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BIOGRAPHICAL APPENDIX.
 

FRANKLIN COUNTY.

OLIVER N. ALDEN was born August 16, 1817, in Yarmouth, Barnstable Co., Mass., being a son of Oliver and Lucy T. (Alden) Alden. The parents were direct lineal descendants of the sixth generation of John Alden, who was one of the pilgrim flock that immigrated to America in 1620. The grandfather of our subject, Timothy Alden, was for sixty years pastor of one church in Yarmouth, Mass. The subject of this sketch moved with his parents from Massachusetts to Meadville, Penn., at the age of twelve; thence the family removed to Cleveland, Ohio. The father died in Ohio and the mother died in Wisconsin. Oliver N., in early life, learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked till 1849, when he went to Wisconsin and entered land near Oshkosh, where he successfully remained In the pursuit of farming till 1873, when he removed to Neenah, Wis., and lived there until 1884, when he removed to Sherwood, Tenn., on account of his health. Here he engaged in merchandising in the spring of 1885, continuing but a short time. He now owns his Wisconsin farm of 120 acres. He was married, in 1841, to Miss Theodosia H. Morton, of Ohio, the fruits of this union being six children, three of whom are now living: Clinton H., in Papillion, Neb.; Violet M., in Oshkosh, Wis.; and Oliver N., in Orcas, Washington Territory. The mother of these children died in 1868, and December 21, 1870, Mr. A. wedded Miss Caroline Alden, also a direct lineal descendant of John Alden. Mrs. Alden was born in Springfield, Mass., and her last residence in that State was in Boston. Her maternal ancestry were direct descendants of the Sears family that first appeared in England in 1016, in the person of Knight, who was engaged with Edward Ironsides against Canute. Through the intermarriages of this noted family, Mrs. Alden is a descendant of the house of Norfolk and of the royal houses of both England and France.

JOHN F. ANDERSON, one of Franklin County's oldest citizens, was born February 27, 1808 in Sullivan County, Tenn., being a son of Thomas and Mary (Davis) Anderson. The father was born in Abington, Va., and when a child immigrated to Sullivan County, Tenn., whence in 1812 he removed with his family to Bedford County, Tenn., and in 1819 near where Sherwood now is. Here he entered twenty-two acres of land and engaged in the pursuit of farming and hunting. He removed to West Tennessee in 1834, and afterward to Mississippi, where he died. The mother was born in Philadelphia. Her father was killed in the Revolution, and she then moved to Sullivan County, Tenn., with a stepfather. She died in West Tennessee about 1835. The subject of this sketch was eleven years old, when coming to Franklin County. In 1828 he bought ten acres of land on credit, and began the pursuit of farming. He surmounted the primitive and numerous obstacles in his road and continued to farm until he amassed an immense estate; at one time owning 26,000 acres of land. He was active in securing the building of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad, and for many years was a director of that road. He now owns about 16, 000 acres of land. He was married August 23, 1827, to Miss Mary Hendricks, a cousin of the late Thomas A. Hendricks. The fruits of this union were twelve children, two of whom are now living--Cyrena (the wife of Larkin Willis) and Thomas B. The mother of these children died about 1854, and on August 23, 1855, Mr. Anderson was again married to Mrs. Mary Stephens, nee King, the results of this union being nine children, seven of whom are now living-George C., Luke W., Lou H. (wife of Dr. Jones Keith), Fay (wife of Henry M. Bunn), Virginia L., Charles W. and May B. Mrs. Anderson was the mother of three children by her former marriage. Two of them are living--William Stephens and Elizabeth (Stephens), wife of James Brown. Mr. Anderson, wife, and several of the family are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Anderson has built a church of worship himself, to which he invites all Christian denominations. He also employs a minister, and he often says: "If the minister don't preach to suit me, I'll turn him off and hire another." He is a Democrat in politics and is a member of the F. & A. M. He has the name of being "the most liberal man in Tennessee."

CAPTAIN CLEM. ARLEDGE, clerk and master of the chancery court, was born June 1, 1826, being one of nine children, the fruits of the union of Clem. Arledge, Sr., and Martha Ginn, natives of South Carolina, from whence they came to Franklin County, Tenn., in 1818. The father was a farmer; he departed this life in 1851, and the mother followed him in the year 1857. Clem. Arledge was reared on a farm. At the age of twenty-six he married, and settled to farming. In 1856 he removed to Texas, and in two years returned to his native county. He was in the Confederate service as captain of Company F, Turney's First Tennessee, from 1861 to 1862-one year-when he resigned on account of temporary loss of sight in both eyes, and perpetual blindness in one eye. In 1871 Capt. Arledge was elected clerk of the county court of Franklin County, efficiently holding that office for twelve years, until 1882. In January, 1883, he was appointed to the office of which he is now the incumbent. He was married, in 1853, to Eliza Roseborough, a native of Franklin County. She has borne ten children to this union, one of whom is dead-viz.: Josiah J., James C., John, Jesse B. (deceased), Robert L., Samuel L., Thomas M., Mattie S., Dora and Willie. Mrs. Arledge is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Capt. Arledge is a firm Democrat in politics, and is an enterprising and respected citizen of the county.

GEORGE E. BANKS, of the law firm of Simmons & Banks, was born in Bridlington, England. When eighteen years of age he crossed the ocean to America, landing in New York in April, 1867. He then taught school in Delaware one year, and in April, 1868, came to Franklin County, Tenn., where he taught two years. He then went to Kansas, and remained two years; thence returning to Franklin County, where he engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes until the spring of 1885. He then went on a visit to Europe, and remained there three months. He then returned to Winchester, and engaged in the practice of law, at which he has since been occupied. He was married, January 10, 1869, to Miss Mattie Johnson, of this county, the fruits of this union being four children, one of whom-George E.-is now living. Both Mr. Banks and his wife are members of the Episcopal Church. Mr. Banks has no relatives in America, he being the only one of the family that came to this country.

JAMES P. BARTON, M. D., of Maxwell, this county, was born in Wilson County, Tenn., February 12, 1851, and is one of a family of seven children born to William and Margaret (Lane) Barton. The father is still living, and has been a minister of the Missionary Baptist Church in Wilson County, Tenn., since nineteen years old. He was born in that county in 1814. The mother is a daughter of William Lane, an old soldier in the Revolutionary war, and is also still living. Our subject was educated at Gibson University, and also taught school prior to his majority. May 7, 1872, he married Miss Anna Pate, native of Putnam County, Tenn. To this union three children have been born: James O., William O., Ada A., all still living. Our subject attended the Louisville Medical College in 1876, and then the medical department of the University of Tennessee at Nashville, in 1877, and soon after moved to this county and has since been practicing medicine. Dr. Barton and his family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Politically he has always been connected with the Democratic party.

EZEKIEL M. BEAN was born August 31, 1833, in Franklin County, Tenn., and is a son of William Bean, who was born in Lincoln County, and married Sallie Lindsey, who was born in East Tennessee. They became the parents of five children, only two of whom are living-our subject and a brother. After the mother's death the father married Anna Weaver, and both are still living in the county. After attaining his majority Ezekiel M., in the month of August, 1854, wedded Louisa Marshall, who was born in Franklin County, Tenn., and to their union were born fifteen children, all of whom are living and five are married. During the late war he was with Ferguson's command two months, but returned home on account of ill health. In 1874 he purchased and located on his present farm. Mr. Bean and part of the family belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the rest are identified with the Lutheran Church. Our subject votes the Democratic ticket.

JOHN K. BENNETT, a prominent merchant of Decherd, Tenn., was born April 23, 1840. His father, H. K. Bennett, was a son of John Bennett, one of the very early settlers of Franklin County, and a well-to-do man, having dealt extensively in leadmining interests. H. K. Bennett was a farmer; he died in 1847. The mother of John K., was Clarissa Keeton, a daughter of John Keeton, one of the very first pioneers of the county and a very prominent citizen. having held the different public offices in the county. When fourteen years of age our subject found himself on his own support. He went to Atlanta and engaged at manual employment for a time, and in 1857 engaged as a mercantile clerk there, which he continued till the fall of Atlanta before Sherman. He then returned to Franklin County, and soon established his mercantile trade, which he has continued very successfully ever since. Besides merchandising he carries on farming and stockdealing. His stock of merchandise is about $3,500, and he transacts a yearly business of from $10,000 to $15,000. He was first married in 1858 to Miss M. T. Allen, of Atlanta, who bore him three children, viz.: John E., Lycurgus L. and Bettie, now the wife of C. D. Jackman, of Kentucky. Mrs. Bennett died in 1872, and Mr. Bennett married Mrs. Lavina Parks, who became the mother of two children-Charles and Lavina-and died in 1877. In 1878 Mr. Bennett chose and wedded Miss 'Florence Hines, the result of this union being four children-Daisy, Robert, Edgar and Minnie. Mr. Bennett and family are members of the Christian Church. Politically he has always been a Democrat. He is an enterprising and respected citizen of the county.

HENSON G. BLANTON (deceased) was born in Bedford County, Tenn., February 12, 1821, and died in Franklin County, Tenn., December 10, 1877. His father, William Blanton, was a North Carolinian, and came with his mother to Bedford County, Tenn., in the early settlement of that State and county. Our subject remained with his parents until his majority, then read medicine, and attended the Louisville Medical College, after which he began practicing in Franklin County. In 1844 he was united in marriage to Miss Eunice Van Zant, who was born in Franklin County, and eight children were born to this union. six of whom are living-James (a physician practicing in Alabama), Mary, Joseph, Charles (also a physician of Alabama), Edward (a physician at Maxwell, Tenn.) and Hugh.

WILLIAM M. BOUCHER, proprietor of the Franklin Hotel, at Cowan, Tenn., was born in Randolph County, Mo., February 2,1825. His father, Robert Boucher, was born about 1795, in Madison County, Ky., where he was reared. He then went to Howard County, Mo., in 1818. He married Elizabeth Willcockson, in 1821, and then removed to Randolph County, Mo., where he died in 1871. The mother was born in Clark County, Ky., in 1805 and died in Randolph County, Mo., in 1867. These were parents of twelve children. William M., our subject, at the age of twenty-one, entered Masonic College, Missouri, and attended one term. In 1850 he went to California and engaged in gold mining three years. Returning home, he married Sophia Darby, in 1853, and followed farming until 1870, with the exception of a few months, near the close of the war, when he was drafted and assigned to Company 1, Sixth Missouri Infantry, joining his company at Washington, he was sent to Louisville and thence to Little Rock, where he was mustered out of service. In 1871 he moved to Huntsville, Mo., where he remained six years and thence immigrated to Franklin County, Mo., where he has since lived. Mr. Boucher has a family of three children now living, there having been eight born to his marriage. In 1884, Mr. Boucher opened up the Franklin Hotel, in the building which was built by Drs. Sloan and Williams, at a cost of $6, 000, for that purpose. By the hospitality of both Mr. and Mrs. Boucher, the Franklin Hotel has gained no little fame along the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad as a first class hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Boucher are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

PETER C. BREEDEN was born in Memphis, Tenn., November 29,1846, and is one of a family of three born to Archibald and Mary A. (Heistand) Breeden. The father was a native of Virginia, and when a young man came to Franklin County, Tenn., where he followed the carpenter's trade all his life, and died in the same county May 8, 1859; the mother having preceded him in the year 1851, August 23. From the time of his mother's death our subject lived with an aunt until he attained his majority, after which he followed manual labor and clerking until 1874, when he engaged in the mercantile business at Huntland, Franklin Co., Tenn., and followed that with success for ten years, when in March, 1885, he disposed of his stock of goods and retired from the business, at least for a short time. But since then Mr. Breeden has not been idle, as he has built a good commodious dwelling house on his property in Huntland, in addition to the one occupied by himself and family. December 1.1, 1878, he married Lila M. Deford, a native of Lincoln County, Tenn. To this union three children. all girls, have been born-Susan, Mary and Sallie, all living. Mr. and Mrs. Breeden are members of the Christian Church, and Mr. Breeden is a strong advocate of the principles of prohibition.

