851, and his wife July 15, 1857. Our subject is one of four children and spent his early days on his father's farm. He attended the common schools and Centreville Academy, and in 1870 began the study of medicine, attending lectures at the old Medical College, of Nashville, and the medical department of Vanderbilt University, from which he graduated in 1875. A year later he located at Pleasantville, in Hickman County, and there continued the practice of his profession until 1879, when he came to Giles County, and in 1881 to Lynnville. He is the leading physician of the town and has an extensive and lucrative practice. In 1877, he married Ardella C. Ross, of Giles County. They have three children: Willie R., Susan A. and Sophia M. Dr. Campbell is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

WILLIAM C. CARTER, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser, residing in Giles County. Tenn., son of Joshua and Mary Carter, whose natal State was North Carolina. They were married about 1827, and became the parents of five children: Jane, Joshua H., William C., John N. and Jacob D. The father died in 1878, and his wife in 1859. Our subject is the third of their children and was educated in the common schools of Giles County. He assisted at farm work in early life, and in 1867 settled on the farm where he now resides. He owns 400 acres of valuable and well improved land, and of late years has devoted his time to breeding and developing fine stock. in which he has been more than ordinarily successful. In 1867 the nuptials of his marriage with Sarah J. Simmons were celebrated, and to their union have been born two children: David P. and John W. Mr. and Mrs. Carter are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is a supporter of Democratic principles. Mrs. Carter's parents are Merrill and Jane Simmons, of Giles County.

J. SAMUEL CHILDERS, wholesale and retail dealer in groceries, was born in Pulaski, Tenn., April 28, 1846, son of J. B. and Susan (Ezell) Childers, and is of Scotch-Irish and English descent. The parents were natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. The former was born August 29, 1815, and the latter was born October, 1825, and died in Giles County in 1865. The Childers family immigrated to Tennessee in 1819, and settled in Giles County. They have for many years been one of the leading families of this county. Our subject, one of the prominent business men of this city, is the eldest of five living children. He was educated at Giles College in Pulaski, and, in 1864 enlisted in Company K, First Tennessee Cavalry, and remained in the Confederate service until the close of the war.In 1865 he engaged in the merchandise business in Pulaski, and in 1868 he was joined In marriage to Miss Ada Pullen, of Giles County. This union was blessed by the birth of one child, Ben. From 1869 to 1874 Mr. Childers was in the dry goods business at Wales Station, this county, but in the latter year he returned to Pulaski, where he continued the dry goods business for two years, and then for four years was connected with a cotton factory. In 1874 he began the grocery business in this city, and has since continued that occupation. Mr. Childers is an enterprising man and a Democrat in politics. He is a Knight Templar, Pulaski Commandery, No. 12, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

WILLIAM A. COFFMAN is the eldest of two children of Amers and Mary M. (Acock) Coffman, and was born in Logan County, Ky., March 23, 1832, and after attending the common schools began tilling the soil. He has been twice married, the first time in Giles County, Tenn., October 16, 1855, to Agnes E. Howard, daughter of Wesley Howard, and became the parents of these children: Rollin, who died November 10, 1882; Robert, died October 27, 1884; Benjamin F., James F., William, Julius C., Arthur, Mary J., Anna Lee and Sallie V. These children's mother was born in Giles County, Tenn., December 5, 1837, and died August 27,1879. Our subject married for his second wife, Maggie R. Barbour. To them were born two daughters: Emma M. and Eva M. Her parents, John L. and Elizabeth E. (Guinn) Barbour; the mother's father, Wm. Guinn, being an eminent divine of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Tennessee. Mr. Coffman is an old-line Democrat and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He has a farm of 109 acres, on which he raises cotton and the cereals. His paternal grandfather, Adam Coffman, was a British soldier and served through the entire Revolutionary war. He was discharged at Montreal, Canada, but was afterward married in Maryland, and then came to Kentucky. Our subject's maternal grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war in the Colonial Army, serving over seven years, and participating in the battles of Camden, Yorktown, Guilford Court House, Brandywine, and many others.

WILLIAM R. CRAIG, grain dealer, was born a few miles west of Pulaski, Tenn., November 21, 1852, son of W. J. and Virginia (Abernathy) Craig, and is of Scotch-Irish lineage. His father and mother were born in Tennessee, and Virginia in 1820 and 1831, respectively. The Craig family came to Tennessee in 1815, and settled in Williamson County, and in 1840 came to Giles County, Tenn., and here the father died in 1884. William R. was the eldest of his six children. He was educated in Woodlawn Academy, and in 1870 came to Pulaski, and for three years was clerk in a grocery establishment. He then began business for himself, continuing until 1882, when he was burned out. In the fall of the same year he engaged in the grain business, and has continued the same up to the present time. He also deals in fruit, and annually ships large quantities of the same. In 1874 he and Sallie Ezell were united in marriage, and four children have blessed their union: W. Ezell, Robert P., Flournoy and Edward M. Mr. Craig is a Democrat and Mason, Knight Templar degree. They are members of the Episcopal Church, and he is one of the popular men of the county.

THOMAS E. DALY, of the firm of Moore & Daly, at Elkton, Giles Co., Tenn., was born March 16, 1859, son of Thomas B. and Martha A. Daly, whose natal States were Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. They were married in Giles County about 1844, and four daughters and three sons blessed their union: Mary V., Ella N., James W., Frederick R., Thomas E., Annie L. and Florence E. The father and mother died in 1873 and 1869, respectively. Thomas E. obtained his education principally at Oak Hill, Tenn., and in 1877 was engaged as clerk by A. D. Bull & Co., and remained with that firm until January, 1881, when he bought out Mr. Bull's interest in the business, and the firm is now known as Moore & Daly. January 2, 1881, Mr. Daly was married to Georgie Bull, daughter of Richard Bull, of Epton, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South at that place. Our subject is a Democrat and of Irish descent, and belongs to an old and highly respected family.

WASHINGTON R. DICKERSON, farmer and stock-raiser, residing in the Thirteenth District of Giles County, Tenn., near Buford's Station, was born in Lynchburg, Va., October 21, 1811, and is a son of Terry and Nancy Dickerson, who were born in the "Old Dominion" and were married about 1805. Mary K., Allen A. and Washington R. are their children. The father died in 1818 and the mother in 1813. Our subject came to this State when a small lad, with some relatives, and settled in Maury County, where his education was very much neglected. He has farmed from boyhood, and in 1838 settled on a farm of his own. He owns 600 acres of as fine land as Giles County produces, besides 235 acres in the Fifteenth District and some valuable property in Pulaski, all of which he has made by his own good management and industry and the aid of his wife, who is in every sense of the word a helpmate. In 1843 he married Mary J. Stone, and eight children have blessed their union: Sarah K., Ophelia S., William A., Mary J., Betsy S., Rosa B. S., Washington R. and Jeffie. The family are Presbyterians, and our subject is a Democrat and of Irish lineage.

HON. Z. W. EWING, lawyer, a native of Marshall County, Tenn., is a son of L. A. and R. A. (Leeper) Ewing, and of old Scotch-lrish Presbyterian stock. His father was born near Athens, Ga., in 1809, and his mother in Bedford County, Tenn., in the same year. The father was a merchant and farmer and for many years was one of the leading magistrates of Marshall County. He died in 1853. The mother of our subject died in 1877, in Marshall County. Mr. Ewing was the seventh of eight children. During his youth his summers were spent on the farm at labor and in the winter season he attended the country schools. In 1859 he was a student at the Lewisburg M ale Academy, and in 1860 went to Maryville College, in East Tennessee, where he remained until the breaking out of the war. He then joined Capt. R. H. McCrory's company, afterward Company H, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and was promoted to lieutenant by commission, but served in the capacity of captain and major for two years. He was captured at Petersburg, Va., in 1864, and was confined under retaliation in the prisons of Fort Delaware, Fort Pulaski, Hilton Head and Sullivan's Island, upon the southern coast. He was released in 1865, and came home and resumed his studies. In 1866 he entered the University of Virginia, and there remained until the summer of 1868. In the fall of that year he taught school at Richmond, Tenn. In 1870 he went to Europe and spent a year in travel and &he study of the German language. In 1871 he came to Pulaski and began the study of law in the office of Judge Thomas M. Jones. In the same year he wedded Harriet P. Jones, of Pulaski. They have one child-Marietta. December, 1871, he was licensed to practice law, and in May, 1877, he was appointed by Gov. Porter, as one of the three railway assessors for the State. In 1878 he was elected to the State Senate from the counties of Giles, Lawrence, Lewis and Wayne, and was chairman of and member of important committees. In 1879 he was appointed State visitor of the University of Tennessee, and delivered the annual address before that institution. September, 1879, he was appointed special attorney for the State and is now engaged in the practice of his profession. He has been a life-long Democrat, and has occupied many positions of public trust and has presided over one of the State conventions of his party. He is one of Giles County's most prominent men. Mrs. Ewing is a member of the Episcopal Church.

WILL S. EZELL, county court clerk, is a native of Pulaski, Tenn., and a son of P. H. and Mary A. (Shields) Ezell. The father was born in this county in 1816, and his mother was also born in this county in 1827. The Ezell family came to Giles County in 1808, and is one of the pioneer familes of this part of Tennessee. Our subject's birth occurred December 16, 1847. He was educated in Giles College, and in 1864 enlisted in Company K, First Tennessee. After the war he engaged as clerk in a store and for some time as book-keeper. He then engaged in the mercantile business for himself. In 1878 his father was elected county court clerk and our subject served as deputy county court clerk for four years. In 1875 he was united in marriage to Ada Faust, of this county, and the fruits of this union were four children: Otis M., Mary A., Edith and John F. In 1882 Mr. Ezell was elected county court clerk and has since held that office. He is a thorough practical business man and has made a good officer. He is a Democrat and a Knight Templar, Pulaski Commandery, No. 12. He came of an old and well respected family, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

PINK M. EZELL, dealer in stoves, tinware and house-furnishing goods, is a nativeP Plaski, Tenn., born January 19, 1860, son of P. H. and Mary Ezell, old and prominent settlers of this county. Our subject is one of ten children, and is of Scotch-French descent. He was educated in the Pulaski schools, and when about sixteen years of age became salesman in the grocery store of W. R. Craig, and later clerked in a stove and tin store, and continued in this capacity until 1880, when he began business for himself, and has continued successfully in the stove and tinware business up to the present time. Mr. Ezell has made his own way in life, and is one of the prosperous young business men of Pulaski. In 1882 he united his fortunes with that of Mattie McCord, daughter of W. L. McCord, ex-editor of the Pulaski Citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Ezell have two daughters, named Mary and Margery. Mr. Ezell is a Democrat, and he and wife are church members.

ABRAM F. FINLEY is the son of Carroll and Nancy Finley, natives of Tennessee. They were married in 1835, and to them were born the following children: James L. D., Martha E., Newton M., Abram F., Josie, Charles C. and Mollie. The mother died in 1854. Our subject was born in Marshall County in 1845, and received a liberal education in the district schools of Marshall County. In early life he assisted his father in farming. At the youthful age of sixteen he joined the Confederate Thirty-second Tennessee Regiment of Volunteers (Col. Ed. C. Cook, commanding), and remained in service until the close of the war, and participated in most of the principal battles. He then returned home, and was engaged in farming until 1867, when he came to Pulaski and engaged in the liquor business. He has been very successful financially, as he started on a very small capital, but by industry he has made himself a wealthy man. He is noted for his liberality, and contributes to all charitable organizations. He is a Democrat in politics. The early members of the Finley family emigrated from North Carolina at an early date, settled in Marshall County, and were among the first settlers of Middle Tennessee.

