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LINCOLN COUNTY

J. S. ALEXANDER, proprietor of livery and feed stable, of Fayetteville, began business in 1876, and although his success was on a very small scale at first, he is at present the owner of eight vehicles and twelve horses, and is constantly increasing his stock. He was born in Lincoln County in 1838. son of Wiley M. and Nancy (Reneger) Alexander, born, respectively, in Tennessee and North Carolina in 1816. The father was an early settler of Lincoln County, and was a stock speculator and a man of exceptional business capacity. He was married in 1835, and died in 1881. He was tax collector and sheriff of the county several years. Of his eight children, four are living: W. S., J. S. (our subject), W. W. and Philomena (Mrs. A. J. Crisman). Our subject was educated in Mulberry, Tenn., and at the age of sixteen began clerking in a dry goods store, and two years later went to Shelbyville, where he was engaged in the grocery business for two years. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B. First Tennessee Regiment, and fought in the battle of Manasses. Gettysburg, Sharpsburg, Cedar Run, Seven Pines, Richmond, Chancellorsville, Harper's Ferry, Fredericksburg and Petersburg, where he was wounded and taken prisoner, and was taken to Washington. D. C., the day Lee surrendered. In 1865 he returned, after an absence of four years. December 22, 1868, he wedded Florinda H. Smith, daughter of Champion E. Smith. Mrs. Alexander was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., May 18, 1845, and is the mother of four children: George R., Claud, Frank and an infant son. He farmed four years after the war. and in 1873 came to Fayetteville, and established a retail liquor store, but ten years later engaged in his present occupations. He is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for Stephen A. Douglas in 1860.

ANDERSON ALSUP, farmer, was born in Granger County, Tenn., July 16. 1809, and was educated in the schools near his home. In March, 1831, he married Sarah, daughter of John and Priscilla Davis. She was born in Lincoln County in 1815, and is the mother of four children: J. V., Amanda E. (Mrs. T. H. Kennedy), Mary A. (Mrs. R. P. Smith), and W. B. Mr. Alsup located on the old home-place after his marriage, and there has since resided, and at the present time owns about 400 acres of very tine land. He has been a successful business man, and has given his children good educational advantages. He has been magistrate of his district four years. He is a Democrat, and cast his first Presidential vote for Andrew Jackson. His wife belongs to the Baptist Church. Mr. Alsup's parents were James and Abigail, born in Virginia and Pennsylvania, respectively, the former in 1769. He came to Tennessee at an early date, and died in Lincoln County in 1829. The mother departed this life in 1848.

WILLIAM El. ASHBY, farmer, is a son of Halifax and Eliza Jane (Hall) Ashby and was born in Lincoln County, May 28, 1830. He was one of a family of eleven children, ten of whom are living. The grandfather, also named Halifax, was born in England, immigrated to North Carolina. where he reared his family. Our subject's father was born in North Carolina, in March, 1807, and received his education in the schools in the vicinity. He was married in 1829, and followed agricultural pursuits, owning at the time of his death, which occurred in October, 1873, 250 acres of good productive land. The mother of our subject was born in North Carolina in May, 1808, and died in March, 1876. William, our subject, received his education in the common schools, and, November 2, 1862, was united in marriage to Mary Elizabeth Ramsey. This union resulted in the birth of nine children, seven of whom are living: Benjamin A., Sallie J. (wife of L. H. Wiley), James H.. Felix B., Tinnie, Mary E. (wife of William Pylant) and Willie E. Mr. Ashby now owns 300 acres of valuable land and is in good circumstances. June 80, 1866, Mrs. Ashby died, and in August. 1868, Mr. Ashby wedded Ellen E. Wadley, a native of Tennessee, born March 9, 1840, and a daughter of J. B. and Matilda Wadley. To Mr. and Mrs. Ashby were born five children: John M., David W.. Susan C., Eliza D., and Ida May. Mr. Ashby is a life-long Democrat and was formerly a member of the I. O. O. F. He and wife are leading members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

TRAVIS D. ASHBY, farmer. and the son of Peter and Mary J. (George) Ashby, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1847. The father was born in Lincoln County, in 1821 and was a tiller of the soil. In 1844 he was married and became the father of three children: Elzina (wife of S. E. Keith, deceased), Sallie H. (wife of LaFayette Kimes), and Travis D., our subject. The father died in 1856. The mother of our subject was also born in Lincoln County about 1830, and is now living in the Fifth District, and is a devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Our subject remained with his mother till he was twenty-five years of age, and received his education in the district schools. December 25, 1872, he was united in marriage to Nancy J. Cunningham, daughter of Peter and Sarah Cunningham, and the fruits of this union were four children, three of whom are living: James N.. Sallie E. and Luler T. About three years previous to his marriage he purchased 100 acres of land where he now resides, and through industry, frugality and close attention to business has added to his estate till he now owns 365 acres of good, productive land. He is a Democrat in politics. casting his first vote for Horatio Seymour. He is a Mason, and he and wife are among the most respected members of the Primitive Baptist Church.

J. W. BARNETT, groceryman and mayor of Fayetteville, Tenn., was born in Salem Va., in 1848, son of John L and Lucinda (Williams) Barnett They were of Scotch-Irish and Welsh- English descent. born in Virginia, in 1814 and 1821, respectively. The father followed merchandising in Virginia for forty years, but is now living a retired life. He has been twice married (the mother died in 1854), his second wife being Mary A. Logan. Two of the three children by the first marriage are living. The second wife bore one child. Our subject attended Roanoke College, Virginia, and at the age of seventeen en listed in the Salem Artillery of Hardway's battalion, took an active part in the battles of Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Richmond, Appomattox Court House and others, and served until the final surrender. In 1867 he began clerking in his father's store but removed to Pulaski, Tenn., in 1871 and continued clerking In 1873 he came to Fayetteville and formed a partnership with F. W. Brown in a general merchandise store. In 1882 he established a staple and family grocery store, and has since been engaged in that business. In January, 1874, he married Julia C. Gordon, who was born ID 1860, and has borne her husband four children: Clare Lou, Mary B., James W. and Julius L. Mrs. Barnett died in 1881, and the following year Mr. Barnett married Sadie E., sister of his first wife, born in 1845, and daughter of John T. Gordon. Mr. Barnett was chosen mayor of Fayetteville in 1885 and yet holds the office. He is a Democrat and a member of the E. of H. and A. O. U. W. He and wife belong to the Presbyterian Church.

L F. BASS, merchant at MeDowell's Mills, was born in Giles County February 7, 1854, and wee one of three children of Farmington and Naomi Bass, born in Giles County, Tenn., in 1818 and 1817, and died in 1884 and 1876, respectively. They were married about 1840, and the father followed farming through life. 'Our subject received such education and rearing as is usually given a farmer's boy, and in 1881 he and Janey Bennett were united in marriage. Mrs. Bass was born in Giles County in 1860, and is a member of the Christian Church. After his marriage, Mr. Bass farmed for two years, and then began merchandising at Bunker's Hill, remaining one year. In 1885 he located at McDowell's Mills, where he keeps an excellent general merchandise store, and is doing a paying business. He takes an active part in all laudable enterprises and is doing much toward improving and building up the place. He gives his support to the Demoeratic party.

MRS. N. E. BENSON, of the Sixteenth District, was born in Lincoln County, April, 1828, and was one of two children born to W. and Cynthia Hayes. Her father was born in North Carolina in 1793, and died November 5, 1866. He was in the war of 1812, under Glen. Jackson, and was a farmer by occupation. The mother of our subject was born in Lincoln County, and departed this life December 19, 1865. The other child of our subject's parents was Commodore P., who was a farmer and resided in Lincoln County. He died December 25, 1867. Our subject received her education in the schools near home end December 4, 1845, was united in marriage to Curran D. Benson, a native of Giles County, born September 10, 1820. By this union, Mrs. Benson became the mother of three children--one of whom is living: Thomas E., born November 14, 1846, and died August 22, 1870; E. F., born April 6, 1849, and died July 5, 1873; and Ella O., born June 16, 1867, and the wife of W. G. Harwell, a farmer of Giles County. They have five children: Robert E., William S., Fannie E., Sally M. and an infant. Mr. Benson (our subject's husband) owned over 100 acres of valuable land at the time of his death, which occurred August 20, 1868. The land was then divided among the children and wife. The wife now owns about 200 acres, located near Millville, and it is considered a fine farm.

DR. WILLIAM BONNER, dec'd,, a native of Granville Co., N. C. was born October 7, 1798, and came to Tennessee with his father December, 1808. For two or three years the family lived in Williamson County, near Nolensville, and then came to Lincoln County, where William Bonner and his brother Moses continued to reside until their death. The whole of the southern portion of Middle Tennessee was then but sparsely settled, and William Bonner, seeing that physicians, even in urgent cases, could be had only by sending fifty or one hundred miles, young as he was, without prompting from others, determined to study medicine. In 1821 he went to Nashville and began the study of medicine under Drs. McNairy and Overton. He never ceased to speak of their kindness and of Mrs. McNairy as one of the noblest of women. In the winter of 1822-23 he attended a course of lectures at Lexington, Ky. In the spring of 1823 he began the practice of medicine in Lincoln County, and soon had a large and lucrative business, making money enough to pay his unpaid bills in Nashville and bear the expenses of a course of lectures in Philadelphia. He received his diploma in the spring of 1827. In extreme and desperate cases he informed his patients and resorted to desperate remedies, often with success. He took a tumor from the neck of a Mrs. Abernathy, when his brother and other learned and experienced physicians and surgeons declared she would die under the operation. She consented to the operation and afterward lived many years. Dr. Bonner returned to Lincoln County and continued the practice of medicine for thirty years. He married Lucy Rosseau Robertson on the 4th of July, 1827. He always seemed indifferent to notoriety, and operated more than twenty times for lithotomy and never lost a case. He collected over $100,000 from his practice and never sued for a medical bill. In connection with his practice he engaged in farming, and at the commencement of the late war he owned 8,000 acres of land and three or four hundred slaves. He was a man of wonderful energy and great physical and mental power. So strong, active and energetic was he for fifty years of his life, and so prosperous, that he never fully realized that any except those who were sick needed help. The result of the war and freedom to his slaves did not embitter him, but he constituted himself a guardian for every negro that lived with him. He died at Fayette September 20, 1879, at the age of eighty years, eleven months and thirteen days. He was a Democrat in politics, and never too tired to gain a vote for his candidate if he could, but in the sick room he eschewed politics and religion.

W. C. BRIGHT, M. D., is a son of John M. Bright, who was born in Fayetteville, Tenn., January 20, 1817. His father, James Bright, was a Virginian and an early pioneer of Tennessee. John M. was educated in Fayetteville and Hillsboro, N. C. In 1839 he graduated from the Nashville University. The subject of his graduating theme, "On the Classics," was a scholarly effort. He began studying law, and in 1841 graduated from the Transylvania University, at Lexington, Ky., with credit to himself and honor to the institution, delivering the valedictory address. He has since practiced in Fayetteville. In November, 1841, he wedded Judith C. Clark, daughter of Gov. Clark, of Kentucky. She died in 1855, and two years later he wedded Zerilda B. Buckner. Mr. Bright has always been a Democrat, and in 1844 stumped the State for Polk in his race for the Presidency. In 1847-48 he was a member of the State Legislature, and served on many im portent committees. In 1848, he made a canvass for Cass and Butler, and a leading journal wrote that it "would be hard to exaggerate the power and brilliancy of his speeches." T he following are some of his speeches that have been published: "The Obligations of the American Youth," a speech against Know-nothingism, "Charity," "Life, Character and Public Services of the Hon. Felix Grundy," "Law, Lawyers, and Law-schools." During the late war he was inspector-general of Tennessee, with the rank of brigadier-general. In 1870 he was nominated and elected to the Forty-second Congress. Mr. Bright is very public spirited, and has done all in his power to further the interests of his State and county. His son, W. C. Bright, was born in Fayetteville in 1844, and was educated in Fayetteville and at Richland Academy, in Marshall County. His school-days were suddenly stopped by the breaking out of the war. May 4, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Eighth Tennessee Regiment, and took an active part in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Peach Tree Creek, Chickamauga, and Decatur. At the last-named battle he was wounded in the left leg, which unfitted him for duty for about fifteen months. After his return home in 1865, he began the teacher's profession, but in the fall of the same year began studying medicine under Dr. Kennedy. From 1866 to 1868, he attended the medical department of the University of Nashville, and delivered the valedictory address in 1868. He immediately began practicing in his birthplace, where he has since resided with the exception of five years spent in Edgefield and Nashville. February 4, 1871, he wedded Annie Bramlett, daughter of Judge L. M. Bramlett. Mrs. Bright was born in 1849 in Giles County, Tenn. They have three children: Bramlett, Mary, and Judith. Dr. Bright is one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Lincoln County, and teas a large and paying practice. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

ANDREW J. CARLOSS is a son of Archelaus and Ruth (Pride) Carloss, is one of their thirteen children, and was born in North Carolina in 1815. The father was horn in North Carolina in 1707, and was a son of Edward C. Carloss, who was born in Spain and immigrated to America when a young man. Archelaus' parents died when he was small, and he was apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, and while serving his apprenticeship assisted in building the first State capitol of North Carolina. He and wife died in North Carolina in 1845 and 1823, respectively. Andrew J. received a practical education, and at the age of nineteen came to Tennessee, where he has always made his home, with the exception of a short time spent in Alabama. July 30, 1839, he married Mary Ann Franklin, granddaughter of ex-Gov. Franklin, of North Carolina, who died at the age of fourteen years. Mr. Carloss owns 2,800 acres of land, and is a man of undoubted integrity. He has been a life- long Democrat. His wife was born in Alabama in August, 1821. Her parents, James and Frances Franklin, were born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1794 and 1797, respectively.

HON. JO. G. CARRIGAN is an attorney at law, of Fayetteville, Tenn., and son of Hiram and Fannie (Randolph) Carrigan. The father came to the United States with his parents when a small lad, and lived, first in North Carolina, and then in Alabama, and finally, in 1854, came to Lincoln County, Tenn. He was a blacksmith by trade, but for the past ten years has lived retired from active business life. He and his wife became the parents of five children, four of whom are living: W. R. who is a teacher and farmer), Susan (Mrs. G. W. Higgins), Josie (widow of A. W. Bonds), and Jo. G., our subject, who was born in Madison County, Ala., September 7, 1835, end' received his education at Hew Hope Academy, Marshall County, Tenn., and Sulphur Springs Institute, Lincoln County, Tenn. He worked at the blacksmith's trade about six years and then entered the teachers' profession and taught one year. In 1858 he purchased a few law books and began his legal studies, being obliged to struggle along as best he could without the aid or instruction of other lawyers. He was admitted to the bar in 1858, and the same year became editor and proprietor of the Messenger at Lewisburg, but at the end of one year began the publication of the Union, at Shelbyville, Tenn., which he continued until the breaking out of the war stopped further business. In May, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Eighth Regiment Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and participated in the Cheat Mountain campaign (of which he has written a full account) and the battle of Perryville. In January, 1863, he was transferred to the quartermaster's department, but in December of that year was discharged, owing to the failure of his eyesight. In August, 1865, he was elected to the State Senate, and served on several important committees. His speeches on the elective franchise bill and the restoration of the people of Tennessee to the control of the State government attracted much attention. He moved to Fayetteville in 1867, where he enjoys the confidence of a large clientage and his brother attorneys. December 22, 1858, he was married to Fannie Higgins, who was born in Lincoln County in 1838 and has borne her husband two children: Emma (Mrs. A. M. McGlaughlin) and Beulah Our subject is a fluent and ready speaker and an earnest advocate and safe counselor. He advocates the principles of the Democratic party, and is a member of the Christian Church. His wife belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JAMES H. CARY, farmer of the Twelfth District and a son of Robert and Sarah Blair) Cary, was born August 15, 1824, near his present residence. The father of our subject was born in Ireland in 1781, and was of Scotch-Irish descent. He was a weaver by occupation in his youth, and in later years devoted his attention to the cultivation of the soil. In 1798 he left his native country and came to the United States, landing at Charleston in February. He located in Chester District, S. C., where he was living at the time of his marriage, which occurred in 1807. In 1818 he immigrated to Lincoln County, and the following year settled on the Fayetteville and Pulaski road, six miles from Fayetteville, where he remained until his death, in 1869. He was one of the early settlers of Lincoln County, and was an industrious, hard-working man. He was the father of four children: Margaret, born in 1817; Isabella, born in 1819 (wife of James I. Tate), John, born in 1821 (and died March 31, 1886, leaving a widow and five children, who now reside on the old homestead), and James H., our subject, who lives half a mile from the old home place with his sister Margaret, and both are single. They have been industrious, persevering and economical, and as a result own 478 acres of excellent land, and have a good home. Mr. Cary is a Republican in politics, and cast his first vote for Lewis Cass in 1848. Margaret is a member of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, and has been for the past thirty-six years. In 1862 James enlisted in Company I, Starne's battalion, Forrest's command. He fought in the battle of Spring Hill, and at the end of five months returned home.

M. H. CAUGHRAN is a Tennesseean, born in Lincoln County in May, 1829. He is one of nine children, and the son of William and Elizabeth (Wiley) Caughran. The father was of Irish descent, born in South Carolina in 1786, and came to Tennessee in 1828. He was a farmer, and died on the 14th of March, 1840. The mother was born in South Carolina, in 1787, and died August 30. 1870. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and resided with his parents until twenty-two years of age. March 23, 18.52, he was married to Julia, daughter of S. S. and Polly (Gibson) Buchanan. Mrs. Caughran was born in Lincoln County March 22, 1831. After his marriage Mr. Caughran looked after the interest of Mr. Buchanan's farm for ten years, and then purchased 100 acres of land near Petersburg, where he resided one year. He then sold this farm, and in 1865 purchased 185 acres of land near Fayetteville, where he resided ten years. He then purchased his present farm of 115 acres, and by his good business qualifications has accumulated quite an amount of property. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. In the late war he served in Company B. Twenty-eighth Tennessee Infantry for three months, then Gen. Bragg appointed him special messenger, taking care of (Governmental supplies and distributing goods for the army. He remained in this capacity until nearly the close of the war.

H. T. CHILDS, farmer of the Eleventh District, was born in Lincoln County. of the same district, July 18, 1841, and was one of four children horn to Thomas and Sally (Wilkins) Childs. The father was born in North Carolina March 9, 1796. and came to Lincoln County, this State, with his people, in 1818. He bought 200 acres of land in the Eleventh District, and yet more in other parts of Lincoln County. He died August 17, 1872. Our subject's mother was born in the Eleventh District in 1808, and departed this life October 19, 1883. Our subject was reared in the country, and received his education at the Sulphur Spring Institute. At the age of eighteen he enlisted in Company D, First Tennessee Infantry. He took an active part in the battles of Seven Pines, Cedar Run and Manassas, and was severely wounded in the last named battle. At the end of six months he was sufficiently recovered to return to active service again. In the battle of Chancellorsville he was again wounded, and did not return to duty for a year. He then joined Forrest's command, cavalry, and took part in numerous cavalry skirmishes. In 1868 be wedded Sally C., daughter of Allen and Martha Taylor, and a native of Lincoln County, born September 18, 1845. This union resulted in the birth of five children, four of whom are living: M. O., Mollie L., Annie N. and Thomas A. Mr. Childs owns 200 acres of valuable land, all well improved, and located near Fayetteville. In 1873 he was elected magistrate of his district, and this position he now holds. He is a strong advocate of good public schools, and a man who is scrupulously honest in all his dealings. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Masonic. fraternity.