W. W. BRITTAIN, fruit grower and nurseryman, was born June 18; 1827, in Rutherford County, Tenn. His father, John Brittain, was born in North Carolina, in 1791, and in 1812, came to Rutherford County, Tenn., where he lived and died. In his early day, he, the father, was a cabinet-maker and also an extensive fruit grower nnd nurseryman, and at his death, in 1859, left an orchard of sixty acres. He was the first man to peddle fruit in Nashville- and was at one time awarded a ten-dollar silver cup as first premium on grape Wine at ;he State Fair. The mother, nee Martha M. Smith, was born in Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1802, and lived all her life in her native county, her death occurring in May, 1882. The subject of this sketch was the third of a family of eight children. He came to Franklin County, Tenn., in 1856, and began farming and fruit-growing, which he has continued very successfully, now owning 140 acres in Franklin County, and 80 acres in Florida on which is an orange grove. He has the most extensive nursery in the county, and an orchard of about 20 acres. He was married in about 1855, to Sarah H. W. Blair, of Rutherford County, the result of this union being three children, two of whom are now living--Martha Ann, John (deceased) and William. The mother of these children died in August, 1864, and in December, 1871, Mr. B. was married to Elizabeth T. Lyons, who is the mother of these children-Ethel, Columbus L., James D., Elmer and Floyd. Mr. B. is a Master Mason and an active Democrat in politics. He enlisted in May, 1862, in Company F, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and served three years, receiving a gunshot wound in the knee. He is an enterprising and highly respected citizen of the county.

STEPHEN W. BROWN, a noted mill-wright of this county, was born in McMinn' County, Tenn., in 1825. Of the family of nine children born to his parents, James and Anna (Kelley) Brown, eight are still living, The father was born in Virginia in 1780, but come to East Tennessee when a child, where he met and married the mother. They followed the tanning trade and farming all their lives. The father died July 4, 1876, the mother in 1877-78. Our subject remained with his parents until his majority, then spent seven years in the Cherokee Nation, after which he moved to Franklin County, Tenn., where he has since resided, following farming in connection with his trade. August 24, 1848, he married Mary A. L. Patton, a native of Coffee County, Tenn. To this union six children have been born, all still living. Mr. Brown, with his family, are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, he being an ordained minister in the Jackson Presbyterian. Mr. Brown has recently constructed and fitted up one of the very best flour-mills in the county. It is located on Bean Creek, two and a half miles north of Huntland, near his residence, and was begun on President Cleveland's inauguration day. The water wheel for this mill is constructed upon an entirely new principle, and was designed and built by Mr. Brown, its chief superiority over the old wheel being the simplicity of the gear, thereby considerably economizing power.

DAVID L. BUCKNER is a native Tennesseean, born in 1846. He is one of five children born to James and Susan (Stephenson) Buckner, both of whom were born in Tennessee, the former in 1820. James Buckner was a dentist of considerable note. He was sheriff of his county and frequently conducted his prisoners to Nashville on horseback. The father died in 1863 and the mother in 1857. Our subject made his home with his parent until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company H, Forty-third Tennessee Infantry, which. after the siege of Vicksburg, was changed to cavalry. Three of his brothers were in the service, and all except our subject were officers. After returning home David began the study and practice of dentistry, and in two years' time moved to Bedford County, where he remained five years. One season was spent in Texas, after which he returned to Tenneseee and located in Maxwell, Franklin County, where he has a lucrative practice. The Doctor has a very desirable country home, and in connection with his profession takes pleasure in following horticultural pursuits. In 1866 he married Elvie Jenkins, a native of Sullivan County, Tenn., and to them were born two children--one now living, Edward. Mrs. Buckner died in 1868, and October 29, 1873, Mr. Buckner wedded Mary Justin, a native of New York. They have two children-James and Freddie.

JOHN M. DONALDSON is one of six surviving members of a family of seven children, and was born in Franklin County, Tenn., in 1837. His parents, William and Ellen (Morris) Donaldson, were born in North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The former was born in 1811, and came to Tennessee with his parents in 1819. He married the mother in 1836, and followed farming until his death, which occurred June 7, 1864. The mother died August 31, 1883. John M. assisted his parents until the breaking out of the war, when he, in 1862, enlisted in Company K, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry. He participated in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Lookout Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta. Goldsboro, N. C., and was fortunate in not being wounded during service, although his horse was killed under him h. the battle of Dover. May 4,1875, he married Ara Phillips, of this county, and this union was blessed with one child, Ellen L. In 1876 they moved to their farm of 250 acres. They also own a tract of 105 acres elsewhere in the county. Mr. and Mrs. Donaldson are members of the Christian Church, and he has always been identified with the Democratic party, and believes in prohibition.

REV. WILLIAM PORCHER DU BOSE, S. T. D., professor of ethics in the academic department and of exegesis in the theological department of the University of the South, was born April 11, 1836, in Winnsboro, S. C., being of Huguenot descent on both sides. He was graduated from the Military Academy of South Carolina in 1855, and received the degree of M. A. from the University of Virginia in 1859. He then entered upon the study for the ministry. In 1864 he entered the Confederate Army and served as adjutant until 1864, when he was ordained and appointed chaplain of Kershaw's Brigade, serving in that capacity until the close of the war. He was then successively rector of the churches of Winnsboro and Abbeville, S. C., and, in 1871 was elected chaplain and professor in the University of the South at Sewanee. He resigned the chaplaincy in 1883, but has filled the chair of professor ever since coming to Sewanee, being one of the ablest and most devoted members of the faculty. He was married, in 1863, to Miss Anne B. Peronneau, who bore him four children, of whom three are living-Susan P., Marv P. and William H. The mother of these children died in 1873, and Dr. Du Bose was then married to Mrs. Maria L. Yerger, nee Rucks, daughter of Judge Rucks, of Nashville. Dr. Du Bose received the degree of S. T. D. from the Columbia College of New York.

THOMAS A. EMBREY was born in Winchester, Tenn., February 27,1861. His father, Alexander S. Embrey, was also a native of Franklin County, Tenn., his birth occurring in 1833. He was a merchant all his life, and was in business in Winchester with a brother for over thirty years, doing a leading business of the place. He departed this life July 7, 1884, having been preceded by his wife on January 21, 1883. The parents reared but one child, and his name heads this sketch. Thomas A. was reared in Winchester, having good educational advantages. He began the reading of law in Winchester, and then took a course in the law department of the Vanderbilt University, of Nashville. He was admitted to the Franklin County bar in February, 1883. He was married October 19, 1883, to Miss Fannie Lindsey, of Gainesville, Tex. Mr. Embrey and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Democrat in politics, and is one of the highly respected attorneys and business men of the county.

FLOYD ESTILL, an attorney of Winchester, is a son of Frank T. and Catharine (Garner) Estill. The father was also an attorney; he was a native of this county, and a son of Dr. Wallis W. Estill, one of the most eminent physicians who ever lived in the county. Dr. Wallis W. Estill came from Virginia to Franklin County in the early settlement of the county, where he lived nearly all his life. He died in Georgia in 1862, while acting as a surgeon in the Confederate Army. Frank T. Estill was born in 1822, and died in 1878, being a leading member of the bar and a popular citizen of Franklin County. He was elected to the Legislature of Tennessee when but about twenty-one years of age. He was county surveyor for a time after the war. He reared a family of eleven children; of fourteen born to his marriage, ten are now living. Floyd Estill was born November 11, 1859, and was reared in Winchester. He read law in Winchester and at Fayetteville, and engaged in the practice of law before twenty years of age in Nashville, and in January, 1883, formed his present partnership under the firm name of Estill & Whittaker. He married Miss Nora Landis, of Bedford County, Tenn., November 10, 1885. Himself and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically Mr. Estill is a firm Democrat.

NATHAN FRANCIS, the editor and publisher of the Franklin County News, was born August 23, 1858, in Franklin County, Tenn., being one of the family born to the matrimonial union of W. R. Francis and Margaret McIlheran. The father is a farmer of Franklin County; he was born in Virginia. The mother was born in Franklin County, Tenn. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm to the age of fifteen, at which time he entered the State University at Knoxville, Tenn., which he attended one year. He then attended the Winchester Normal School and graduated from that institution. He was elected to the office of clerk of the Circuit Court of Franklin County, efficiently serving in that trust till 1886- one term. For four years he taught school in his county, previous to his term of office. In 1886 he took charge of the News, his first issue being June 4 of this year. Mr. Francis was united in marriage December 25, 1883, to Miss Lulu Wood, of Scottsboro, Ala., the fruits of this union being one daughter, Grace. Both himself and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a firm Democrat. He is an advocate of prohibition, and is a promising young man of the county.

REV. THOMAS FRANK GAILOR, M. A., S. T. B., professor of ecclesiastical history and polity, and chaplain of the University of the South, was born in Jackson, Miss., September 17, 1856. His mother, who is still living, was Miss Charlotte Moffett, the youngest daughter of an Irish family which came to the United States in 1849, and which boasts that for nearly 200 years it has given one or more of its sons in each generation to the ministry of the Episcopal Church. His father was Frank M. Gailor, a New Yorker by birth, who went to Mississippi in 1853, but moved to Memphis, Tenn., and was associated with M. C. Gallaway on the editorial staff of the Memphis Avalanche. When the war broke out he entered the Confederate Army, and after gaining distinction on the fields of Shiloh, Munfordsville and other places, he was killed while leading the Thirty-third Mississippi Regiment to the charge at the battle of Perryville, Ky., October 8, 1862. Rev. Prof. Gailor received his early education in Memphis, Tenn., which he still claims as his home. He was graduated with the degree of B. A. at Racine (Wis.) College in 1876, and took the M. A. degree from the same institution in 1879. He received his theological training in the General Theological Seminary, New York, where he was graduated in 1879, and earned the degree of S. T. B. In 1879 he was ordained to the ministry of the Episcopal Church, and for three years had charge of the Church of the Messiah in Pulaski, Giles Co., Tenn. In 1882 he was elected to the professorship of ecclesiastical history and polity at the University of the South, and in 1883, was made chaplain of the university, both of which positions he Dow holds. In November, 1885, Prof. Gailor married Miss Ellen Douglas Cunningham, daughter of George W. Cunningham, Esq., of Nashville, Tenn.

J. A. GAINES, dealer in a general line of merchandise in Winchester, established business October 1, 1882, and has been successfully selling goods ever since. He was born in South Carolina, in 1835, and was reared in that State. He remained in his native State till 1881. When young he had the advantages of a common school education. When twenty-one he began the blacksmithing business, having learned the trade before. This he pursued and doing a general mechanical business, as long as he lived in South Carolina, also carrying on merchandising therefor several years. In 1881, he moved to Sweetwater, Tenn., and in 1882 came to Winchester, as stated above. He was married in 1859 to Miss Margaret Pegg, of South Carolina. Eleven children were born to this union, nine of whom are living, viz.: Ora A., Nettie F., Pauline, Carrie, Julian, Raymond P., Charles, Ira and Frank. Mr. Gaines and wife and his three older children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a Royal Arch Mason. Politically he is a Democrat. His parents were from Virginia and were of Welsh descent.

IRVIN C. GARNER, a merchant of Winchester, was born March 23, 1837, near Winchester. His father, Charles C. Garner, was born in Rutherford County, N. C., January 18, 1800, and when two years old went to Kentucky where he lived a short time, and then, with his parents, came to near Winchester, where he died May 6, 1882. He was a farmer by occupation, was a well known man, and was also one of the prominent farmers of the county The mother, nee Beulah Wadlington, was born near Princeton, Ky., in 1806, and when a girl came to this county, where she is now living. Irvin C. began clerking in a store at the age of fifteen, and continued to do so till the war. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Turney's First Tennessee, and was in the service till September, 1861, when he was discharged on account of disability. He returned to his command in May, 1864, and remained till the close of the war. He then resumed mercantile pursuits till 1867, when he began general merchandising for himself, which he has continued ever since. He was married, March 20, 1866, to Mary C. Pryor, a native of Winchester, born September 29, 1844, the result of this union being two children-Nannie P. and Beulah T. Mrs. Garner and oldest daughter are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Garner is a member of the K. of H. and of the K. & L. of H. Politically he has always been a Democrat.

JOHN H. GILLESPIE is a native of Huntsville, Ala., born in' 1813, and an only child of James T. and Clarkie (Gillespie) Gillespie. The father was born in Pennsylvania, and was in the war of 1812 and was killed at Horseshoe battle, on the Coosa river, September 14, 1814. The mother was born in Louisiana, and died in 1870. John H. remained with his mother until her death. He was married to Sarah Morris in 1832, and to them were born nine children, seven of whom are living-Mary E., William J., John D., Cynthia, Ruth, Monroe and Charles E. Mr. Gillespie and family are earnest members of the Christian Church. Originally he was an old-line Whig but at the present- time has no particular preference. He is a strong advocate of prohibition.