CAPT. JOHN D. FLAUTT, cashier of the Giles National Bank, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., October 2. 1835, son of James and Delilah O. (Dillon) Flautt, and is of German descent. James Flautt was born in Maryland, in 1800, and his wife in North Carolina, in 1804. He came to Tennessee in 1820 and to Giles County in 1838, and died in the latter place in 1883. Mrs. Flautt died in 1868. Our subject is the sixth of their seven children, and received the rearing and schooling of the average farmer's boy, besides attending Giles College, at Pulaski. From 1860 until May 14, 1861, he was a clerk in the dry goods store of D. C. Corbt & Co. At the latter date he enlisted in John C. Brown's Company, Third Tennessee, Confederate States Army, as private, and was commissioned regimental quartermaster in October, 1862, with the rank of captain, and thus continued until the close of the war. In December, 1865, he engaged in the hardware business in Pulaski, but in 1882 was elected assistant cashier of Giles National Bank, and January, 1883, was elected cashier. May 19, 1869, he wedded Salonia M. Rose, daughter of Col. S. E. Rose. They have five children: Marcella R., James S., Mary L., John H. and Meredith. Mr. Flautt is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Buchanan. He became a Mason in 1866, and he and Mrs. Flautt are members of the Presbyterian Church.

WILLIAM FOGG, deceased, was a farmer and a stock raiser of the Sixth District in Giles County. He was born in King George County, Va., in 1799, son of Frederick and Elizabeth Fogg, natives of Virginia. William received a good education and came to this State, settling in Giles County in the early part of this century. He was a tiller of the soil, and in 1832 he was joined for life to Frances Fogg, who died in 1852, in Giles County. In 1855 he took for his second wife Sarah L. Morris, the widow of Gen. Lafayette Morris, and the daughter of Levi and Mary A. Reed, natives of Tennessee. By this union our subject became the father of five children, viz.: Annie M., Frances E., William R., Frederick A. and Louisa M. Mr. Fogg came from a very highly respected family, and is of English descent. He owned 300 acres of good land, all well improved, and was in very comfortable circumstances. He died in 1868, mourned by a large circle of relatives and friends. He was a Democrat in politics.

THOMAS S. FOGG'S birth occurred in King and Queen's County, Va, June 20, 1820, the oldest and only surviving member of a family of five children born to James G. and Patsy (LaFaun) Fogg, and is of Scotch and French extraction. James Fogg was born in Virginia, in 1790, and came to Tennessee in 1823. He served in the war of 1812, and died in Giles County, Tenn., July 2, 1852. The mother was also a Virginian, born in 1795, and died in 1833, in Tennesee. Our subject's grandfather, James Fogg, served in the war for Independence and fought at Bunker Hill and Cowpens. Our subject has made farming his chief business through life, but in early life followed carpentering and traveled in all the Southern States. Mary M. Beasley became his wife December 24, 1846, and has borne him twelve children, nine now living: Thomas A., Walter S., Oscar G., Harry P.. Edwin, Claude, Guy, Gertrude and Maie. Mrs. Fogg was born May 11, 1829. Mr. Fogg was an old-line Whig and since the death of that party has not affiliated with any political organization. He was made a Mason in 1847, and owns the "Pleasant View" farm of 500 acres, and is a liberal and benevolent giver, aiding all laudable enterprises. The most of the family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

ANDREW L. GLAZE, M. D., a practicing physician located at Elkton, Giles County, was born February 25, 1837, in Limestone County, Ala., and is of Irish extraction. He received his early education in the schools of Alabama, and subsequently attended school at Elkton, Giles County. In 1858 he began the study of medicine with Dr. A. J. Held, of Elkton, and in 1859 entered the University of Nashville and attended one course of lectures. At the time of the breaking out of the war he was connected with the medical department of the Confederate Army where he remained until the close of the war. He then returned to Elkton, and was engaged in the practice of his profession. October 18, 1866, he was joined in marriage to Martha J. Stone, daughter of Thomas J. and Almira Stone, of Lincoln County. By this union our subject and wife became the parents of four children: Lilla, Madora, Mattie and Annie. In 1874, Dr. Glaze entered the University of Nashville, and graduated from that institution in 1875. He then returned to Elkton. and has been constantly engaged in his profession ever since. The Doctor is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Glaze died May 2, 1886.

GEORGE D. GRAY, M. D., of Buford Station, Tenn., was born in Mississippi, near Holly Springs, Marshall County, June 18, 1845. His father, Dr. George W. Gray, was born in Maryland in 1814, and came to Tennessee in 1828, thence to Mississippi, thence to Arkansas in 1854, where he resided and practiced medicine until his death in 1873. Our subject's mother's maiden name was Sallie Reynolds, who was born in Giles County, Tenn., and died in 1848. George D. received a liberal education at North Mount Pleasant, Miss., and began the study of medicine in the fall of 1865, attending lectures at the University of Louisiana, at New Orleans, and subsequently attended lectures at Washington University, at Baltimore, Md., graduating from that institution in 1868. He located in Arkansas, where he practiced his profession with success until 1883, when he came to Giles County, Tenn., and has successfully practiced his profession at Buford Station. In 1873, he married Sallie Sloan, of Arkansas, and by her is the father of five children: Dudley, George W., St. Clair N., Janie and Maud. Dr. Gray and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

BERRY C. HARDIMAN is a son of William J. Hardiman, and was born in Charlotte County, Va., June 5, 1839. The father came to Tennessee in the fall of 1856, by wagon, the journey lasting seven weeks. He was married to Mary A. Irvin, who was born in Virginia in 1816, and died in Giles County April 4, 1865. Our subject in youth received the advantages the common schools afforded. He served in the Fifty-third Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, three years, and was captured at the fall of Fort Donelson, but escaped by swimming the Cumberland River. He then joined Wheeler's Cavalry, and after being exchanged at Vicksburg returned to his former regiment. He was at Port Hudson, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, the almost continuous battle from Dalton to Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville, where he was wounded and disabled for further service until the close of the war He was married, February 12, 1868, to Mattie M. Barnes, and seven children blessed their union, six of whom are living: William, Mary A., Ozellar, Mattie M., Revy L., and Ethel B. Mrs. Hardiman was born in Giles County, April 9, 1845, the thirteenth of fifteen children born to Jeremiah and Marilla (Gooch) Barnes. Mr. Hardiman was a Whig, but since the war has voted the Democratic ticket, and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He owns 253 acres of good land, and is doing well financially. Uriah Hardiman, grandfather of our subject, served throughout the Revolutionary war

HON. THOMAS B. HARWELL, a retired physician of Giles County, is the son of Gilham and Annie Harwell, natives of Virginia, who immigrated to Tennessee when quite small. They were married in 1820, and this union resulted in the birth of seven children: Sarah E., Thomas B., Samuel G., Annie W., Alfred F., Mary A. and William G. The father died in 1838, and the mother is still living. Our subject received his education in the Wurtenburg Academy, at Pulaski. In 1844 he commenced the study of medicine with I. J. Pepperson, of the above town, and in the fall of 1844 entered the Louisville Medical College, and attended one course of lectures. In 1850 he commenced the practice of medicine, and was engaged in this profession until 1867. He then abandoned his practice, and has since been devoting all his time to agricultural pursuits on the farm where he now resides. He has 600 acres of excellent land, all well improved, which is six miles south of Pulaski, near Harwell's Station. He has been a rather successful man in all his undertakings, and is regarded as a prosperous and industrious farmer. In 1875 he was elected to the Legislature from Giles County, and was re-elected to the same in 1879, representing Giles and Lincoln Counties. He is a Democrat in politics, a member of the F & A. M. fraternity, and is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He has also taken an active part in educational affairs of Tennessee, and is one of Giles County's leading citizens.

ROBERT A. HAZLEWOOD may be mentioned as one of the prominent and successful farmers of Giles County, Tenn. He was born in Campbell County, Va. January 15, 1822, and is the second of nine children of Little B. and Rachel (Walker) Hazlewood. His early education was obtained in the common schools. At the age of nineteen his inclination drew him westward, and he lived in Alabama two years, then came to Tennessee and followed farming and carpentering in Giles County. November 2, 1843, he married Amanda M. Hazlewood, daughter of Mitchell Hazlewood, and these children Mitchell F., Rachel W., Ann Eliza, Sarah 1. (deceased), and Lucretia were born. Mrs. Hazlewood died December 17, 1851, and our subject married Serena S. Hazlewood, daughter of John Hazlewood. Henry, Thomas, William W. (deceased), John F., Allen W. and Felix S. are their children. Our subject's grandfathers, Hazlewood and Walker, were born in Virginia, and were Revolutionary soldiers, and his father was a soldier in the war of 1812. Robert A. served in the late war in the Fifty-third Tennessee Infantry, and was captured at Fort Donelson, and for seven months was a prisoner in Indianapolis. In March, 1862, he was discharged on account of age. Mr. Hazlewood is a Democrat from principle and education. He owns 160 acres of good land, and he and wife and four children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

ROBERT N. HERBERT, M. D., is a native of Williamson County, Tenn., his birth occurring near the village of Brentwood September 27, 1842, son of Robert N. and Elizabeth (Cummins) Herbert, and of English origin. His parents were born in Davidson County, Tenn., the father in 1811, and the mother in 1814. Of a family of nine children our subject is the fifth. He spent his boyhood days on a farm and in attending the common schools. At the breaking out of the late civil war he enlisted in Company B, Twentieth Tennessee Infantry, and served four years to a day, participating in some of the most hotly contested battles of the war. He began the study of medicine upon his return home, under Dr. B. W. Carmack, and graduated from the Nashville Medical College in 1867, and the same year located at Campbellsville, Giles Co., Tenn., where he has since been a successful practitioner of the healing art. December 14, 1867, he was married to Wessie Reams, who died September 2. 1874. November 14, 1876, Dr. Herbert married Kittie Rogers, and four children have blessed their union: Robert C., Mary Wessie, Annie L. and Sallie E. Dr. Herbert is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

LEWIS S. HODGE, farmer, is a North Carolinian by birth, born February 21, 1817, and came to Tennessee with his parents, John and Sallie Hodge, at an early day. They located in Maury County, and became the parents of six children--three daughters and three sons: Gabriel L., Elizabeth, Lewis S., Mary, Samuel and Nancy. The father's death occurred in 1825, and the mother's in 1868. Lewis S. obtained such education as could be obtained in the common schools of Maury County at this early day. He has followed tilling of the soil from boyhood, and has resided on his present farm of 116 acres of valuable land since 1834. Willie J. Cavnor became his wife in 1835. She is a daughter of Thomas and Nancy Cavnor, of Giles County, and became the mother of ten children-- seven sons and three daughters: John, James, Sallie, Samuel, William, Jackson, Harris, Nannie, Henry and Mary. Mr. and Mrs. Hodge are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in his political views are subject is a Democrat.

WILLIAM J. HOWARD, is a son of John W. Howard, who was born in Butler County, Ky., in 1804, and came to Tennessee in 1825, and a few years later married Jane H. Butler, who was born in Giles County, Tenn., in 1809. The father was a farmer and died August 2, 1882. His wife died at the old homestead in 1875. William J. was the second of nine children, and was born in Giles County, Tenn., June 7, 1831. His preparatory education was obtained in the common schools, after which he took a course in Giles College, Pulaski, Tenn. He began farming for himself when about twenty-one years of age, and has followed that calling through life, and owns 518 acres of good land. March 3, 1859, Amanda M. Poor, of Logan County, Ky., became his wife, and of eight children born to them seven are living: George W., Drury R., Isaac B., Edward W., Berilla R., Amanda E. and Tennessee. Mrs. Howard was born June 12, 1837, and is the daughter of George A. and Berilla (Howard) Poor. Our subject served in the late war in the First Tennessee Cavalry, under Col. Wheeler, and was captured and taken to Jeffersonville, Ind., where he was paroled. Mr. Howard is conservative in his political views and belongs to the Masonic fraternity.