DRS. R. E. &; W. W. CHRISTIAN, physicians and surgeons of Fayetteville Tenn., are the sons of Dr. D. W. and Americus (Faulkner) Christian. The father was of Scotch Irish descent, and was born in Knox County, Tenn., in 1817. At the age of eighteen he began studying medicine under Dr. Cooper, and later graduated from the Louisville (Ky.) Medical College. He practiced in Kentucky and Texas, and during the lute war resided in Louisville. In 1878 he established a drug store in Fayetteville, but died March 9, 1880, after living a useful and well-spent life. He was a true Christian, and left behind him an untarnished name. He was married May 16, 1844. His wife was born in Christian County, Ky., and since the death of her husband has resided with her two sons in Fayetteville. She is the second cousin of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Of her seven children five are living R. E., Lillie M. (widow of Dr. B. C. Newman), Hattie Lee (Mrs. E. D. Stocking"), Fannie Ella and W. W. R. E. Christian is a druggist, physician and surgeon of Fayetteville. He was born in Christian County, Ky., in 1846, and was educated in the common schools and at Louisville, Ky. In April, 1883, he entered upon his chosen profession, and in 1886 graduated from the medical department of the Vanderbilt University December 20, 1882, he married Josephine Carneal, born in 1858, daughter of Walker Carneal. W. W. Christian was born in Lexington, Tex., in 1857. He attended school in Trenton, Paducah and Louisville, Ky., and Fayetteville, Tenn. In August, 1880, he purchased some medical books and began the study of medicine on his own responsibility. Two years later he entered Vanderbilt University, graduating as a physician and surgeon in February, 1883. After his father's death he and his brother, R. E., took control of the drug store which belonged to their father, but in July, 1884, the building caught fire was consumed. They soon re-established, and keep a fine stock of drugs. These enterprising young men are building up a fine practice, and will rank among the leading physicians and surgeons of Tennessee. W. W. belongs to the K. & L. of H., and both brothers are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

MRS. HARRIET CLARK was born in Washington County, Va., December, 1802. Her father, Zachariah Shugart, was born in Pennsylvania, and died in Virginia. The mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Offult; she was born in Montgomery County, Md., and died in 1818. In 1824 Harriet Shugart married William Clark, who was also a Virginian, born in 1782 and died in June, 1871. Of the six children born to them, four are living: Elizabeth B. (Mrs. William L. Thomas), James (deceased), William B., Rebecca H. (Mrs. Joseph Roe), Isabella J. (deceased) and C. S., a married son, with whom Mrs. Clark now lives on the old home-place. He is the youngest son, and has always looked after the interests of the farm. In 1872 he married Susan, daughter of Fenlie and Martha Smith. His wife was born in Lincoln County, in 1846, and she and her husband have three children: Martha, Willie and Lizzie. Our subject is said to be the oldest person residing in the district, but is yet quite hale and active. She belongs to the Presbyterian Church, and is a very estimable old lady.

HON. JOHN CLARK, farmer, was one of ten children born to James and Nancy Clark. The father was of Scotch origin, and a native of Blount County, E. Tenn. He was a farmer by occupation and lived to be over seventy-one years of age. The mother was born in the same county as her husband, and died at the age of forty five. Our subject was also born in Blount County August 2, 1815, and got his education in the country schools. In 1838 he married Matilda Thompson, a native of Tennessee, born January, 1818. By this union he became the father of these children: James H., B. A., Nancy A., Martha J., J. P., Roena, Edward G., Will and Theodore. In 1859 Mrs. Clark died, and in the same year our subject married her sister, Priscilla Thompson. To the last union were born seven children: Margaret, Robert, Richard, Mollie, Charlie; Lina and Gertrude. In 1863 Mr. Clark was elected to represent two counties in the State Legislature, and in 1870, shortly after coming to Lincoln County, he was elected magistrate, and re-elected in 1874, but resigned before the term expired to accept the position of deputy sheriff. Mr. Clark owns 225 acres of desirable land. mostly well improved with good houses and out buildings. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

W. B. CLARK, son of William and Harriet (Shugart) Clark, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in February, 1832. He received his education in the country schools, and, remained with his parents until he was twenty-two years of age. Febuary 22, 1872, he wedded Laura J. Mountcastle, a native of Mississippi, born in the year 1845, and to this union were born two children: William M. and Harriet E. Mr. Clark had 135 acres. which were given to him by his father, and upon this he located after marriage. In 1874 he sold out and went to Colorado, where he remained over five years, in that time, acquiring a homestead of 160 acres. besides purchasing the same number of acres. In 1880 he disposed of his property, returned to his birthplace, where he purchased 162 acres in the Twelfth District, and is at the present residing there. During the war he enlisted in the Confederate service, in Company G. First Regiment Tennessee Infantry, under Col. Turney; was in several skirmishes; but at the end of eighteen months was discharged on account of ill health. Mr. Clark is an enterprising. industrious farmer, and bears the reputation of being an honest man and a good citizen. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and Mrs. Clark are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Clark's father was a Virginian, born in Washington County in 1792, and was an enterprising farmer, and, in connection with this oecupation, worked at the blacksmith trade. About 1824 be came to Lincoln County, Tenn., and located in the Ninth District where he bought property and lived until his career ended in 1863. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and for his services his widow draws a pension of $96 per year. He was twice married, his first wife being Barbara Tolbert. The mother of our subject was also born in Washington County, Va. She is still living, and since the death of her husband has made her home with her eon, C. S. Clark.

LEWIS AND DR. J. C. COATS were born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1830 and 1853, respectively, sons of Thomas and Sarah Coates. The father was born in North Carolina about 1802, and came to Tennessee with his widowed mother when a boy. He was a farmer, and died November 2, 1874. The mother was born in South Carolina about the same time as her husband. Her death occurred June 9, 1870. Lewis Coats was married in 1851 to Mary Smith, who was born in (Giles County, in 1830. Four children were born to them: J. C., Drucilla A. (Mrs. J. S. Parker), Mary L. (Mrs. J. P. Bruce), and Orlena T. Mr. Coats at one time owned 500 acres of land, but gave to his children until he now owns 260 acres. He was married when about twenty-one years of age, and as a Democrat cast his first presidential vote for Pierce. Dr. J. a. Coats was educated in the schools near his home, and when about twenty years of age entered the office of Dr. H. M. Beaty, in Blanche, and began the study of medicine, continuing two years. He then entered Washington University, at Baltimore, Md., and afterward took a course at Vanderbilt University, from which he graduated in 1878. He has since practiced in Blanche, and has treated all the diseases peculiar to that locality with commendable success. In 1880 he began keeping a general merchandise store, and has succeeded well from a financial stand-point. November 15, 1879, he wedded Alice E. Byers, born in 1862. They have three children: Mabel, Louis M. and an infant. The Doctor is a Democrat! and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

REV. A. B. COLEMAN, citizen of Lincoln County, and a native of the Keystone State, was born in November, 1830, in Indiana County. He is a son of James and Mary (Campbell) Coleman, both natives of Pennsylvania, and both of Scotch-Irish extraction. The father was born in Indiana County about 1795, and followed the occupation of farmer. He died in 1857. The mother was born in 1801, in Westmoreland County, and after the death of her husband, lived with her children. She died in 1884, in her eighty-second year. She was the mother of nine children five of whom are now living: John, Mary Jane (wife of Alexander Lyons), Margaret, Thomas W., and our subject, who remained with his parents till he was thirty years of age. His academic education was received at Elder's Ridge Academy, Pennsylvania, under the auspices of the Presbyterian Church, and at the age of eighteen he entered the teacher's profession, which occupation he continued for upward of ten years, but not without interruption, however, as he attended school some of the time. In 1857 he entered the Westminister College, Wilmington, Del., and commenced the study of the ministry proper. He graduated in June, 1859, and in 1861 he was licensed to preach. The following year he was ordained as minister, and sent to Minnesota to do missionary work. where he remained five years engaged in his religious duties. In 1867 he was sent South to organize and lay a foundation for their church work. He came to Lincoln County, Tenn., where he has since remained engaged in the good work. The same year of his arrival he dedicated the first United Presbyterian Church in the State of Tennessee. January 31, 1868, he married Hannah B. Taylor, a native of Lincoln County, born in 1840, and the daughter of Henry and Catherine M. Taylor. As a citizen Mr. Coleman is highly respected and bears the reputation of being a man of high character and one who leads a conscientious, straight-forward course through life, During the war he affiliated with the Union cause and was a strong supporter of the same. Mr. Coleman had the misfortune to lose his wife December 10, 1883.

WILLIAM COPELAND, distiller, and farmer of the Third District, and a native of Lincoln County, was born in 1829, and is one of ten children born to the union of John and Sarah (Massey) Copeland. The father was born in South Carolina in 1798, and was of Scotch- Irish descent. He was a minister of the P. B. Church; was also a soldier in the war of 1812, and was married in the same year. The latter part of his life was spent in farming in connection with his ministerial duties in Moore County, where he had a farm of 250 acres. He died in the year 1865. The mother was born in South Carolina in 1789, and died in 1857. Our subject received a good education, and when about seventeen began teaching, and taught several terms. At the age Of twenty he took a trip to Arkansas, but returned home at the end of twelve months, and was elected constable. In 1852 he entered the mercantile establishment at Marble Hill in Franklin County, and clerked there for three years. November, 1854, he married Mary Ann (George, and by this union became the father of eleven children, eight of whom are living: Jefferson M., William C., Mollie El. (wife of John M. Franklin), Thomas N., Emily E. (wife of H. Snow), George M., Robert L. and Ida May. In 1857 Mr. Copeland sold his property, and entered the mercantile business at Smithland, where he remained three years. He. then sold out and bought a farm of 800 acres, in the Fourth District, and for two years was revenue tax collector of Lincoln County. In 1867 he engaged in the distillery business, and this he still continues. In 1881 he purchased a distillery at Flintville, since which time he has been engage-d in the business at that place. His machinery has a capacity of over three barrels per day. In 1885 he moved his family to the farm where they now reside. In politics he is a Democrat. Be is also a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mrs. Copeland is a member of the Baptist Church.

JUDGE H. C. COWAN, farmer, was born in Franklin County, Tenn., November 15, 1809, son of Capt. James B. Cowan. who was of Irish descent, born in 1777, in Maryland. In 1797 he married Nancy Williams, who was born in Virginia in 1782. Their family consisted of six children. They came to Tennessee in 1806, locating in Franklin County, and there the father died in 1831. He was a captain in the war of 1812, and while living in East Tennessee two of his sisters were killed, while making maple sugar, by a band of Indians who came upon them suddenly. Retribution soon overtook them however, for a company of men was raised and seventeen Indians sent to the " happy hunting grounds" by the outraged settlers The mother of our subject died in 1818. H. C. Cowan clerked for about five years in several places, and taught his first school in 1826, then went to Jackson County, Ala., and taught two short sessions. He then sold goods one year in Sparta, White Co., Tenn., when owing to some little disagreement he returned home and taught two five months' sessions, when he received apologies from his former employers and returned to them and sold goods a little over a year. He was then called home by the death of his father, and farmed and taught school, and in January, 1839, he became a resident of Lincoln County, and taught about fifteen sessions of school in and around Fayetteville, and in 1841 purchased 156 acres of land, where he settled and has since resided. At different times he has purchased 137, 45 and 75 acres. Two of his sons live on the latter farms. Mr. Cowan served as magistrate for forty-four years, and for fifteen years acted as chairman and one of the quorum of the county court, thus illustrating the respect in which he was held by the people. In 1869 he was elected judge of the county court, for eight years, but only served three years, owing to ill health. December 22, 1842, he married Agnes B. McDaniel, who was born March 29, 1814, and six children blessed their union, of which three are dead. Those living are, Andrew J., William Thomas and Louisa E. Judge Cowan began life poor in puree, but now owns 413 acres of fine land. He has a remarkably retentive memory, and is a man, who, by his exemplary life, commands the respect and esteem of all. He is a Democrat and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His wife died November 94, 1881, and since that time his daughter has been his housekeeper.

W. S. CURTIS, a farmer, and a native of Madison County, Ala., was born November 14, 1823, son of Johnson D. and Isabella Curtis, natives of Georgia and North Carolina, respectively. The father was a farmer by occupation, and died in 1826. The mother was of Irish descent and died in 1824. Our subject-was reared by his aunt, Mrs. McMurray, and received his education in the Giles County schools. In 1844 he married Margaret Bussell, a daughter of Robert and Nancy Bussell. Mrs. Curtis was born in 1822, and died August 19, 1858. By this union our subject became the father of five children: Robert J., a farmer of (Giles County; T. D., a resident of Pulaski; W. A., a farmer of Giles County; James M., now in Lawrence County, Mo., and J. D., of Lincoln County, Tenn. After marriage, Mr. Curtis bought 150 acres of land in Giles County, where he located and remained six years. He then disposed of that property and bought 224 acres in the Sixteenth District of Lincoln County, where ho is now living. He now owns 800 acres of very desirable land. October 28, 1859, he married A. Oliver, a native of Lincoln County, born January 18, 1854, and a daughter of E. P. and Sarah Oliver. This marriage of our subject resulted in the birth of eight children: Julia, wife of W. T. Woodward; C. L., E. S., C. M., F. J., A. L, J. H. and Alexander. Mr. Curtis has always been a hard working, industrious man, and has been quite successful in business, and has given his children the advantage of acquiring a good English education. He is a Democrat in politics and cast his first presidential vote for Taylor. He and wife are members of the New School Presbyterian Church.

JOHN M. DICKEY, farmer, was born in Franklin County in 1840, and received his education at New Market, Ala. When hostilities broke out between the North and South he enlisted in Company L Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, Confederate States Army, and was in the principal battles of the war. He we' captured and taken to Rock Island, III., where he was held till May 6, 1865, President Lincoln signing the petition for his release the day he was assassinated. Mr. Dickey then returned home and engaged in blacksmithing. November 18,1861, he wedded Louisa McGehee, and became the father of five children: William M., Julia M., Lucy V., Edward W. and Fannie L. In 1870 Mr. Dickey purchased 300 acres of land, on which he is now residing. May 7, 1876, Mrs. Dickey died, and June 18, 1878, Mr. Dickey married Mrs. Laura V. Kyle, daughter of J. J. and Elizabeth Tucker, by whom he became the father of three children: Frederick C., John M. and Hughes D. In 1878 Mr. Dickey was elected magistrate to fill the unexpired term of Henderson Thompson, and has since filled the office in a satisfactory manner. He is a Democrat in politics and a Mason. Mrs. Dickey is among the most respected members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Our subject's parents were Ephraim M. and Louisa (Rich) Dickey. -The father was born in Franklin County, in 1812, and was of Irish lineage. His education was considerably above the average, notwithstanding his meager advantages, and he was a blacksmith by occupation. He died in 1859. The mother of our subject died May 4, 1873.

HON. ISHAM P. DISMUKES (deceased), one of the leading members of the Fayetteville bar, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., April 19, 1832, son of Marcus L. and Delia (Wadkins) Dismukes. He received a thorough literary education in the Fayetteville Academy, his preceptor being Prof. F. A. Dickinson. He began teaching school, and during his leisure moments was an earnest student of Blackstone. In 1855 he entered the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tenn., and graduated in 1856. He returned to Lincoln County, and formed a law partnership with Hon. Edmund Cooper, of Shelbyville, and in 1860 Hon. J. G. Woods entered as partner, and after a short time Mr. Cooper withdrew, and W. B. Martin took his place. In 1861 Mr. Dismukes enlisted in Freeman's battery, and fought at Parker's Cross Roads, Chickamauga and Knorville. He served until the close of the war, and was a brave and gallant soldier. December 17, 1867, he married Jennie Fulton, daughter of Hon. James and Mary (Morgan) Fulton. Mr. Dismukes' career from the very first was brilliant and successful. He was an able and wise counselor, and was unsurpassed in readiness of speech and brilliancy of thought. He had a large and paying clientage at the time of his death. He died of consumption, September 14, 1875, after living a life of great usefulness, and it may justly be said of him that his character was beyond reproach, and that he was an honorable and noble gentleman. He was candid in speech, honest in his motives, sincere in his manifestations of friendship, and incapable of a mean action. At his death the members of the Lincoln County bar passed a series of resolutions on his life and character. an eloquent tribute to his memory was delivered by his first law partner, Hon. Edmund Cooper. Since his death his widow has resided in Fayetteville, where she has a beautiful home.

ROBERT S. & DAVID G. DOUTHAT, boot and shoe manufacturers, of Fayetteville, Tenn., are the sons of John H. and Margaret (Burke) Douthat. The father is of Scotch-Irish origin, and was born in 1816, in Fincastle, Va., and when a youth began learning the blacksmith's trade, which he mastered, and at which he worked for over fifteen years. He then began manufacturing wagons and plows but for the past twenty-five years has been engaged in manufacturing boots and shoes. The mother is of German descent, and was born in Virginia in 1818. Eleven children blessed their union, ten of whom are living. Robert was born in 1844, and at the age of nine years began learning the shoe maker's trade. In 1867 he left the paternal roof, and came to Fayetteville, where he continued working at his trade. October 27, 1837, he wedded Mary Ann Noblett, who was born in Tennessee, in 1844. In 1872 Robert and his brother, William B., established a boot and shoe shop in Fayetteville continuing until 1884, when David G. was taken into partnership. In 1873 William was elected postmaster of the city, and his brothers, Robert and David, became sole proprietors. They are good workmen, and have been fairly successful in their business. They are stanch Republicans in politics, Robert casting his first presidential vote for U. S. Grant and David for R. B. Hayes. David was born in Virginia, in 1853, and, like his brother, learned the shoe-maker's trade, and left home when quite young, coming to Fayetteville. In August, 1875, he married Susan D. Bell, daughter of James H. Bell. Mrs. Douthat was born in 1855, and has borne four children: Robert H., John F., Margaret and David G.

CAPT. WILLIAM B. DOUTHAT, postmaster of Fayetteville, and a native of Christiansburg, Montgomery Co., Va., was born March 1, 1840, son of John H. and Margaret (Burke) Douthat. He received his education in Snowville, Pulaski Co., Va., 'and at the age of twelve was bound out for seven years to T. S. Bullard, of Snowville, to serve an apprenticeship at the shoe-maker's trade. He worked four years, abandoned his master. and commenced in life on his own responsibility. He went to Salem and worked for his brother, James H., ten months, after which he returned to his former home and set up a shop. During the late Rebellion he was a firm supporter of the Union. In 1863 he was about to be drawn into the Confederate side, when he, with upward of fifty others, started to join the Union forces, walking to Somerset, Kg., a distance of 150 miles, where they took the train for Nashville. He enlisted in Company C, Twelfth Tennessee Cavalry, U. S. A., and took en active part in the battles of Trune, Clifton, Lynchburg, Pulaski, Tenn., Florence, Sulphur Trestle and Richland Creek Bridge, Ala. In the action at Pulaski he was wounded twice, being shot in the right arm and hip. He was taken to the hospital at Nashville, where he remained two months. December, 1864, he rejoined his regiment and remained until October 7, 1865, when he was mustered out at Fort Leavenworth, Kas., and discharged at Nashville. He was appointed second lieutenant of Company A, Twelfth Regiment Cavalry, Tennessee Volunteers, United States Army. May 11, 1864, he was promoted to first lieutenant of the same company and regiment. April le. 1865, he was assigned assistant adjutant general on the staff of Brig.-Gen. G. Spaulding. He was assigned to duty as regimental commissary in June, 1865, and served until mustered out of service. He received a complimentary commission As captain October 20, 1865, for gallant and meritorious service. In 1866 Mr. Douthat went to Denver, Col., and remained there three years. In the spring of 1870 he came to Fayetteville, and the following year he and his brother, Robert S., formed a partnership in the manufacture of boots and shoes. In 1873 he accepted the position of postmaster at Fayetteville, and in 1885 disposed of his interest in the shoe shop, since which time he has given his attention to the office. In 1875 he married Emma Burgess, a native of Lebanon, Tenn., born July 7, 1848, and the daughter of Charles T. and Mary E. Burgess. This union resulted in the birth of one child--Carl B. Mr. Douthat has proved to be a most worthy and efficient postmaster. He has given universal satisfaction, and not one word of complaint has been offered for his removal under the new administration. He is a Republican in politics, and his wife is a member of the Christian Church.

J. H. C. DUFF was born in Lincoln County January 26, 1838, and remained with his parents until he reached his majority. He received a fair education in the common schools and afterward attended some time at Union Academy, Lincoln County, where he took a thorough course in surveying. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in Company (l, Eighth Mulberry Riflemen, under Capt. William L. Moore, but was afterward transferred to Came's Battery. He was in the battles of Perryville, Ky., and Chickamauga, and was captured at the latter place and sent to Camp Morton, Ind., where, February, 1864, he scaled the prison walls, under the cover of darkness, and without being seen, succeeded in making his escape. He was afterward captured again in Giles County, and made his escape once more. In 1866 he went to Bethel, Lincoln County, and married Jane a. Craig, but immediately returned to his father's, where he remained six years. This union resulted in the birth of nine children, eight of whom are living: Bessie C., Margaret E., Myrtle, Ruby, Henry N., Alfred F., Thomas D. and James B. F. In 1873 he was elected surveyor of Lincoln County for a term of two years. In 1885 he moved to the farm where he now resides. He in Independent in politics, is a Mason and an Odd Fellow, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His father, H. a. Duff, was born in South Carolina, August 28, 1808, and in 1845 immigrated to Lincoln County, where he purchased seventy-six acres in the Fifth District, and where he located and still resides. He has since increased his estate to 580 acres, but has given his son 200 acres. In 1837 he married Eliza D. Brown, who became the mother of our subject.