ZUINGLIUS C. GRAVES, LL. D., president of the Mary Sharp College, of Winchester, Tenn., was born April 15, 1816, in Windsor County, Vt., being a son of Zuinglius C. and Lois M. (Snell) Graves, natives of Massachusetts and of German, descent. When our subject was but five years old his father died, and he was then reared by his mother to the age of sixteen. At this age he entered the Chester Academy of Vermont, and afterward attended the Black River Institution at Ludlow, Vt., graduating from this school in 1837. He then went to the Western Reserve, Kingsville, Ohio, and founded the Kingsville Academy, of which he was president for twelve years. In December, 1850, he was called to Winchester, Tenn., to establish and conduct the Mary Sharp College, the presidency of which he has held ever since. From the very germ he has developed Mary Sharp to be one of the very best colleges for the education of women in the country. Dr. Graves was licensed to preach in the Missionary Baptist Church when nineteen years of age. The degree of A. M. was conferred upon him by the Madison University of New York, and the degree of LL. D. by the Union University of Murfreesboro, Tenn. He is a man wholly attached to his work, and has had under his charge as many as 10,000 different pupils during his career. He was married at the age of twenty-five, in Kingsville, Ohio, to Miss Adelia C. Spencer, the fruits of this union being four children-James R., who was killed in the late war; Florence M., who died after becoming the wife of Henry Green, a commission merchant of Columbus, Ga.; Zu. D., deceased; and Hubert A. Dr. Graves is an enterprising and valued citizen of Franklin County, and one of the eminent instructors of the State.

ISAAC GRAY is a son of George Gray, who was married to Lucy Benning and became the father of seven children only three of whom survive. George Gray was born in 1777, in North Carolina (his father being in the Revolutionary war at the time), and came to Kentucky when a boy. In 1" he came to Franklin County, Tenn., and soon located on the farm where our subject now lives. There the father died in 1859, and the mother in 1844. Isaac Gray was born in 1815, and spent three years, from 1847 to 1850, in Arkansas, in the tanning business; and with the exception of these three years has always lived in Franklin County. He is well preserved and is a hale, hearty and jovial old bachelor, and, although over seventy years old, can see to read without the aid of glasses better than most men of fifty. He owns a fine tract of 1,200 acres of land, and is considered one of Franklin County's successful financiers. He is a member of the Christian Church, and was formerly a Whig, but is now a Democrat and a firm believer in the principles of prohibition.

THOMAS D. GREGORY, one of Tennessee's eminent attorneys, was born December 31, 1842, in Lincoln County, Tenn. His father, Brown Gregory, was also a native of Lincoln County, and by occupation was a farmer. In 1852 he removed from his native county to Franklin County, Tenn., where he remained till his death in 1858. The mother. nee Mary McClellan, is yet living; she was born in Lincoln County, Tenn. The subject of this sketeh was reared on a farm and received a common school education. At the age of eighteen he entered Turney's First Tennessee Regiment, Confederate States Army, and served throughout the war, being promoted to adjutant of the regiment and serving in that capacity the last eighteen months of the war. Returning from the war he began the reading of law with A. S. Marks, of Winchester, and in September, 1866, was admitted to the bar. He is a man of fine physical build and of marked firmness of character. He was married, in 1868, to Miss Mary Simmons, a native of this county. Two daughters have been born to this union. Their names are Lena and Lou. Politically Mr. Gregory is a firm and active Democrat. He is a member of the State Democratic Executive Committee. He has never aspired to official honor, but is a popular and leading member of his party in that part of the State in which he lives. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the K. of H.

GEORGE O. HANNUM, principal of the Sherwood Academy, was born February 2, 1833, in Belchertown, Hampshire Co., Mass., being of English descent. He is the son of a farmer, his parents both dying in Massachusetts, of which Stale his father was a native. His mother was a native of Connecticut. He received a fair early education, and remained with his parents to the 'age of twenty-one, when he was married. He then engaged in farming and teaching until 1868, in his native State. He then removed to Winnebago City, Minn., where he taught school and farmed; also, a part of time, he was engaged in the flouring-mill business. In the spring of 1883 he removed to Sherwood, Tenn., and has since had charge of this academy. His marriage ceremony was solemnized in 1856, uniting him in wedlock to Amelia Nutting, a native of Amherst, Hampshire Co., Mass. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hannum are members of the Union Church at Sherwood, and are valued citizens of the place. In Massachusetts Mr. Hannum Was on the board of superintendents of schools, and was for a series of years an assessor and supervisor under municipal government; and in Winnebago, Minn., he was justiee of the peace.

JAMES L. HATCHETT was born in 1838 in this county, and is one of three children born to Archard and Sarah (Lucky) Hatchett. The father was born in 1782, in Virginia; came to Rutherford County, Tenn., in 1806, where he remained a few years, and then came to this county, locating on the farm where he lived and died, which is also the birthplace of our subject and his present home. He followed farming, making stock raising a specialty, and was an associate of David Crockett, with whom he frequently hunted game in this vicinity; and even now their initials may be seen carved together on many trees in this county. His first wife, Susan Sublet, bore him eleven children, and died about 1834; he then married our subject's mother, a native of North Carolina. She was born in 1799, and died in May, 1879. The father died May 24, 1852. Our subject remained with his parents until their deaths; but on the day of his majority he married Jane Larkin, a native of this county, to whieh marriage eight children were born, all living. The mother of these children died March 23,1875. In the fall of 1862 he enlisted in Company K, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, with which command he remained until the close of the war, and then returned to his farm, which he has since cultivated, devoting considerable attention to stock raising. Mr. Hatchett and family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JOHN HESSLER, an enterprising farmer of Franklin County, was born December 18. 1823, in Saxony, Germany. His father was Conrad Hessler, and his mother was nee Margaret Kluge. The father was born in Prussia. He served eight years under Napoleon 1, participating in the great battles of Leipsic, Moscow and Waterloo. He died in Saxony in 1856. The mother was also a native of Saxony, where she died a few weeks before the death of the father occurred. In 1844 John Hessler came to America, where he found employment in carpet factories in New York and Baltimore for about twelve years. In 1856 he moved to Fort Wayne, Ind., where he followed the same occupation for two years. He then removed to Wabash, Ind., and there worked at his trade a short time, and then engaged for about ten years in tenant farming. He then immigrated to Franklin County, Tenn., where he farmed as tenant for seven years, and then bought the farm whereon he now lives. While in New York he married Margaret Klein, a native of Darmstadt, Germany, who became the mother of ten children, eight of whom are still living. She died May 24, 1855, in Wabash County, Ind. Mr. Hessler has a good farm of 250 acres, which he has paid for with the products of the place. It is splendidly improved, considering that when he bought it it was an old and worn-out farm.

ISEBRAND H. HEIKENS is a native German, born in 1839, and is one of six surviving members of a family of seven children, born to Heije and Trientje, who were born in 1804 and 1806, and died in 1858 and 1884, respectively. Our subject remained with his parents in Germany and worked on a farm until twenty-two years of age, and then, in company with a twin brother, came to America locating first in Stephenson County, Ill., and later purchased a farm in Iowa, where they remained eleven years. Our subject then came to Tennessee, and purchased the farm of 460 acres where he is now living. October 30,1866, while in Iowa he married Aafke Jaspers, who was born in Germany and immigrated to America about the time our subject did. After having borne seven children Mrs. Heikens died August 11, 1880; and June 4,1883, Mr. Heikens married Laura Pack, of Franklin County, Tenn. They became the parents of two children, one of whom is living, and the mother died February 13, 1886. Mr. Heikens' children's names are-Heije, Berend, Trientje, Hinderina and Margarethe by his first wife, and Georgia by his last wife. Mr. Heikens has never taken much interest in American politics, but is a civil and law-abiding citizen.

REV. TELFAIR HODGSON, D. D., of the Protestant Episcopal Church, was born in Columbia, Virginia, March 14, 1840. He graduated at the College of New Jersey at Princeton, N. J., in 1859. He studied theology in the General Seminary, New York, 1860; entered the Confederate Army in 1861. In 1863 he was ordained to the lower, order of the ministry (the Diaconate) at Savannah, Ga., and to the priesthood at Columbus, Ga., in 1864. From 1866 to 1869 he had charge of St. Mary's Church, Keyport, N. J.; then, in 1869-70, lie traveled in Europe, returning to Keyport, N. J., in 1871. He was professor of philosophy at the University of Alabama 1872-73, and was assistant in Christ Church, Baltimore, Md., 1874. From 1874 to 1878 he was rector of Trinity Church, Hoboken, N. J. In 1878 he took the chair of vice-chancellor of the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn., and is still in that office, much of the grand success of that institution being due to him. While at Keyport, N. J., Mr. Hodgson was president of the New York & Freehold Railroad Company and of the Matawan & Keyport Gas Light Company. Dr. Hodgson has published several sermons, reports and fugitive pamphlets. He is a man of high intellectual powers and a vigilant worker.

SAMUEL C. HOGE, one of the leading merchants of Sewanee, was born in Alabama in 1839, and was reared in his native State, receiving a common school education. At the age of eighteen he began mercantile clerking, which he continued until the war, when he enlisted in Company C, Third Confederate Cavalry, remaining in the service until the close of the war. After the war he moved to Cowan, Tenn., and engaged at farming one year and then in merchandising for a time, He then went to Jasper, Tenn., and for one year engaged in merchandising, and in 1869 came to Sewanee, and established his present business three years later, in 1872, since which time he has done a thriving business. He has a stock of about $4,000, and transacts a yearly business of about $20,000. He was married, in 1872, to Miss Tommie Holland, the fruit of this union being four children: Nellie W., Eunice H., Nannie and John E. Mrs. Hoge is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically Mr. Hoge is a Democrat. He was postmaster for ten years under Republican administrations, and is now the postmaster at Sewanee, The parents of Mr. Hoge were James and Nancy (Kelly) Hoge, natives of Virginia. They died in Alabama, having been among the very early settlers of Wills Valley, Ala.

WILLIAM B. HOLT was born January 15, 1824, within eight miles of where he now lives, being one of ten children, the fruits of the union of Jacob Holt and Elizabeth Byrom. The father was one of the early pioneers of the county; he wag born in 1799, and died in 1874. He was married four times and had a family of twenty-seven children. The mother was a daughter of Henry Byrom, one of the earliest citizens of Franklin County, who came from South Carolina and died in this county. lie reared a family often children, and was a highly respected old citizen of the county. William B. Holt was reared on the old-time farm and has seen the county develop from a howling wilderness to its present state of civilization and cultivation. He delighted in the sports of hunting and fishing. When twenty-two years of age he was married, in the year 1846, to Miss Sallie Holt, who bore him nine children, eight now living: James H., Eva E., deceased; Turley C., the wife of Rufus Daniel; William J., John A., Thomas M., Joe L., Mary J., wife of Henry Furgerson; and Martha A., wife of James Chilton. He engaged in farming, and has continued it ever since. For fifteen years after his marriage he ran a blacksmith shop, and then engaged in gunsmithing, which he has continued ever since. He now owns 450 acres of good land. Himself, wife and six children are members of the Baptist Church. Mr. Holt has taken ' notice of things that have passed by him, and enjoys his old days in thinking over pioneer times.

HENRY S. HUDGINS, dealer in a general line of merchandise at Estill Springs, was born June 7, 1847, in Williamson County, Tenn., being a son of John J. and Maria (Coleman) Hudgins. The father now resides in Franklin County, He was born in Mecklenburg County, Va., in 1803, and has been a farmer all his life. When young he came to Williamson County, where he lived till 1856, when he removed to Franklin County, When Henry S. was but six years old his mother died; he remained with his father to the age of twenty, when he engaged in farming in Franklin County, until November, 1884, when he began merchandising, which he has very successfully continued. He was united in the bonds of matrimony in 1866, to Rebecca B. Muse, a native of Franklin County. This union has been blessed in the birth of five children, all of whom are living: Mary A., James H., William D., Kindred W. and Burthal. Mr. Hudgins, his wife and his oldest daughter are members of the Baptist Church. He is a Democrat in politics, and is one of the enterprising and respected citizens of the county.