SAMUEL C. JOHNSTON, a native of Charlotte County, Va., was born in 1818. and came to Tennessee with his parents in 1833. They settled in Giles County six miles northwest of the county seat. His father, John Johnston, was born in Charlotte County, Va., in 1790, and followed the carpenter trade until after marriage, when he began farming. His wife, and the mother of our subject, Judith Cobb, was horn in Virginia, in 1785. and died July 19, 1847. The father is still living but is very feeble. Our subject was reared on the farm, and in 1840 wedded Dianna Smith, a native of Tennessee, born in 1824, and the daughter of Archibald and Frances (Wright) Smith. To Mr. and Mrs. Johnston was born one child, named Charles F.: he was born in 1841 and died January 28, 1866. Mrs. Johnston died in 1846, and in 1850 our subject immigrated to California, and spent fourteen months prospecting in the rich gold fields of the border State. He was a private in Thomas' Tennessee Regiment, Haynes' company, in the Mexican war. Mr. Johnston has always lived on the farm with his father: this tract contains 340 acres of good land. In 1854 he wedded Harriet E. Rolland, a native of Tennessee, born in 1834, and the daughter of John and Harriet (Carter) Rolland. To our subject and wife were born four children: Mary E., Mattie H., John R. and Margaret S. Mr. Johnson is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Johnston was also a member of the same church, and remained firm in the faith until her death, which occurred in 1885. The Johnston family are of Irish descent and have always made honorable and prosperous citizens.

MONROE M. JOHNSON, M. D., is a son of Matthew and Sina (Abernathy) Johnson, and was born January 3, 1828. His parents were born in North Carolina, and were there married in about 1818, and came to Tennessee the same year. Three daughters and four sons were born to this union: Franklin, John C., Harriet, James, Rebecca, Monroe M. and Drusilla C. Matthew Johnson died in 1867, and his wife in 1860. Our subject received the advantages the common schools afforded, and supplemented that by a five years' course in the College Grove Academy, in Williamson County. In 1850 he began studying medicine under Dr. R. G. P. White, and in the fall of the same year entered Jefferson Medical College, at Philadelphia, Penn., from which institution he graduated three years later. He practiced in Old Lynnville until the breaking out of the civil war, when he enlisted and served in his professional capacity four years. He then purchased the farm of 252 acres where he now lives, and has practiced his profession and farmed ever since. Mary E. White became his wife in 1853. She is a daughter of Benton and Jane White, natives of Giles County, and became the mother of five children: Annie B., Alice B., Robert B., Walter T. and Helen W.; Anna and Helen only are living. Dr. Johnson is of Irish descent, and is a Democrat in politics and a member of the F. & A. M.

HON. THOMAS M. JONES, attorney at law, is a son of Wilson and Rebecca (McKissack) Jones, and of Welsh-Scotch descent. The father of Mr. Jones was a Virginian and immigrated to Giles County, Tenn., in 1817, and died here in 1818. His grandfather McKissick was a Revolutionary soldier. Our subject was born in Person County, N. C., December 16, 1816, and was the youngest of five children. He grew up on the farm and received a common school education. In 1831 he entered the University of Alabama, where he remained until the fall of 1833, after which he entered the Universitv of Virginia and there remained until 1835. In the latter school he began the study of law, and after returning to Pulaski he began reading law in the office of Col. John H. Rivers & W. C. Flournoy, and remained here until 1836, when he raised a company for the Seminole war; was mustered out January, 1837, and the same year was admitted to practice law. In 1844 he was county elector on the Democratic ticket, and in 1847 he was elected to represent Lincoln and Giles Counties in the Legislature, and in 1847 was elected State senator for Giles and Maury Counties. He was elected a member of the Confederate Congress in 1861. Nine years later he was elected a member of the Constitutional Convention of Tennessee. For nearly fifty years he has been engaged in the law practice, and is now the oldest practitioner in Giles County bar. He has held the office of judge a number of times by appointment. He is one of the successful lawyers of this part of Tennessee. December 25, 1838, be wedded Marietta Perkins, of Williamison County, Tenn., and to this union were born nine children: Calvin (deceased), Charles P., Thomas W., Hume T., Harriet, Edward S., Lulie A., Lee W. and Nicholas T. Mr. Jones is a Democrat, a Mason, a Knight Templar, Commandery No. 12. Mrs. Jones died in 1871, and in 1883 Mr. Jones married Mrs. Ann Wood, of West Tennessee. He and wife are members of the Episcopal Church.

JAMES L. JONES (familiarly known as Lew Jones), county judge, was born in Giles County, Tenn., October 28, 1824, son of Edward Dandridge and Elizabeth H. (Rainey) Jones, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. The former was born in 1788 and the latter in 1790. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Abram Jones, a native of Virginia, who died in that State some time about 1792. About 1818 the father of our subject immigrated to Giles County, Tenn., and for nineteen years was county court clerk. He died in 1855. Our subject's mother died in Tennessee in 1854. James. L. Jones was a country boy, and received his education in the common schools. In 1847 he enlisted in Company C, Third Regiment, Tennessee Foot Volunteers of the Mexican war. He was a lieutenant, and served until the close of the war. From 1848 to 1855 he was deputy county court clerk. Then for a number of years he was engaged in trading. In 1865 be was elected magistrate and also assistant assessor of internal revenue, which position he held until 1869. In 1873 he was elected county judge, which office he has held continuously since. His official record is one of the best ever made in Giles County. In 1860 he wedded Julia E. Blair, of Maury County, Tenn., and this union was blessed by the birth of nine children, six of whom survive: Edward B., Llewellyn, Mattie R., Elizabeth H., William R. and Mary. Mr. Jones was formerly a Whig, but is now a Democrat. He is a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JOHN W. JUDKINS is the son of Robert B. and Mary C. Judkins, natives, respectively, of South and North Carolina. They were married in this county in 1830, and to them were born nine children: Mary J., William S., John W., Martha A., Amanda C., Thomas D., Sarah M., Harriet V., and Enoch L. Our subject was born November 12, 1836, in Giles County, and received a liberal education in the common district schools of that county. In 1861 he wedded Tennessee C. Hopson, daughter of Renix and Rachel Hopson, natives of North Carolina, and this union resulted in the birth of one daughter, Tennessee C. Mrs. Judkins died in 1862, and in 1867 Mr. Judkins took for his second wife Mary F. Rains, daughter of William and Mary Rains, of Kentucky. By the last union our subject became the father of seven children: George A., Mary F., Martha O., Margaret E., Julia R., Lela J. and Robert R. In 1872 Mr. Judkins engaged in the grocery and general merchandise business in Pulaski, and still continues that business in connection with farming. He has a good farm of ninety-eight acres, all well improved, lying near the town of Pulaski. Mr. Judkins has been quite successful in all his undertakings, and is regarded as a prosperous and industrious farmer.

JASPER KELSEY, M. D., of Old Lynnville, Giles Co., Tenn., was born in Maury County In 1838, son of Thomas and Hester Kelsey, natives of the Palmetto State. They were married in Tennessee in 1828, and the following children were born to their union: Mary A., William T., Susan M., Robert A., George E., Newton and Jasper. Mrs. Kelsey died in 1848, and the father in 1872. Our subject's juvenile days were spent in attending school and assisting his parents on the farm. In 1860 be began his medical studies under Drs. Beard and Harwell, of Henryville, Tenn., but on the breaking out of the war he enlisted in the Twenty-third Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers, and served four years, participating in most of the principal battles of the war. After his return he resumed his medical studies, and in 1867 entered the University of Nashville, and was graduated as an M. D., from that Institution in 1869. Since that time he has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession at old Lynnville, and is regarded as a reliable and successful physician. In 1868 he and Mary M. Compton were united in matrimony, and their union was blessed with the following family: Hettie E., Mary R., Annie T., Frederick W., Edna G., Alice V. and Verda. Y. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and our subject is a Democrat and of Irish descent.

JOHN T. LOWRY was born where he now resides, September 1, 1841, the youngest of three children born to James B. and Elizabeth Lowry, born in South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. They were married about 1835, and in 1840 located on the farm where our subject now lives. The father died in 1864, and the mother in 1869. John L. is of Scotch-Irish descent, and after attending the common schools in his youthful days, engaged in farming and tanning. He owns 350 acres of valuable land, well improved, and devotes considerable attention to the raising of fine stock. In 1867 he was married to Matura A. Gracy, daughter of Joseph B. and Elizabeth Gracy, and to them were born James B., David B., John S., Lizzie L., Eddie E. and Luther. Mr. and Mrs. Lowry are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

THOMAS MARTIN. Indissolubly connected with the history of Giles County is the life of Thomas Martin. The son of Rev. Abram Martin, he was born in Albemarle County, Va., on the 16th of December, 1799, and in 1818 moved to Pulaski, Tenn., to carve his own fortune in what was then the far West. Imbued with a deep religious fervor, which characterized his entire life, he early joined the Methodist Church, of which he was ever after an active and earnest member. In a comparatively short time, by economy, prudence, sobriety and an unusual facility for business, he had amassed a respectable fortune, which was entirely swept away by the treachery of his partner in business, who had been left in entire control of Mr. Martin's funds, while the latter was absent for a short time on a visit to his parents. Despite the blow, which would have utterly crushed the hopes and ambitions of most young men, he firmly refused to take the advice of friends and attorneys to avail himself of the plea of infancy, for he was not yet grown to man's estate, and assuming the entire obligations of his false partner, he started again in business with the declaration: "If God gives me life and strength, every dollar shall be paid." Against such energy and iron-will the fates themselves are powerless to prevail; the character and integrity shown in the beardless boy challenged the admiration of the entire business community; he was quickly offered a partnership by the principal merchant of Pulaski, and it was not long before the firm of Meredith & Martin became known throughout Middle Tennessee. About this time he married Miss Nancy Topp, and formed a copartnership with his brother-in-law, Dr. Wm. Topp, a highly educated and accomplished physician, and one of those hardy pioneers, who, on the staff of Andrew Jackson, aided in achieving the laurels of "Old Hickory," and added not a little to the brilliant successes of the Seminole war. The new firm displayed the activity, which had accompanied all the enterprises with which Mr. Martin had been connected, and by utilizing the small streams which flow into the Elk River, secured a market for the cotton of Giles County in New Orleans, then, as now, the chief cotton mart of the world. Mr. Martin had now become the recognized financier of his section, and the subject of a railroad through the central portion of the State being agitated, his aid and counsel were eagerly solicited. He was not slow to perceive the advantages which railway communication with north Alabama would give to Giles County, and rode night and day to personally solicit the aid of every man, who could assist the enterprise. In a short time the idea became a fact; the Southern Central Railroad, which is now a part of the great Louisville & Nashville system, was built, and soon after Thomas Martin became its president. Though Mr. Martin took no active part in politics, he was a life-long Democrat, and thoroughly concurred with the doctrines of that party, and on the accession of James K. Polk to the Presidency he was tendered the secretaryship of the treasury, which office, however, he declined. Though he had always firmly refused a nomination for any political office, he consented to act as one of the commissioners to the Peace Conference, and did everything in his power to avert the dreadful calamities, which followed the civil war. Mr. Martin died in 1870, at the age of seventy years, leaving a large fortune, despite the losses which he had suffered by the war. He had several children; but Ophelia, who married Judge Henry M. Spofford, afterward United States Senator from Louisiana, was the only one living at the time of his death. His charities were numerous: he contributed largely to the building of the Methodist Church in Pulaski, and to the male academy, and endowed the large and handsome female seminary which bears his name. He never failed to aid the youth who was struggling with poverty, provided he was moral and industrious. In death, as throughout life, he was a zealous Christian, and died with the praises of the Redeemer on his lips: "Sweet Lamb of God, I'll see Thy bright face, joy! joy!" being nearly his last words on earth. "In business he was a giant," once remarked an admirer; he might have added that in all the grander attributes of human character, he was the ideal of splendid manhood.