R. M. DUNLAP is a Tennesseean, born April 22, 1837. James E. Dunlap, his father, was of English-Irish origin, born in South Carolina, and came to Tennessee when a young man and married our subject's mother, Sarah E. James E. was a farmer by occupation, and died in 1858. The mother died in 1842. Our subject is one of their eight children. His education was obtained in the district schools and his boyhood days were spent on a farm. In 1859 he wedded Sarah E. Cole, who was born in Lincoln County in 1840, and departed this life in 1861. Two children were born to them: Sarah (Mrs. James Rhodes) and R. J., both living in Texas. In March, 1861, Mr. Dunlap enlisted in Company D, Forty-first Tennessee Infantry, and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Port Hudson and numerous others. He was taken with the small-pox, and returned home in February, 1863. He has since been engaged in farming, and owns 230 acres of valuable land. In December, 1863, he married Sarah E., daughter of J. H. and Sarah Midley, of Fulton, Miss., horn in 1835. They hare nine children: Mary E. (deceased), Nancy E., James M., P. M., J. M., Patrick M., D. C., Shelton and Emma. Mr. Dunlap is quite skillful at almost any kind of work, and does his own blacksmithing and wagon work, and has been fairly successful in his agricultural pursuits. He is a Democrat.

JAMES M. DYER'S birth occurred in Lincoln County, Tenn., February 2, 1813. His early education was limited, but he has done much to eradicate this evil by reading, and is well posted on all the topics of the day. In 1834 he married Martha Newton, who was born in Shelbyville in 1813, and departed this life in 1874. Of their nine children three are living: Joseph H., Canthes V. and M. F. Our subject resided with his mother until about twenty years of age, and then sold dry goods throughout the western and middle portion of Tennessee for about three years. In 1848 he purchased 182 acres of land, and is now the owner of 282 acres of valuable land. In 1875 Mr. Dyer married Tennessee Larue. She was born in Marshall County in 1834. Notwithstanding many difficulties Mr. Dyer has encountered through life, he has now a good home and a comfortable competency. He is a Republican and was strongly opposed to secession. He held the position of magistrate twelve years, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is a distant relative of the late Thomas A. Hendricks. His parents were James and Martha (Garland, cousin of Attorney-Gen. Garland) Dyer, born in Tennessee in 1778 and 1781, and died in 1817 and 1854 respectively. They were married in 1799. The father was a farmer, and a soldier in the war of 1812. Both our subject's grandfathers were soldiers in the Revolutionary war.

J. S. EDMISTON WAS born in Washington County, Va., in 1815, and was one of a large family of children of G. W. C. and Elizabeth (Steward) Edmiston, natives of Virginia, born in 1785 and 1791, and died in 1847 and 1839, respectively. They were married in the "Old Dominion," and immigrated to Tennessee in 1817, where they led the lives of farmers. J. S. Edmiston was educated in the schools near his home, and when about twenty- three years old purchased 140 acres of land near Swan Creek, where he remained four years, and then disposed of his property and bought out the heirs to the old home place, where he located and has since resided. He owns 450 acres of good land. well improved. He is a Democrat, and during the late war was strenuously opposed to secession. Previous to that conflict he was a Whig. He is also a Mason. His grandfather, William Edmiston, was a Virginian, and was a captain in the Revolutionary war. Two of his brothers were killed at the battle of King's Mountain. December 13, 1863, our subject married Margaret E., daughter of Russell T. and Eliza (Forsythe) Harreld, of Kentucky. Mrs. Edmiston was born January 16, 1833, and has borne seven children: William C., John H., Clara, Mary E., Catherine T., Robert R. and Thomas S. Our subject and wife are members of the Old Presbyterian Church, of Petersburg, Tenn.

JAMES P. EDWARDS, farmer of the Fifth District, and a son of James A. and Susan (Goodwin) Edwards, was born in Rutherford County August 4, 1939. The father was born in Rutherford County December 1, 1801, and is of Dutch-Welsh descent. He had the advantages of a district school education, and possessing an intellect above the average mind received an education accordingly. He is of noted ancestry, his great-grandfather once being Duke of Wales, and his mother a near relative of the elder Adams, also closely connected with the Buchanans, the early settlers of Nashville. He was married in 1825, and became the father of six children, four of whom are living. The mother of our subject was born in 1805 and died in 1807. The father died about 1875. Our subject received his education in the common schools, and later spent several years in the school at Tullahoma. During the war he enlisted under Capt. Meade, in Alabama, but did not enter the service on account of sickness. He was confined at home for several months, and upon his recovery entered the army as an enrolling officer, and continued in that capacity till the army retreated from Tennessee. He then went back with Gen. Forrest to take care of a sick brother, with whom he remained until his death near the close of the war. He was captured at Tullahoma and charged with bushwhacking, but acquitted himself nobly, and was released at the end eleven days. He then returned to Lincoln County, and commenced farming in cotton. December 1, 1870, he wedded Bettie Warren, and by this union became the father of ten children, nine of whom are living: Emma, Henry W., James A. and William Owen (twins), Edgar A., Bessie Polk, George W., Sue May and Anna Lynne. In 1882 Mr. Edwards purchased 60 acres, where he now resides. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Edwards is a graduate of the Mary Sharp College at Winchester, Tenn.

HON. W. W. ERWIN, farmer, and a native of Tennessee, was born April 26, 1846. His parents, Robert and Jane E. (Woods) Erwin, were natives of Tennessee. The father was born in 1810, and the mother about the same year. She died September, 1885. The father is still living and is a saddler by trade. Our subject received his education at Moorsville Academy. December 23, 1869, he married Addle, daughter of Dr. John and Josephine Wood, and a native of Lincoln County, born March 30, 1853. By this union they became the parents of five children: Robert, Willie B., Edwin S., Ross and Leroy W. Mr. Erwin remained with his parents for some time, and received a good education in the schools of the county. He then engaged in teaching, and has followed this occupation for ten years. He has taught in Marshall, Giles and Lincoln Connties, and was principal of the Boonshill Academy for some time. In 1871 he moved on his present farm which consists of 150 acres of productive land. In 1884 he was elected to represent the people of Lincoln and Moore Counties in the Legislature of the State. Mr. Erwin is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JOSEPH FARRAR, an old and influential resident of Lincoln County, Tenn., was born in North Carolina, June 11. 1811, and was the son of John W., and Elizabeth (Williams) Farrar. The father of our subject was born in Virginia in 1750. and moved to North Carolina, and remained there until 1810. He was captain of a company in the Revolutionary war, under Gen. Greene, and served through its entire time. IIe was a cabinet-maker by occupation, and was with Daniel Boone, the flrst settler of Kentucky. He died in 1830. The mother of our subject was born in North Carolina, and died in Lincoln County, Tenn. Our subject received his education in the common schools, and December 22, 1831, he wedded Elizabeth, daughter of Robert and Polly Abernathy. Mrs. Farrar was born in Lincoln County, in 1814, and by this marriage became the mother of twelve children, four of whom are living: Nancy A. (wife of William West), James T., Pinkney E. and Miles J. After marriage our subject purchased one-half of the homestead, where he located and remained until 1853. In 1855 he bought 115 acres of land in the Thirteenth District, where he has since lived. He has since bought more land, and at one time owned 800 acres, but has divided it among his sons, reserving for himself about forty acres. Mr. Farrar is well known and highly esteemed far and near. He is an excellent citizen and a kind and obliging neighbor. He is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Andrew Jackson. He and wife are worthy and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

P. E. FARRAR, farmer, is a son of Joseph and Elizabeth Farrar. The father was born in one of the Carolinas in 1811, and came to Lincoln County with his parents when but a lad. After marriage he located in the Thirteenth District, where he still lives, and is a farmer by occupation. The mother of our subject was born in Lincoln County in 1814, and was married about 1831. She and her husband have been living together longer than any other couple in the district. Our subject was born in Lincoln County in October, 1850, and is one of twelve children born to his parents. He received his education in the district schools, and remained with his parents until he was twenty-five years of age. In 1875 he married N. J. Dickey, a native of Lincoln County, born in 1855, and the daughter of Alfred and Eliza Dickey. The fruits of this union were an interesting family of five children: Lizzie, Myrtle, Nannie L., Annie B. and Edna. After marriage our subject bought a farm in the Twelfth District, but remained there only three years, when he disposed of that place and bought 200 acres in the Thirteenth District, where he now resides. Mr. Farrar had two brothers who served in the late unpleasantness between the North and South. One brother, John, was killed after a service of about four years. Mr. Farrar and wife are members of the church and are among the county's best citizens.

WILLIAM B. FAULKNER one of the principal citizens of the Twenty-fifth District, and a son of William and Ellen (Bolton) Faulkner, was born in Lincoln County in 1834, and is one of a family of seven children, four of whom are living. The father was born in Ireland in 1797, the grandfather in England and the grandmother in Scotland. The father of our subject received a fair education in the common schools, and was married twice, his first wife being Miss Patterson, by whom he had two children, one of whom died during the voyage to America. His wife died shortly after his arrival in this country, and in 1832 he wedded the mother of our subject. He was a farmer, a ditcher and blaster by occupation. His death occurred in 1870. The mother of our subject was also born in Ireland, in 1798, and died in 1843. Our subject received a fair education, and as his parents were poor he was compelled to work for a livelihood. He was employed for several years in a factory and afterward was engaged in trading and teaming in some of the Southern cities. During the war he enlisted in Company H, First Tennessee Regiment, and soon entered the Army of the Potomac, where he was quite a favorite of Stonewall Jackson's. At the end of a year he was discharged on account of ill health, but soon returned and engaged in some of the principal battles of the war. He was captured and held a prisoner until 1866. In January, 1866 he wedded Mrs. Charlotte Taylor, daughter of J. and M. Simmons. To Mr. and Mrs. Faulkner were born five children: Amanda E., Nancy J., Eliza B., Ellen F. and William A. Our subject located on ninety four acres of land in the Twenty-fifth District, where he remained three years. He then purchased the same amount of acres in the same district, on which he located and still resides. Mrs. Faulkner died November 24, 1877, and in January, 1879, he married Mrs. Harriet A. Smith, daughter of David and Martha Sisk, by whom be had three children, two of whom are living: Mattie and Mary Pearl. Mr. Faulkner is a Democrat, a Mason and an Odd Fellow, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

JOSEPH M. GREER is a son of Joseph and Mary (Harmon) Greer, and is one of eleven children and of Irish descent. The father was born in the "Keystone State " in 1764, and was an early pioneer of Tennessee, coming in 1790 and entering about 10,000 acres of land. They suffered all the hardships incident to pioneer life, but, unlike many of the early settlers, had the good will of the Indians. Mr. Greer was a farmer and merchant at Knoxville, Tenn., and was clerk of the first chancery court after the organization of the county. He died in 1835. Our subject was reared in Tennessee when there was no schools, consequently his education was acquired at home mainly through his own exertions. In 1847 he married Mary Edmiston, who departed this life September 19, 1868. They had one son--Joseph M._who resides on the old home place and looks after his father's farm. He was born September 13, 1858, and was educated at Petersburg and Fayetteville, and is now the owner of 535 acres of fine land, and is noted for his generosity and honesty. He votes with the Democratic party, and belongs to the Masonic fraternity.

PLEASANT HALBERT'S birth occurred in Williamson County, Tenn., in 1811. His parents, James and Elizabeth (Smith) Halbert, were born in North and South Carolina in 1771 and 1788, and died in 1833 and 1813, respectively. The father was a farmer, and in 1795 immigrated to Tennessee, but remained only four years, when he returned to his native State. September 9, 1801, he returned to Tennessee. He was married in 1810, and in 1813 came to Lincoln County, where he spent the remainder of his days. He was father of two children, only one now living--Pleasant Halbert_who made his home with his father as long as he lived. He was educated in the district schools, and October 8, 1833, married Nancy Crawford, who was born in 1810, and a daughter of John Crawford, who was an early pioneer of Lincoln County. Our subject and his wife became the parents of eight children, seven of whom are living: Martha (wife of Dr. J. E. Youell), Margaret E. (Mrs. Lemuel D. Sugg), James C., Mary J. (Mrs. Capt. J. H. George), Pleasant W. (a physician and surgeon), Naomi E. (Mrs. S. M. Clayton) and William H. (a physician and surgeon of Lebanon). Mrs. Halbert died August 5, 1850, and April 8, 1852, he wedded Emily Buchanan, who was born July 23, 1814, and a daughter of John Buchanan. Of their three children two are living: Laura G. (Mrs. Pleasant Hobbs) and Isaac B. This wife died February 9, 1868. and July 1 of the same year Mr. Halbert married Martha V. Smith, daughter of David Smith. She was born in Alabama in 1826. Mr. Halbert owns 600 acres of land in the Eighth District, and is one of the old and highly respected citizens of the county. He has been a life-long Democrat, and has served as magistrate six years. He and Mrs. Halbert are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

JOHN HAMILTON, a native of Moore County, was born April 19, 1826, and is a son of William and Rachel Hamilton, natives, respectively, of South Carolina and East Tennessee. The father, when a young man, went to Tennessee, where he was married, and soon came to this part of the State. He was a farmer by occupation, and owned about 300 acres in what is now Moore County. He died in 1873. The subject of this sketch was reared on the farm, and secured a fair education in the district schools near Lynchburg. In 1847 he married Ann, daughter of Preston and Nellie Midkiff. Mrs. Hamilton was born in Moore County, in June, 1826, and by her marriage became the mother of four children: John, Nancy, James and Susan. Mr. Hamilton, after moving around for some time, bought 100 acres of land, where he located, and where he has since resided. He now owns 738 acres of valuable land. He has always been a hard-working, industrious man, and has been quite successful in his occupation In 1857 he bought a mill, and has done considerable business, both in grinding grain and sawing lumber. He is a Democrat in politics, and Mrs. Hamilton is a member of the Lutheran Church. .

WILLIAM HAMILTON, farmer. was born near his present residence in 1836, and is the son of David M. and Elizabeth (Morton) Hamilton. The father was a native of South Carolina, born in 1809, and was of Scotch-Irish lineage. He came to Tennessee in 1811 with his' father, John Hamilton, who settled in the Twelfth District, bought property, and remained until his career ended, about 1818. While chopping a tree it suddenly split and flew back, striking Mr. Hamilton and killing him instantly. His wife returned to South Carolina in a short time to look after his unsettled business, going and returning on horseback through unbroken forests, bivouacking out of nights along the route. David M., our subject's father, lived in Lincoln County at the time of his marriage, which occurred in 1831. He lived in different parts of Lincoln County, but the last five years of his life were passed in the Fourteenth District. He owned 160 acres of land, and may properly be classed as one of the early settlers. He died in 1845, in the prime of life. The mother of our subject was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1813, and was of Irish extraction. Her father, Alexander Morton, was a native of Ireland. He came to Lincoln County at a very early date, and was one of the first white men in the county. Since the death of her husband Mrs. Hamilton has lived with her children, and for the past eighteen years has lived with her son William. There were five children, four of whom, are living. William was reared at home, and received a practical education in the public schools. October 22, 1857, he married Elizabeth E. Wyatt, daughter of Thomas Wyatt. Mrs. Hamilton was born in Lincoln County in 1835, and the result of her marriage was the birth of two children: David Knox and Mollie (wife of John Montgomery). After marriage Mr. Hamilton resided on the old home-place until 1868. In 1870 he had the misfortune to lose his wife, and January 8, 1878, he wedded Mrs. Anna (Telford) Massey, daughter of William Telford. The second Mrs. Hamilton was born in 1857, in Marion County, m., and this marriage resulted in the birth of one child, Cora Agnes. In 1872 Mr. Hamilton purchased 100 acres of land in the Twelfth District, where he has since resided. -He is one of the farmers of Lincoln County who is possessed with modern ideas of cultivating the soil. He is a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church.

THOMAS HAMPTON is one of a large family of children born to the marriage of Preston and Sarah Hampton, who were born in North Carolina and Tennessee in 1777 and 1788, and died in 1859 and 1830, respectively. They were farmers. Thomas was born in Lincoln County, October 29, 1815. He resided at home until twenty-six years of age, and three years later was united in marriage to Martha J. Smith, who was born in 1826 and died in July, 1883. Seven children were born to them, four of whom are living: William, E. T., Mary A. (Mrs. W. F. Hamilton), and Sarah (Mrs. Robert Cleghorn). Mr. Hampton traveled in the West two years before his marriage and for two years after his marriage, farmed his father-in- law's farm, then purchased 175 acres which he afterward increased very much, but gave to his children until he now owns 121 acres. In 1885 Mr. Hampton married his second wife, Mrs. Elizabeth (Yant) Pampen. She was born in Lincoln County, September 25, 1835. Our subject suffered heavy losses by the late war, but in the main has been more than ordinarily successful. He and wife belong to the Baptist Church.

DAVID L. HARRIS, son of John and Susan (Lee) Harris, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1830, and is one of two children, our subject only living. The father was Scotch- Irish by birth, born in Virginia about 1804. He came to Tennessee at an early day, where he married and afterward resided a few years, but ended his days in Kentucky, in 1843. He was twice married, his second wife being Jane Abernathy, by whom he had three children: After his parents' death our subject resided with his uncle, Joel M. Harris, with whom he remained until twenty-one years old. He learned the tanner's trade of his uncle, and afterward became one of the firm and remained such until the business was abandoned about 1879. He owns a farm of 800 acres, upon which he located in 1860. In 1857 he married Julia Conaway, by whom he had seven children: William N., Alice B., Sarah L., Joel L., John M., David D., and Samuel S. Mrs. Harris died March 24, 1870, and the August following Mr. Harris married Sarah Bray, and Thomas, Susan T., Fannie, Maud and Ira are the children born to this union. Iron and coal have recently been discovered in almost inexhaustible quantities on Mr. Harris' farm, and when developed may prove of great value to the county. Our subject is a wealthy land owner, and was formerly a Whig, but since the war has affiliated with the Republican party. He belongs to tile F. &; A. M. and I. O. O. F.

O. R. HATCHER, M. D., was born on the 30th of August, 1840, one of five children of Octavus and Caledonia (Pillow) Hatcher, who were born in Virginia and Tennessee, in 1818 and 1826, respectively. The father was brought to Tennessee when about eight years of age, became a merchant, and died in 1856. Our subject, O. R., was educated at College Grove, under Profs. Wynn and Carey, and then entered the medical department of the Nashville University and attended six months, and then went to New York, to Bellevue Medical College, where he graduated as an M. D. in 1872. In February, 1873 he and Mary Woodard were married. She was born in 1849 and has borne three children: John U.. Nellie I., and William L. Dr. Hatcher practiced medicine in Fayetteville about five months, and then moved to Hazelgreen. Ala., but two years later returned to Lincoln County, where he has since resided and practiced his profession with much success. He and his brother, A. H., have a farm of 282 acres under the latter's supervision. The Doctor is a Democrat and a Mason, and he and Mrs. Hatcher are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

SAMUEL HAYNIE, farmer. was born in Bedford County, in 1833, and remained at home until he was twenty-five years of age. He received a fair education in the neighboring schools, and December 30, 1850, led to the altar Anna Moore, a native of Lincoln County, Tenn., born June, 1832, and the daughter of Andrew and Rachel Moore. The union of our subject and wife resulted in the birth of ten children, seven of whom are living: Samuel J., Robert H., Mary J., Hugh L., Thomas J. J., Anna L. and Emma L. Mr. Haynie resides on the old home-place, which now consists of 302 acres under a good state of cultivation. In 1803 he enlisted in Company D, Eighth Tennessee, and took an active part in the battle of Murfreesboro. He was in the retreat toward the south, and soon after returned home and resumed farming. Mr. Haynie taught school several terms before marriage and also several after marriage. He is a life-long Democrat in politics. Our subject's parents, James and Elizabeth (Bailey) Haynie, were married about 1830. The father was born May 18, 1810, and was of Scotch-Irish descent. He was a farmer by occupation, but, being a natural genius, could manufacture or repair nearly all kinds of machinery. He died in 1878. The mother of our subject was born in North Carolina and died in 1882.