CHARLES L. JONES, an enterprising farmer of this county, was born in Franklin County, Tenn., in December, 1829, and is the youngest of two sons and one daughter born to Wm. L. and Mary (Arnett) Jones. The parents were both born near Richmond, Va., and married there, 'but afterward moved to this county, where their family of three children were born and raised. The father was born May 31, 1792, and died January 16, 1857. The mother was born May 6. 1806: died July 28,1861. In 1852 our subject married Rebecca J. Harris, native of this county, and to them was born one child, dying in infancy, the mother of which also died in 1853. October, 1858, he married Susan Horton, also native of this county, to whom five daughters have been born, one dying in infancy, and another, Mary R., in October, 1882. The names of the three remaining are Ella J., Belle and Willie. Mr. Jones has followed farming all his life on the place where he now resides--a splendid farm, well improved, and on which are several very fine and never-failing springs., He and his family are members of the Baptist Church; he also being a member of the F. & A. M., and identified with the Democratic party.

WILLIAM M. KEITH, a prominent and successful farmer of Franklin County, was born March 22, 1844, and is one of a " family of eight children born to James N. and Nancy E. (Larkin) Keith. The father was born in North Carolina about 1814, and came with his grandparents to this county when quite young, and followed farming here until his death, which occurred in 1876. The mother was a native of this county, lived here all her life, and died March * 1872. Our subject remained with his parents until the commencement of the war; he then enlisted in Company E, Seventeenth Tennessee Infantry, with which he remained until the battle of Murfreesboro, at which place he lost an arm, and then came home staying with his father about ten years. , In 1874 he, in partnership with a Mr. Lipscomb, embarked in the mercantile business at Huntland, this county, which he continued two years, and then returned to the farm, remaining with his father until his (the father's) death. January 22, 1878, he married Julia Ann Lipscomb, of this county, since which he has followed farming, where he now lives. To the above marriage three children have been born, all living: Buford, Floyd and Elizabeth. Mr. Keith has always been identified with the Democratic party, and is a supporter of the principles of prohibition.

JOHN M. KELLY, justice of the peace and postmaster at Sherwood, was born in Franklin County, Tenn., in 1846, being a son of William and Angeline (Prince) Kelly. The father was born in Franklin County, Tenn., was a farmer all his life, and died in 1861, his father being John M. Kelly, Sr., a very prominent early settler of the county. The mother is a daughter of Squire William Prince, who is now among the very oldest citizens of Franklin County, and yet resides near Sherwood, and has been justice of the peace for about twenty years. The mother of our subject is now living. The immediate subject of this sketch was reared on a farm. He enlisted in May, 1861, in Company I, Seventeenth Tennessee, remaining in that command throughout the war. After the war he engaged in farming, which he continued until about 1882, when he was elected justice of the peace, and has since lived in Sherwood. He was appointed postmaster in 1885, and now holds that office. He was married, in 1867, to Elizabeth Garner, the fruits of this union being five children, four of whom are still living: Jennie, Annie, Tina and Willie. The mother of these children died in 1880, having been a member of the Cumber land Presbyterian Church, as is Mr. Kelly. Mr. Kelly is a member of the Franklin Democratic Executive Committee.

HENRY M. LAIRD, car-inspector at Cowan for the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad Company, and for the Tennessee Coal, Iron & Railroad Company, was born in June, 18,17, being an only child born to James A. and Martha E. (Williams) Laird, both natives of Tennessee. The father published the first Know-nothing paper ever published in Tennessee. He died in Bedford County, Tenn., in 1861; the mother still lives in Nashville. The subject of this sketch was married, October 15, 1880, to Miss Ida Williams, daughter of William E. Williams, one of the pioneers of this part of the State. To this union two children have been born, whose names are Colie E. and Bessie A. Both Mr. and Mrs. Laird are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

WILLIAM T. LEAGUE was born March 10, 1830, in Alexandria, Va. When one year old his parents removed to Baltimore, and he was reared in that city. At the age of fifteen he began mercantile clerking, and also learned the trade of manufacturing silk bats, which trade he pursued very successfully till the war, when he engaged in the hotel business at Annapolis, Md., for about two years. After the war lie came to Estill Springs for the purpose of again establishing a silk hat manufactory. He soon disposed of his stock of hats, and in 1866 engaged in general merchandising, which he has ever since continued. He was appointed postmaster in 1866, and has held the office continuously ever since. He was first married in Fredericksburg, Va., in 1850, to Miss Fannie Bradshaw, the result of this union being five children, viz.: Jared H., Metamora, Rosa B. (wife of R. T. Miller), William T. (a prominent lawyer in Poplar Bluff, Mo.) and Emma. He lived with the mother of these children until 1866, and in 1871 be was married to Miss Nannie Hill, of Franklin County, who bore him two children, one of whom-Achaen-is now living. This wife died in about 1875. Mr. League and his two daughters are members of the Christian Church. Mr. League is a Democrat in politics, and is a well respected citizen of the county. The League family originated in America through one James League, who, with seven sons, immigrated to Maryland in Revolutionary times. He was very wealthy. The father of our subject was also James League. He was a defender of Baltimore in 1812, and died in 1873.

DAN LENEHAN, one of the leading merchants of Decherd, Tenn., was born October 17, 1839, in Winchester, Tenn., being a son of Peter and Narcissa (Champion) Lenehan. The father was born in Dublin, Ireland, and when about nineteen lie immigrated to America. In a short time he found his way to Franklin County, Tenn., in the very early settlement of the county. He taught school here for many years, but afterward engaged in farming, which he continued till his death, at the age of ninety, in 1878. The mother was a daughter of Daniel Champion, one among the first settlers of the county. She died a few months before the father's death occurred. The subject of this sketch remained with big parents to about the age of eighteen, when -he lived with his grandfather, Daniel Champion for a time. He went to Illinois and taught school and worked oil a farm for about two years. He afterward returned to Franklin County; in 1861 enlisted in Company I, Turney's First Tennessee Regiment, Confederate Army, and served throughout the war. He had three brothers in the same company with him, only one of whom returned from the service alive. He also had a brother in the Forty-fourth Tennessee, who safely returned. Coming from the war our subject taught school and clerked a while. In 1870 he established his mercantile trade, which he has continued successfully ever since, carrying a stock of about $6,000, and transacting annually about $12,000 worth of business. He was married, December 23, 1869, to Miss Susan Featherstone, the result of this union being three children, viz.: Richard, Pearl and Thomas. Mr. Lenehan was bereft of his wife May 13, 1882. He takes an active interest in politics, acting with the Democratic party. He is a moral and enterprising citizen of Franklin County.

JOHN LIPSCOMB, merchant at Bean's Creek, Franklin County, Tenn., was born it) this county in 1838, and is one of seven children born to Granville and Jane (Breeden) Lipscomb. The father, a native of Virginia, was born about 1805, and married his first wife in Virginia, then moved to Franklin County, Tenn., where she died, having borne one child. Mr. Lipscomb then married his second wife, also a native of Virginia, and removed to Illinois, where he remained two years, and then returned to this county. where his second wife died, leaving two children, William and David, the latter being editor of the Gospel Advocate at Nashville, Tenn. Mr. Lipscomb's third wife was our subject's mother; she was also born in Virginia. At the age of sixteen John entered Franklin College, near Nashville, and attended two terms. In 1863 he enlisted in the Forty-first Tennessee Infantry, with which he remained about eight months, then returned home, and in 1865 began operating the tan-yard at Bean Creek, now owned by him. and recently remodeled with the view of running it on a large scale. It was the pioneer manufactory establishment of this part of Franklin County, being first operated in 1823. In 1876 Mr. Lipscomb began merchandising at Bean Creek, and in 1881 a cousin, J. C. Breeden, became his partner. In 1863 Mr. Lipscomb married Ann Smith, who has borne him nine children, all living. Mr. Lipscomb is a supporter of the principles of Prohibition, and he with his family are members of the Christian Church.

JOHN T. LIPSCOMB, farmer, was born October 22,1840, in this county, and is one of seven children born to William C. and Elizabeth (Lipscomb) Lipscomb. The father was born in Spottsylvania County, Va., June 7, 1804, and came to this county in 1833; remaining one year, he returned to Virginia and married our subject's mother, a native of Louisa County, Va. In 1835 they removed to Franklin County, Tenn., where they remained farming until their deaths, which occurred March 16,1847, and December 20, 1877, mother and father, respectively. Our subject remained with his parents until his majority, attending Franklin College, near Nashville, two years previous to the commencement of the war, when he enlisted in Company F, First Tennessee Confederate Infantry, joining his command in Virginia. He was captured at the battle of the Wilderness, and taken to Point Lookout, Md. At the close of the war he embarked in the mercantile business at Huntland, this county, which he continued successfully ten years. He then moved to his present farm, which he had purchased while in business. He has since followed farming, and is considered one of Franklin County's successful farmers. In August, 1869, he married Mrs. Mary M. Rutledge, nee Montgomery, who had two children by her former husband, both still living: George C. and Eva D. To this marriage one child was bornWilliam Ira, still living; and the mother died April 8, 1871. On October 21, 1879, he married Mrs. Lina E. Porter, nee Montgomery (sister of his first wife), who had three children by her former husband-Flora M., Tinie L. and Willie G., all living. To this marriage one child has been born-Thomas Colville, living, Mr. and Mrs, Lipscomb are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, He has always voted the Democratic ticket, and is a firm supporter of the principles of prohibition.

HUGH N. LUCAS was born in 1827, a native of this county and one of a family Of seven born to William and Grissella Lucas. The parents were natives of North Carolina and South Carolina, father and mother, respectively. The father was born in 1798, and came to this county in 1818; he married the mother of our subject in 1820, she having moved to this county in 1816. They followed farming here in the county, the father dying in 1861 and the mother in 1882. Our subject remained with his parents until 1847, then spent eleven years in Texas, but returned to this county, where he purchased a farm and afterward located where he now resides. He has a controlling interest in the Falls Mills Manufacturing Company, of this county. In October, 1862. he was drafted into the Twenty-eighth Tennessee Infantry, with which he remained but a few months, owing to bad health. In 1865 he married Nancy Hannah, a native of Franklin County, which union has been blessed by the birth of six children, all still living. Mr. and Mrs. Lucas are members of the Methodist Church. He is also a member in good standing of F. &A. M.

JOHN D. LYNCH, one of the leading merchants of Sherwood, Tennesse, is the fourth of a family of seven children, born to the marriage of John D. Lynch and Hettie Wilkinson. The father was born in 1818, being a son of David Lynch a prominent early settler of Franklin County. John D. Lynch, Sr., was a farmer by occupation, and for many years was a magistrate of the county, his death occurring in 1883. The mother of ,our subject is still living. The immediate subject of this sketch was reared on a farm, having been born in 1844. In May, 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate service in Company I, Seventeenth Tennessee, in which he served until the surrender, and at Chickamauga lost a leg. Returning from the war he farmed a short time. Since then he has been dealing in lumber and tan bark, and has also been merchandising. He does an extensive business in the tan bark trade. He was married, in 1867, to Nancy Jane King, a native of this county, who has borne nine children to this union, six of whom are living, ,viz.: John B., Hettie, David, Lucinda, Rebecca, and Nancy Jane. Politically, Mr. Lynch is a Democrat. He is an enterprising and successful business man and a good citizen. His grandfather, David Lynch, was a soldier in the war of 1812. His uncle, Elijah Lynch, was a soldier in the war of 1812 and in the Florida war.

DAVID LYONS, a farmer, living in the Tenth District, was one of five children born to the marriage of William Lyons and Catharine Howp, nee Corner. He was born in 1815 in Augusta County, Va., and is the only one of the family now living. The father came to Franklin County. Tenn., with his family, about 1826, and died in the county in 1858, having been preceded by his wife about ten years. David Lyons remained with his parents till attaining his majority, when he began farming for himself. In 1859 he bought the farm whereon he now resides. In 1839 he married Nancy Ferrall, a native of this county, who bore him eight children, seven of whom are now living. This wife died in 1878, and in 1881 Mr. Lyons was united in marriage to his second wife, Mrs. Boyle, nee Black, a native of Blount County, Tenn. Mr. L. lives in a brick house, one among the first, if not the first one, ever built in Franklin County. In a little cemetery on his farm lie the remains of Col. James Lewis, an officer in the Revolutionary war, and one of " Washington's Forlorn Hope " at the battle of Brandywine. Col. Lewis was born in Albemarle County, Va., in 1755, came to Franklin County about 1811, locating on the farm now owned by Mr. Lyons, and died February 21, 1849.