JESSE MAYES, M. D., an old and prominent physician of Giles County, is the son of Jesse and Frances (Hill) Mayes, natives of Virginia. They were married in 1800, immigrated to this State and settled in Giles County in 1825. To this union were born ten children: Fletcher H.. Thomas H., Mary, Susan, Elizabeth, Jesse, Fannie, Octavia, Samuel J. and Abigail. The father died in 1860, and the mother followed him in 1866. Our subject was born October 25, 1814, in Rockbridge County, Va., and attended the district schools. In 1834 he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Edward R. Field, a prominent physician of Pulaski at that time. Our subject entered the Cincinnati Medical College in 1838, and after attending two courses of lectures he received an appointment from the government as assistant surgeon in the Indian emigration and held the position for the year 1840. At this time he returned to Giles County, and has since been constantly engaged in his profession and is regarded as one of the oldest and most reliable physicians of this county. In 1841 he married Mary E. Cook, daughter of Col. and Sallie Cook, of North Carolina, and to them were born three children: Julia F., Sarah F. and William H. (deceased). Dr. Mayes has 400 acres of land in partnership with his son-in-law, Jacob E. Morton, and is in very comfortable circumstances. In 1836 he was in the Florida war, and served his time and received an honorable discharge at New Orleans, Dr. Mayes is a Democrat in politics, and all his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JOSEPH B. McCAUL, merchant, was born in Williamson County, Tenn., May 27, 1845. son of John A. and Elizabeth (Boon) McCaul, and is of Scotch-Irish lineage. John A. McCaul was born in Rutherford County, and died in Marshall County, Tenn., about 1858. The mother was born in the same county as her husband, and died about 1855. Joseph B. is the third of their ten children, and when about thirteen years of age began learning the saddler's trade, at which he worked until 1861, when he enlisted in the Twentieth Tennessee Infantry, but was discharged the same year on account of physical disability. He re-enlisted in the Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry in 1862, and served until the close of the war. From 1865 to 1867 he farmed and then engaged in the mercantile business at Bethesda, Tenn., remaining two years, and then came to Lynnville and began keeping a saddle and harness shop. At the end of eight years he engaged in the grocery business, and is the leading merchant in his line in the town. He also deals in grain. In 1868 he married Elizabeth V. Beatty, of Williamson County. He is a Democrat and Mason, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

GEORGE W. McGUIRE, M. D., is the son of Cornelius W. and Sarah McGuire, natives of Virginia. They were married about 1825, in this State, and had born to their union thirteen children: Elizabeth, William H., Lucinda A., Harriet M., Calvin B., John P.. James S., Robert R.. Cornelius N., Mary P., George W., Narcissa E. and Docia A. The father died September 28, 1859, and the mother April 20, 1875. Our subject was born April 11, 1844, in Lincoln County, Tenn., and is of Scotch-Irish descent. He attended the county schools, and in 1866 began the study of medicine with a brother, Dr. C. B. McGuire, of Millville, Lincoln County. In the fall of that year he entered the University of Nashville, and graduated from that institution in 1869. After which he returned to Mill ville and commenced the practice of his profession with his brother. In 1874 he located at Dellrose, in Lincoln County, and practiced his profession with evident success. August 21, 1872, he married Ella O. Patterson, daughter of John C. and Elenor Patterson, of Giles County. To our subject and wife were born three children. James C., Cornelius N. and John P., The mother of these children died in 1881, and he then married Laura M. Legg, daughter of Andrew C. and Martha Legg, of Alabama. To the last union was born one child--Myrtle. In 1884 Dr. McGuire moved to Giles County, and purchased the land where he now resides. He is a very successful practitioner and is kept almost constantly busy visiting his numerous patients. He is Democratic in his political belief.

ANDREW J. McKIMMEN, a prominent stock raiser, living one mile east of Pulaski, Tenn., was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, March 28, 1834, and is a son of Daniel and Jane McKimmen, who were natives of the "soil," and removed to the United States in 1843, settling on a farm in Giles County, Tenn., on which our subject now resides. They were the parents of the following children: Mary, Margaret, Emily, Andrew J., Isabella and Jane. The father died in 1878, and the mother in 1880. Our subject is their fourth child, He received a limited early education, and It is time has been employed in breeding fine trotting horses, being the first man who introduced blooded trotting stock in Giles County (in 1856) and one of the first in the, State. He is widely known and much respected by all. He and Georgie A. Everly were united in marriage in 1859. She is a (laughter of Capt. George and Mary Everly, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Tennessee. Our subject is a Democrat, and is noted for his charity to the poor.

JAMES T. McKISSACK, farmer and stock-raiser, is a native of Person County, N. C., born in 1823, son of William and Janette McKissack, both natives of North Carolina, They were married in the early part of the present century, and to them were born five sons and three daughters: Susan P., James T., Gorham T., Don J., Alexander C., Lucy H., Jessie H. and William. Our subject was the second child born to this union. In 1833 he came with his parents to this State and settled in Maury County. He received a good practical education in the Jackson College, of Maury County, and in 1842 was engaged in the grocery and general merchandise business at Spring Hill, Maury County. In 1854 after moving around for some time, he settled in Pulaski, and was engaged in building the old court house and a number of other business blocks. Previous to this, in 1845, be married Sylvina C. Rowe, daughter of Louis and Lucy Rowe, and this union resulted in the birth of six children, named Lucy J., William L., Susan O., Edward F., Mary E. and Calvin C. The mother of these children died in 1880. In 1856 he purchased land near Vale Mills, in this county, and was engaged in farming and manufacturing until 1870, when he sold farm and business and moved to where he now resides, near Pulaski. He has 137 acres of valuable land, well improved. Mr. McKissack is of Scotch-Irish descent. and a Democrat in politics.

HENRY CLAY McLAURINE, whose birth occurred in Giles County, Tenn., January 8, 1840, is a son of William and Ann (Swan) McLaurine, and of Scotch-Irish descent. His parents were natives of Virginia, born in 1791 and 1797. The father was a tiller of the soil and died in this county in 1862. The mother died in 1866. Our subject is the youngest of eleven children, seven of whom are now living. He was reared on the farm and received his education in the district schools. During the years 1859-60 he clerked in a dry goods store at Molino, Lincoln County. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, First Tennessee Cavalry, and for more than a year was a prisoner in Camp Morton. In 1866 he came to Prospect, in this county, and after clerking for one year engaged in the general merchandise business and there remained until 1882, when he removed to Pulaski. In 1873 he married Bettie M. Deaver, and in 1876 he ran for the office of sheriff and was deputy sheriff from 1872 to 1875. He ran for sheriff in 1876 against four Democrats and one Republican, and was defeated by the Republican by two votes. In 1882 he was elected county trustee and discharged the duties of this office in a highly satisfactory manner for two years. In 1885 he was commissioned postmaster at Pulaski, and confirmed January 12, 1886, by the United States Senate. He is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is one of the county's best citizens, and a representative of one of the old families.

MARK McNAIRY, farmer. and a native of Giles County, Tenn., was born November 1, 1833, son of Frank and Mary McNairy, natives of Tennessee, who were married in Giles County about 1830, and were the parents of four children: Robert, Mark, John F. and William J. The father died in 1837 and the mother in 1853. The subject of this sketch received a fair education in the common schools, and subsequently attended the Giles College at Pulaski. In 1845 he moved to that town and was engaged in trading until 1865. In 1858 he led to the altar Lute Maxwell, daughter of William A. and Delila Maxwell, of Giles County, Tenn. By this Marriage, Mr. McNairy became the father of four children: Roy, Lycurgus, Minnie and Ellen. Mr. McNairy is a Democrat in politics and of Irish lineage. In 1865 be moved to the farm where he is now living, which consists of 240 acres. He has been successful at his occupation and is a prosperous, industrious farmer.

JAMES O. MITCHELL, of Lynnville, Tenn., is a native of Giles County, born December 19, 1833, son of Andrew and Eliza (Alexander) Mitchell, and is of Scotch-Irish descent. His parents were both born in North Carolina, the father in 1807, and the mother in 1809. His paternal grandfather was John Mitchell, also a North Carolinian. The Mitchell family came to Tennessee about 1809, and settled in East Tennessee. The father of our subject came to what is now Marshall County when a young man. He died in 1864, and the mother in 1865. James O. is the third of nine children, and grew to manhood on a farm, and was educated in the neighboring schools. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Third Tennessee Infantry, and participated in the battles of Raymond, Miss., Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and the Georgia Campaign. Since the war he has been in business in this county. He was married, in 1856, to Frances Angus, who died in 1861. Mr. Mitchell's second wife was Sarah Kellam, whom he married in 1871, and who died four years later, leaving two children: Andrew and Nancy. Mr. Mitchell is a Democrat, and one of the substantial men of the county.

MARCUS M. MITCHELL is a native of Giles County, Tenn., born January 26,1838, the second of three children and the son of Robert C. and Jane (Beasley) Mitchell, born in Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. The former came to Tennessee with his parents when a boy and there spent the rest of his life with the exception of a short period. He died in 1870, and the mother in 1863. Our subject resided with his Grandmother Beasley and obtained a practical business education in the common schools. By perseverance, honest dealing with his fellow-man, and economy, he is ranked among the wealthy farmers of the county, owning 322 acres of land. In the late war he served in the First Tennessee Cavalry, under Col. Wheeler, and participated in many hotly contested battles. He was finally released from service by his father taking his place, as the latter had no one depending on him, and our subject had a wife and one child. He was married, May 26, 1861, to Margaret H. Kimbrough, who bore him one child, a daughter--Almeda G.--born April 7, 1862 (wife of W. D. Abernathy). Mr. Mitchell is a Democrat, a man of generous and liberal disposition, and highly respected in the county where he resides.

ASA W. MOORE, of the firm of Moore & Daly, dealers in dry goods and general merchandise at Elkton, Tenn., is a son of David J. and Mary E. Moore, who were born in Virginia and North Carolina, respectively, and were married in 1828, in Alabama, and came to Tennessee the same year. Both parents died in 1857. Our subject is the seventh of their twelve children, and his early education was obtained in the common schools of Giles County. He attended the Pettusville High School, in Alabama, two and a half years, and at the breaking out of the war enlisted in the Ninth Alabama Regiment, and served until the close of the war, participating in many of the principal battle. After his return home he taught school until 1870, and at that time formed a partnership with A. D. Bull, and entered into his present business. Our subject has been successful as a business man and is considered one of the estimable citizens of the county. December 23, 1868, he was married to Eva Bull, and by her is the father of six children: David, Ethel, Joseph, Eva, Tom and Nellie. Mr. Moore belongs to the F. & A. M., and is a Democrat in politics, and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JACOB B. MORELL, farmer, was born in East Tennessee, in 1820, and is of German- Irish descent. His parents, Christian and Susan Morell, were natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. They were married about 1812, and became the parents of six children: Elizabeth, John H., Jacob B., Samuel H., William and Christian. The father's demise occurred in 1827, and the mother's in 1859. Our subject received his education in the common schools of East Tennessee, and assisted his father in agricultural pursuits from early boyhood. He located in Giles County in 1842, and has been devoting considerable attention to milling. He is the proprietor of the Elk River Grist Mills, which are situated on Elk River, near Elkton. He has also 270 acres of good land, all improved, Mr. Morell has been a very successful man, financially, and all his property has been made by hard work and good management. January 16, 1844, he married Eleanor P. Phelps, and to this marriage were born an interesting family of eight children: Martha D., Allen P., Fredonia E., Emmett, Frances, Varina D., Pressley L. and Alice J. Mr. Morell is of Democratic principles, and is a man of sound judgment and good sense.