HENRY HENDERSON, trustee of Lincoln County, was born in the Twenty-first District of that county in 1825, and is the son of David and Elizabeth (Lee) Henderson. The father was a Virginian and was of Scotch extraction. In 1800 he came to Lincoln County, and was among the pioneer settlers of the same. He was in the war of 1812, was wounded in the right arm. which rendered him a cripple for life. About 1814 he was married. and afterward located in the Twenty-first District, where he died in 1857. He was a tiller of the soil and at the time of his death owned upward of 1,100 acres of land. The mother of our subject was born in North Carolina in 1800 and died November, 1871. They had ten children, only four of whom are living: James, Sandy, Henry and Daniel W. Our subject was reared at home and received his education in the public schools. In 1855 he was elected surveyor of Lincoln County, and served in that capacity until 1876, with the exception of a short interval during the Rebellion. In 1868 he married Mrs. Sarah (Blake) Crawford, daughter of William Crawford. Mrs. Henderson was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1827, and by a previous marriage became the mother of four children: Delia F. (wife of Pleasant Snoddy), James 15., W. B. and Annie (wife of a. D. Wicks). By her last union was born one child, Victoria MAY (wife of Thomas Phillips) In 1861 Mr. Henderson bought 285 acres in the Nineteenth District, where he has since resided. In 1870 he was elected county trustee, and at the expiration of his term was re-elected, and so has continued for five successive terms. He is a Democrat in politics and a member of the Masonic fraternity, being a Royal Arch Mason. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and his wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He was major of the Second Battalion, Seventy-second Regiment of the Fourth Division of Tennessee Militia for three or four years, being commissioned by the governor of Tennessee, and was frst lieutenant of a company in said battalion for a number of years.

AUSTIN HEWITT, of Boonshill, Tenn., was born in 1840 near Norwich, Conn., son of Elkanah and Lucy Hewitt, born in Virginia and Connecticut, respectively. The father was born in 1808, and was a brick-mason by trade. He was a resident of Connecticut many years, and there died. The mother's death occurred in 1849. Austin remained with his parents until about sixteen years of age, and then went to Macon, Gal, and was overseer of a brick manufactory. After a short residence in South Carolina he went to Arkansas and while there enlisted in Company D, First Arkansas Infantry, and took an active part in the battles of Manasses, Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and was with Thomas at the time of the surrender. He served three years and rendered his country valuable service. July 3, 1864, he married Martha E. Reed, born in Lincoln County in 1844, and began farming. In 1871 he purchased 172 acres of land, which he has increased to 540 acres. He takes much interest in stock-raising, and besides hit home farm has valuable property in Pulaski, Giles County. He is conservative in politics and cast his first presidential vote for S. J. Tilden. Mr. Hewitt wishes to retire from active business life and to dispose of his farm, which is well adapted to grazing stock and raising ail kinds of grain.

H. C. HIGGINS is a son of Owen W. Higgins, who was of Scotch descent, born in Kentucky in 1802. He came to Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1806 with his father, and eventually became the owner of 200 acres of land, about five miles from Fayetteville. He was married about 1824 to Fannie H. Stone, and by her was the father of eleven children, eight of whom are living: Nancy (widow of Daniel Tucker), Sallie (Mrs. Daniel B. Shull), Mary (Mrs. Isaac Holman), George W., a lawyer in Fayetteville; Martha D. (Mrs. James Cato), Fannie E. (Mrs. J. E. Carrigan), Virginia (widow of Prof. Peter Hunbaugh) and our subject, H. C. Their father died in 1865, and their mother, who was born in 1806, in Virginia, died in 1871. The subject of our sketch was born near his present place of residence in 1846, and was educated in the neighboring schools and at Fayetteville, and made his home with his mother as long as he remained unmarried. December 22, 1868, he wedded Fannie Stone, daughter of L. L. Stone. Mrs. Higgins was born in Lincoln County, and has two children: Berry Owen and Julia. Mr. Higgins and wife own 488 acres of land, and have a beautiful and comfortable home. Mr. Higgins is a man of good business qualities, and in politics is very conservative, casting his first presidential vote for Seymour and Blair. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

J. B. HILL, jeweler of Fayetteville, Tenn., was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1832, son of Ebenezer and Mary T. (Bryan) Hill. The father was born in Mason, N. H., October 14, 1791, and died at the residence [of his son. in Manchester, May 16, 1875. At the age of fourteen he went to Amherst and worked in a printing office. He then went to Troy, N. Y., and while there enlisted in the war of 1812, and served until the close. He went to Huntsville, Ala.. in 1819, and the following year came to Fayetteville, where he has continued to reside with the exception of two years. In March, 1823, he began the publication of a weekly paper called the Village Messenger, which he continued to issue until July 18, 1828. In 1826, with his brother J. B. Hill, he issued the first number of Hill's Almanac, which grew into popularity until 1862, when the war prevented its continuance. It was considered an almost indispensable article in every household and office. In 1838 and 1834 he published the Independent Yeoman, a hebdomadal journal, edited by himself. He published several works, and established and conducted a circulating library. He possessed more than ordinary mental ability, and was a terse and fluent writer, and his editorials were noted for their shrewd common sense and logic. He was married in 1824, and about four years previous to his own death his wife died. Our immediate subject, J. B. Hill, was educated in the schools of Fayetteville. He began learning the jeweler's trade at the age of twenty-two, and finally wedded Maggie Bearden, who has borne him five children: Charles B., Mary, Eben, Maggie B. and Emily H. Maggie is but six years of age, but is a fine performer on the violin, playing by ear almost any tune she ever heard with almost perfect time and expression. Mr. Hill served in the late war in Company C, Forty- first Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, and was afterward appointed quartermaster-sergeant. Mr. Hill and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is the leading jeweler of Fayetteville and a much respected citizen.

DAVID F. HOBBS, a prominent citizen and farmer, is one of eleven children born to Nathaniel and Sarah Hobbs. The father was of English descent, and was born in North Carolina in 1789. He was married in 1812, and came to Lincoln County in 1832, locating in the Sixteenth District. He was a cabinet-maker by occupation, and died in 1861. The mother of our subject was also of English origin, was born in the same State as her husband and about the same year. She died in 1875. Our subject was born in North Carolina July 25, 1820, and received his education in the schools near home. In 1841 he married Sarah Shipp, a native of Lincoln County, born 1823, and the daughter of Louis and Mary (Cole) Shipp. To our subject and wife was born one boy, Pleasant, now a merchant in the Thirteenth District. After marriage Mr. Hobbs engaged with Dr. Bonner, and remained with him nineteen years, overseeing and looking after the interest of the plantation. In 1865 he purchased 155 acres of land in the Thirteenth District, where he located. and has since remained. He has since bought more land, and now he and his son own about 800 acres. He is a Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for James E. Polk. Pleasant Hobbs, son of our subject, was born April 4, 1844, and received his education in Lincoln County. In 1870 he wedded Laura Halbert, a native of Lincoln County, born in 1854, and by this union became the father of five children: Tula H., Sarah E., David F., Jr., B. and B. M. Pleasant Hobbs, since he has grown to manhood, has been a partner with his father on the farm. December, 1880, he began the mercantile business in the Thirteenth District, where he still continues. September, 1885, J. D. Sugg entered into partnership with them, and the firm is now known as Hobbs & Sugg. They are doing a good business in the sale of dry goods and groceries, and carry about $4,000 worth of stock. Pleasant is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. He and wife are also members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

COL. J. H. HOLMAN attorney, at law at Fayetteville, Tenn., is a son of James W. Holman, who was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1812. He was a farmer and Primitive Baptist minister. In 1830 he married Jean Flack, who was born in Lincoln County in 1812, and in 1881 came to Fayetteville, and has since resided with his children. He owns 800 acres of land, and has been a minister of the gospel since 1845. His father, Rev. Hardy Holman, was a Virginian, and moved to Kentucky previous to 1800. He was among the very early pioneers of Lincoln County, and surveyed the town plot of Fayetteville. Our subject is one of eight children, four now living; Dr. Thomas P., a resident of Lincoln County; Sue M. (Mrs. Dr. W. A. Millhouse), Jennie P. (Mrs. John G. Tolley), and J. H., our subject, who was born in Lincoln County in 1836, and received an academic education in the schools of his county. In 1856 he entered Union University, at Murfreesboro, but in the spring of 1857 was appointed lieutenant in the regular army by President Pierce, and held the position until the breaking out of the war between the North and the South, when he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the First Regiment Tennessee Volunteers. In 1863 he was promoted to the rank of colonel, which position he held until the close of the war. He was at Cumberland (lap, Perryville, Lawrenceburg, and in many skirmishes, and was wounded on three different occasions, but not seriously. He was paroled May 24, 1865, at Houston, Tex. He was taken prisoner at Winchester, Tenn., in 1863, and retained at Camp Chase, Ohio, and Johnson's Island for thirteen months. After returning home he began the study of law, and in 1867 was admitted to the Lincoln County bar and began practicing with his brother, D. W. Holman. November 23, 1865, he and Lizzie C. Kimbrough were united in marriage. Mrs. Holman was born in 1840, and was a daughter of Rev. Bradley Kimbrough, a Baptist minister. In 1870 Mr. Holman was elected attorney-general of the Sixth Judicial Circuit, holding the office until 1877. and has since devoted his attention to his profession. In 1878 he was appointed commissioner to the Paris Exposition by Gov. Porter, and during his absence traveled in various portions of Europe. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, Union Chapter.

THOMAS P. HOLMAN, M. D., an influential farmer of Lincoln County. Tenn., is a son of James W. and Jean (Flack) Holman, and was born March 3, 1834. At the age of sixteen he began teaching school, and followed that occupation at irregular intervals for upward of six sessions. He entered Union University, Murfreesboro, Tenn., and graduated at the age of twenty-four years. He then became a follower of AEsculapius. and continued his studies to the time of the late civil war. In 1862 be joined Company C, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, and participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Massy Creek, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Dalton, Resaca, and numerous other engagements of less note. He was captured at Fayetteville in 1864, and taken to Camp chase, Ohio, but was exchanged at the end of six weeks, and immediately rejoined his command. He returned home in 1865 and taught school one session, and then kept a hotel in Shellbyville for about one year and a half. In 1867 he entered the medical department at Washington University at Baltimore, Md., and graduated as an M. D. in 1869. He was appointed resident physician of Bay View Asylum at Baltimore, but the following year returned to Tennessee and began his practice at Mulberry. January i, 1875, he wedded Silena Moore, daughter of Capt. Lewis Moore, who was killed at Jonesboro in 1864. Mrs. Holman was born in 1850, and has borne her husband the following children: Burke, Wayne. Leon. Fannie Lynne, Boss, and Moore. Dr. Holman owns 3()0 acres of land near Fayetteville, to which he gives the most of his time and attention. He met with good success in his practice, but owing to his enfeebled constitution was compelled to abandon it. In politics he is a Prohibitionist in principle and practice. He belongs to the Freemasons, and his wife is a member of the Christian Church.

B. F. HOUSTON, oculist and aurist of Petersburg, was born in Marshall County, Tenn., September 11, 1852. B. F. Houston, father of our subject, was born in Tennessee in 1807, and was a farmer by occupation. He died February 1. 1862. He was married to N. B. User, who was born in 1813 in Giles County, anti died in November, 1878. Our subject was educated at the Mooreville Institute under Prof. Burney. September 11, 1872, M. A. Elliott, who was born in Franklin County December 9, 1850, became his wife. They kept a boarding house at Louisville two years, and then returned to the old home and he began taking charge of his mother's farm. In 1874 he began the study of medicine, but on account of weak eyes was obliged to abandon the study for some time. In 1879 he moved to Petersburg, and after a time went to Florence, Ala., and took special instruction on the eye and ear under the well known doctor, A. M. Park hill, and now has an extensive practice in Lincoln, Marshall and the adjoining counties, also a number of counties in Alabama adjoining the State. He has acquired a reputation, especially in the treatment of the eye. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.

CAPT. WILLIAM W. JAMES, farmer of the Fifth District, was born in 1828, in Lincoln County, Tenn., and was one of eleven children born to Thomas and Martha (Duke) James. The father was born in Norfolk, Va., in 1790, and was of English lineage. His education was fair, and when about twenty years of age, he, in company with an elder brother, immigrated to Lincoln County, but soon went to Alabama, and engaged in the war- of 1812, under Gen. Coffee. They were in the battle of New Orleans, and at the close of the war immigrated to Lincoln County and located near Mulberry, where he purchased a farm. In 1825 he was married, and at the time of his death, which occurred in 1866, he owned several good farms. The mother died about 1874. Our subject received his education in the neighboring schools, and the age of nineteen entered as clerk in a mercantile establishment at Fayetteville. In 1849, he, in company with about thirty-five others, started to cross the plains for the El Dorado. He engaged in mining while there, and at the end of two years returned home and engaged in the mercantile business at Mulberry Village. wherehe continued until 1861. In 1859 he wedded Susan V. Freeman, and to them were born eight children, five of whom are living: Thomas D., Sarah William W., Alice P., and John M. In 1861 Mr. James was made captain of Company A., Forty-first Tennessee Infantry, and was taken prisoner at Fort Donelson. He was exchanged at Vicksburg, and soon after was discharged on account of poor health. In 1869 he purchased 300 acres of land at Mulberry, where he now resides. In politics he is a life-long Democrat, casting his first vote for Franklin Pierce. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and of the I. O. O. F., and he and Mrs. James are among the most substantial members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

GEORGE A. JARVIS, postmaster and merchant, of Petersburg, Tenn., was born on the 13th of June, 1840, at Richmond. Va., son of Gus and Rebecca (Smith) Jarvis. He was educated and reared in his native town, and May 20, 1869, married Lula Green, who was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., August 12, 1847. and two children are the result of their union: George A. and Minnie E. In 1857 Mr. Jarvis became salesman for Joseph Akin, of Maury County, and remained with him until the breaking out of the war, after which he acted as traveling salesman for Louisville houses for seven years, and in 1872 came to Petersburg. Since 1874 he has been in the mercantile business, and has also had the postoffice at Petersburg. Mr. Jarvis is a Democrat, and belongs to the I. O. O. F. and K. of H. fraternities. April 27, 1861, he entered the Confederate Army, serving in Company B. Second Tennessee Infantry, commanded by William B. Bate, the present governor of Tennessee. He served as lieutenant. He afterward became a member of another company, and served in the quartermaster's department. He participated in many battles, and May 1, 1863, was captured and taken to Johnson's Island, where he remained a prisoner twenty-two months. He returned home in May, 1865.

T. A. JEAN, farmer and mechanic. is a native of Lincoln County, Tenn., born in 1836, and is one of eleven children of John and Ann (Shaw) Jean. The father was of Irish lineage, born in North Carolina in 1797, a merchant and farmer by occupation. He came to Tennessee in 1815, and two years later married. He died in 1883, at the advanced age of eighty-six years. He was twice married, his second wife being Patsey Taylor. The mother was born in 1801, in North Carolina, and died in 1845. At the age of ten years our subject became the architect of his own fortunes, and for about eight years was a farm laborer, and for his first year's labor received $3 per month for his services. January 27, 1856, he married Martha E. Rutledge, who was born in 1829, in Lincoln County. The following are their children: William McHenry, John Alex, Elizabeth A., Thomas M., Mary C., Martha L. and George W. In 1882 Mr. Jean purchased 141 acres of land near Fayetteville, on which he located and has since resided. He is very skillful with the use of tools, and does his own blacksmithing and repairing in general. He is a Democrat in politics, and his first presidential vote was cast for Breckinridge, in 1860. He served in the late war in Forrest's escort. and was in many severe Skirmishes. His principal duty was scouting, and during his entire service he was neither wounded nor captured. He returned home in 1865, after an absence of three years. He and Mrs. Jean are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

DR. GEORGE W. JONES. physician and surgeon of Mulberry, and a son of C. G. and Nancy (Moore) Jones, was born in Maury County in 1835. The father was born near Lynchburg, Va., in 1803. and was of English lineage. At the age of twenty-six, he, in company with an elder brother, immigrated to Maury County, Tenn., making the entire journey on foot. In 1831 he was married and became the father of nine children, of whom our subject is one. He died January 2, 1874. The mother was born in North Carolina in 1805, and is now living on the old farm in Maury County. Our subject remained at home until he was twenty-one years of age, and received his early education at Rock Springs. In 1865 he entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, where he graduated in 1858. He immediately located in Mulberry and began practicing his profession. In 1858 he wedded Lizzie Whitaker (daughter of Newton and Fannie Whitaker) and to this union were born eight children, five of whom are living: Charley N., Clarence G., Lelia W., George M. and Jennie M. In 1859 he removed to Mississippi, where he remained till 1861, after which he returned to Mulberry, and has since resided there. During the war he was elected sergeant of Company C, Fifth Kentucky, and was soon afterward made lieutenant of his regiment, but was discharged after the battle of Murfreesboro, on account of disability. Since that time he has continued the practice of his profession, in which he has made a complete success. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and K. of H. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

W. L. KIILPATRIC, merchant of Fayetteville, and farmer, living two miles south of that village was born in south Alabama. October 20, 1857, son of I. T. and M. V. Kilpatric. The father was born in South Carolina in 1818, and was of Irish lineage. He moved to Georgia when a youth, and was married there, and moved to Alabama; thence to Lincoln County Tenn., in 1883 where he located and now resides. The mother was born in Georgia in 1827 and died in January. 1884. Our subject received his education in the various schools of Alabama. In 1879 he married Mary Wilson, a native of Lincoln County, born May 1, 1865,and the daughter of Matthew T. and Jane C. Wilson. By this union our subject became the father of one child--Alva W. After marriage our subject located on the farm, where they have since resided. He now owns over 500 acres of excellent land, well improved. In 1882 he and his brother, T. B., engaged in the mercantile business at Fayetteville. In 1886 he purchased his brother's interest, and took another partner, T. I. McCowan, and now do business under the name of Kilpatric & Co. They have been very successful in the sale of dry goods, clothing, etc. Mr. Kilpatric is a Democrat in polities, and cast his first presidential vote for Grover Cleveland. J. E. Kilpatric, brother of W. L., was in the late war, enlisting in 1864 when but seventeen years of age, and remaining until the surrender; Our subject and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

WILLIAM J. LANDESS, farmer and tanner of the Sixth District, was born October 9, 1852, in Lincoln County, Tenn. The father of our subject, John Landess, was born in Kentucky, November 11, 1799, and was of Dutch extraction. He acquired a good business education and was a tanner by occupation. He located in the Sixth District, where he soon established a lucrative business. April 5, 1831, he married Mary H. Stone, and became the father of eleven children, ten of whom 'are living, our subject being one of them. The father died September 11, 1876. and the mother is still living on the old home-place. Our subject received his education principally at the Oak Hill School, taking quite a thorough course in the languages. November 28, 1878, he led to the altar May Boone, a native of Lincoln County, born February 8, 1856, and the daughter of Capt. Nathan and Orpha Boone. This union resulted in the birth of three children, two of whom are living: John B. and Alberta K. Mr. Landess is now residing on the old home-place where he was born. He is the owner of 300 acres of good land, well cultivated, and succeeded his father in the tannery business, in which he has been quite successful. He is a Democrat in politics, casting his first vote for S. J. Tilden. He and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church. Mrs. Landess was educated at the Female Institute at Winchester.