EX-GOV. A. S. MARKS was born in Daviess County, Ky., October 16, 1836. He was reared in his native county to, the age of twenty, on a tobacco plantation. His father was a well-to-do farmer, and died when A. S. was but about ten years old. At the age of twenty our subject came to Winchester and began reading law in the office of A. S. Colyar, and he was admitted to the bar just before the war. He then enlisted in 1861, as captain of Company E, Seventeenth Tennessee, in the Confederate service. In May, 1862, he was elected colonel of that regiment. At Murfreesboro he lost a leg, and after his recovery, he was in Forrest's military court till the close of the war. After returning home he resumed the practice of law in Winchester until 1870, when he was elected chancellor of the Fourth Division of Tennessee, and in 1978 was re-elected without opposition. He soon afterward, in 1878, received the nomination by the Democratic party for governor, and was elected, serving one term, 1879-81. He has since been engaged in the practice of law, being one of the very able lawyers of the State. and one of the popular and leading men of his party. He was married, April 28, 1863, to Miss Novalla Davis, of Wilson County, Tenn. Gov. Marks has two sons, one of whom, Arthur H., is now consular clerk in the United States Diplomatic Corps in London, being a lawyer by profession, and the other one, Albert D., is practicing law in the firm of Marks & Gregory, having been admitted to the bar when seventeen years of age.

WILLIAM W. MARTIN, one among the old citizens of Franklin County, was born within two miles of Decherd October 17, 1829. He is one of a family of eleven children born to the marriage of Nathan R. Martin and Jane Witt. The father was born in South Carolina December 1, 1804, where be lived till the age of twelve, when, in 1816, he immigrated to Franklin County, Tenn., where he married, lived and died, his death occurring in 1859. The mother was. born December 20, 1804, in Virginia, whence she came to this county when seven years old. She lived in this county till 1874, when she removed to Houston County. Ga., where she now lives. Our subject was reared on a farm. He learned the blacksmith trade, and when twenty-one he began the pursuit of his trade for himself, which he continued until 1858, when he entered the mercantile business, which he continued till 1861. He then raised a company for the Confederate service, but the company was not received. He then remained at home till 1863, when he went to Houston County, Ga., there worked at his trade in the Confederate service till the close of the war. After the war he engaged at his trade in Decherd, and continued till October, 1865, when he established his present merchandising trade, which he has successfully continued ever since. He was married, March 19, 1853, to Miss Lizzie Hines, the result of this union being ten children, eight of whom are living: Edward H., Annie, Lou B. and Isaac H. (twins), Nathan E., Theodosius W., Meredith P. and Clyde. Mr. Martin and all of his family, except the two youngest children, are members of the Presbyterian Church, Mr. Martin being an elder in the church. Politically he is a Democrat, and is one of the leading and influential citizens of the community.

JOHN H. MARTIN, one of Winchester's attorneys, was born December 27, 1844, in Franklin County, Tenn., being one of a family of children, the fruits of the marriage of Daniel J. Martin and Sarah Martin, natives of this county, and of the same surname, although of no blood relation. The father was a farmer by occupation, and a prominent man of the county. He held the office of constable about ten years, that of justice of the peace six years, deputy sheriff four years, and sheriff four years. He raised four children, all now living in this county. He died in 1875, but the mother is still living. Our subject was reared on a farm, securing a good common school education. He began reading medicine in 1866 and continued until 1869, he then abandoned that profession and began the reading of law, and was soon admitted to the bar, since which time he has continued in that profession. He also owns 200 acres of land in the Fourth District. Politically he has always been a Democrat.

ISAAC N. MARTIN, farmer of this county, was born in 1828, in Franklin County, Tenn., and is one of a family of two children born to William and Elizabeth (Sandidge) Martin. The parents were both born in this county about 1801, and married about 1826. The father dying in 1831, the mother afterward married Jesse Garnett, a native of Mississippi, who died a couple years later. The mother died in August, 1855. Soon after his fattier's death, our subject made his home with his grandparents Sandidge, and remained with them until fifteen years old, when his mother returned to housekeeping. He lived with her until his marriage in 1853, to Sarah Horton. He then embarked in the mercantile business at Salem, this county, which he continued until 1876. He then followed farming near Maxwell, until the year 1881, at which date he began the mercantile business at Maxwell, in which he has been interested since. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Martin was blessed with the birth of five children, three of whom are now living. The mother of these children died December 16, 1885. Mr. Martin and family are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

JOHN W. MASON, a leading merchant of Decherd, Tenn., was born in Franklin County, October 18, 1858. His parents were James and Melvina (Buckner) Mason, both natives of Franklin County. The father was at one time sheriff of this county, but now lives in Alabama. The mother is yet living near Decherd. John W. Mason was reared on a farm and received his education in the common schools of the county. When about thirteen years old he began clerking for Lenehan & Holland and continued with them for eight or nine years. He then succeeded his employers in business. He has been very successful, and now carries about $8,000 in stock, transacting a business of about $2,000 annually. He began with nothing but what he had earned himself, and is an example of a self-made successful man. His marriage ceremony was solemnized January 21, 1880, uniting him to Miss Laura Hines, a native of this county. Four children have blessed this union, whose names are as follows: Ward, Clara, Mary and Buford. Mr. Mason and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Democrat in politics.

CAPT. STEPHEN D. MATHER was born in Penn. in 1842, and is one of a family of five born to Daniel and Roxana (Underwood) Mather. When five years of age he went to Illinois with his parents, who died in 1885 and 1859; father and mother, ninety and sixty years of age, repectively; both of old New England Puritan stock. Our subject remained with his parents until his majority, and graduated at Cornell College, Iowa, receiving the degree of A. B., in 1860, and since, A. M. At the commencement of the war he enlisted in the Nineteenth Iowa Infantry and was orderly sergeant, and afterward captain and quartermaster. He remained until the close, participating in the whole campaign of the Cumberland, once being taken prisoner at Nashville, but soon escaped, walking by night through to the Ohio River. In 1867, he came to Franklin County, Tenn., which place had attracted his attention and admiration during the war, buying at first 300 acres with the expectation of starting a colony for Northern settlers. Owing to the political difficulties which for a time disturbed the South, his first intentions were never carried out, although by his influence this section (around Belvidere) has been settled mainly by thrifty, enterprising Northern farmers, who, by systematic farming, with the use of fertillizers and systematic rotation of crops, have given the place no little fame as being the "garden spot of Tennessee." In 1866 he married Rebecca Stamper, a native of the county. To this marriage four children have been born, two of whom are still living--Bessie and Nellie. Mr. Mather met with the bereavement of the loss of his wife on June 29, 1880. Politically, Mr. Mather is a stanch Republican, and is a member of the State Republican Executive Committee, and he is a firm believer in the principles of prohibition.

HON. LEWIS METCALFE, the oldest living member of the Franklin County bar was born in Lexington, Ky.. February 22, 1818. His father, Barnett Metcalfe, was born in Fauquier County, Virginia, and when young went to Kentucky, where he married Letitia Martin, a native of Jessamine County, of that State. The father was a farmer and merchant. He removed to Huntsville, Ala., in 1822, and afterward to Fayetteville, Tenn There Lewis began the study of medicine. He afterward attended Medical College at Lexington, Ky., graduating in that institution. He then engaged in the practice of medicine for ten years in Franklin County, Tenn., and in Mississippi. Returning to Franklin County from Mississippi he read law, and in 1952 was admitted to the bar, and since then has practiced law in Franklin County, having attained prominence in his profession He is highly educated. He was elected to the Senate of Tennessee, in 1884, and has held that office one term. He was married, in 1848, to Miss Sarah A. Stamper, a native of North Carolina, who came to this county when young. This union was blessed in the birth of one daughter. She became grown, graduated in the Mary Sharp College, and died on April 9, 1865, at the very hour of Lee's surrender. Mrs. Metcalfe is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Politically, Mr. Metcalfe was a Whig before the war; since then he has been a Democrat.

JACOB MIESCHER, an extensive and influential farmer of Franklin County, Tenn. is one of two children born to the marriage of Peter and Elizabeth Miescher. Our subject was born in Switzerland November 23, 1822, and with his parents came to America in 1853, and located in Wayne County, Ohio, where the parents passed the remainder of their lives. The father died in August, 1865, and the mother in June, 1855. July 6, 1847. our subject married Elizabeth Reinhard, who was also born in Switzerland. Two sons and one daughter were born to this union, two of whom were born and died in Switzerland. In 1870 Mr. Miescher came to Tennessee to choose a home. He made a second visit in 1871, and still another in 1872. On his last visit he purchased the home where he now lives, a splendid farm of 180 acres, which he has greatly improved. Since that time he has added 600 acres to the original tract. Mr. Miescher has been an exceptionally successful man, and is identified with the Democratic party, and he and family are members of the German Reformed Church.

SAMUEL M. MILLER, a farmer of Franklin County, living in the Tenth District, was an only child born to Montgomery C. and Melvinie (Buckner) Miller. He was born in Franklin County, Tenn., June 30, 1850. The father, Montgomery C. Miller, was also born in this county, where he lived all his life. He, the father, departed this life to join the innumerable dead in 1850, having beer. a farmer throughout his life. Samuel M. was reared to the years of maturity with an uncle. He then bought the farm whereon he now resides. He chose his helpmeet in the person of Joan Hines, daughter of  I. F. Hines, one of Franklin County's prominent pioneer settlers. The marriage ceremony was solemnized in September, 1872. This union has been blessed in the birth of four sons, one of whom is deceased, and one daughter. Those now living are Walter, Montgomery, Burk and Leuvinie. In political affairs Mr. Miller cooperates with the Democratic party  Mrs. Miller Is a member of the Baptist Church.

JEFFERSON D. MILLER was born July 14,1861, in Franklin County, Tenn., and is one of a family of nine children born to the matrimonial union of John H. and Nancy (Brazelton) Miller. The father was born in Franklin County in 1834. At the commencement of the late war he enlisted in the First Tennessee Infantry, but owing to bad health he was discharged at the end of six months. The mother is also a native of this county. Both parents are yet living. Jefferson D. remained with his parents to the age of twentyone, when he accepted the position of telegraph operator at Cowan, which position he has ever since held. He has also been the regular correspondent of the Franklin County News for two years. In February, 1881, he married Miss Fannie Miller, a native of Bullock County, Ala. One daughter, Lilly Corene, has blessed this union. Both Mr. Miller and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JNO. C. MONTGOMERY, a prominent citizen of Franklin County, was born September 24, 1820, in this county, being the only child born to the. marriage of William H. Montgomery and Susan Cowan. The father was born about the year 1795, in Blount County, Tenn., and in 1806 came to Franklin County, where he followed farming until his death in October, 1829, his wife having preceded him to her long home in October, 1820. The subject of this sketch lived with his grandparents till attaining the years of majority. He was elected constable of the Tenth District in 1842 and taught school in 1844. Soon afterward he bought the farm on which he has ever since lived. He was elected justice of the peace in 1846, which office he held for eighteen years. On January 15, 1850, he married Nancy Cowan, daughter of James P. Cowan, an old pioneer of Franklin County, who was born December 1, 1792, and died April 7, 1862. To the above marriage were born nine children, five of whom are still living. The names of those now living are: William M., born in 1850; James C., born in 1853; Mary A., born in 1856; Ellen, born in 1863; and Kittie born in 1869. Squire Montgomery is a firm Democrat in politics. He Is a thoroughly self-made man, having begun life with nothing, and by thrift and economy has become a well-to-do farmer, now owning 300 acres of fine land. Besides this his wife owns 100 acres. Both Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