JOSHUA MORRIS is a son of Isaac Morris who was born in Delaware, June 29, 1766, and died July 16, 1856. He moved to North Carolina shortly after the Revolutionary war. Our subject's mother, Susanna Tacker, was born in Maryland in 1770, and died in 1840. Joshua Morris was born in North Carolina December 1, 1807 and is one of the old and leading citizens of Giles County. He was deprived the benefits of school, but gave himself a fair education, At the age of twenty he began life for himself, and a year later was married to Mary S. Tarkington, who bore him one child, named Isaac G. L., who died in 1853. Mary (Tarkington) Morris was born February 12, 1812, and died August 31, 1843. Our subject fought in the Florida Indian war and was faithful to his duties. He has held different county offices but is a farmer by occupation. By industry and perseverance he has accumulated considerable property, having at the present time 2,665 acres of land and all but 700 acres under fence, 500 acres of this land contain fine timber, such as oak, poplar and chestnut. He has twenty-seven tenants on his land, and has several tenement houses unoccupied. He has been a stock-raiser and was always successful; in fact, his every effort has been crowned with success. During the late war he was captain of a company for a short time. He is a Democrat in politics, and cast his first vote for Andrew Jackson. He has on his home farm, located on Big Creek, a cotton-gin and a grist-mill. He has living with him six great-grandchildren, which compose the entire family.

WILLIAM G. NANCE, dealer in confectionery, fancy groceries, cigars and tobacco, in Pulaski, Tenn., is a son of Sterling A. and Eliza Nance, natives, respectively, of South Carolina and Alabama. They were married in the latter State in 1830, and became the parents of six children: John D., Elizabeth, James F., Sterling A., William G. and Mary E. The father died in 1859 and the mother in 1872. William G. was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., in 1840. After acquiring his rudimentary education in the common schools, he, in 1855, entered LaGrange College, at Florence, Ala., and attended one session. In 1857 and 1858 he attended the University of Murfreesboro, Tenn., where he finished his literary education. He then farmed in his native State until the breaking out of the war. In 1864 he enlisted in the Tenth Alabama Cavalry, and served until Lee's surrender. He then resumed farming, and in 1874 became clerk for J. Butler & Co., dealers in dry goods in Pulaski, Tenn. In 1878 he was compelled to suspend active business life, but in 1883 formed a partnership with his son, William J. Nance, in the liquor business, and continued the same until June, 1885, when he sold out and engaged in his present business. In November, 1860, he married Mollie Coffee. daughter of Joshua and Mary M. Coffee, of Alabama. They have five children: Willie J., Lula M., Adine P., Mamie and Sterling. Mrs. Nance died in 1874. Mr. Nance is a Democrat, and the family are church members.

WILLIAM C. NELSON, assistant cashier of the Giles County, Tenn., National Bank, was born in Limestone County, Ala., August 17, 1849, son of Isaac and Lizzie Nelson, and of English descent. The father was born in Giles County in 1822, and was a farmer and merchant by occupation. He died in 1854. The mother was born in South Carolina about 1824 and died in Giles County in 1854. Our subject's paternal grandfather was John Nelson, a native of Virginia, and an early immigrant to Tennessee. William C. was the third of four children and was raised on a farm. He received a practical education and, in 1871, began clerking in a dry goods store, where he remained until 1878, and then engaged in the clothing business, and continued that until 1881. At that time he opened a hardware store, and the same year became assistant cashier of Giles County National Bank. He sold his stock of hardware in 1885. In 1881 he married Georgie Adams, and is now the father of two children: Sue Adams and Lizzie. Mr. Nelson is a Democrat and a Mason, Knight Templar degree, and is at present eminent commander of Commandery No. 12. He is a Presbyterian and his wife belongs to the Episcopal Church.

ROBERT S. PARTRICK, owner and proprietor of the village of Bodenham, was born in Alabama in 1847. This village is composed of one water-mill, one cotton-gin, cabinet shop, blacksmith-shop and a general merchandising establishment. He immigrated from Alabama to this place about two years ago, and has been successfully engaged in business ever since. He was reared in Rogersville, Ala., and lived with his grandfather until fifteen years of age. He then enlisted in Company E, Seventh Alabama Cavalry, and remained in the service until the close of the war. He was a participant in some of the most hotly contested battles fought during that time. He returned to Alabama, and was engaged in different pursuits until coming to his present location. His father was a native of Kentucky, born in 1800, and came to Alabama when quite young. He married for his first wife a Miss Brooks, who bore him six children. She died about 1840. He then married Elvira Sham, she being the mother of our subject, and a native of Alabama, born in 1820. The last union resulted in the birth of four children. The mother died in 1854 and the father three years later. Our subject was united in marriage, in 1870, to Elizabeth Elledge, a native of Alabama, born in 1850, and to them were born three children: Infant (died unnamed), Ethel (who died in 1873), and Beatrice L. Our subject is a stanch Democrat, and cast his first vote for Horace Greeley. The Partrick family are of Irish descent, and emigrated from Ireland in the early part of the seventeenth century.

WILEY B. PEPPER, M. D., an old practitioner of medicine, and now a druggist of Lynnville, Tenn., is a native of Robertson County, Tenn., born near Springfield April 13, 1821, son of William C. and Sarah (Powell) Pepper, and is of English extraction. His father was a native of Virginia, and came to Tennessee with his parents in 1808. The family first settled where Nashville now stands, but later removed to Robertson County, and since then the Pepper family has figured prominently in the affairs of Robertson County, and there the parents of our subject deceased. Dr. Pepper's early life was spent on the farm. He received a liberal education at the Springfield schools, and began the study of medicine in 1844, graduating from the Memphis Medical College in 1849, and the following year located in Giles County, where he continued his profession two years. He then removed to Limestone County, Ala., where he remained until 1865, and just after the surrender of Lee at Appomattox he returned to his native county, and there lived five years, and in 1870 came to Lynnville, continuing the practice of his profession about six months, and then engaged in the drug business, which he has since continued. He was married, in 1853, to Miss Sarah E. Horwell, of Giles County. He was formerly an "old-line" Whig, but is now a Democrat, and was made a Mason in 1850. They are leading members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is an honorable citizen.

RICHARD PEPPER, a successful farmer of Giles County, was born in Robertson Count Tenn., and is the son of William and Sarah Pepper. He received his education at Springfield, Tenn., and was a school-teacher for some time. October 14, 1867, he was united in marriage to Mattie E. Anthony, daughter of John B. and Sarah Anthony, of Giles County, and to our subject and wife was born one child--Tullia. Mrs. Pepper died April 16, 1873, and March 11, 1874, he married, for his second wife, Ella Westmoreland, daughter of Thomas A. and Elizabeth J. Westmoreland. By this last union our subject became the father of three children: Annie Kittie and Mildred. In 1876 Mr. Pepper located on the farm where he now resides. which consists of ninety-eight acres of fine land. He has been successful in most of his enterprises and is very comfortably situated. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

REV. FRANCIS F. POLLARD was born in Virginia, May, 1832, one of a large family of children born to the marriage of Uriah W. Pollard and Elizabeth Haley. Both born in Virginia, where the father died. The mother came to Tennessee with our subject in 1856, and died in Giles County November 28, 1861. Our subject's early education was obtained in the common schools. On the 31st of December, 1859, he and Ann E. Wells were united in marriage, and seven children were born to their union: William J., James B. (deceased), John C., Nancy A. E., Emeline, Mary F. and Sarah Helen. Mrs. Pollard was born on the farm where she now lives, August 5, 1831, daughter of Jesse Wells. Mr. Pollard served in the Ninth Alabama Cavalry, under Col. James C. Malone, but after six months' service was discharged for disability. He is a Democrat, and is, and has been, an active and efficient minister in the Baptist Church for twelve years. He owns a plantation of 407 acres, on which he raises cotton and the cereals.

JEFFERSON D. PULLEN, wholesale and retail grocer, is a son of John C. Pullen, who married Pauline Wheeler, and by her became the father of ten children. The father died in 1868 and the mother in 1877. Our subject is the ninth child, and in his juvenile days received a fair education. At the age of eighteen he began farming for himself and continued up to 1882, when he came to Pulaski, and engaged in his present business in partnership with J. S. Childress, and has succeeded beyond his expectations from a financial stand point. He was married in 1881 to Maggie Johnson, daughter of Samuel and Bettie Johnson, old and prominent settlers of Giles County. Mr. Pullen is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for Hancock. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

RICHARD H. RAGSDALE, farmer and stock-dealer, was born in Logan County, Ky., January 1, 1847, son of Burrell Ragsdale, who was a native of Virginia, born in 1804, and an early settler of Kentucky. He was twice married; his first family of ten children was raised in Kentucky. His second wife, our subject's mother was Olive F. Foote, a native of Tennessee, and born in November, 1812. She died in Logan County, Ky., in the spring of 1874, followed by the father two years later. Richard H. served in the last year of the war, and December 25, 1867, was married, in Giles County, Tenn., to Anna L. Howard, born in 1849, and daughter of John W. Howard. Their children are James H., Jerry, Gray and Eunice. Mr. Ragsdale is a Democrat; and while he has not identified himself with any church, his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He has 151 acres of fine land, and gives the most of his attention to raising stock.

ISAAC H. RAINEY, an enterprising citizen, was born in Giles County, Tenn., February 25, 1842; son of Horace D. and Eliza (Summerhill) Rainey, and of Scotch-English lineage. The father was born in North Carolina June 9, 1799, and the mother was born in the same State in December, 1799. The Rainey family came to Giles County about 1839. Our subject's father was a farmer by occupation, and his death occurred in this county in June, 1863; the mother died the year previous. Isaac H. Rainey is the eighth in a family of nine children. He assisted his father on the farm and attended the country schools. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, First Tennessee Cavalry, and was a prisoner for five months. Since the war he has been engaged in the livery and farming business at Pulaski. In 1874 he was united in matrimony to Viola Wilkinson of Marshall County, and the fruits of this union were an interesting family of four children: Guy, Earl, Hugh and Paul. In 1877 he was elected marshal of Pulaski, and served in that capacity for six years. He has the only livery stable in Pulaski, and is doing a successful business. He is a Democrat, a member of the Masonic lodge, and he and wife are worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

RUFUS C. REYNOLDS, proprietor of the Belle Air Stock Farm, was born in Giles County, Tenn., son of Giles A. and Minerva (Childress) Reynolds, and of Scotch-English lineage. His parents were born in Virginia and Tennessee, respectively; the father in 1801, and the mother in 1811. They were married in 1829. The father came to Tennessee in 1825, and was by occupation a farmer. He died in 1867. The mother died in 1870. Our subject assisted his father on the farm and attended the schools in the county. He completed his education at the University of Mississippi, and subsequently engaged in breeding horses for the race course. In 1881 he purchased the famous "Almont, Jr." (Basticks), sire of "Annie W.," 2:20; "Judge Lindsay," 2:21¼, etc. In addition to the above, Mr. Reynolds owns fifteen extra well-bred brood mares. He purchased the old Reynolds homestead in 1870, known as Belle Air Stock Farm, settled by his father in 1875. Mr. Reynolds is one of the most successful stock-men of this section of Tennessee. He is a Democrat and a K. of P. His farm is located one mile east of Reynolds' Station on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, and consists of 333 acres of well improved land.