R. W. LONG is a son of Joseph Long, who was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee and married Matilda Flack. The mother was born in 1804 and died in 1873. Our subject received a common school education, and after 0a marriage, in 1857, to Tabitha Bledsoe, he tilled the home farm for his mother, who was a widow. His wife was born near Petersburg, November 10, 1836, and seven children blessed her union with Mr. Long: Alva M. (Mrs. J. C. Moore), Nora 1. (Mrs. C. A. Talley), Thomas A., Fannie E. (Mrs. O. B. Taylor), James B., Helen B. and Affa C. In 1872 our subject and family moved onto their present farm of 200 acres, comprising seven acres of all kinds of fruit trees. Mr. Long has given his children good educational advantages, sod is Conservative in politics, voting rather for the man than the party. He served in the late war in Company F., Forty-first Tennessee Infantry, and took an active part in the battles of Fort Donelson, Franklin, Nashville and several minor engagements. He was captured at the fall of Fort Donelson, and imprisoned seven months at Lafayette and Indianapolis, In i. He was the wagonmaster in the quartermaster's department two years. He returned home in the fall of 1864. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

J. W. LLOYD, senior partner of the firm of Lloyd & Blake, proprietors and publishers of the Fayetteville Express was born October 3, 1843, in Huntsville, Ala.. son of W. B. and Martha P. (Tatum) Lloyd, born in Virginia in 1818 and 1817, and died in 1873 and 1851, respectively. They were married in 1838, and soon after moved to Huntsville, Ala. Our subject's mother died when he was quite young, and at the age of thirteen he became an apprentice at the printer's trade, working on the Huntsville Advocate four years. He then commenced life for himself as a journeyman, and the following thirteen years worked in most of the large cities in the South, assisting on the leading daily and weekly papers. In April. 1873, he came to Fayetteville and assisted in the establishing the Fayetteville Express, the proprietor and publisher being J. B. Smith. In 1876 Mr. Lloyd and F. O. McCord purchased the press, but in 1880 Mr. J. W. Goodwin purchased Mr. McCord's interest, and for two years the firm was known as Lloyd & Goodwin. From 1882 to August, 1883, the firm was Lloyd & Carrigan, and in January, 1884, Mr. Blake took a one-half interest. The Express is a newsy paper and is devoted to the interests of the people. Mr. Lloyd has been in the newspaper business nearly thirty years and knows the needs and wishes of his patrons. He is a Democrat in his political views, and cast his first presidential vote for S. J. Tilden in 1876. February 23, 1881, he married Kate Jones, daughter of Capt. Joel J. Jones, who was killed in the battle of Perryville, Ky. Mrs. Lloyd was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1863, and has one son--Sumner.

J. J. MADDOX, farmer of Lincoln County, is a son of John and Elizabeth Maddox, who were born in 1811 and 1812, respectively. They came from the Carolinas, and were among the early settlers of Tennessee, and were farmers. The father died in 1880 and the mother in 1872. Our subject received a liberal education, and December 18, 1873, led Martha A. Sherrell to the hymeneal altar. She was born in Lincoln County July 3, 1855, and is the mother of six children: R. S., J. S., B. M., A. A., M. S., and L. J. In May, 1861, Mr. Maddox joined the company known as the " Camargo Guards," and was in the battle of Murfreesboro and many minor engagements. He returned home in 1863, and three years later purchased the farm on which he now lives, consisting of 368 acres of land. Mr. Maddox is well respected by his fellow-man, and takes an active interest in all institutions which promote the advancement of the county. He is a Democrat and Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

W. L. McCANN was born in Jackson, Ala., in 1827. His father was of Irish descent, born in the " Palmetto State" in 1800, and moved to near Alabama in 1825, and after a two years' residence came to Tennessee, where he died in 1867. The mother was born in South Carolina in 1804, and died in May, 1882. Vi . L. McCann was educated in the Eighteenth District of Lincoln County, and in 1851 married Miss M. J. Rawls, daughter of L. H. and Sarah Rawls. She was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., November 3, 1832. Mr. McCann purchased his present farm in 1872, which consists of 386 acres of excellent farming land, well improved with good buildings and a line orchard. He has been very successful, as he began business for himself since the war with little or no means, and now owns an excellent tract of land. He is a Democrat, and during the late war was strongly opposed to the principles of secession. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity.

COL. C. A. MeDANIEL is a son of Fielden and Lucy (Barker) McDaniel, and was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1823. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in Virginia, in 1781, but a resident of North Carolina at the time of his marriage, which occurred about 1803. In 1808 he came to Middle Tennessee. and was a resident of Lincoln County, Tenn., after 1810 or 1811. He died in 1840, being one of the early residents and pioneers of the county and suffering many privations incident to pioneer life The mother was born in North Carolina, in 1783, and died in 1839. Our subject is one of their nine children, and resided with his parents until their respective deaths, then he and his brother Charles bought the old homestead and began tilling the soil. When the news came that gold had been discovered in California, he, with a number of friends, started for the " Golden Gate," going overland, the trip taking nine months. There he remained seven years engaged in mining. He returned home in November, 1856, and in December, 1857, was married to Margaret daughter of Andrew Buchanan. Mrs. McDaniel was born in Lincoln County in November, 1831. They have four children: Mary Lou (Mrs. J. B. Whitaker), Andrew C., and Fielden and Felix (twins). In 1848 Mr. McDaniel had purchased 100 acres of land, on which he settled after marriage, and where he has since made his home. He now owns 374 acres of good and well improved land. In 1847, at the age of twenty-three, he was elected to the State Legislature, being the first native representative of Lincoln County. In 1854 he represented Calaveras County, Cal., in the State Legislature, and has been a life-long Democrat. He served in the Mexican war and was slightly wounded at the battle of Monterey. He took an important part in the late war, and assisted in organizing the Forty- fourth Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, and he was chosen colonel of the same. He was wounded in the right arm at Shiloh, but served until the close of the war with the exception of nine months. He returned home in May, 1865. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

M. L. McDOWELL, miller of the village known as MeDowell's Mill, Tenn., was born in Murfreesboro, Tenn., May 14, 1843, son of James and Harriet McDowell, born in 1818, in Tennessee and North Carolina, respectively. The father is a carpenter, and he and wife are yet living. His grandfather was born at Staten Island, N. Y., and he and his wife and family, with the exception of three sons, were murdered by the Indians. Our subject was educated in the Murfreesboro Academy, and in 186] he enlisted in Company A, Second Tennessee Infantry, commanded by W. B. Bate, the present governor of Tennessee, and participated in the battles of Bull Run, Shiloh, Richmond, Chickamauga and Murfreesboro. He was wounded at Richmond, Ky., and was unfitted for further service, but remained with his company in preference to a hospital. He returned home in 1864, and in 1865 wedded Mary A. Cawthon, daughter of M. B. and and M. J. Cawthon, of Alabama, and seven children were born to them: George L., E. R., H. E., M. L., S. J., M. B. an d Myrtle L. Mr. McDowell farmed in Alabama a number of years, but met with reverses, and moved to Tennessee and began working at the carpenter's trade at Lynchburg, and erected very nearly all the fine houses in the place. While there he was mayor, magistrate and notary public. In 1880 he moved to Giles County, and was in the milling business two years in that county, then came to McDowell and erected his present mill. There was no village at the time of his location, but the place has now about 100 inhabitants, two dry goods and grocery stores, a postoffice, blacksmiths and carpenters shops and nine dwelling horses, and a fine schoolhouse is in process of being erected; all of which has been brought about by the energy of Mr. McDowell. He belongs to the Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities, and in politics is a Democrat.

C. C. McKINNEY, attorney at law and magistrate of District No. 8 of Lincoln County, Tenn., was born where he now resides, in 1828. His father, Dr. Charles Mckinney, was of Scotch-Irish extraction, and was born in Wayne County, Ky., in 1788, and educated at Center College, Danville, Ky., where he also read medicine. He married Mary Russell in 1810, and came to Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1812, being one of the pioneer settlers and physicians of the county. His visits to the sick were made by following the old Indian trails and foot-paths, and he was known far and near as a man possessed of remarkable intelligence and honesty. He was surgeon in the war of 1812, and died in 1864 full of years. The mother was of direct Scotch descent, born in 1790. She died in 1863. They were the parents of fourteen children, only three of whom are now living. Our subject's paternal and maternal grandparents were born in Ireland and Scotland, respectively, and both were early emigrants to America. C. C. McKinney received an academical education, and in 1850 became a disciple of Blackstone, Hon. James Fulton being his preceptor. He was admitted to the bar in 1861, and has since practiced his profession, and regarded as a successful, earnest advocate and safe counselor. He was in partnership in the practice of law two years with W. B. Martin, and thirteen years with F. P. Fulton. In August, 1885, Mr. McKinney was elected magistrate of his district, and yet holds that position. He has always resided in Fayetteville, and his displayed qualities of head and heart which have enabled him to surmount many difficulties. He is a Democrat, but previous the war was a Whig. He is also a Mason. In June, 1856, he married Ellen Dennis, born in Alabama, in July, 1837. They have two children: James D., who is the pharmacist in W. A. Gill's drug store, in Fayetteville, and Charles F., who is salesman in the dry goods store of J. A. Lumpkin. Mr. and Mrs. McKinney are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

R. D. McMILLEN is a son of Joseph McMillen, who was of Irish origin, born near Knoxville, Tenn., in. 1784. He was a tailor by trade, and died in 1859. Our subject's mother was of Scotch descent, born in Kentucky in 1787 and died in 1863. Our subject was born in Fayetteville August 17, 1822, and, being the youngest of twelve children, was left to look after the old home place and care for his parents. He owns 267 acres of valuable land near Petersburg, and has been a successful business man. In 1858 he married M. J. Millard, daughter of Willam and Mary Millard. She was born in Lincoln County in 1833, and died in 1878, having borne seven children, six of whom are living: Margaret F. (deceased), Effie (Mrs. C. Rosborough), William J., Sarah, Thomas, Minnie and Lucinda. They have received good educational advantages, and have made the most of their opportunities. Mr. McMillen is a Conservatiye Democrat, but was formerly a supporter of the Whig party, and is a man well versed on all the questions of the day. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity.

MRS. CHARLOTTE MERRELL, a native of Lincoln County, Tenn., born June 1, 1813, is one of the two children born to James and Elizabeth (Daugherty) Grant. Our subject's father was born in Virginia, and, after living there some time, immigrated to North Carolina. He was a farmer by occupation, came to Tennessee in 1812, and died in the Sixteenth District April 8, 1841. The mother of our subject was born in North Carolina about 1761, and departed this life January 26, 1836. Charlotte received her education in the schools near home, and October 14, 1838, she married William Merrell, a native of North Carolina, born January 26, 1815. By this union were born nine children, five of whom are living: Robert and Thomas are living in Lincoln County; Susan is the wife of William Soloman, and she with her husband and three children, Charley, Dewit T. and Dorinda are living with our subject on the old home place; Charley is living in Colorado, Texas. Mr. Merrell died October 31, 1880, and left a fine farm of 200 acres lying on the western portion of the Sixteenth District of Lincoln County and a portion in Giles County.

J. S. MERRELL'S birth occurred in Giles County, Tenn., in March, 1839. His father was born in North Carolina, in 1798, and came to Tennessee when a lad, and afterward became a farmer. He died in December, 1866. His wife was born in Tennessee, and died in 1852. Our subject's early education and raising was like the average boy of his period. To his marriage with Josie Reed in December, 1860, were born the following family: Martha (deceased wife of A. J. Smith), Cynthia (Mrs. P. A. Hall), Susan; Cora G., Hugh F., Mollie B. and James E. Since 1866 Mr. Merrell has farmed in the Seventeenth District of Lincoln County, where he owns 145 acres of fertile land, well improved. In connection with overseeing his farm he carries on blacksmithing, and is a skillful wood-workman. He takes much interest in educational affairs, and has given his children good educations. He is a Democrat and a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. In 1801 he enlisted in Company F. Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and was in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Siege of Knoxville, besides many smaller engagements. He was a brave and faithful soldier, and returned home in December, 1803.

JAMES A. D. MIDDLETON, lumberman and prominent citizen, and a son of Alexander D. and Jane Smith (Brodie) Middleton, was born July 24, 1842, in New York City. The father of our subject was born in Scotland about 1815, and was a descendant of Scotch ancestors. He was a marble-cutter by occupation, learning this trade in New York City. The mother of our subject was also born in New York City about 1817. After the death of the father, which occurred July 26, 1849, the family went to Virginia, and soon after to ____ County, Mo., where they remained two years. They then removed to St. Louis in 1851, where they remained till after the death of the mother, which occurred in 1865. Our subject remained at home until nineteen years of age, and received his education principally in the free schools of St. Louis, Mo. 31st of July, 1868, he wedded Mrs. Cordelia J. Hague, daughter of G. W. Alexander, of Lincoln County. They have two interesting children: C. Jennie and Walter P. J. Previous to his marriage he went into the army with Lieut.-Col. Mortimer Okean as a hostler, and there he remained until 1865, when he landed at Tullahoma. After staying there two years he received an appointment in the internal revenue service, where he remained until April 30, 1884, with the exception of about two years, 1868 and 1870, when he was postmaster at Mulberry. May 1, 1884, Mr. Middleton commenced his present occupation. He is a Republican in politics, and a Prohibitionist, and cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. He is an Odd Fellow, Knight of Honor, a Good Templar and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, as are also the two children. Mrs. Middleton is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

DR. W. L. MOORES, a physician of the Thirteenth District, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1842, and was one of two children born to William H. and Elizabeth (Sugg) Moores. The father was of Welsh origin and was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., about 1820. He was a tiller of the soil, and died in 1845. The mother of our subject was of English origin, born in Robertson County, Tenn. in 1801, and died in 1874. Our subject received a good literary education in the counties of Lincoln and Giles In 1862, he enlisted in Freeman's battery, and took part in the battle of Parker's Cross-roads, and other minor engagements. He was captured while sick at home, July, 1863, and taken to Camp Chase, where he remained seven months, after which he was conveyed to Fort Delaware and remained there a year. In June, 1865, he began the study of medicine and at the end of a Year and a half entered the Cincinnati College of Medicine and Surgery, where it required three years to complete the course, but owing to hi' rapid progress was allowed by the faculty to take all his examinations at the end of the second year, and received his diploma in 1867. In the same year he married Sarah J., daughter of Mill and Lucretia (Fox) McCollum, her mother being a cousin of Glen. B. F. Butler. Mrs. Moores was born in Giles County, July 5, 1844, and by her marriage became the mother of six children: Cyrus L., James A., Ira, Edna, Matt W., and William C. Dr. Moores has always been an active, energetic man, and has a large and increasing practice. He has met with commendable success and is continually laboring for the good of the people. He is postmaster at Cyruston, and this office has been in the hands of the family for fifty years. He is a Mason, a K. of H., and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and is secretary of the same. Mrs..Moores is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Dr. Moores has a small farm where he resides, and has a fine young orchard. He is making a specialty of the study of horticulture, and he also has on his place a fish-pond and is a pisciculturist to some extent.

J. K. MOORES, farmer, was born in the Thirteenth District, where he now resides, and is one of nine children born to his parents, Daniel and Elizabeth Moores. The father was born in New Jersey in 1789, and came to Lincoln County with his parents when but nineteen years of age. He followed agricultural pursuits and was married in 1816. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died in 1849. The mother of our subject was born in the southern part of Pennsylvania in 1796, and died in October, 1876. Our subject was reared at home, received his early education in the country schools and afterward completed at Viny Grove Academy. In 1856 he wedded Louisa Smith, a native of Lincoln County, born in 1839, and a daughter of the well known Constant and Margaret Smith. By this union our subject became the father of four sons: John, now living in Obion County, Tenn.; Knox and Cyrus, in Texas; and Ross, who still remains with his father. Mr. Moores taught school for some time, and after marriage located on the old homeplace, where he has since resided. In 1868 his wife died, and in 1872 he wedded Mrs. D. J. Wilson, who was born in Lincoln County in 1837, and who is the daughter of Maj. and Elizabeth Ruth. The result of our subject's marriage was the birth of two children: Astor and Bessie. He is a Democrat in politics, a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In 1870 he was elected to the office of magistrate, which position he held for six years in a satisfactory manner. Mr. Moores now owns 250 acres of good land, all well cultivated and improved.

WILLIAM T. MOYERS, carpenter, is a son of Samuel H. and Sarah (Phelps) Moyers, and was born in Fayetteville, Tenn., in September, 1827, and at the early age of twelve years left home and became the architect of his own fortune, working at the tinner's and coppersmith's trade for three years. At the age of sixteen he began working at the carpenter's trade, and has followed that calling through life. In October, 1853, he was united in marriage to Martha G. Rowe, who was born in Lincoln County in 1837, and daughter of William Rowe. Mr. and Mrs. Moyers became the parents of fourteen children, nine of whom are living: Edna (Mrs. Ephraim Pitts), Thomas, Robert, Hardy, Fannie, Nama, Curtis, Jesse and Jacob. Mr. Moyer is a Democrat in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for Lewis Cass. He is the oldest native inhabitant of Fayetteville, and is a member of the F. & A. M., I. O. O. F. and K. of H. fraternities. His father was of German descent, born in Virginia in 1791, a shoe-maker by trade. The grandfather, Peter Moyer, was a native German, and came to America previous to the Revolutionary war, and to Tennessee in the early part of the present century. He assisted in leveling the canebrakes where Fayetteville now stands, and took up his abode in the village. He lived to be one hundred and one years of age, and was a man of powerful physique. When eighty-four years old he felled a large oak tree, and split 100 rails in order to reach home by 1 o'clock to see a game fight. He served through the entire Revolutionary war. Samuel Moyer was an 1812 soldier, and was married about 1820. He kept a boot and shoe store in Fayetteville a number of years, and in 1843 moved to the country, where he resided until his death, December 24, 1869. The mother was born in Tennessee in 1810, and died in October, 1871. Nine of their thirteen children are now living.

HON. DAVID J. NOBLITT, physician and surgeon, and a son of Abraham and Sarah Ann (Razar) Noblitt, was born in Bedford County, March 16, 1836. He worked at home until he was eighteen years of age, paying $50 a year for the remainder of his time. He received his early education at the free schools, and when he first left home entered the Charity School, taking an English and Latin course there for two years. He taught two years, and in 1857 entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, where he graduated in 1860. In 1861 he enlisted in Company F. Forty-fourth Tennessee, and was appointed assistant surgeon of the regiment, in which capacity he remained till after the battle of Murfreesboro, when his health failed, and he was compelled to resign his position. November 22, 1860, he wedded Sylvania C. Boone, daughter of Samuel and Cynthia Boone, and this union resulted in the birth of two children: Leona N. and Boone E. In 1866 our subject purchased 190 acres of land at Booneville, where he located and still resides, and where he continues to practice his profession, and is now one of the leading physicians of this county. He owns 185 acres of land under a good state of cultivation and good improvements. In 1872 he was elected to represent Lincoln and Giles Counties in the lower house of the State Legislature, and re-elected in 1874. He is a Democrat and a Mason. Mrs. Noblitt is a member of the- Primitive Baptist Church. Our subject's father was born in North Carolina July 4, 1812, and was of Anglo- Polish descent. He was of noted ancestry, his great-grandfather being connected with the English Navy in the days of William Penn, and came with him to the new world to aid and assist him in his colonization. Abraham, our subject's father, was a farmer, and died in 1845. The mother of our subject is still living, and is making her home with our subject. Her father was a cousin to Patrick Henry, of Revolutionary times.

B. S. PAPLANUS, a merchant of Petersburg, Tenn., was born in Hungary, Europe, and being left an orphan at an early age, he resolved to make the New World his home, and accordingly came to the United States in 1871, landing in New York, but only re
sided in the metropolis a short time, when he went to Ohio, and peddled in that State about one year, and then came to Tennessee in June, 1872, where he pursued the same vocation until the fall of 1878. In September of the same year he began merchandising in Decatur, Ala., but remained place but a short time, when he returned to Tennessee and located in Petersburg, where he engaged in business, He started with a small stock and limited patronage, but has increased his business year by year, and by fair dealing, industry and courtesy he has gained the esteem of the people, and has built up a trade second to none in the county. He goes to headquarters to buy his goods, and is an energetic business man and shrewd financier and a valuable addition to the county. He also deals in corn, wheat and country produce, and in 1885 purchased more dried fruit than was ever purchased by any merchant in the county, shipping at one time six car-loads.