HORATIO R. MOORE, an enterprising and intelligent citizen of this county, was born near Florence, Lauderdale County, Ala., in 1833. He is of a family of five sons and two daughters that has been remarkably well preserved. The brothers-John J., Robert J., Hugh B. and James Knox Moore, and the sisters-Mrs. Sarah Millican and Mrs. Rebecca Patrick, are all living. Two of the brothers were wounded during the war, but all are now in good health, and the youngest is now over forty-one years old. The father, Stephen R. Moore, was born in Moore County, N. C., a county that was named for his grandfather, Robert Moore, who was a native of Ireland, and who came to America with his father, Patrick, and his brothers, Hugh and Patrick, and settled in South Carolina, and subsequently moved to North Carolina, where he lived at the breaking out of the war of 1776. He belonged to the Colonial Army and fell just before the close of the war at Guilford's Court House in Marion's command. Stephen, with his father, mother, brothers and sisters, left North Carolina and settled among the pioneers of north Alabama in the year 1820. The mother, Lucy (McDougal) Moore, was born in Cumberland County, N. C., and settled in north Alabama about the year 1820 with her parents. The parents of our subject were married in Alabama in 1829, and lived in that productive section till 1837, at which time they settled in north Mississippi, where they prospered farming. The mother died in 1845. The father never married a second time. His home fell within the Federal lines in 1863. He was taken North with many others of that section, and put in prison because he was true to his convictions, as a Southern citizen, where he died in 1864. Our subject was a regular laborer on the farm, occasionally attending the old style schools of that section till 1853, at which time he left home, without the approval of many friends, with the view of enjoying better educational advantages than that country afforded. He soon entered Franklin College, near Nashville, where he remained working and teaching during vacations till he completed the course of study and graduated in 1857. He then returned to Mississippi and taught till the fall of 1860. On the 5th of September of that year he and Miss Annie Hunt, with whom he became acquainted while students at Franklin College, were married in this county. After a short stay in Mississippi they returned to Huntland, where they have lived ever since. Our subject entered as a partner into the mercantile business with his wife's father, Clinton A. Hunt, who is reputed to be the first white child born in Franklin County. The civil war soon put a stop to this undertaking. Insecure farming was then tried, next the Confederate service was entered, which ended with the surrender of Forrest's command in May, 1865. He at once went to farming, and has been busily engaged in this business on his 400 acre farm that lies adjacent to Huntland, on the Fayetteville branch of the Nashville, Chatanooga. & St. Louis Railroad, ever since. He has at times been connected with the mercantile business, and is now secretary and treasurer of the the Fall Mills Manufacturing Company. He represented Franklin County in the General Assembly of the State in 1873-74, and has always taken an interest the public enterprises and issues of the country. He and his good wife are members of the Christian Church. They have had born to them seven sons and five daughters, the names of whom we give consecutively in this connection: Barclay D., Miss Elma, Miss Lou, William L., Miss Annie, Miss Mamie, Hugh B., Hunt C., Knox J., Horatio R. Miss Lexie and Tom P. Moore.

T. F. MOSELEY, a well known and popular old pioneer of Franklin County, Tenn., was born in the "Palmetto State" November 28, 1816, and is one of two children living out of a family of seven born to the marriage of George Moseley and Nancy Wakefield. The father was born in South Carolina and the mother in North Carolina. They came to Tennessee in 1818, and located on Bean Creek November 28 of that year. Our subject's paternal grandparents preceded them to Tennessee two years. Our subject made his home with his parents until nineteen years of age, and then accepted a clerkship in a general merchandise store at Salem, Tenn., receiving $50 for his first year's service, $100 for his second, and $150 for his third. He soon after took an interest in the business, continuing until 1841. December 12, 1839, he wedded Arie V. Simmons, and. then located on the farm, where he still resides. The mother was born November 6, 1820, and died July 4, 1879, having borne eleven, children. May 10, 1881, Mrs. Lucy (Dean) Noblett became his wife. She was born in South Carolina January 28, 1824, and died July 16. 1884.

HON. JOHN R. OLIVER, an active business man of Franklin County, at Estill Springs, was born January 17, 1837, in Tishamingo County, Miss. His parents were R. H. and Malinda Myra (Petty) Oliver. The father was born in Franklin County, Tenn., his father having emigrated from Virginia at a very early date. The father of our subject lived in his native county all his life, except about three years, which time he lived in Mississippi. He was a very prominent citizen, having been deputy sheriff of the county. His death occurred in 1837, and the mother's death about four years later. John R. was then reared with an only sister by an uncle, Lanson Rowe, a very prominent and public spirited citizen of Franklin County. He received his education at Irving College, Warren Co., Tenn., graduating in 1858. He then engaged in teaching as principal in the County academy at Woodbury, Cannon Co., Tenn., till the war. He then enlisted in Company E, Thirty-second Tennessee, and served in that company until the battle of Fort Donelson. Being absent from his command he was not captured with his company. He then joined Company K, Forty-fourth Tennessee. He was elected first lieutenant just before the battle of Shiloh, and acted as captain through that battle, afterward being promoted captain of the company, commanding it until after the battle of Chickamauga, when he was appointed captain of an engineer corps in A. P. Stuart's Division, and was on detached service on Gen. Stuart's staff until the close of the war, being paroled at Greensboro, N. C. He then resumed his profession at Woodbury, as principal of that school, until 1867, when he removed to Estill Springs and engaged in merchandising, and by thrift and energy has been very successful. He deals in railroad timber supplies and carries on farming very extensively, now owning about 1,000 acres of good land. He owns an interest in a store at Marble Hill, Moore County, and is the agent for the Nashville Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad at Estill Springs. He was married, December 22, 1858, to Miss Callie McFerrin, oldest daughter of A. F. McFerrin, of Woodbury, Tenn. Mr. Oliver has a family of five children: Robert A., Joseph L., Eliza C., Myra S. and Ida M. Robert A. is married and has two children, and lives in Nashville. He is , a traveling salesman. The subject of this sketch and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Oliver is a member of the F. & A. M. Besides being an active and popular business man Mr. Oliver has interested himself in the public affairs and represented Franklin County in the Legislature in 1876-77.

R. C. PATRICK was born in Madison County, Ky., in 1825, and is one of a family of ten children born to Jno. R. and Matilda (Callaway) Patrick. The father was born in Virginia in 1797, and moved to Kentucky while young, and was married in Franklin County, Tenn., after which they returned to Kentucky, but moved to this county about 1827, where he farmed and followed merchandising until his death, which occurred in 1847. The mother was born in this county in 1807, and died here in the county, where she lived all her life. Our subject remained with his parents until 1849, when he went to California, and engaged in mining about a year, after which he returned to Franklin County, Tenn., embarking in the mercantile line at Salem, where he remained nine years; then he moved to .Maxwell, and took Franklin County census of 1860, after which he farmed for about seven years; but again embarked in merchandising, this time at Maxwell, about 1867, which he continued twelve years He has also been acting as agent for the Winchester & Alabama Railroad at this point, since its reconstruction after he war. August, 1854, he married Mary M. Clements, native of this State. This union has been blessed by the birth of five children, four of whom are still living-Anna, Emma, John and Jesse.

JOHN A. RUCH, a farmer of this county, was born September 28, 1842, in Holmes County, Ohio. The parents, Jacob and Magdelene Ruch, were both natives of Switzerland, and came to America about 1835, locating in Ohio, where they remained all their lives farming. The mother died in 1870, the father in 1876. Our subject remained with his parents until the commencement of the war, and then joined the Nineteenth Ohio Infantry, with which command he remained throughout the war, participating in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Nashville and Atlanta, escaping without a wound, there being but one other who had been with the command all the time so fortunate. After the war he returned home and engaged in the saw-milling business seven years. In 1868 he married Anna Graber, a native of Ohio, to which union four children have been born. In 1872 he, with his family, moved to Franklin County, Tenn., locating on the farm where he now lives. Since 1876 he, with others of his neighborhood, began the use of bone fertilizers, which, with thorough cultivation and systematic rotation of crops, has given the Belvidere settlement fame as an agricultural district. Politically Mr. Ruch is a Republican and a firm supporter of the principles of prohibition. He and his family are members of the German Reformed Church.

WM. M. RUTLEDGE was born in Roane County, Tenn. in 1848, and is one of a family of six children born to Geo. P. and Delia (Tedford) Rutledge. The father was born in Sullivan County, Tenn., June, 1813, and followed farming in that and Blount Counties until about 1861, when he moved to Spalding County, Ga., and from there in 1865, to Huntland, Franklin Co.,Tenn., at which place he embarked in merchandising, and continued that until a short time before his death, which occurred in February, 1884. The mother, a native of Alabama, preceded him May 11, 1878. Wm. M., the subject of this sketch, remained with his parents until their death, and in 1878 he began merchandising for himself, and in partnership with Geo. C. Rutledge carries a splendid line of general merchandise at Huntland, this county. In November, 1879 he married Martitia Staples, daughter of Jno. W. Staples, of this county. This marriage has been blessed by the birth of two children, both girls: Roxie and Nettie, both still living. . Mr. and Mrs. Rutledge are active members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Rutledge has always been a Democrat, and is a strong advocate of the principles of prohibition.

LARKIN R. SARTAIN was born September 18,1882, in Franklin County, Ga., being one of a family of three sons and two daughters, the fruits of the marriage of Elijah Sartain and Sarah Williams. The father was a native of Georgia, and died about 1850, at Barnesville, in his native State. The mother was born in North Carolina, and died March 11, 1862, in Franklin County, Tenn., whither she had removed in 1357. The subject of this sketch came to Franklin County, Tenn., before the war, and has ever since been employed as engineer on the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad. During the war he was employed in hauling supplies for the Confederate Army, the above named railroad company having all their rolling stock then in the South. Mr. Sartain has met with two very narrow escapes with his life, having twice gone through bridges, each accident occasioning several deaths. He each time escaped injury, but afterward met with an accident on November 6, 1875, which cost him a leg. November 6, 1873, he was united in marriage to Jenney Hawkins, the result of this union being four daughters, viz.: Clara, Nettie, Eleanor and Daisy. Before the war Mr. Sartain was a Whig, but since the war he has been a Democrat. He is now an advocate of prohibition. Both himself and wife are members of the Christian Church at Cowan, where they reside.

DR. J. C. SHAPARD, one of the leading physicians of Winchester, was born August 30, 1823, in Rutherford County, Tenn. His father, James P. Shapard, was born in North Carolina, and immigrated to Rutherford County, Tenn., when very young. He was a merchant, and lived in Rutherford County till near his death, when he removed to Texas, where he died in 1850. The mother also died in Texas in 1875. Dr. Shapard was the oldest of ten children. When a young man he came to Winchester and conducted merchandising for his father two years. He began the study of medicine when twenty-two years of age, and soon entered the practice. He attended one course of lectures at Louisville, and then, in 1859, graduated in the medical department of the Vanderbilt University. He then entered upon the practice of medicine in Franklin County. In 1862 be removed to Winchester, where he has ever since continued, and has been justly successful. He was married, in 1846, to Miss Elivira Clark, of Bedford County, Tenn. This union has been blessed in the birth of seven children, six of whom are living, viz.: Melissa H., wife of J. W. Thornton, of Chattanooga; Mary E., the one who died; Henry C., Thomas N., Charles J., Leonora and Florence. Dr. Shapard and two of his sons and three daughters are members of the Episcopal Church, and his wife and youngest daughter are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Dr. Shapard is a firm Democrat in politics, and is a valuable citizen of Franklin County.

E. E. SHERWOOD, senior member of the firm of Sherwood & Whittemore, is a son of C. D. Sherwood, who, in 1875, organized a colony of settlers at Sherwood, Tenn. C. D. Sherwood was born in 1832, in Connecticut, where he was reared. In his native State he married Miss Charlotte Ferriss, and in a few years he moved to Minnesota, where he remained until 1875, attaining prominence in political circles in that State. He has been a member of both branches of the Legislature of Minnesota, and was lieutenant-governor of that State one term. The subject of this sketch was born in 1861, being the second of the family. He remained with his parents till coming to Tennessee, when he opened his mercantile business, in which he has been very successful. He was united in marriage, In 1884, to Miss Esther Foote, also A native of Connecticut. One son, Ambrose E., has blessed this union. Walter D. Whittemore, of the firm of Sherwood & Whittemore, was born in Minnesota in 1861, being the son of Reuben and Nancy (West) Whittemore, natives of Massachusetts. The father is a farmer and stock-raiser. He removed from Massachusetts to Rushford, Minn., where he lived until removing to Sherwood, where he now lives. In the spring of 1886 Walter D. entered the firm of Sherwood & Whittemore. This firm carries a stock of about $2,000 and transacts a yearly business of about $15,000. Both are young men of business ability and are highly respected.