GEORGE T. RIDDLE, cashier of the Peoples National Bank, was born in Pulaski, Tenn., May 23, 1844, and is the third of six children born to Thomas S. and Margaret (Speer) Riddle. He is of Scotch-Irish lineage. His father was born in Virginia in 1800 and his mother was a native of the Emerald Isle. The Riddle family came to Tennessee in early times, and here the father of our subject died in 1874. He was for many years engaged in active business in Pulaski and was county trustee for several terms, and was a leading citizen and a useful man. Our subject was educated at Giles College, this county, and at Bethany College, West Virginia, where he graduated in 1867. In 1862 he joined the Confederate Army and served in the ordnance department until the close of the war. Subsequent to his college and war life he began the study of law and was licensed to practice, but fearing his health he abandoned the idea of a professional life. In 1871 he was made book-keeper of the National Bank of Pulaski, and was made cashier of the same institution in 1873. He held this position until 1882, when the National Bank went into liquidation. He was then elected as director and cashier of the Peoples National Bank and now holds that position. He is one of the best financiers in Pulaski, and a most thorough business man. In 1872 he married Annie Lea Skillern, of this county. He is a Democrat and a member of the K. of P., and he and wife are members of the Episcopal Church.

DR. JOSEPH COLEMAN ROBERTS was born on the Madison and Limestone County line, in Alabama, November 18, 1822, being of honorable parentage, not wealthy or distinguished, but highly respected for the sort of integrity and strength and purity of character and modesty in asserting their claims to high distinctions that constituted marked virtues among the agricultural classes in the earlier years of this country. He received an elementary education in the country schools of that day, and afterward attended the Frazier Academy, at Athens, Ala., and studied the classics, and at the age of about nineteen began teaching school, after which he entered the office of Dr. Frank Malone, at the Cross Roads, in Madison County, and in 1843-44 attended a course of medical lectures; after which he located in Limestone County and practiced his profession four years. He then went to New York City, and graduated at the University of New York in 1848. He returned home and located at Bethel, Giles Co., Tenn., where he has since resided. In 1849 he married Sarah I. Anthony, and to their union four children were born: J. C., Estella (who died in childhood), Walter A. and Sallie Bettie. The Doctor was laborious and persistent in his medical studies, and diligent and faithful in his professional engagements. At the beginning of the war the means he had accumulated had been invested mostly in slave property, and as a result of that conflict he was left comparatively penniless. He offered his services to the Confederacy, and served in the field and hospital as aid to Dr. Ford, acting in the capacity of assistant and director. When the army commanded by Beauregard and Bragg started on the Kentucky campaign, he was transferred to the Western Department, and was assistant to Dr. Wooten, now of Texas. After the war the Doctor located in Pulaski, Giles Co., Tenn., and by energy and frugality owns a neat and valuable brick residence on Main Street, and a farm of 600 acres of excellent land in the county. He has been constantly engaged in his profession for about forty-two years: has the reputation of being a studious, able and successful physician, and is engaged in active practice at the present time. His parents, George and Elizabeth (Kendrick) Roberts, were born in Georgia and were of English and Welsh ancestry. They moved to Alabama about 1800, and located where our subject was born. The father died in Lawrence County, Ala., and the mother in Mississippi. Their family consisted of seven sons and three daughters. Dr. Roberts is considered one of the county's best men. He is a Mason, a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

HON. SOLON E. ROSE, of Pulaski, is descended from an old and honored family of Scotland, whose history can be traced back for many generations. Col. William Rose, the father of the subject of this sketch, was a native of Virginia, born in 1779. He moved to Giles County, Tenn., in 1813, and was one of the early pioneers. He wedded Elizabeth W. Meredith, a lady of Welsh ancestry, who bore her husband a family of seven sons: Edward W., William M., Alfred H., Robert H., Fielding, David E. and Solon Eldridge. The father was one of the foremost men in the community in which he resided. He died in 1851, preceded by his wife in 1820. Solon E. Rose was born in this county August 18,1818, was educated at Wurtenburg Academy in Pulaski, and was reared to years of maturity in his native county. At eighteen years he took part in the Florida war, participating in the battles of Withlacoocha, Panasophca and the Wahoo Swamp. In 1839 he began the study of law, and when in his twenty-second year was licensed to practice. After remaining for a time in Pulaski he removed to Lawrenceburg, and in 1843 was elected attorney-general, a position he retained six years, declining a re-election. From 1848 to 1859 he was president of the Lawrenceburg Bank, and was also connected with other enterprises. During the latter year he returned to Pulaski and formed a partnership with Judge J. A. Tinnon in the practice of the law, which continued until 1883, when Judge Tinnon was elevated to the bench. For the last fifteen years he has been president of the Giles National Bank of Pulaski. It would require a volume of no small dimensions to give in detail Mr. Rose's political career. It will suffice to briefly state that he has been active in advancing the cause deemed best for his country's good; that he has occupied numerous positions of honor and trust, and that he has reflected honor and credit upon the same. He is a Democrat. Mr. Rose selected for his helpmate through life Miss Marcella, daughter of M. H. and Ethalinda (Bumpass) Buchanan, and to their union four children were born: Solonia M., born November 16, 1844, now Mrs. John D. Flautt; William Haynie, born April 19, 1847, and now a resident of this county; Elizabeth E., born in 1849, and died in 1858; And Solon E. F., born December 19, 1850, now residing in Mississippi. Mr. Rose began life without financial means, but by adhering to strict business rules in general, and the golden rule in particular, he has amassed a comfortable fortune and won the esteem of the best citizens of the State.

HON. JAMES C. SANDERS, a native of Tennessee, was born in 1816, and is the fourth of eight children born to William and Elizabeth (Bellantfant) Sanders. The parents are natives of North Carolina, and immigrated to Tennessee about 1812, locating in Williamson County, where they remained a few years, after which they permanently settled in Giles County. Here the mother died in 1872, and the father too passed from life about four years later. Our subject passed his early life on the farm and in the district schools. He lived with his father having entire control of the farm until about forty years of age. He was bitterly opposed to secession and stood firm for the Union. During the war he remained at home as quiet and peaceable as man could be under like circumstances. In 1865 he married Catharine Parsons, a native of Tennessee, born about 1830, and the daughter of James W. and Massie (Gordon) Parsons. Our subject began life a poor man, had but poor advantages for an education and yet he is a good neighbor and an energetic, industrious citizen. In 1869 he was elected to the State Legislature to represent the counties of Marshall, Lincoln and Giles. At the end of two years he returned home and confined himself to the farm until 1884, when he was again called upon to appear before the people as an independent candidate for representative, and was duly elected for the years 1885 and 1886. Mr. Sanders resides in the Twelfth District, on an excellent farm of about 100 acres, which is fairly improved.

SAMUEL D. SCOTT is a native of Giles County, Tenn., born June 16, 1849, son of Thomas J. and Malinda W. (Holt) Scott, the former born in Illinois, in 1819, and was taken to Alabama at the age of two years. He married and removed to Mississippi, and at the end of seven years moved to Tennessee, and then to Alabama, and in 1881 again to Tennessee. The mother of our subject was born in Alabama, January 11, 1823. Our subject always had a predilection for farming, and has made that his occupation through life, and now owns 380 acres of fine land, on which he raises cotton principally, and also takes considerable interest in stock-raising. November 12, 1868, he wedded Mary F. Whitfield, daughter of Alfred and Elizabeth (Simpson) Whitfield, one of the large landowners and prominent planters of Giles County. To the union of our subject and wife were born the following children: James A. (deceased), Anna R., Minnie E. and Elizabeth W. The mother was born June 24,1850. Mr. Scott is a supporter of Democratic principles, and he and Mrs. Scott are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JAMES SCRUGGS, farmer and stock-raiser of the Ninth District, was born in 1812, in Davidson County, Tenn., and is the fourth child born to the union of Thomas and Edna Scruggs, natives of Virginia. They immigrated to this State in 1809, and to them were born nine children: Elizabeth, Nancy, James, Narcissa, Mary, Jane, William H., and Roxie A. James, our subject, attended the common schools, where he received a liberal education. When quite young he came to Giles County, and worked at the saddler's trade at Elkton until 1841, after which he began farming where he now resides. He has 600 acres on Elkton Turnpike, and is in very comfortable circumstances. All this he has made by hard work and good management, and is not in debt one dollar. In 1834, he married Susan Nelson, daughter of John and Phoebe Nelson, natives, respectively, of Alabama and Tennessee. This union of our subjects resulted in the birth of four children: William P., Mary E., James H. and Annie E. Mr. Scruggs, in politics, is Democratic, and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, in high standing. In 1875, Mrs. Scruggs was paralyzed, and has never fully recovered from the stroke, but is much better. The Scruggs family is one of the fixtures of this county, and all are good citizens.

GEORGE E. SHORT, farmer and native of Giles County, Tenn., was born about three miles from Pulaski, Tenn., July 11, 1829. His parents, J. T. and Elizabeth (Abernathy) Short, were born in Brunswick Co., Va., in 1793 and 1803, respectively. They moved to Giles County, Tenn., in 1828, and settled about three miles southwest of Pulaski. The father was a planter, and followed that calling until his death, which took place in Giles County, in 1875. The mother died three years earlier. Of their ten children, our subject was the fifth. He was educated at the old field schools and at the schools of Pulaski. In the fall of 1862, he enlisted in the Third Tennessee Infantry, Capt. Ray's Company, Confederate States Army, and after nearly one year's service he was released on account of physical disability, and after peace was established he again resumed farming. He owns 480 acres of land, the greater part of which is in a fine state of cultivation. He resides in Pulaski. In 1858 he was married to Virginia M. Boisseau, who died February 23, 1881. In 1882, his marriage with Virginia C. Reynolds was consumated. They have one child: George Edward. Mr. Short is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and are well respected citizens of the county.

PROF. WILLIAM J. SMITH, merchant, is a son of Lawrence and Mary J. (Overstreet) Smith, who were born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1807 and 1818, respectively. The father immigrated to Tennessee about 1815, and settled in Maury County, and there died in 1879. William J., our subject, was born in Giles County, July 28, 1837, and after fitting himself for college at Pisgah, Tenn., completed his education in Lebanon University, at Lebanon, Tenn., and entered North Carolina University in 1862. In the late civil war he served in Company B, Forty-eighth Tennessee Infantry, and was captured at Port Hudson, but was soon paroled. After the battle A Missionary Ridge, he was in Gen, J. E. Johnston's army and later in Hood's army. He was captured at the second battle of Nashville and taken to Camp Douglas, and there held until the close of the war. For fifteen years subsequent to the war he taught school in Alabama, and was pronounced a competent and sucessful educator. Since 1881 he has resided in Lynnville, Tenn., and he and his brother, C. A. Smith, are associated in the merchandise business, the style of the firm being Smith Bros. Our subject is also engaged in farming; and in 1873 was married to S. E. Scruggs, at Portland, Ala. Prof. Smith is a Mason and is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and his wife of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

NATHAN A. SMITH'S birth occurred in Giles County, Tenn., March 24,1857, and he there received his education in the common schools. He has always followed the fortunes of a farmer's life, and in 1874 located on 143 acres of valuable and well improved land. In 1873 he was united in marriage to Loretta K. Shields, of Giles County, and five children are the result of their union: Susie, Jimmie, Owen B., John A. and one infant daughter. Mr. Smith is of Irish extraction, and in politics is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. His wife is a daughter of James and Eliza Shields, and he is a son of Nathan and Frances Smith, who were born in Virginia and Tennessee, respectively, and were married about the year 1835. Eleven children were born to them, named Elizabeth, Thomas G., David J., Susan A., Owen S., William C., Nathan A., Fannie, Sallie J., Charles V. and one infant, deceased. The father died in 1864, but the mother is still living.