JOEL PARKS was born near his present residence in 1837, son of William and Mary (Thurston) Parks. The father was born in North Carolina in 1786, end was a farmer by occupation. He came to Lincoln County, Tenn., when a young man and purchased 300 acres of land near Fayetteville, where he resided until 1850, when he removed one-half mile northwest of Fayettville, where he resided until his death in 1863. He was a successful farmer owning over 800 acres of land. The mother was born in North Carolina, and died in 1840. Of their eleven children. four are living: Elizabeth (widow of Hugh Thomison). Martha (Mrs. John Roach), Catherine (widow of Joseph Cashion), and Joel, our subject, who was educated in the schools of his native county. He made his parents' house his home until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company K, Eighth Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and fought at Perryville, Murfreesboro, Resaca, Marietta, Jonesboro. Franklin, Nashville, and other engagements of minor note. He was wounded at Murfreesboro by a shell, and was released from active duty about one month. He returned home in December, 1864, and lived on the old home-place with his sister, Mrs. Cashion until 1876, when the estate was settled. In October, 1878, Mary. daughter of Frank Renegar, became his wife. She was born in Lincoln County in 1850, and has borne her husband one daughter--Sarah Elizabeth. In the spring of 1877, he erected a house on his portion of the old homestead, where he moved and has since resided. He is. a Democrat in polities, and cast his first presidential vote for S. J. Tilden. in 1876. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity.

ELISHA T. PARKS, farmer, and a native of Lincoln County, was born August 1, 1839, son of Benjamin T. Parks, a native of Lincoln County, born in 1815, and a farmer by occupation. In 1838 he married Martha Thomison, and located where the village of Kelso now stands. After remaining here till 1850, he moved to what is now known as the Twenty-first District, and remained there till 1856, when he purchased 520 acres in the Fifth District, where he located and remained till his death, which occurred in February, 1857. The mother was born in Lincoln county, in 1816, and died in 1880. Our subject received his education in the school of the vicinity, and after the father's death, assisted his mother on the farm. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in whet was first Company H. afterward Company K, Eighth Tennessee, of Mulberry Riflemen Riflemen.. He was wounded at the battle of Murfreesboro, and returned home in December, 1862, where he remained till July,1868. He then joined the army in Georgia, and served through the Georgia campaign. He was captured at Petersburg, and taken to Nashville and finally to Columbus, Ohio, where he was held for about five months. November, 1865, he married Mary Ann Alexander (daughter of Col. L. S. and Mary Alexander), and this union resulted in the birth of four children: Benjamin N., S. O., Ernest and Cora A. Directly after marriage Mr. Parks located on the old home-place where he still continues to reside. He has 100 acres of excellent land, all well eultivated, and is living in one of the oldest houses in the vicinity. It was built eighty years ago. In 1882 he was elected magistrate and filled the office to the entire satisfaction of the public. In polities he is a life- long Democrat, and he is also a Mason. Mrs. Parks is a member of the Primitive Baptist Church.

W. E. PATRICK, a worthy and well-to-do farmer of the 21st District, was born near his present residence in 1832, and was the eldest of six children of John and Mary Patrick, who were born in Lincoln County, where they always lived with the exception of about nine years spent in Alabama. Our subject attended the schools near his home and assisted his parents on the farm. In 1855. he was married to Margaret George, who was born in Lincoln County in 1832. Seven children were born to their union, named James A. J., G. F., T. L., P. F., H. C. and Fannie B. In 1876 he purchased a farm of 160 acres of good and well cultivated land in the Twenty-First District' where he has since resided. He has been fairly successful in his business enterprises and gives his aid to all worthy enterprises. Mr. Patrick is a Democrat in his political views, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

MRS. E. R. PATTERS0N, is a daughter of James and Rebecca Cheatham, and is one of the two surviving members of their family of four children. She was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1819, and her parents were born in Virginia, and came to Tennessee at a very early date. The subject of our sketch was reared at home, and in 1844 was married to D. S. Patterson, who was born in Sumner County about 1821, and came to Lincoln County, when a boy. He owned about 800 acres of land at the time of his death, which occurred April 4, 1862. Their family consisted of eight children: Maria S. (Mrs. Dr. H. L. Patterson), James S. (deceased), Elizabeth (deceased), Dr. William A. (deceased), Davidson H., who conducts the home-place, Cornelia R. (Mrs. W. B. Stevenson), Belle V. (Mrs. W. S. Patterson), and Emma J. (Mrs. J. E. Reeves). They were all given good educations and two of them were graduates of colleges. Davidson H. and his brother are well-to do in worldly goods. His early education was obtained in the common schools, which he completed at Bethany College.

JAMES H. PATTERSON is one of eight children, and was born in Tennessee July 9, 1832, son of William and Rachel (Clendening) Patterson, and of Irish descent. William was born in North Carolina and came to Tennessee, where he married Miss Clendening, who was born in 1790 and died August 8, 1877. James H.'s early education was obtained in the schools near home and at Briar Patch Spring schools. He owns 485 acres of land near Blanche, and in 1880 sold 300 acres. Besides this he owns 500 acres in different tracts. Mr. Patterson is a man noted for his charity. and is esteemed and respected by all. Of his father's eight children only three are living: J. C.. who is a farmer in Giles County; and our subject and trig sister Violet, who keeps house for him. November 7, 1861, he enlisted in Capt. Rhodes, company--Company G. Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry--and was made first lieutenant, and was promoted to the rank of captain. He was discharged in 1862, on account of ill health, and returned home. J. H. Patterson (deceased), an uncle of our subject, will be remembered by many of the old residents of Sumner County, as he was widely known. Dr. John Patterson, his son, is one of the leading physicians of Murfreesboro.

W. S. PATTERSON is a son of L. M. and L. P. Patterson, who were born in 1834. The father served in the late war in Company G. Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, as lieutenant, and was killed at the bloody battle of Shiloh. The mother is residing with her children. The rudiments of our subject's education was obtained in the common schools near his early home. He afterward completed his education at Blanche Academy, which was under the management of J. A. Holland. W. S. was born June 21, 1859, and in 1881 was united in marriage to Belle V., daughter of D. S. and E. R. Patterson. She was born in Lincoln County, in 1858, and has borne her husband two children: AIma V. and L. E. Mr. Patterson has resided on the old home place since his marriage, and owns 305 acres of valuable land; he is an industrious farmer, and fully deserves his good fortune. He gives his support to the Democratic party.

LEWIS PEACH, marble and stone cutter, of Fayetteville, was born in 1836 in Davidson County, Tenn., and is the son of William and Susan Peach. The father was born in 1808 in Williamson County, Tenn., and was a marble-cutter by trade. His father, Jonathan Peach, was a native of South Carolina, born in 1783. He was one of the pioneers of Williamson County, assisting in forming one of the first settlements William lived in his native county at the time of his marriage, and soon afterward moved to Davidson County. About 1842 he moved to Nashville, where he resided and worked at his trade. He assisted in cutting the stone for the State capitol, and since the conflict has been living a retired life with his son Lewis. The mother was born in 1818 in Williamson County, Tenn., and died in 1865. They had nine children, five of whom are firing. Our subject education in Nashville, and at the youthful age of thirteen began learning the marble and stone- cutter's trade, under the direction of his father. This he has since continued with the exception of four years during the Rebellion. In 1862 he enlisted in Company C, Eighth Regiment of Tennessee Infantry, and took part in some of the principal battles. Owing to the weakness of his eyesight he was placed on detached duty. In December, 1864, he returned home and re- opened business at Petersburg, Tenn. In 1873 he came to Fayetteville, where ho has since resided. July, 1871, he wedded Susie J. Sheffield, a native of Bedford County, born in 1844, and the daughter of James W. Sheffleld. Mr. Peach has devoted his entire time and attention to the marble and stone-cutting business, and has proved to be a skilled workman and artist. He turns out fine specimens of art, his work giving almost universal satisfaction. He has the only tombstone and marble business in Lincoln County. Mr. Peach is very conservative in politics, voting for principles and not for party. He is a Mason, and his wife is a member of the Primitive Baptist Church.

R. PETTEY, proprietor of the leading hotel in Fayetteville, was born January 8, 1829, in north Alabama, son of Dr. John W. and Annie (Harris) Pettey. The father was a North Carolinian, born in Wilkes County, February 28, 1791, and a physician in his neighborhood of considerable note. He was also a farmer, and about 1825 he left North Carolina and immigrated to Madison Co.. Ala., where he purchased 160 acres. Previous to his death, which occurred September 23, 1876, he was the possessor of 360 acres. The mother was born January 18, 1798, in North Carolina, and reared to maturity a family of thirteen children. seven of whom are now living. She died June 18, 1869. Our subject received a limited education in the country schools, and remained with his parents until he was about twenty-one years of age. In the fall of 1849 he left the parental roof and immigrated to Lincoln County, where he lived with his brother W. W. as a clerk. In 1855 he came to Fayetteville, where he has since resided, and in 1858 he and his brother W. W established a dry goods store on their own responsibility, the firm being known as W. W. & R. Pettey. They continued in business until the civil war, when our subject enlisted in the Confederate service in Company G, First Tennessee Regiment, under Col. P. Turney. He was wounded at the battle of Seven Pines, the ball passing through his right lung and through the entire body. He did not recover sufficiently to re-enter the field. In 1867 he resumed his clerkship, working in various kinds of merchandise establishments. October 29, 1869, he wedded Margaret C. Norris, a native of Alabama, born November 26, 1841. and the daughter of Dr. George D. and Martha W. (Ragsdale) Norris. The result of our subject's marriage was the birth of four children Gertrude, Annie C., Burton, and Mabel. In 1873 Mr. Pettey and his brother W. W. established a book or stationery store, and in the following year W. W. became proprietor of a hotel. In 1876 our subject sold his interest in the store and brought his brother's interest in the hotel, and from that time to the present has been engaged in that business. Mr. Pettey is a courteous and obliging gentleman, and is quite popular among the traveling public as a flrst-class hotel proprietor. Mrs. Pettey as a land lady is pleasant and entertaining. In politics Mr. Pettey is a stanch Democrat. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

SQUIRE PICKLE, of Lincoln County, Tenn., was born in Bedford County January 27, 1815. His parents, Henry and Rachel (Nealy) Pickle, were born and married in North Carolina. They came to Bedford County, Tenn., soon after. and there spent the remainder of their lives. Our subject attended the neighboring schools during the fall and winter, and after attaining his majority became the architect of his own fortunes. After his marriage to Martha Harris, which occurred in 1840, he purchased 130 acres of land in Bedford County. but four years later disposed of this land and came to Lincoln County where he now owns 188 acres of good land. Mrs. Pickle died in 1860, having borne one daughter, now deceased. In 1861 Mr. Pickle married Mrs. Harriet Scott. Our subject and his wife are well-to-do in worldly goods, as well as in the respect and esteem of their neighbors and friends. He is a Democrat, and is ever ready to support worthy enterprises. On his farm is a well seventy feet deep, which was bored in 1883, the water having excellent mineral ingredients and possessing superior medicinal qualities. It was analyzed with the following results: Saline sulphur, chloride of sodium, sulphate of sodium, carbonate of sodium, chloride of magnesium, sulphate of magnesium, carbonate of magnesium, sulphate of calcium, carbonate of calcium, also traces of phosphates, iodine and bromine.

JOHN PIGG is one of nine children and the son of Edmund and Rebecca Pigg, who were born in Virginia and North Carolina in 1804 and 1808, and died in 1884 and 1875, respectively. Our subject was born June 9, 1847, and spent his early days on his father's farm. In 1876 he was married to Ida Dyer, who was born in Lincoln County in 1857, and is a daughter of J. W. and Narcissa Dyer. Mr. and Mrs. Pigg have three children: James E., Rebecca and Ida M. Mr. Pigg resided with his parents until twenty-eight years of age, but after his twenty-first birthday began doing for himself. He was in partnership with his father and brother, Claybone, in the farming interests eight years, and then worked on the home-farm four years longer. He now owns a farm of 450 acres, on which he resides, besides 200 acres in another tract; and, in connection with his brother, Joseph, owns 1,000 acres in Lawrence County. He is an energetic and honest business man and as such has the respect of all. He raises, buys and ships a large amount of stock, and in polities he is a Democrat. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

ISAAC S. PORTER, a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Casey) Porter, was horn in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1817. He was reared principally by his mother, as his father died when he was about ten years of age. He attended the neighboring schools, and in 1838 married Emeline, daughter of George W. and Ann Dennis, by whom he had twelve children, ten of whom are living: George W. D., Benjamin F. P. (deceased), David S.. Isaac H. M., Robert M., Lawrence L. T., Elizabeth C., Eliza C., Helen L., Jane F. and Julia F. Mr. Porter owns 235 acres of valuable and well improved land. His two sons George and Benjamin were in the late war and participated in many of its principal battles, the latter being killed at Resaca, Ga., May 15, 1864. Mrs. Porter was born in Tennessee in 1816, and her father and mother in North Carolina in 1791, and 1789, respectively. Mr. Porter was a Whig, but since the war has been a Democrat. His father was born in Boston, Mass., in 1763, and in 1804 married the mother, who was born in Virginia in 1778, and they together came to Tennessee in 1809. The father died in Lincoln County in 1828. The mother died in Texas in 1857.

J. C. REED, an enterprising citizen of the Fourteenth District, was born in Williamson County, Tenn., in 1820, son of J. C. and Agnes Reed. The father was born in North Carolina about 1785, and immigrated to Williamson County, Tenn., with his parents when but thirteen years of age. He was a tiller of the soil, and died in 1848. He was one of the minute men in the Seminole war under Gen. Jackson. The mother of our subject was born in Pennsylvania about 1790, and was of Irish origin. She died in 1828. Our subject was reared on the farm and attended school until he was large enough to assist on the farm. In 1847 he wedded Louisa, daughter of Jesse and Eliza Fee. Mrs. Reed was born in Lincoln County in 1833, and by her union with Mr. Reed became the mother of eight children: Eliza A., John M., Sarah E.. J. L., S. W., M. A., Martha and H. C. After marriage our subject lived on the home place for thirteen years, after which he began for himself with but little means. He is now a well-to-do farmer, owning about 750 acres of fair land. He is a Democrat, and his first presidential vote was for James K. Polk. Mrs. Reed is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Her father, Jesse Fee, was born in North Carolina in 1805. He was a farmer by occupation, and died very suddenly May 22, 1867, from what was thought to be heart disease.

R. C. RIVES, saddler, of Petersburg, was born in Marshall County March 12, 1838. His father, Green Rives, was of English descent, born in Virginia in 1773, and came to Tennessee in 1830. He was a schoolmate and personal friend of Winfield Scott, and was married three times. Our subject is the son of his wife Susan (Woodard) Rives, who was born in Virginia in 1810. She died in 1850, as did her husband. Our subject was reared on a farm, and March 12, 1862, married Rebecca J. Gillian, who was born in Alabama April 2, 1839. To them were born twelve children, these five now living: Anna, Mary C., Sarah, Lutha G. and Bertie. After his father's death our subject resided with his brother twelve months, and then learned the saddler's trade. After some time he and his brother B. W. became partners in business, continuing until the war, when he enlisted in Company C, Eighth Tennessee Infantry, but after a short time was discharged on account of ill health. After the war he again opened a shop at Petersburg, where he has since resided, with the exception of four years, when he had a shop at Belfast, and spent one year at Lewisburg. Since December, 1885, he and 0. S. Christopher have been partners in business, and keep the largest stock in the county. Mr. Rives is conservative in politics, but of late years has voted the Democratic ticket. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church

JOHN ROACH, an old and well respected citizen of Lincoln County, and a native of Warren County, Tenn., was born December 28, 1823. His father, James Roach, was a native of Ireland, born in 1788, and followed agricultural pursuits for a livelihood, in connection with kinds of mechanical work. When about nineteen years of age he left Ireland and came to the United States, landing at Savannah, Ga., where he lived at the time of his marriage, which occurred about 1800. In 1828 he came to Lincoln County, where he died in 1831. He was one of the early settlers of Warren County. The mother of our subject, Elizabeth (Ivy) Roach, was born near Savannah, Ga., in 1789. Her father was o f English and her mother of Scotch extraction. She was the mother of fifteen children, ten of whom lived to be grown, and five are living now, viz.: Ellen, Susan J.. Martha, William D. and John. Our subject was reared without a father's care or guidance or a mother's tender love and training. After the death of his parents there were five children left, all of whom were bound out. John was bound out till he was twenty one years of age, and was to receive for his services a horse, saddle and bridle, valued at $125; a suit of clothes, worth $35; and twelve months' schooling. He was married a short time before his time was out, and received his horse and saddle. His wife was Martha D. Parks, daughter of William Parks, his guardian. Mrs. Roach was born in Lincoln County June 13, 1825, and by her marriage became the mother of six children: Benjamin T., William A., Clayborn M., Mary E. (wife of Madison Luna), Othena (wife of William A. E. Pitts), and Martha E. (wife of William R. Cashion). Between the years 1845 and 1856 he became the possessor of 280 acres of land in the Eleventh District, where he remained until July, 1866, when he disposed of his real estate and, October 4, bought 280 acres in the Seventh District, where he now resides. October, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Thirty-second Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and was elected first lieutenant He fought in the battle of Fort Donelson, in which action he received a wound in the throat and arm, and was disabled from duty for the remainder of the year. After recovering from the wound he was taken with the fevers, and was never able to return to duty. He has been a life-long Democrat. and his first vote was cast for James K. Polk. In 1852 he was elected magistrate of his district, and for nine years tilled that office. He is a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church.

IVISON T. RODES, station agent at Fayetteville, Tenn., for the Fayetteville Branch of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad, and the Fayetteville Branch of the Duck River Valley Railroad, is the son of Thomas J. and Mildred Martin (Dickerson) Rodes, born in Virginia in 1807 and 1811, respectively. They came to Tennessee in 1837, and the father died in Coffee County in 1864. After his death Mrs. Rodes married Ira Kinnaughan, and in 1885 she, too, passed away. Our subject was born January 19. 1838, and received an academical education in Coffee and Warren Counties. He resided with his parents until twenty-five years of age. October 16, 1860, he and Emma Miller were united in marriage. Mrs. Rodes is a daughter of Peter Miller, and was born in October, 1838. The following are the names of their children: Thomas M., James E., both railroad contractors; Mary M.; William C., telegraph operator at Fayetteville; Arthur S.; who assists his father; Ivison T., Jr., and Henry Ernest. Mr. Rodes' early life was in farming, and in the fall of 1863 he enlisted in Company H. Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, and in 1864 was appointed lieutenant of Company A, Twenty-eighth Regiment, and served until the close of the war. He was at Murfreesboro and in numerous minor engagements, returning home in May, 1865, and soon after began his career on the railroad as conductor, express mail agent on the McMinnville Branch for three years. In October, 1878, he came to Fayetteville, and for two years was conductor on the branch from Decherd to Fayetteville, and was then given his present-position. During his long career on and in the service of the road he has ever proved upright, straight-forward and courteous. He is a Democrat, a Mason, a member of the K. of H., a Good Templar, and himself and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Mr. Rodes lost his wife in 1880, and March 24, 1882, he wedded Florida Lasater, of Manchester, Tenn.