JOSEPH A. SHORT, the present superintendent of the Tennessee Iron, Coal & Railroad Company's works at Cowan, was born April 12,1850, in Rowan County, Tenn. His parents were George W. and Eliza (Parks) Short; they being parents of fourteen children. The father Is a native of Virginia, the mother of Tennessee. They now reside in Roane County, Tenn., where the father follows farming, having formerly been engaged in iron interests in Roane County. The subject of this sketch remained with his parents to the age of nineteen, when he engaged in the iron business in his native county for four years. He was then engaged in the same business in Dade County, Ga., about three and a half years. He then went to Dickson County, Tenn., still in the iron business,. remaining there a few months. Thence he went to the Chattanooga Furnace for a few mouths; thence to Baxter County, Ga., in the employ of a New York Iron Company for one year. In 1881, he took charge of his present business at Cowan, where he now resides. He was united in marriage, in 1871, to Miss Caroline Underwood, a native of Roane County, Tenn., the fruits of this union being two children, viz.: Michael and Cora. This wife died at her parents' home in Roane County, Tenn., in 1875. In 1879, Mr. Short married Lizzie Allison, a native of Alabama.

GEN. FRANCIS A. SHOUP, D. D., professor of physics and engineering in the University of the South, was born in Laurel, Franklin Co., Ind., March 22, 1834. His father, George Grove Shoup, was a member of the State Constitutional Convention of Indiana, and for many years was a member of the Legislature of that State. He was an extensive merchant, and was a man of large property. The maternal grandfather of Gen. Shoup, James Conwell, was also a man of large property. He founded the town of Laurel, Ind., and was for a number of years a member of the Legislature. When Gen. Shoup was nineteen years old his father died, and about three years later his mother died. He was educated in the Asbury University, Greencastle, Ind., and in the Military Academy, West Point, N. Y., which latter place he entered in 1851, graduating in 1855. He was then assigned second lieutenant of the First United States Artillery, resigning in 1859. He then went to Indianapolis and began the practice of law. There he organized a company of zouaves. He then went to Florida and was commissioned in the regular army, Confederate States, and when the volunteer Confederate Army was raised he was made major of artillery, his first service being at Mobile Bay. He was then ordered to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and served through the early part of the war with Hardee's army, chief of artillery, and was senior officer of artillery in the battle of Shiloh. After this battle he was made chief of artillery in Beauregard's army. He was again ordered to the Trans-Mississippi Department with Gen. Hindman; was appointed brigadier-general, and commanded a division in the fight of Prairie Grove. Afterward he was ordered to the command of the harbor of Mobile; thence to the army at Vicksburg, where he commanded a brigade during the siege and at the surrender. After being exchanged he was again ordered to the defense of Mobile; thence to J. E. Johnston's army at Dalton, Ga.; and was chief of artillery through the campaign before Atlanta. He designed and executed an original system of fortifications at the Chattahoochee, which was very effectual in repelling all attacks, and which has been much admired by great artillery officers. Gen. Shoup was then made chief of Gen. Hood's staff. upon the appointment of the latter officer. After the war he was elected to the chair of physics in the University of Mississippi (Oxford, Miss.), and while there took orders in the Protestant Episcopal Church. He was elected to the chair of mathematics in the University of the South, at Sewanee, in 1870. In 1874 he took a parish in the diocese of Albany, N. Y., and was made canon in the All Saints Cathedral, Albany, N. Y. In 1877 he returned to the South, and was in charge of Christ Church, New Orleans, for a time. He was elected to the chair which he now fills in 1883. Dr. Shoup was married in 1871 to Miss Esther H. Elliott, daughter of the late Bishop Elliott of Georgia. He has a family of three children: Francis, Charlotte and Stephen. Dr. Shoup received the degree of D. D. from the University of the South in 1880.

JOHN SIMMONS, one of Winchester's prominent attorneys, was born April 28,1846, in Franklin County, Tenn. His father, George Simmons, was a farmer of the county,, and died in November, 1867. His mother was nee Mary Fancy. The paternal grandfather of John Simmons was William Simmons, who came to this county in the very early settlement of this part of the State. The maternal grandparents were French and Scotch-Irish; the paternal grandparents were English and German. The subject of this sketch received but a common school education. He remained on the farm till two years after the war, and then worked about at different vocations for a few years. In 1869 he began reading law at home, and in 1871 he was admitted to the bar, and has since been engaged in the practice of law. He was married, December 18, 1878, to Miss Anna Pennington, the result of this union being one son, Pennington. Mr. Simmons is a firm. Democrat, and always has been, his ancestors having been old-line Whigs. His grandfather, Fancy, made the first donation to the Vanderbilt University in the sum of $1,000.

A. J. SKIDMORE, the trustee of Franklin County, Tenn., was born November 2, 1839, within one mile of where be now lives, being one of the family of children born to the marriage of William Skidmore and Sallie Keith. The father was a native of North Carolina; he immigrated to this county about 1813, and died in 1862, having been a farmer. The mother was born in Franklin County, Tenn., and she died in 1874. Mr. A. J. Skidmore was reared on a farm. At the age of nineteen he enlisted in Company I, Turney's First Tennessee, Confederate States Army, and was in the service about two years, and was discharged on account of disability. After the war he married and settled down to farming, where he has ever since resided, owning 135 acres of land three miles from Winchester. He also taught school about eight years after the war. He was elected in 1875 to the office of county assessor, which he held one term. In 1874 he was elected county trustee, and has filled his term of office with efficiency. He was married, in 1865, to Miss Sarah Jane Sells, the results of this union being five children, viz.: Mary J., Laura E., Bettie S., James F. and Hattie S. This wife died in 1874, and in 1878 be was married to Miss Nira Terry, of Jackson County, Ala. Five children have been born to this union, viz.: Maggie, Estella, Mattie and two unnamed. Mr. Skidmore, his wife and four children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. He is a firm Democrat and always has been. He is a self-made, substantial citizen of the county.

DR. FLAVEL B. SLOAN, a prominent physician of Franklin County, was born in Polk County, Tenn., March 12, 1844. He was one of a family of eleven children born to James and Susan (Brown) Sloan. The father was born January 27, 1803, in Blount County, Tenn., and died October 15, 1880, in Polk County, Tenn., where he had followed farming all his life and having been an elder in the Presbyterian Church for fifty years. The parents of our subject were married November 15, 1827. The mother was born in Rockbridge County, Va., October 14, 1808, and died August 31, 1875, in Polk County, Tenn. Dr. Sloan was reared on a farm till the commencement of the war, when he joined the Fifth Tennessee Cavalry, in which he served six months and was discharged on account of bad health. In 1863 he again joined his command, and was afterward detailed private scout, first for Johnston and afterward for Hood. After the Tennessee campaign he again joined his company in South Carolina, and served in that until the surrender of Johnston's army. From 1865 to 1869 he attended the McNutt's Academy at Franklin, Tenn., where he also read medicine. He then attended the medical department of the University during the sessions of 1869-70 and 1870-71. He then began practicing in Franklin County where he has since followed his profession. He is a Democrat in politics and is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

GEN. E. KIRBY SMITH was born in St. Augustine, Fla., in 1824, being a son of Judge J. L. Smith, presiding judge of the United States Court in Florida. He was, graduated from the West Point Military Academy, in the class of 1845. Almost immediately he was ordered to Corpus Christi and before the age of twenty-one began his military career. He was before Vera Cruz, and at the first battles of Resaca de la Palma and Palo Alto. He was mentioned in the official report of John McIntosh, of the Fifth Infantry, for his brave conduct. He received two brevets in the campaign, one for the battle of Cerro Gordo, where he was one of the first to scale the heights, and one for gallant and meritorious conduct at Contreras. He was appointed instructor of mathematics at the military academy (West Point, N. Y.) for three years, and was selected to join the boundary commission, under Maj. Emory, in which service he received a high compliment in Maj. Emory's official report. On the organization of the cavalry he received the appointment of captain, high on the list, and was ordered to Texas, where he served ten years, eleven times successfully engaging the Indians, and was severely wounded in one engagement. On the secession of Florida he offered his services to the governor of that State. At this time he was lieutenant-colonel of cavalry. Returning from Texas he received, first an appointment as major of artillery in the Confederate service, and afterward that of lieutenant-colonel of cavalry. He was ordered to Lynchburg, Va., to muster in troops, and on Gen. Joseph E. Johnston taking command of Harper's Ferry, he accompanied him as chief-of-staff. After the evacuation of Harper's Ferry he received from President Davis the commission of brigadier-general. He was shot while gallantly leading a charge at Manassas, and was carried to the rear. Recovering from the wound he was assigned to the Department of Tennessee, Kentucky and the mountain region of North Carolina and Alabama. He led the advance into Kentucky, winning the victory at Richmond. He was then assigned to the command of  the Trans-Mississippi Department, and defeated Banks, on Red River, and Steele, in Arkansas. He was, the last general to surrender in the war. After the war he was president of the Atlantic & Pacific Telegraph Company, and built the lines from Cincinnati to New Orleans. He was appointed vice-chancellor of the University of Nashville, and reopened that institution, after the war. In 1874 he came to Sewanee as professor of mathematics, and has since filled that chair. He was married, in 1861, to Miss Cassie Selden, of Virginia, the fruits of this union being eleven children, all now living.

JOHN M. STEWART was born in Franklin County July 25,1847, being one of two sons, the progeny of Anthony and Rebecca (Holland) Stewart. The father was a native of Tennessee, and lived and died in Franklin County. The mother was born in Alabama, but was reared from childhood in Franklin County, where she died in about 1857. The subject of this sketch lived with his grandfather, in this county, from the age of ten to that of sixteen. In 1867 he had learned telegraphy, and then accepted the position of operator in the employ of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad until 1875, when he was appointed local agent at Cowan, Where he has since resided and yet holds the same position. He was married, November 16,1870, to Elizabeth Brazelton, the fruits of this union being six children, of whom four are living. Their names are Venna, Leala, Myra, Sterling, Orlin and an infant, the last two being deceased. The mother of these children died September 16, 1882, and October 6, 1884, Mr. Stewart was married to Mrs. Mattie Sherrill, nee Shook. To this union one son has been born, James S. Mr. Stewart has recently built himself a very fine residence-the best in Cowan., He is a man of public spirit and, has done much for the up-building of Cowan, especially for the schools, etc. Both himself and Mrs. Stewart are very highly respected. Mrs. Stewart is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JOHN W. SYLER, the surveyor of Franklin County, was born April 23,1825, in this county, being a son of Jacob and Jane (Thompson) Syler, natives of Franklin County, Tenn., and North Carolina, respectively. The grandfather was John Syler, who came from Rockbridge, County, Va., in 1812, and settled in the west part of this county. Here he reared his family, all the Sylers of the county being descendants of his. Jacob Syler, like his father, was a farmer, a man of ordinary means. The mother came from her native State to this county when young and lived all her remaining life in Franklin County. John W. Syler, the subject of this sketch, was reared on a farm. He attended and graduated from the Davidson College, of North Carolina, and then entered the profession of teaching. For about ten years he was professor of mathematics, languages and science in the Robert Donald College, at Winchester, Tenn. He then taught the Carrick Academy, of Winchester, for many years, being engaged in the profession of teaching altogether about twenty years. He has also carried on farming all the time since he was a young man. He now owns about 10,000 acres of wild land. He has been superintendent of public instruction in this county for many years. In 1878 he was elected county surveyor of Franklin County, and now holds that office. From 1869 to 1872 he was engaged in merchandising. He was married, in 1853, to Miss E. V. Mann, the fruits of this union being ten children, eight of whom are now living, and six of whom are grown, viz.: Mollie L. (wife of Peter Weir, of Texas), J. F., Annie V. (wife of Fred Heep, of Texas), Bettie J. (wife of J. C. Arledge), John T., Emma, Walter S. and M. R. Mr. Syler is a Blue Lodge Mason. Politically he is a firm Democrat.