HON. NOBLE SMITHSON was born December 7,1841, near Nolensville, Williamson Co., Tenn., and resided in said county until 1853. He, with his parents, then removed to Lexington, Ala., and resided there until 1865, when he came to Pulaski, and has since continued to reside here. His father is the Rev. John G. Smithson, who was born in Virginia, in 1820, and who immigrated to Tennessee in 1830, and settled in Williamson County. He is a clergyman in the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and now resides near Pulaski. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Hezekiah Powell Smithson, a Virginian, and a soldier in the war of 1812. At one time he was sheriff of Pittsylvania County, Va. The great-grandfather of our subject was Francis Smithson, also a Virginian, who died in Maury County, Tenn. The family came from North Cumberland County, Eng., to Virginia. The mother of our subject was Ann Vaughn Ladd, born in Williamson County, Tenn., in 1818, and was a daughter of Noble Ladd and Mary Burton Ladd. Her parents were natives, respectively, of Rockingham and Stokes Counties, N. C. She died near Pulaski, Tenn., July 20, 1886. Our subject's early life was spent on the farm. His father being in humble circumstances, he labored to aid him in the support of the family and received a good English education, and April 2, 1865, wedded Alice Patterson, of Giles County, and by this union has six children. He has been a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is now a Mason and Knight Templar. He is also a Knight of Honor and a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He is a member of the Tennessee Historical Society and of the Bar Association of Tennessee. He is one of the leading lawyers of the State, and in politics is Independent. He is an advocate of woman suffrage, and district attorney-general for the Eleventh Circuit, composed of the counties of Williamson, Maury, Marshall, Giles, Lawrence, Lewis and Hickman, from November, 1867, to September, 1870. He was elected to the Thirty-eighth General Assembly as State Senator, from the Fifteenth Senatorial District, composed of the counties of Giles, Lawrence, Wayne and Lewis, November 6, 1872, for the next two years, 1873-74. He was chairman of the judiciary committee and also chairman of a special joint committee to investigate the affairs of the Bank of Tennessee. He was one of the thirteen senators who voted for the public school law of 1873, under which the present system of popular education has grown to be so efficient and beneficial to the State. He was a delegate to the National Greenback Convention at Indianapolis in 1876, which nominated Peter Cooper for the presidency. He has a large practice in the local courts and the supreme court of Tennessee, and is a distinguished lawyer and an eminent citizen.

REV. JOHN G. SMITHSON, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser, was born In 1820 in Pittsylvania County Va., and is the son of Hezekiah and Henrietta Smithson natives of Virginia. They were married about 1810 in Virginia, and to this union were born eight children: Hezekiah, Eliza. Henrietta, Paten, John G., Nathaniel, William and Henry C. The subject's father was a very prominent man in Virginia, and was sheriff of Pittsylvania County for many years. Our subject moved to Jefferson County, Tenn., in 1827 with his father, but afterward moved to Williamson County, Tenn., and received his education in the common schools of that county. In 1841 he was married to Ann V. Ladd, the daughter of Noble and Mary Ladd, natives of North Carolina. To Mr. and Mrs. Smithson were born fifteen children: Noble H., Mary H., Anne, Martha J., Rebecca J., Fountain D., John G., Paten C., Sarah E., Thornton L., William B., Isaac N., Alice D., Thomas F. and Henry C. In 1866 our subject purchased 350 acres where he is now residing. It consists of excellent land, three and a half miles west of Pulaski, all well improved and a part in cultivation. He has been a local Methodist Episcopal minister in this county since 1854. The Smithson family are all highly respected citizens, and the early members of the family were among the first settlers of Tennessee. Mr. Smithson owns a half -interest in the cotton and gristmills known as the Vale Mills. which are very famous all over the country. He is also a stockholder in a turnpike, and a Republican in politics.

ISAAC NEWTON SMITHSON, of the firm of J. G. & N. Smithson, manufacturers of cotton goods, flour, meal, at the point known as Vale Mills in the Sixth District of Giles County, was born in 1858 in Alabama, and is a son of John G. and Ann V. Smithson, natives of Virginia, and Tennessee, respectively. Isaac received a liberal education in the Giles College, at Pulaski, and in early life assisted on the farm. He moved with his father to this State in 1866, and settled in Giles County. After completing his education at Giles College he was engaged as one of the teachers in that institution, and remained there one year. He then engaged in the book and stationery business until 1883, when he sold out his interest and moved to where he now resides at Vale Mills. The grades of flour manufactured by this firm are very fine, and their brand of flour known as "Excelsior" is extensively used in Middle Tennessee. September, 10, 1884, Mr. Smithson led to the altar Louise C. Harrison, daughter of Col. Thomas J. and L. E. Harrison of Indiana. Our subject is Independent in political belief, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Smithson is a member of the K. of P., at Pulaski, and of English-Irish descent.

JOSEPH B STACY, clerk and master of the chancery court of Giles County, Tenn., was born in Franklin, Williamson Co., Tenn., October 4, 1827, son of Mahlon and Elizabeth G. Stacy, and of Scotch-Irish descent, His father was a native of North Carolina, born in 1797, and the mother of our subject was born in Williamson County, Tenn., in 1803. The Stacy family immigrated to Tennessee about 1803, settling in Davidson County; afterward removed to Williamson County, where they remained until 1828. Mahlon Stacy then removed to Giles County, where the mother of our subject died in 1876. The father died in 1880. Our subject is the second son of four children. He grew to manhood on the farm, received a practical education, came to Pulaski in 1845, and until 1851 was engaged as a clerk. He then engaged in merchandising, which he continued until 1859. In 1854 he married Miss Rebecca J. Johnson, daughter of Richard Johnson. The birth of four children blessed this union, two of whom are still living, to wit: Maria L. and Richard M. In 1862 Mr. Stacy joined the First Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate States Army, and was in the command of Col. James T. Wheeler. He took an active part in the battles of Corinth and Nashville. At the time of the surrender he was at Columbus, Miss. He returned to Pulaski in 1865. and the year following was engaged in general merchandising in this city. He continued this business until 1870, when he was appointed clerk and master of the chancery court, which position he has held continuously since, save a period of about six months. He is one of the best county officials the county has ever had. He is a true Democrat, and one of the leading stock-men of Giles County. He has given special attention to blooded horses and cattle since 1873. and has one of the best stock farms in Giles County. He is one of the most prominent men of this county, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

JOHN T. STEELE, M. D., a prominent and successful practitioner, and a native of Giles County, was born October 1, 1826, and is the only child born to the union of Robert G. and Sarah Y. (Graves) Steele, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Tennessee. The father was a tiller of the soil and a soldier in the war of 1812. Our subject received his education in the best county schools. In the year 1843 he began reading medicine with Dr. E. R. Field, of Pulaski, where be remained for two years. He then entered the old University of Pennslyvania, and graduated in the spring of 1848. He located in Pulaski, and entered into partnership with Dr. C. Perkins and practiced one year; after which he moved to Arkansas, locating at Augusta, and remained there three years. In 1853 he returned to Giles County, and since that time has been located in different parts of the county. In 1880 he located on the site where he now lives, which consists of a farm containing 215 acres of good land, with neat residences erected on it. He has also a saw and gristmill erected on the farm, both in good running condition. December 1, 1853, he married Josephine C. Wilkes, a native of Maury County, born June 17, 1836. This union resulted in the birth of twelve children, seven of whom are living: Hume R., Robert W., Judith L., Hortense, Mattie R., John F. and Fannie C. Mr. Steele is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

COLEMAN L. STEVENSON, a first-class farmer and stock-raiser, residing in the Ninth Civil District of Giles County, was born in that county December 26, 1832, and is the son of William P. and Malinda Stevenson, both natives of North Carolina. The father of our subject was born in North Carolina in 1810, and received his education in the schools of Giles County. He was a farmer by occupation, and by his marriage, in 1830, became the father of these children: Coleman L., Elam R., Joseph J., Presley W., William F., Sarah A. P., John H. and Wilber M. The father settled where he now resides in 1838, and has 300 acres of valuable land, all well improved. He has four brothers who are ministers of the gospel, and his father was also a very prominent Methodist Episcopal minister. Our subject's paternal grandparents were Rev. Elam and Lydia Stevenson, natives of North Carolina, who were married about 1805, and located in Giles County, Tenn., about 1813. To them were born these children: Katherine, William P., James C., Abner A., Willis M., Minerva J., John B., Thomas C., Amanda, Elam A. and Gilbert. The grandfather died in 1875 and the grandmother in 1872. Our subject, Coleman L. Stevenson, received a fair education, and has been engaged in farming from early youth. January 28, 1855, he was married to Louisa Jackson, daughter of Barrington and Nancy Jackson, natives of North Carolina, and to this union was born one child--William B. Mrs. Stevenson died February 1, 1856, and February 5, 1857, he was married to his sister- in-law, Dorcas Jackson. The last union resulted in the birth of three sons: James M., Elam A. and Thomas M. Besides his own children he took three orphan children. to raise: Martha V., Nancy M. and Mary J. They are the daughters of James and Mary Jackson (deceased). In 1862 Mt. Stevenson enlisted in the Thirty-second Tennessee Regiment of Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. He participated in most of the principal battles, and was a brave and gallant soldier. Mr. Stevenson and family are consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He has a good farm of 265 acres where he now lives, and 400 acres in other parts of Giles County. He is a Democrat in politics.

WILBUR M. STEPHENSON, farmer and stock-raiser of the Ninth District of Giles County, Tenn., was born on the 20th of January, 1841, and is a son of William P. and Malinda Stephenson. In his youth he attended the common schools of Giles County, Tenn., and his early occupation was farming. At the breaking out of the late civil war he enlisted in the Thirty-second Regiment of Tennessee Volunteers, and served until the fall of 1864, when he was compelled to abandon service owing to ill health. After recovering he resumed farming, and in 1884 settled upon his valuable and well-improved farm of 112 acres. Besides this he owns a valuable tract of land lying along Elk River, and near the town of Elkton. Our subject is a Democrat. November 9, 1863, he led to the hymeneal altar, Martha J. Hampton, daughter of Matison and Melissa Hampton, of Lincoln County. Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson are the parents of the following children: Matison P., John L., Maggie and Erskin. Husband and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

GEORGE E. SUTTLE, a native of Giles County, and a successful farmer and stockraiser, was born December 29, 1829, and is the son of Richard C. and Harriet A. Suttle, natives of Virginia, who were married in East Tennessee about 1826, and settled in Giles County in 1827. They had an interesting family of ten children, named Mary E., George E., Saraphana, Lucius D., Willimina, Matherine, Leroy W., Delphina, William D. and an infant daughter that died in 1857. The mother of these children is still living. Our subject is of Scotch-Irish descent. He received the rudiments of his education in the common schools, and then finished at the Murfreesboro University in 1853. September 17, 1861, he was married to Theodosia O. Green, who was born April 11, 1842, and who is the daughter of Alfred B. and Sarah O. Green, natives of Tennessee. By this union our subject became the father of seven children--two daughters and five sons: Lizzie L., William D., Harry H., Claud, two infants, boy and girl (twins), and James P. Claud died July 16, 1874, and the twins died in 1877. In 1869 he settled on the farm where he now lives, which consists of 443 acres of valuable land five miles cast of Pulaski. on the old Elkton road. He is regarded as a No. I farmer and an excellent citizen. He also owns some valuable city property on East Hill in Pulaski. Mr. Suttle is a Democrat, and he and children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mrs. Suttle is a member of the Presbyterian Church, at Pulaski. The Suttle family is very old and highly respected.

EPPERSON TARPLEY, Esq., wagon and carriage manufacturer, was born in 1846 in Giles County, and is of Irish descent. He attended the district schools, and afterward finished his education in Giles Academy, in Pulaski. He then engaged in agricultural pursuits, and continued this occupation until 1867, when he entered into his present business. He has been rather successful at this, and is doing a good business. In 1862 his marriage with Malissa A. Kellum was solemnized. She is the daughter of Thomas J. and Nancy J. Kellum, of Giles County. The marriage of our subject resulted in the birth of six children: Lizzie V., Silas E., Elwood L., Alice B., Guy and Earl. The family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in high standing. In 1868 Mr. Tarpley was elected magistrate of the Eighth District of Giles County, and still holds that position, He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the F. & A. M. fraternity. His parents are Silas S. and Susan V. Tarpley, natives of Tennessee.