W. M. ROSBOROUGH'S father was born on the Atlantic Ocean in 1777, while his parents were on their way to the United States from Belfast, Ireland. They located in South Carolina, and there our subject's father and mother were married. The father died in 1845, and the mother in 1877. W. M. Rosborough was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., June 13, 1827, and after his father's death, he took care of his mother until her death. His father was a large land owner, and at his mother's death he inherited her dower, and now owns 280 acres of good land. He was married to Harriet Thomas in 1878. She was born in Lincoln County in 1831. Our subject is an excellent neighbor and citizen, and is a conservative Democrat in politics, and, although he served in the Confederate Army, was opposed to the principles of secession. He served in Company C, Eighth Tennessee Infantry. He was wounded four times at Murfreesboro and was compelled to abandon service two years. He then rejoined, and was at Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek. Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville and others. He returned home in 1865. Mr. Rosborough is an Odd Fellow, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

J. H. RUSSELL, proprietor of a hotel at Petersburg, is a native of Marshall County; born March 18, 1842, one of ten children of John M. and Ella J. (Bedford) Russell. The father was a Georgian by birth, born in 1805, a farmer and extensive tobacco grower. He located in Marshall County, Tenn., in 1835, and there remained until his death in 1862. The mother was born in the same neighborhood as her husband, in 1807, and died in 1866. Our subject attended New Hope Academy and resided under the paternal roof until 1861, when he entered the army, joining Company A, Eighth Tennessee Infantry, and took part in the battles of Murfreesboro, Shiloh, Winchester, Huntsville, and several smaller engagements. He served three years, was wounded seven times, but lost little or no time from active field duties. He returned home in January, 1864, and began farming, and remained in this business about four years. February 11, 1864, he married Mary J. Waters, who was born in Marshall County, in 1846, and bore her husband five children: George H., Fannie E., W. T., Susan B., and Myrtle. About 1868 Mr. Russell removed to Petersburg, and has since kept hotel. He keeps a first-class house and is obliging and hospitable in the treatment of his guests. He is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

ISAAC RUTLEDGE, farmer of the Fifth District, is a native of North Carolina, born in 1819, and a son of Isaac and Ruth (Steelman) Rutledge. The father was a native of North Carolina, and of French descent. He was a farmer by occupation, and died about 1836. Mrs. Rutledge was also born, reared and married in North Carolina, and died in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1828. Our subject was reared by his father, his mother having died when he was small, and had the advantage of a district school education. In 1842 he married Martha J. Wagoner, and this union resulted in the birth of six children, four of whom are living: Margaret A., wife of James C. Shofner; Daniel H., of Texas; Ruth R., wife of R. B. Logan, and Nanny J., wife of Andrew Edwards, of Rutherford County, Tenn. Mrs. Rutledge died in the latter part of the year 1857, and in 1858 our subject wedded Rebecca A. Buchanan, and by her became the father of eight children. six of whom are living: Orville O.; Lola L., wife of O. O. Osborne, of Bedford County; Fannie L., wife of Elder T. C. Herndon, one of Kentucky's best divines and instructors; John L., Rosa Lou and Garland M. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate Army, Fifth Kentucky Regiment, and was in most of the principal battles. During the battle of Baton Rouge he was shot through the body, and lay on the battle-field twentyfour hours before he received aid. He was then taken prisoner, but not thinking he could recover he was turned over to his friends, and has never entirely recovered from the effects of his wound. He is of Democratic principles, and he and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church. In January, 1886, he sold his farm of 305 acres to his son, Orville C., who is now living at home, and who is a promising young man. He received the best educational advantages the Fifth District can afford, and is a Democrat in polities, casting his first vole for Grover Cleveland. He is a member of the Primitive Baptist Church.

D. M. SANDERS is a native of Lincoln County, Tenn., born in 1846, and his early days were spent in attending the district schools and assisting his parents on the farm After attaining man's estate he was married to Mrs. Martha J. Watson in December. 1865. She was born in Lincoln County in 1842, daughter of James and Betsy Bowles, and their union was blessed with the birth of two children: John B. and Arena. In 1882 Mr. Sanders purchased 316 acres of valuable land, on which are good buildings and a fine orchard. His farm, which he has accumulated by hard labor and good management, is located on Coldwater Creek near Fayetteville. Mr. Sanders is a Democrat, and during the late war served in Capt. George's company--Company G, Twentieth Tennessee Cavalry, a short time during 1864. His parents, M. and Eveline Sanders, were born in Alabama and Tennessee in 1820 and 1824, respectively. They were married in Tennessee, whither the father had moved in his youth. The father was a farmer, and died March 26, 1880. His wife resides with her son Mack.

E. M. SCOTT is a son of John L. Scott, who was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1824, and whose people came from North Carolina at a very early date and located where Nashville now stands. Our subject's grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier, and died in Tennessee when over ninety years of age. Our subject's father died in 1854. The mother was born in Lincoln County in 1822, and is now the wife of Squire Pickle, and resides in the Eleventh District. At the age of sixteen our subject joined the army, serving in Company C, Eighth Tennessee Infantry nine months, and then joined Company K, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and participated in many bloody engagements. He was captured near Knoxville, but made his escape the same day. He returned home May 18, 1865. In 1866 he married M. T. Chitwood, daughter of William Chitwood. She was born in Lincoln County in 1849, and six children were born to their union. Ophelia, John L.. Clemmie, Willie, Thomas R. and Ella. Mr. Scott has always been a farmer, and is the owner of 181 acres of valuable and well improved land. He and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church, and he is a Democrat in politics.

D. C. SHERRELL, citizen and merchant of Dellrose, and a native of Lincoln County. Tenn., is a son of Dr. Joseph L. and Martha Sherrell. The father was born in Lincoln County October 2, 1824, and is now a retired physician, residing in the Sixteenth District. The mother was also born in Lincoln County, Tenn., and died in 1862. Our subject received an excellent education, and January 1, 1880, was united in marriage to Mary E. McCoy, who was born in Giles County, January 1, 1862, and whose parents were M. E. and Elinor McCoy, of Bradshaw, Giles County. To our subject and wife was born one child: Horace E. Previous to his marriage D. C. Sherrell entered the employ of Hill, Miller & Co.. merchants of Pulaski, Giles County, as salesman, and afterward entered into partnership with W. H. Stone, and began merchandising at Dellrose, where he has since continued. From 1873 to 1876 he was alone in the business, but in 1881 W. E. McCoy bought an interest in the business, and the firm is known as D. C. Sherrell & Co. He and his brother, B. A., are also in the drug business, and are doing a good business for a country town. Mr. Sherrell has also a harness shop at the same place. Mr. Sherrell is a man much respected by all his acquaintances, and is an excellent citizen and an obliging neighbor. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. Dellrose can boast of a telephone. The line runs from Pulaski to their village, and the only one at the present time in Lincoln County.

JAMES C. SHOFNER, farmer, and a son of Jephtha H. and Nancy (Logan) Shofner, was born June 5, 1845, and is one of a family of eleven children, seven of whom are living. The father of our subject was born in Lincoln County in 1811 and was of Dutch extraction. He was a farmer and died March 11, 1886. The mother of our subject was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1816 and is now living on the old homestead. Our subject received his education in the Mulberry and Greenwood school, and during the late war he enlisted in Gen. Forrest's escort under Capt. Boone, when he was but sixteen years old, and was in many of the principal battles. He was captured while at home and paroled. In 1865 he wedded Mary A. Rutledge (daughter of Isaac and Jane Rutledge) and the fruits of this union were nine children, seven of whom are living: Lena L., Mattie J., Walter N., Pearl, Mary, Alice R. and Reuben T. Soon after marriage Mr. Shofner purchased 150 acres of land of his father near Booneville, where he still resides. In 1883 he connected himself with R. A. Musgrove in the mercantile business at Booneville, and is succeeding in an admirable manner. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and Mrs. Shofner are worthy members of the Baptist Church.

REV. ARCHIBALD S. SLOAN, of the Twentieth District, and son of James and Jane (Thompson) Sloan, was born in Newbury, S. C., December 8, 1821. He was one of a family of eight children, only three of whom are living, viz.: Rev. H. T., pastor of Cedar Springs and Long Cane, S. C., which position he has filled for thirty-eight years; Mrs. Jane Chalmers, of Newbury, S. C.; and our subject. The father of our subject was born in South Carolina in 1796, and was of Irish extraction. He was a farmer by occupation and was married in 1819. At the time of his death, which occurred in 1869, he was the owner of about 800 acres of good land. Mrs. Sloan was a native of South Carolina, born in 1803, and died in 1872. Our subject received the rudiments of his education in the schools of the neighborhood, but subsequently entered Erskine College, South Carolina, where he took a regular course, graduating in 1844. In 1846 he was licensed to enter the ministerial profession under the Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church and soon after emigrated to Lincoln Connty, and after moving around for some time began his ministerial career at Prosperity, where he remained as pastor for twenty-seven years. March 14, 1848, he wedded Elizabeth J. Stewart, a native of Lincoln County, born September 20, 1829, and to this union were born seven children, six of whom are living, viz.: Nora J. (wife of H. T. Sloan), Mary F. (wife of John Lindsey), James T., Olivia C. (wife of E. H. Parkinson), Thomas W. and Ebbie C. Mr. Sloan has a fine farm in a good state of cultivation. While yet preaching at Prosperity his charge increased till he was compelled to abandon his practice at that place, since which time he has been pastor at Bethel and New Hope; virtually he has preached the gospel to the same people for forty years, being among the earliest Christian workers. In 1886 his son, Thomas W., graduated at Erskine College, South Carolina, the same place from where his father graduated forty-two years previous.

J. H. SMITH, farmer, was born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1834, and received his early education at the schools near his home. He afterward attended New Hope Academy, Marshall County, Tenn., and Erskine College, at Due West, S. C. Here he graduated August 8, 1860. In September, 1863, he united his fortunes with those of Nancy M. Downing, a native of Marshall County, born October 23, 1834, and a daughter of John and Eliza Downing. This marriage resulted in our subject becoming the father of four children, three of whom are living: John F., Anna E. B., Eliza 31. (deceased), and Elmer R. After graduating, Mr. Smith entered the teacher's profession, and taught until hostilities broke out between the North and South. At the close of the war he resumed teaching and his wife also engaged in that occupation, which they continued for eleven years. In 1871 Mr. Smith purchased eighty-nine acres of land in the Thirteenth District, where he located. and where he has since resided. He now owns 187 acres of land in a good state of cultivation. Mr. Smith has given his children good educational advantages, and has given his support to all laudable public enterprises, and especially to educational and religious institutions. In 1876 he was elected to the office of magistrate. and held this position for six years. He is independent in political belief and was much opposed to the principles of secession. He is a Mason, a K. of H., and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mrs. Smith attended school for some time at Columbia Tenn., and afterward assisted in teaching at Waco College, at Waco, Texas. Here she carried on her studies and graduated from that institution in May, 1860. Mr. Smith is a son of Franklin and Elizabeth Smith. The father was of French-Welsh descent, and was born in 1802. He died November 2, 1863. The mother was a native of South Carolina, born in 1807, and died in July, 1859.

W. R. SMITH, a prominent citizen of the Eighth Dlstriet, and also a farmer and butcher, of Fayetteville, was born in Lincoln County July 20, 1838. He was one of three children born to John N. and Nancy B. Smith. The father was born in Georgia in 1816, and was of German lineage. He died August 19, 1859. The mother was born in North Carolina in 1806, and now resides with her son, W. R. Our subject received the rudiments of his education in the schools near home, and subsequently completed his education at the Sulphur Springs Institute. In 1859 he married Martha E. Koonce, a native of Lincoln County, born March 1, 1843, and the daughter of Needham and Burdotta Koonce. Mr. Koonce was a well known and much respected citizen of Lincoln County. He was a brick-mason and contractor, and helped lay the foundation of the State penitentiary, at Nashville, being a young man at the time. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith were born eight children: Mary E. (wife of John Monday), Lizzie B. (wife of O. P. Gray). Anna (wife of Charles McCloin), Robert A., Willie R., Burrell, Roscoe and Nannie B. In 1866 be purchased eighty acres of land in the Eighth District of Lincoln County. where he soon located and has since resided. He now owns 275 acres in the Eighth District and 280 in the Twenty-first District. Besides conducting the farm, he and his cousin. J. H. Smith, have a meat market in Fayetteville, and also have the stock-yard at that place. Mr. Smith teas on his place a fish-pond, and has for a number of years past been engaged in raising fish, mostly of the carp species. Mr. Smith has been extensively engaged in handling cattle, and for some time past has been making a study of their diseases. Mr. Smith has given his children the advantage of a good English education, and gives his support to all laudable public enterprises, especially educational institutions. He is conservative in polities, and is considered one of the county's best citizens. Mrs. Smith is a member of the the Methodist Episcopal Church.

REV. A. P. SMITH, a farmer and minister, residing near Petersburg, was born at New Philadelphia, Ohio, December 27, 1855, son of John T. and Mary A. (Brown) Smith. The father was born in Virginia. October 26, 1827, and moved to Ohio with his father, who had been a large slave-holder in Virginia. Not believing in slavery, however, he sold his negroes and moved to Ohio, where he followed merchandising, and died in 1872. A. P.'s mother was born at New Philadelphia. Her maternal grandparents were Stephens by name, and belonged to the nobility of England. On their voyage to America their daughter formed the acquaintance of a gentleman by the name of Brown, and married him, although her parents were strongly opposed to the union. A. P. Smith's mother was the result of this union. She died in 1874. Our subject graduated from the New Philadelphia High School in 1875, and completed his education in the Vanderbilt University at Nashville. December 22, 1882, he married Carrie, daughter of D. R. and Jane (Greer) Smith. The father was born in Virginia in 1814, moved to Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1838, and was married when about twenty-seven years of age. He was a merchant and farmer, and died July 4, 1863. The mother was born in 1825, and died June 1, 1878. Their five children still retain an interest in the home farm. J. B. resides in St. Louis, Mo., and J. G., Virginia, Carrie and B. B. reside at or near the old home. In 1878 A. P. Smith entered the Tennessee Conference as a Methodist Episcopal minister, and in 1880 entered the editorial profession, and edited the Upper Cumberland, a Democratic paper, but four years later disposed of it, and engaged in agriculture. local minister, and delivers many lectures in favor of temperance. His brother, John, lives in Janesville, Iowa, and his sister, Ola (Mrs. W. H. Morgan), is clerk of the State Senate, and Alice is the wife of Clark Cook, of Lebanon.

RICHARD SMITH, merchant and farmer of the Twenty-fifth District, was born in Lincoln County, in 1827, and is one of nine children born to Richard and Elizabeth (Arwood) Smith. The father was born in North Carolina about 1779, received a very meager education, and was obliged to make his way in life without the benefit of that blessing. When twenty-one years of age he was married, and followed the occupation of a farmer till his career ended in 1852. The mother was born in North Carolina about 1784, and died in 1850. Our subject remained with his parents until he was twenty years of age, and received his education in the common schools. February 25, 1847, he was united in marriage to Eliza Faulkner, a daughter of William and Ellen Faulkner. Soon after his marriage our subject began farming as a tenant, and this continued for two years. He then entered the mercantile business at what is now Smithland, and is still engaged in that occupation. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, Forty- fourth Tennessee, and entered the Army of the Cumberland as a drummer, where he remained about seven months, after which he returned home, and resumed his business. Although having very little of this world's goods to start with, he is now in very comfortable circumstances, and is the owner of about 550 acres of good land. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Masonic fraternity, also of the I. O. O. F. He and Mrs. Smith are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

J. FRANKLIN SMITH may be mentioned as a prosperous farmer of Lincoln County, Tenn. He was born in 1835, and is one of ten children of Lemuel and De Bolious Smith, born in 1790 and 1808, and died in 1855 and 1863, respectively. At the age of seventeen Franklin entered a newspaper office at Athens, and worked on the Herald about eight years. In 1863 he entered the army, joining Wharton's brigade and Malone's battalion, but remained only a short time, when he returned home. Since the war he has followed tilling the soil, and owns 371 acres of very desirable land, well improved. In December, 1879, he began merchandising near home, keeping a general line of goods, and h large patronage and is doing well. He is a Democrat, and. although he was in the war a short time, he was opposed to secession. He belongs to the I. O. O. F.

W. J. STEGALL, saw-mill contractor and farmer, of Fayetteville, Tenn., was born in Rutherford County, in 1823, son of Jesse and Elizabeth (Webb) Stegall, born in Mecklenburgh County, Va., in 1794 and 1801, respectively. The father, in 1818, determined to seek his fortune in the far West, and accordingly located in Rutherford County, Tenn., where he bought property, and lived until 1832, and the following ten years resided in Bedford County. From 1842 to 1860 he was a resident of Marshall County. In 1866 he went to Waco, Tex., where he died in 1867. The mother died in 1842. Mr. Stegall was twice married, and the father of sixteen children, ten by his first wife and six by his second. Our subject secured a limited education in the old-fashioned log schoolhouse of early days. February 2, 1847, he wedded Rebecca McCleary, who died in 1848. In 1850 Melvina (Temple) Wilhoit became his second wife. She was born in 1852, in Shelbyville, Tenn., and has borne three children, two of whom are living: Ewing B. and William W., the former a carpenter of Fayetteville, and the latter a resident of Florida. Mr. Stegall has been a resident of Fayetteville since 1856, with the exception of four years during the war. He joined Col. Hatton's regiment in 1861, and later was given a position in the quartermaster's department. February 2, 1865, he wedded Mrs. Florence M. (Batie) Foster, who was born in Georgia in 1848. For a time Mr. Stegall worked, and had an in terest in a carriage-shop, but soon disposed of his interest and engaged in contracting and building and speculating in stock. He owns 220 acres of land, one business house and trenty-two houses and lots in Fayetteville. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.

W. B. STEVENSON was born January 1, 1856, of Irish descent, son of C. L. and Louisa Stevenson, were born in in County, Tenn., in 1832 and 1834, respectively. The father has been twice married, our subject being the only issue of his first marriage. The mother died February 1, 1856. W. B. Stevenson completed his education at Bethany High School, and has since been a successful agriculturist. In 1875 he married Nelia, daughter of David S. and Elizabeth Patterson. Mrs. Stevenson was born in June, 1856, and has borne three children: Jerrena R., Zana M. (deceased) and Annie Hencil. Mr. Stevenson owns a large and well cultivated farm, and is a man of good business qualifieations. He raises considerable stock, his farm being adapted to grazing as well as raising cereals, and he takes much interest in establishing and supporting educational and religious institutions. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. For the last four years he has been experimenting in growing hedge fences, and has been very successful, and now has hedge on his place, three years old, which is sufficiently large to confine stock.

DR. WILLIAM STEWART, physician and surgeon, residing near Molino, Tenn., was born in Newberry, S. C., February 9, 1809. His parents, John and Elizabeth (Drennan) Stewart, were born in the Emerald Isle. They came to the United States, and the father participated in the Revolutionary war, serving the entire time. He was a farmer and died in 1826. In 1827 the mother came to Tennessee with her children, and here she died in 1844. They were the parents of seventeen children. Our subject was educated in his native State, and came to Tennessee when nineteen years of age. He began studying medicine at the age of twenty-three, and October 12, 1831, married Nancy McClain, who was born in Davidson County, Tenn., in 1811. Of their ten children nine are living: John P., James L., J. Milton, Robert A., Henry M.. Elizabeth. A. (Mrs. A. J. Davis), Joseph B., Mary J. (widow of J. W. Dandridge), and Oliver Sidney. Our subject farmed for some time in Bedford County after his marriage, and then began practicing medicine, soon acquiring a lucrative business. In 1848 he settled in Lincoln County-on the old home place. In 1860, not being satisfied with his medical knowledge, he went to Macon, Ga., and took a course of lectures in the Reform Medical College, and graduated in the same year. August 29, 1869, Dr. Stewart lost his wife, and September 27 of the following year he married Fannie Sheddan, who was born in Blount County in 1836. Dr. Stewart has been exceptionally fortunate in the practice of his profession, and is considered a skillful physician and surgeon. He owns 205 acres of land, and in politics still holds to the old Whig principles. In 1866 he represented Lincoln County in the State Senate. Dr. Stewart is a strong advocate for temperance and has done much to eradicate the evil of intemperance in communities where he has resided. Not one of his large family of children has ever used liquor in any form, and the same may be said of them in regard to tobacco, tea and coffee. The Doctor and his wife have been members of the United Presbyterian Church for many years.

J. D. STONE, a prominent citizen of the Seventh District, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., December 26, 1839, one of six children born to the marriage of L. L. Stone and E. P. Drake, who were born in Bedford County, Va., and Madison County, Ala., respectively. The father's birth occurred in 1801. Ho came to Tennessee, with his parents, when about sixteen years of age. He was a farmer and owned upward of 1,000 acres of land. He died in 1880. The mother departed this life in 1872. Our subject received his rudimentary education in the common schools of Lincoln County, and afterward attended Nashville University. In 1861 he wedded S. A., daughter of D. B., and Julia Shull, and their union resulted in the birth of five children: Julia (Mrs. J. A. Gowell), Eva, B. B., E. E. and Rose. Our subject has always resided on the old homestead. After the death of his father he fell heir to a portion of the family estate, and he now owns 615 acres of very desirable land, well improved. He has given his children good educational advantages, and has done much to aid educational and religious institutions. He is conservative in politics, and his wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B. Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and was at Shiloh, Chickamauga, Perryville, Murfreesboro and many minor engagements. He was wounded at Shiloh and gave up active duties for about three months. He was captured at Murfreesboro, and held a prisoner at Camp Douglas, Chicago, for about four months. He returned home in May, 1863.