WILLIAM E. TAYLOR, clerk of the county court was born January 14, 1824, one and one-half miles south of Winchester, his parents being James and Milly (Mullins) Taylor, natives of Virginia and North Carolina respectively. The parents were married in Virginia, and removed to eastern Kentucky, from where they emigrated to Franklin County, Tenn., in 1810. The father died in 1866, having been a farmer and was born in 1781. The mother was born in 1784 and died in 1868. William E. was reared on a farm. When twenty-three years of age he was elected clerk of the county court, and held the office ten years and three months before the war. During the war he was engaged in farming, and continued in that pursuit until 1882 when he was re-elected to the clerkship of the county court. He was married July 25, 1855, to Melinda J. Turney, daughter of Hopkins L. Turney. He has a family of eight children, viz: James, Hop. T., Dick, Mary E., Milly, Ellen, Orpha, and Jennie. Mr. Taylor is a stanch Democrat, and a highly respected citizen of the county.

CHARLES H. WADHAMS was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1838. When sixteen years of age he left home and went to London, where he became one of the Queen's Light Guards. Three days after the death of the Duke of Wellington he embarked for America, lending at New York. He then went to Lake George, and there became the chief steward of the noted hotel, William Henry, for six years. Leaving there he removed to Nashville, Tenn., and was steward in different leading hotels of that city. Then he had charge of Gen. Hood's bakery while his army was there, and then of Gen. Thomas' bakery after he had taken the city. After the war he went to Atlanta, Ga., and there worked in the American House, thence to Lookout Mountain for two months. He then removed to Franklin. Williamson Co., Tenn., remaining there five years in the bakery and confectionery business. He then came to Sewanee at the solicitation of the university dean in 1871, and engaged in his present business. He was married January 1, 1858, to Elizabeth Gibson, of Scotland. This union has been blessed in the birth of one child, Lizzie. Mr. and Mrs. Wadhams are members of the Presbyterian Church. Politically Mr. Wadhams is a Democrat. He is enterprising, and commands the respect of the people who know him

JOHN W. WEBER, head-master of the grammar school in Sewanee, Tenn., was born in Columbia, Maury Co., Tenn., May 2, 1853. He is a son of Henri Weber and M. I. Weber. During the sessions of 1870 and 1872 he attended the Edgefield Male Academy, and entered the University of the South as a student September 12, 1872. He was elected fifth assistant in the grammar school in March, 1877, and fourth assistant in 1878, first assistant in 1879, and headmaster in 1881, which position lie now holds and is filling in a very satisfactory manner. He was married, March 18, 1879, to Maud J. Graves, daughter of Henry and Susan Graves, of Davidson County, Tenn.

M. N. WHITAKER, of the law firm of Estill & Whitaker, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., January 29, 1860. His father was Newton Whitaker, a native of Lincoln County, Tenn., a farmer by occupation and a man of financial means. He, the father, died in August, 1879. The mother is yet living near Mulberry, Lincoln Co., Tenn., on the old homestead. Our subject was reared on a farm, and was educated mainly in the Mulberry Academy of his native county. He began reading law when nineteen years of age, and entered the practice of his profession when twenty-one. In January, 1883, he located in Winchester in his present partnership. He was married, October 15, 1885, to Miss Florence J. Griffin. Mr. and Mrs. Whitaker are both members of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Whitaker is a firm Democrat in politics.

GREENOUGH WHITE. Ferdinand Eliot White was born in 1788, and was a merchant in the city of Boston. He was graduated from Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., in 1854. He was twice married, his second wife being Dorothy Gardner, who was born in 1799, and a niece of Madam Hancock. To them were born four daughters and three sons, our subject's father, John Gardner White, being born in 1833. Our subject's maternal grandfather, George Beach, was born in 1788, and for many years was president of the Phoenix Bank in the city of Hartford. For his second wife he married Maria, daughter of C. Nichols, of Hartford. She was born in 1799. One of her sisters married George Beach, Jr., the eldest of Grandfather Beach's seven sons by his first marriage, and another sister became the wife of Isaac Toney, Senator and Secretary of the Navy under James Buchanan. Our subject's mother was a Miss Beach. She was married to John Gardner White in June, 1862, and our subject, Greenough White, was born on September 17, 1863, it being the anniversary of the death of his uncle, William Greenough White, on the battle-field of Antietam. Greenough, our subject, was prepared for entrance to Harvard College at the private school of G. W. C. Noble, of Boston, and entered the university in the autumn of 1880, and in June, 1884, he received his degree as B. A. (cum laude, and with honoruble mention in English). Through the following year he pursued courses in literature, ecclesiastical history and the history of art, and was graduated as Master of Arts in June, 1885. In the same month he was appointed assistant professor of modern languages in the University of the South.

B. LAWTON WIGGINS was born in Sand Ridge, Berkeley Co., S. C., September 11, 1861. His father was James Wiggins, Esq., planter. His mother was the daughter of Col. William Millard, for many years State senator in ante belIum days. In 1868 the family moved to Spartanburg, in the northern part of the State, for educational facilities. From Spartanburg they moved to Charleston, in 1873, where Mr. Wiggins attended the Holy Communion Church Institute. At the end of four years, having graduated there, he entered the University of the South, at Sewanee, Tenn., in 1877. In 1879 he became assistant to the professor of modern languages, and in August of the same year assistant to the professor of ancient languages, which position he retained until 1881, when he became first assistant in the Grammar School Department of the University. He received, in 1880, the degree of B. A., and in 1882 that of A. M., in which year he was elected professor of ancient languages and literature, which position he still retains. In the winters of 1883 and 1884 he attended the Greek Seminary of the John Hopkins University under that eminent scholar, Prof. B. L. Gildersleeve, and was made fellow by courtesy.

CLAIBORNE N. WILLIAMS is a native of White County Tenn., and one of Franklin County's enterprising farmers. He was born in 1830, and is of a family of thirteen children, born to Jesse and Malon (Sewell) Williams. Jesse Williams was born 1783, in North Carolina, and first married Caroline Maston, to whom five children were born, then she died, and he married the mother of our subject. They moved from White County, Tenn., to Mississippi, and from there to Franklin County, Ark., where they both died, 1855 and 1866, father and mother respectively. At the age of seventeen, our subject came from Mississippi, to Franklin County, Tenn., and procured for himself such educational advantages as the common schools of this county offered at that time. In 1854, he married Martha Hatchett, and followed farming until 1862, when he enlisted in Company K, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and remained with that command till the close of the war; then returned home and resumed farming at the place where he now resides, which he purchased in 1859. Mr. Williams devotes considerable attention to wheat raising and is very successful in that branch of agriculture. Mr. and Mrs. Williams are members of the Christian Church. To them have been born twelve children, nine of whom are still living, part being members of church with the father and mother, while part identify themselves with the Baptist Church. Politically Mr, Williams is a Democrat, and is in sympathy with the principles of prohibition.

DR. HARVEY P. WILLIAMS, one of Franklin County's most prominent physicans, who was born in Bedford County, Tenn., Feburary 14, 1850, being one of thirteen children born to the marriage of Aaron Williams and Patsie Brothers. The father was born in Buckingham County, Virginia, in 1801, and in about 1815, he immigrated to Rutherford County, Tenn., where he married about 1820. Dr. Williams, remained with his parents until attaining the age of twentyone, when he engaged in merchandising at Millersburg. He afterward traveled in Texas one year, and upon his return, began the reading of medicine under Dr. White, of Millersburg. After attending the medical college at Nashville, he began the practice of that profession, in Bedford County, in 1875. After one year he removed to Cowan, where he has very successfully continued to practice. His marriage ceremony was solemnized December 23, 1875, uniting him to Sallie E. Brothers, a native of Rutherford County. Dr. Williams is a member of the K. of H. the A. O. U. W. the I.O.O.F. and of the Christian Church. He has always been a Democrat in politics, and is an advocate of prohibition. Mrs. Williams is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

GEORGE THORNTON WILMER, D. D., wits born on the 8th of May, 1819, at Alexandria, then within the District of Columbia. His father, the Rev. William Holland Wilmer, D. D., was a native of Kent County, Md., where his ancestors were seated as early as 1693, at which time the American record of the family begins. He became rector of St. Paul's, Alexandria, was prominent in the successful effort to resuscitate the Episcopal Church in Virginia and in founding the Theological Seminary of the Diocese of Virginia, being one of its earliest professors. After leaving Alexandria he became rector of Bruton Parish, Williamsburg, Va., and president of the College of William and Mary, He died in 1827, in his forty-fifth year, and while holding both of these offices. The authorities of Williamsburg took charge of his burial; he was interred beneath the chancel of the parish church, and a memorial tablet, the contribution of Christians of all the denominations in the town, commemorates affectionate esteem of his character and services. The family of Dr. W. H. Wilmer removed to Fairfax County, Va. The pious care of his widow, a step-mother in name to many of the children, and a real mother to all the children of a large and dependent family, provided such means of education as a home school could supply, followed by such collegiate training, in the case of the sons, as they saw fit. George T. Wilmer, after a short stay at Bristol College, which he left without graduating, passed about two years in civil engineering; then two years in studying law, and in managing the small farming interests of the family; then three years at the Theological Seminary of Virginia, whence he was graduated in 1843; was ordained deacon by Bishop Meade. The larger part of his diaconate was passed at Wilmington, N. C., as assistant to Rev. R. ff. Wilmer, rector of St. James', in that city, and subsequently bishop of the Diocese of Alabama. Rev. George T. Wilmer was admitted to priest's orders by Bishop Johns in 1844, and took charge of a parish in the counties of Botetourt and Roanoke, in the valley of Virginia; became rector of Bruton Parish, Williamsburg, in 1854; rector of a parish in Pittsylvania County in 1866; became rector of Christ Church, Mobile, Ala., and continued such rather more than two years; was for a short time in charge of Bishop Atkinson's Mission House, Asheville, N. C.; entered on his duties as professor of moral and intellectual philosophy and belles-lettres in the College of William and Mary, 1869; for about the last four years of his connection with the college, was also rector for the second time of Bruton Parish: in 1876 was elected professor of systematic divinity in the University of the South. and pending the organization of the theological department, assigned to duty as professor of metaphysics and English literature and other branches. From 1878 to 1885 he preformed the duties of professor of systematic divinity, professor of metaphysics, acting professor of political science and history, and lecturer on commercial law. Since the opening of the session of 1885-86, Dr. Wilmer has taught exclusively in the theological department. His degree of D. D. was conferred by the College of William and Mary in the year 1860.

JOSEPH D. WILSON, of the firm of Wilson & Francis, general merchants, was born in Pittsylvania County. Va., May 20, 1824. The father, Green B. Wilson. was a farmer by occupation, and in 1848 removed to Henry County, Tenn., where he died in 1866. The mother, nee Frances Q. Holderby, survived the father, and departed this life in 1874. Joseph D. was reared on a farm, and remained with his parents till after coming to Henry County, Tenn. He received but a limited early education. In Henry County he engaged in farming and in the tobacco business till 1885, when he removed to Winchester and engaged in his present trade in February of that year. He has been successful, and carries a stock of about $8,000, He chose as his helpmeet, Miss Annie E. Cox, the matrimonial ceremony being solemnized October 29, 1868. This union has been blessed in the birth of eight children, one of whom died in infancy. The others are Annie Q. Hunter L. Ruth A., Asa B., Lydia M., Flora D., and Hoyland L. Mr. Wilson. his wife, and three children, are members of the Baptist Church. Politically, Mr. Wilson is a firm Democrat, and always has been. He is an enterprising and respected citizen of the county.

SAMUEL M. WOODWARD is a Tennesseean, born in Lincoln County, June 12, 1828. He remained at home until his marriage to Caroline Frame, August 3, 1845, also a native of Lincoln County. In 1854, he purchased his farm of 135 acres, where he has since lived, and has given his attention. to agriculture and stock raising, and has been fairly prosperous in his business ventures. January 4,1886, Mrs. Woodward died, having borne seven children, two of whom still survive: William B., born in 1846, and died in 1879; married Lizzie Lockhart in 1869, and was blessed by the birth of four children; James P., born in 1848, and died in 1864; John L., born in 1851, and died in 1858; Samuel W., born in 1858; Sarah A., born in 1855; Nicy M., born in 1858, and died the same year, and Susan E., born in 1861, and died in 1868. Mr. Woodward is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has always voted the Democratic ticket.


Source: The Goodspeed Histories of Giles, Lincoln, Franklin & Moore Counties of Tennessee. Reprinted from The Goodspeeds History of Tennessee, 1886, by Woodward & Stinson Printing Co., Columbia Tennessee, 1972. Transcription 29 Apr 2000 for PeaRidge Relations. Updated 28 Dec 2004.