CALLAWAY H. TIDWELL, ESQ., a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of the Sixth District of Giles County, is a son of Vincent and Phebe Tidwell and the grandson of Isaac and Elizabeth Tidwell, who immigrated to this State from South Carolina and settled in this county in the early part of the eighteenth century. Our subject's mother was the daughter of Silas Rackley of South Carolina, who came to Tennessee at an early date and settled in Lawrence County. The parents of our subject were married January 10, 1817, and their family consisted of eleven children: Callaway H., Jane E., Silas, Elizabeth, Charles W., Darling M., William G., Thomas B., James P., Melissa A. and Andrew J. Callaway passed his youthful days on the farm and secured a practical education in the country schools. In 1841 he was united in marriage to Leah Tucker, a native of Giles County, born February 17, 1825, and the daughter of Anderton and Stacy Tucker, natives of North Carolina, who immigrated to this State at an early day and made their home in this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Tidwell were born eleven children: Nancy J., Margaret A. Stacy E., William C., Martha C., Vincent M., Phebe M., Alice N., Mary W., Charles W. and Ozro H. Our subject settled where he is now living in 1874, and his farm consists of 500 acres of excellent land, all well improved and a part of the same in a high state of cultivation. He also owns 600 acres more, all well improved, in other parts of the county. He has been very successful financially. as he started in life with very little of this world's goods. He was elected magistrate in 1845, and has held the office in an able and capable manner. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, at Trinity, and are all very highly respected citizens. Mr. Tidwell's political belief is Democratic.

JAMES J. UPSHAW, M. D., dealer in drugs and general merchandise, is a son of James and Elinor Upshaw, natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. They were married about 1842, in Limestone County, Ala., and to them was born a family of three children: George L., William E. and James J. The father died November 6, 1858, and the mother in 1864. Our subject was born in 1858, in Giles County, received a fair education, and in 1876 began the study of medicine with Dr. James A. Bowers (deceased), of Elkton. He graduated from the University of Louisville in 1878, after which he came to Elkton, where he has remained ever since. He has had a good and lucrative practice, and was one of the county's best physicians. In 1883 he abandoned his practice, and has since devoted all his time to his present business. In 1878 he married Violet R. Patterson, daughter of John C. and Elinor Patterson, of Giles County. The result of our subject's marriage was the birth of two children: Louis B. and Minnie L. Dr. Upshaw is of English extraction, a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church at Elkton.

REV. JOHN F. WALKER is a son of William B. and Ann (Scott) Walker. The father was born in Virginia in 1789, and after his marriage immigrated to Tennessee and located in Wayne County. On building his first house in 1816 the logs were cut from the forest, the house erected and the goods put in in one day. He was magistrate of his district twelve years, and died on the old homestead in April, 1873. The mother was born in 1794 and died in 1876. Our subject was born January 17, 1821, and received such early education as the primitive schools of his day afforded, and finished his education at Cumberland University, at Lebanon, Tenn. He taught school, and devoted his time until twenty-four years old to completing his education, when he was ordained a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and has been an active and efficient laborer in the cause forty-one years. He joined the Fifty-third Tennessee Infantry as chaplain, and was captured at Fort Donelson and kept a prisoner at Indianapolis, Ind., and later at Camp Chase, Ohio, where, through the influence of Gov. Tod, he was given the privilege of the city. He was confined at Johnson's Island for some time, when he, with a number of chaplains and surgeons, were released as non-combatants, and allowed to return home. March 21, 1855, he wedded E. A. Brown, and eight children were the results of this union: Herschel P., W. B., J. Luther, C. Herbert, Lura, Ida and Dezzie. Mrs. Walker was born January 17, 1831, daughter of Rev. B. Brown, who was an early pioneer of Tennessee and an efficient and popular divine. He died about 1875 and the mother in 1885. Mr. Walker is conservative in his political views. He owns a farm of 157 acres, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

DR. MARK S. WATERS, physician, and owner of the farm "Wood Lawn," was born August 30, 1833, the eldest of three children of David M. and Sarah F. (Toland) Waters, who were born in South Carolina and Alabama in 1813 and 1814, and died in 1860 and 1836, respectively. Our subject received the rudiments of his education in the common schools, and completed his literary education at Cumberland University. He began reading medicine with Dr. Elihu Edmundson, and attended two courses of lectures, and graduated from the old University of Nashville and later from the old University of New York, and now possesses an extensive practice. April 7, 1857, Maggie M. White, born April 20, 1835, became his wife. She is a daughter of James and Matilda M. (Gooch) White, who were born in Georgia and North Carolina in 1794 and 1800, respectively. The father died in 1877. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was pronounced one of nature's purest and best men. Our subject served in his professional capacity two years in the late war, but finally resigned his commission at Dalton, Ga. Dr. Waters is a conservative Democrat, well posted on the politics of the day. He and wife are parents of the following children: Thomas M., David S. (a promising young man and a medical graduate of the old University of Nashville), James W., Archibald C., Addison K., Guy S., Maggie L. and Fannie T. Dr. Waters is a Mason, and owns 280 acres of good land. He is a generous citizen and aids all enterprises for the public weal.

JOHN R. D. WILLIAMS, of the firm of Williams & Watson, lumber dealers, of Pulaski, Tenn., was born in Giles County in 1840, and is a son of William J. and Martha Williams, who were born in Tennessee and were married in 1839, and located in Giles County in 1840. Their family consisted of John R. D., Joseph, Mary, Lou and Melvin. The mother died in 1851. John R. D. was educated in the common schools, and in early life worked at the carpenter's trade. In 1861 he enlisted in the Ninth Tennessee Battalion of Cavalry, serving four years and participating in several of the principal battles. At the close of the war he was employed by the Government as bridge carpenter, but soon abandoned that occupation and engaged in building and contracting, following that business until 1877. He then entered into his present business in Pulaski, and has been very successful. In 1865 he was married to Maggie J. Walker, daughter of William M. Walker, of Maury County. The family are members of the Presbyterian Church, and Mr. Williams is a Democrat and a member of the F. & A. M.

DR. THOMAS L. WILLIAMS, a successful practitioner, was born in Giles County September 9, 1832, and is the son of George and Sarah (Graves) Williams, natives of Tennessee. They were married in Giles County in 1826, and moved to Mississippi in 1837, where they remained until 1839. To them were born three children: John, Thomas L. and George. The father died in 1852 and the mother in 1842. Our subject received his education in the common schools of Arkansas, and in early life was engaged in farming and blacksmithing. In 1856 he began his medical studies. which he continued until the breaking out of the war. He then enlisted in the Fortieth Arkansas Regiment of Volunteers, but owing to failing health he was soon discharged from the service. He then resumed his medical studies. In 1869 he graduated from the medical department of the University of Louisville, and returning to Elkton located there, where he has since remained. In 1859 he took for his wife Carrie Bull, daughter of Adrian D. and Ursula Bull, of Giles County. To our subject and wife was born one daughter--Katie. Dr. Williams is one of the county's best physicians, as his many patients yet living can testify. He has been very successful professionally as well as financially, and is a self-made man in every respect. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a member of the F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F.

SAMUEL S. WILLIAMSON was born within a mile of his present place of residence March 19, 1825. He has always been a tiller of the soil, and until attaining his majority resided with his parents. He was a soldier in the Mexican war, and fought at Vera Cruz, Matamoras, and was at one time confined to the hospital and pronounced incurable, but finally rallied, and is now enjoying the health usually allotted to man. He was married in Giles County, Tenn., March 9, 1854, to Jane P. Rainey, daughter of Horace D. Rainey, and to them were born three children: John E., Horace Glenn, and Lizzie C. (wife of J. B. Potts). Horace G. is a physician, who graduated from Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., and is practicing at Prospect. John E. died on the train eighty miles west of New Orleans December 22, 1883, while en route home from California, whither he had gone for his health. Mrs. Williamson was born in North Carolina October 7, 1825, and came to Tennessee in 1887. Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he is a Democrat and belongs to the I. O. O. F. His parents, John and Susan (Sutherland) Williamson, were born in North Carolina and Virginia in 1784 and 1783 respectively. They were early settlers of Tennessee. The father died October 14, 1856, and the mother in 1859.

SAMUEL A. WILSON, a leading citizen of Giles County, was born in 1823, and is living on the farm of his birth. He was united in marriage in 1857 to Mary Herron, who was born in Mississippi in 1837, and the daughter of Thomas and Mary (Wynne) Herron, natives of Tennessee, born, respectively, in 1808 and in 1816, and died in 1844 and in 1819. To our subject and wife were born three children: Sallie W., Herron C. and Georgie W. Mr. Wilson remained on the farm with his father until 1843, when he went to Yazoo City, and engaged in merchandising, in partnership with his brother for about five years He then moved to Memphis, Tenn., and embarked in the dry goods business, which occupation he followed for four years. He then, in partnership with Norman & Carter, opened a cotton commission house, which also proved successful until the breaking out of the Rebellion. Mr. Wilson then went to Mississippi and opened a tannery, and was engaged in this business until the close of the war, after which he re-opened the cotton commission house, the firm being then known as Wilson, Carter & Co. In 1867 Mr. Wilson sold out and returned to Tennessee, locating on the farm of his birth, which consists of 400 acres of land in a high state of cultivation. Mr. Wilson is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His wife is also a member of the same church. His parents, James and Elizabeth (Weir) Wilson, were native of Virginia, born, respectively, in 1783 and 1782. The father was it farmer by occupation, and participated in the war of 1812, and wits also with Jackson in the Creek and Seminole Indian wars. He died in 1857, and his wife followed him the same year.

JOSEPH M. WRGHT, a prominent man and successful dentist of Elkton, Tenn., was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., November 4. 1839. and is the fifth of a family of six children, and received his education in the common schools of his native County. His early days were spent in farming, and in 1867 he began the study of dentistry with G. A, Dewey, of Glasgow, Ky., and two years later began practicing. In 1870 he removed to Mississippi and after a three years' residence in that State lived a short time in Giles County, Tenn., and then moved to Texas, where he resided until 1878. At that date he returned to Giles County, where he has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession, and has met with good success financially and professionally. In 1874 he was married to Elmira N. Benson, daughter of Benjamin and Adaline Benson, and to them was born one child. Mrs. Wright died in 1881, and in 1884 Mr. Wright married Susan A. Graves. Both are church members, and our subject is a Democrat. His parents, Jacob R. and Mary Wright, were Tennesseeans, and were married about 1830. Their children are Laminda, Minerva, Martha J., John D., Joseph M. and Jacob A. The father died in 1886 and the mother in 1844.

HUGH YOKLEY, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Davidson County, N. C., in 1813, son of Andrew and Delia (Morris) Yokley, and is of Irish-Dutch origin. Both parents were born in the same State and county as our subject, and came to Tennessee and settled in Giles County in 1816, where they died. Hugh is the eldest of six living children, and attended the first schools of Giles County. He has lived the free, happy and independent life of a farmer, and settled on the farm where he now lives in 1841. He is an extensive land owner, and has been quite prosperous financially. In March, 1838, he wedded Martha Hannah, who was born September 29, 1817. daughter of James Hannah, a native of Ireland. They have six children: Sophronia, Martha A., Catherine, Henrietta, Eugenia and Hugh L. Mr. Yokley was formerly an old-line Whig, but is now a Democrat. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he belongs to the I. O. O. F. and G. T., and is considered one of the substantial and worthy citizens of the county.


Source: The Goodspeed Histories of Giles, Lincoln, Franklin & Moore Counties of Tennessee. Reprinted from The Goodspeeds History of Tennessee, 1886, by Wooward & Stinson Printing Co., Columbia Tennessee, 1972..
Transcription 11-May-2000 for PeaRidge Relations