DR. B. S. STONE, a physician of Dellrose, was born in Giles County, Tenn., June 15, 1849, and was a son of Thomas J. Stone, and a grandson of Thomas C. Stone, and a great- grandson of Joshua Stone. Thomas J., the father of our subject, was born August 7, 1806, and went to Giles County, with his parents, in 1812, locating at Pulaski. He was married in 1839, and was a farmer by occupation. His death occurred April 17, 1874. The Doctor's mother was born in Giles County in 1816, and died in 1849. Our subject received a good literary education at Bethany and Elkton, Giles County. He then entered the office of Dr. A. L. Glaze, a very prominent citizen and a brother-in-law of Mr. Stone, where he remained about twenty months. He then entered the medical department of the Vanderbilt University, where he graduated in 1875, Previous to this. December 24, 1874, he married Annie Sherrell, a native of Lincoln County, born December, 1856, and by this union they became the parents of four children: Emmet R., Mary V., Joseph S. and Andrew A. After graduating Dr. Stone located in the Sixteenth District. and began the practice of medicine, In 1881, for the purpose of getting a more central location to his practice and a pleasant place, he removed to Dellrose, and ha. recently built a fine residence on an excellent farm of 300 acres. He has a large practice, and is entirely devoted to his professional duties. He has had flattering success in all treatments of patients, and is a man well-known and much esteemed throughout the county. He is independent in political belief, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

GEORGE STUART, farmer, whose birth occurred in North Carolina in March, 1814, is a son of Thomas and Sarah Stuart. The father of our subject was a descendant of Irish ancestors, and was born in North Carolina. He immigrated to West Virginia, and remained there until his death. The mother was also born in North Carolina, and died in Moore County, Tenn. Our subject was reared on the farm, and received a rather limited education in the schools of those early days. He came to Tennessee, with his widowed mother, when about seventeen years of age, and in 1831 married Harriet Woodard, a native of North Carolina, born in 1816, and the daughter of William and Sarah Woodard. To Mr. and Mrs. Stuart were born these children: Sarah (wife of Thomas Lockey), Eliza (wife of William Tucker), Thomas. Green. Mary (widow of D. M. Summers), Robert, Martha (wife of Joseph Clark). and Docia (wife of Dr. Walter McMullen, of Texas). Soon after marriage our subject moved to Millville, and was engaged in the milling business for seven years. In 1849 he bought 100 acres in the Thirteenth District, where he located and where he has since resided. He has since bought more land, and now owns 300 acres of good land. Mr. Stuart has reared a large family, and helped them to a good start in life. He began for himself with no means, but by energy and good business qualifications has amassed a considerable amount of property. Mr. Stuart is a Democrat in polities, and during the late civil war had two sons in the army. Thomas entered in the first company that was organized, and served four years. He was captured, and taken to Fort Delaware, but made a daring escape by swimming the bay. Mr. Stuart and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are noted for being good citizens and kind neighbors.

HON. L. D. SUGG, an old and respected farmer, was born in Robertson County, Tenn., March 8, 1820, and is a son of Cullen E. and Sidney (Conrad) Sugg. The father was born in Robertson County, Tenn., in 1798. He was of Scotch descent and was married about 1822, and was a blacksmith and farmer by occupation. He came to Lincoln County about 1826. The mother was born in Springfield Tenn., in May, 1802, and died in February, 1886. His people first went to Davidson County at a very early date and built block-houses to protect themselves from the Indians. The father died in 1849. Our subject in youth received the rudiments of his education in the schools near home, and afterward completed his education in the Viny Grove Institution, under Parson Bryson and Prof. John A. Steward. In 1856 he married Margaret Holbert, daughter of Pleasant and Nancy Holbert. Mrs. Sugg was born in Lincoln July 9, 1836, and her marriage resulted in the birth of seven children: Douglas, Ethel (wife of E. Wilson, Naoma, Eula (wife of Edgar Thurston, of Alabama), Sidney, Nancy and William. Mr. Sugg now owns 600 acres of good land, all well improved. He is a man well known through out the county, and is much esteemed for his many good qualities. In 1878 he was chosen to represent the people in the House of Representatives, and that position he filled to the satisfaction of his constituents and in a creditable manner to himself. He is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

H. H. SUGG, citizen and farmer, was born on the farm where he now lives in the Thirteenth District February, 20, 1831, and is a son of Cullen and Sidney (Conrad). Sugg. Our subject received the rudiments of his education in the schools near his home, and finished at Fayetteville and Forest Hill, Giles County In November, 1855, he wedded Sallie Bruce, a native of Lincoln County. She died the same year they were married, and May, 1868, our subject took for his second wife Mrs. Elvira, daughter of Cornelius and Mrs. Allen. The result of this union was an interesting family of two children: Edward and Kate 13. (wife of J. K. Whitaker). After his marriage he located on the old home-place, and remained there until 1859, when he bought 320 acres near by, and moved to that. At the end of ten years, he exchanged with his brother T. J. for the old home place, and now owns 340 acres of valuable land. In 1865, he wedded Miss L. Yowell, a native of Petersburg, Tenn., born in 1837, and to this union were born four children: Henry, Sabra, Susie and William. Mr. Sugg has been quite successful in business, and has given his children good educational advantages. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. In 1862 he enlisted in Capt. Freeman's Company of Artillery, and was in the battle of Chickamauga and a great many artillery engagements. He was captured in 1863, but was soon afterward exchanged.

W. C. SUGG is one of seven children born to the marriage of Cullen E. and Sidney Sugg, and was reared at home, receiving his education in the schools near his home and Viney Grove Academy. In 1858 he married Mary S., daughter of Dr. John and Josephine Wood. She was born in Lincoln County in September, 1841, and bore her husband eight children: J. D. (merchant), Jennie (wife of S. A. Bingsley), Mary A. (Mrs. J. C. Whitaker), W. C., Jr., Vic, Ida W., Lemuel H. and Thomas F. Our subject and his brother, L. D., farmed together about ten years when he purchased 500 acres of land, on which he located and which he has increased to 820 acres. His farm is well improved with good barns and fine orchards. Mr. Sugg has trafficked a great deal in both land and stock, and is a shrewd financier. Besides his home farm he owns 400 acres elsewhere. Most of his children have had the advantage of a collegiate education and he is a man of broad views and keen intellect. He is a bitter antagonist to all monopolies and everything that tends to oppress the laboring man. He is conservative, voting always as his conscience dictates.

NEWTON C. SULLIVAN, farmer and magistrate of the Twelfth District, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1823, and is the son of Cornelius and Mary A. (Gunter) Sullivan. The father was a native of Cheatham County, N. C., born in 1793, and followed agricultural pursuits as a livelihood. He was married in 1812, and in 1818 came to Lincoln County, Tenn., locating in the Fifth District, but afterward moved to the Twelfth District, where he remained until his career ended in 1846. He was of Irish extraction. The mother was born in 1794, in Cheatham County, N. C., and since the death of her husband she has lived on the old place, but is now living with her children. She is yet living, and is ninety-two year sold. About four years ago she fell and injured her hip, which renders her helpless in regard to walking, but her mind is perfectly clear and active. She is the oldest lady in the county. Our subject was one of eleven children, seven of whom are living. He was reared at home, and received a fair education in the schools of the county. At the age of nineteen he left home, and commenced working as a day-laborer on the farm. In 1844 he went to Mississippi and became an overseer on a plantation, where he remained for six years. He then returned to his birthplace, and in March, 1851, he married Margaret Mauldin, daughter of Harris Mauldin. Mrs. Sullivan was born in Marshall County in 1836, and by her union to Mr. Sullivan became the mother of eleven children: Harris H., Mary E. (wife of James A. Brisco), George W. J., Susan D., Newton C., Julia F. (wife of James Barns), Alva El., Sarah M., Octavia A., Cornelius B. and Willie B. Our subject enlisted in the Confederate service in 1861, in Company E, Forty-first Regiment. Tennessee Infantry, under Col. Bob Farqueharson, and fought in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Knoxville and numerous severe skirmishes. After the fight at Fort Donelson the Forty-fourth Regiment, followed Gen. Sidney Johnston to Corinth, Miss., and joined under Col. John S. Fulton, where he remained until the latter part of the year 1863. In 1865 our subject located on 290 acres in the Twelfth District where he has since resided. He now owns 415 acres. In politics he has been a life-long Democrat, casting his first vote for Lewis Cass. He is a Mason. and Mrs. Sullivan is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South. In 1874 Mr. Sullivan was elected magistrate to fill a vacancy, and for the past ten years has adjusted his constituents difficulties, with impartial fairness. and there has never been an appeal taken from his decisions. The Sullivan family are noted for longevity. Susan, our subject's great aunt, lived to be one hundred and seven years old. Nancy, her sister was ninety, and Jerry, their brother, was also ninety.

CAPT. W. A. SUMMERS was born in Limestone County, Ala., February 20, 1838, and received his rudimentary education in the common schools, and afterward attended Oak Hill Institute, and graduated in 1870. While a student he conducted some of the classes in the college. June 9, 1870, he married Annie, daughter of J. L. and C. L. Walker. Mrs. Summers was born in Giles County, Tenn., September 14, 1848, and was educated at Bethany Institute and Oak Hill College, and was a teacher for some time. She has borne three children: Tully A., Willie H. and Laura K. Mr. Summers taught school eight years after his marriage, and was very successful in that calling. In 1878 he was compelled to give up teaching, owing to ill health. He began farming, and now owns 300 acres of very desirable land. He is a Democrat in politics, and in 1861 enlisted in Company E, Thirty second Tennessee Infantry, and upon the reorganization of the army he was promoted to the rank of captain. He participated in the battles of Fort Donelson, Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge, and received a severe wound. After his recovery he was at Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain and many other engagements. and was a brave soldier, rendering valuable service to the Confederacy. He was A prisoner for some seven months, and returned home in June, 1865.

JAMES H. TAYLOR, farmer and prominent citizen of the Twenty-fifth Distriet, and a son of Young and Sarah C. (Poston) Taylor, was born in Lincoln County April 11, 1822, and is one of a family of nine children, only two of whom are living. The father of our subject was born in 1789, and had no advantages for acquiring an education. He was married when about twenty-two, and was employed for many years as an overseer of slaves. About 1818 he immigrated to Lincoln County, and farmed as a tenant for several years. He then purchased 240 acres in the Fourth District, where he remained until his wife's death in 1866. His death occurred about 1874. Our subject received a practical education in the neighboring schools. and February 15, 1844, wet married to Martha Simmons, by whom he had six children, four of whom are living: Jarred B., Sarah (wife of Thomas B. George), Franklin P. and William. After marriage our subject farmed for several years as a tenant, but imitating the example of his father, and inheriting his strong will and determined character, was so far successful in his labors as to soon be able to procure a home of his own. In 1849 he purchased one-half interest in 400 acres of land at Smithland, on which he located and continues to reside. He has since increased his original tract to over 1,000 acres, but has donated considerable to his children, and now has about 550 acres of fine land. Mrs. Taylor died April 17. 1881, and November 11, 1884, Mr. Taylor married Mrs. Rettie Reagor, who was born in Lincoln County May 22, 1846. Our subject is a Democrat in polities, and cast his first vote for James K. Polk. Mrs. Tayloris a member of the Christian Church.

JARRED S. TAYLOR, farmer, and a son of James H. and Martha (Simmons) Taylor, was born in Lincoln County in 1847, and is one of a family of six children, four of whom are living. He received a liberal education in the common schools, and taught during the years 1869 and 1870. He afterward engaged in farming, and in March, 1871, united his fortunes with those of Mollie McLaughlin, daughter of William H. and Margaret K. McLaughlin. The result of our subject's marriage was the birth of eight children: Bernice, Beulah, William H., James M., Guy F., Andrew E., Maggie E. and Horace. Mr. Taylor began farming at first as a tenant, But in 1874 purchased land in Smithland and began clerking in a mercantile establishment at that place. In 1883 he, in company with his brother, entered the mercantile business on their own responsibility in the same place. In 1884 he disconnected himself with the firm, and removed to where he now resides, one mile north of the village, on a farm of 140 acres. Mrs. Taylor was born in Lincoln County in 1842, and she, as well as her husband, are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Taylor is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Horatio Seymour. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

YOUNG A. TAYLOR is a son of Edmund and Jane (Poston) Taylor, and was born in Lincoln (County, Tenn., in 1828. His early schooling did not exceed four months. When the war broke out between the North and South he enlisted in Company A, Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and was in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and Petersburg. He was wounded at Horse Shoe Bend, and was obliged to give up further service. He resumed farming on his farm of 126 acres, which he had purchased before the war, and which he has since increased to 308 acres. When twenty-three years old he was married to Elizabeth Styles, who died in 1859, leaving four children: Mary A., Sarah, Francis, and James. In March, 1861, Mr. Taylor wedded Martha McClure, by whom he had ten children, nine now living: Temple C., Young A., William F., Zylphia E., John H., Ida B., Cora F., Ardella, and Andy W. Our subject's parents were born in Virginia and North Carolina, respectively, and were married in the latter State. The father was a farmer, and died a few years previous to the war. The mother died in 1874.

TEMPLE C. TAYLOR, farmer, and a son of Edmond and Jane D. (Poston) Taylor, was born in Lincoln County Februarv 4, 1825, and is one of ten children, six of whom are living. The father was born in Virginia and married in North Carolina. He was a farmer by occupation and owned 204 acres of land. His career ended a few years previous to the civil war. Mrs. Taylor died about 1874. Our subject was reared at home and received no education worth speaking about, having attended school only about six weeks in his life. During the war he enlisted in Company A, Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, under Capt. Styles, and was engaged in many of the principal battles. He then returned home after four years of honorable service. He had purchased a small farm previous to the war, and after his return sold it and purchased 265 acres where he is now living. October 9, 1878, he married Mrs. Clemmenza L. McClellen, daughter of Martin and Nancy N. Wisener. Mr. Taylor is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Previous to entering the army our subject made a pair of shoes which he wore during the entire service. Mr.. Wisener was born July 26, 1812, and is now living with her daughter, Mrs. Taylor. Mr. Wisener was born March 18, 1786, and died when Mrs. Taylor was quite small.

THOMAS TAYLOR, son of James and grandson of Edmund Taylor, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1824. His father and grandfather were Virginians. The former married Jensie Shelton in Virginia. and became the father of eleven children, four now living. He has always made farming his occupation, and at an early day came to Tennessee and settled among the canebrakes, where he afterward became the owner of 400 acres of land. He died in 1844, after a well-spent life. The mother died in 1852. Thomas received very meager educational advantages. November 15, 1853, he married Mary, daughter of Hillery H. and Dovey Hill, and nine children are the results of their union: James H., Young A., Elizabeth J., John F., Robert J., Jennie L. and Susan F. Mr. Taylor farmed his father's place until both parents' deaths, 'and in 1861 purchased sixty-nine acres of land, which, by the aid of his wife and his own energy and economy, he has increased to 800 acres. During the late war he served gallantly in Company B. Forty- fourth Tennessee Regiment, C. S. A. He has been a life long Democrat.

EDWARD TAYLOR, farmer, was born October, 1821, in Lincoln County, and is one of a family 'of seven children born to William and Priscilla (Alexander) Taylor. The father was born in Virginia in 1790 and received his education in the neighboring schools. He was a mechanic and farmer by occupation and immigrated to Tennessee, with his parents, when but a small boy. He was married about 1819, and in 1842 purchased 150 acres where Edward now resides. He died in 1858, and Mrs. Taylor several years previous. Our subject received a fair education, and after reaching his majority began farming his father's place. December, 1849, he was married to Eliza Forester, by whom be had one child: N. Alexander, who is now at home. He is a young man of exemplary habits, industrious and honest. After marriage our subject continued to farm for his father for several years, and at last purchased his father's fine tract, which now consists of 160 acres. December, 1883, Mr. Taylor had the misfortune to lose his wife. Mr. Taylor is a Democrat in polities and is strenously opposed to monopolies and is an ardent friend to all laboring men.

JOHN A. TAYLOR, merchant and farmer, and a son of John A. and Elizabeth (Stubblefield) Taylor, was born in Lincoln County in 1849. The father was also a native of Lincoln County, born about 1810. He was married about 1828, and became the father of eleven children seven of whom are living. He was a tiller of the soil, and at the time of his death which occurred April, 1850, owned about 225 acres of good land. The mother was born in Lincoln County about the same time as her husband, and died March, 1873. Our subject was reared by a mother's tender care, his father having died when he was but an infant. He received his education in the district schools, and December 8, 1870, was married to Mary E. Reynolds, daughter of John and Malinda Reynolds, by whom he had seven children, four of whom are living, viz.: Ella, Alda O., John A. and C. Wilson. At the time of his marriage our subject was engaged in the grocery business at Kelso, where he continues to reside. In 1872 he purchased a stock of general merchandise, and is now carrying a stock to the value of about $800. He now owns real estate in the village, besides a valuable farm of 150 acres in the Twenty-third District. Mr. Taylor is at present depot agent at Kelso. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the K. of H., and he and Mrs. Taylor are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Taylor was born in Franklin County, in 1846, and her parents were also natives of the same county.

SAMUEL H. TAYLOR is a son of Henry and Catherine M. (Sloan) Taylor, and was born in the district where he now resides. in 1834. His grandfather, Henry Taylor, Sr., was a South Carolinian, and in 1806, located in Lincoln County, Tenn., and was one of the first white men to assist in forming a white settlement within its borders. His son, Henry Taylor, settled on the old homestead after his marriage, and there passed the remainder of his days. He died in 1855. The mother was born in South Carolina, in 1807, and since her husband's death has made her home with her children. Samuel H. is her third child. He was educated in the neighboring schools, and attended one session at Viny Grove Academy. October 10, 1854, he married Miss L. Ormand, daughter of James and Mary (Ray) Ormand. Mrs. Taylor was born in Franklin County, Ala., in 1831, and became the mother of nine children, five of whom are living: Mary Emma C. (Mrs. Samuel H. McDill), Ormand B., Lorena A., Albert P. and Oscar S. Mr. Taylor lived twelve years on the old homestead after his marriage, and in 1867, purchased eighty acres of land in the Twelfth District, where he has since made his home. In 1884 he purchased a portable saw-mill which he operates in connection with his farming. It has a capacity of 6,000 feet per day. Attached to this is a mill for grinding corn, both for rough feed and table use. Mr. Taylor is a Republican, but cast his first Presidential vote for James Buchanan. In 1864 he was elected magistrate, and in 1868 was chosen tax collector of Lincoln County. He has been an elder in the United Presbyterian Church for the past twenty- six years. His wife died August 30, 1885, and since then his daughter Lorena has been keeping house for him.

H. D. A. THOMAS first saw the light of day in Lincoln County, Tenn., January 7, 1824, being one of twelve children. William Thomas was of English birth, born in Kentucky, about 1789 and was a resident of Lincoln County, Tenn., at the time of his death, October 1, 1872. He was a teacher by profession, and served in the war of 1812, and was married, about 1814, to Rebecca Lyon, who was born in North Carolina in 1794, and died in 1868. The subject of this memoir was reared at home and educated in the common -schools, and after attaining his majority began carving out his own fortune, but continued to reside with his parents until thirty-four years of age. After his marriage to Lyntha Millard, in 1858, he purchased his present farm of 250 acres. His wife was born September 3, 1829, daughter of William and Mary (Wade) Millard, and has borne the following children: Mary J. (Mrs. Thomas Bryant), Rebecca ( Mrs. R. L. Moore), Elizabeth, Cora E. and Marcus. Out subject has given his children good educational advantages, and is considered one of the honorable and public-spirited men of the county. He is a Democrat, and was opposed to secession during the late war, although he assisted in the Confederate Army. He is a Mason and K. of H., and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. They have in their possession a Bible that was printed in 1655, that is supposed to have been printed in England and descended through her father and grandfather to Mrs. Thomas.

E. T. THOMAS was born in Lincoln County March 1, 1819, son of William and Rebecca (Lyon) Thomas. (See sketch of H. D. A. Thomas for parents' biography.) He attended the country schools near his home in youth, and for two years after his marriage resided on the old home place. In 1848 he married Jane Moore, daughter of John and Esther (Harking) Moore. She was born in 1823 and died in 1883, having borne eleven children, seven of whom are living: Esther (Mrs. H. C. McKinzie), Albert, Rebecca (Mrs. J. S. Smiley), William, Josie (Mrs. P. H. Smith). Nannie (Mrs. J. T. Holland), Mary (Mrs. James Poindexter). Mr. Thomas has given considerable land to his children, but still owns 270 acres, all of which he made by his own indomitable energy. He is conservative in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for W. H. Harrison. He is a Mason. For his second wife he took Mrs. Elizabeth Beasley, widow of Daniel Beasley, who died in the army in 1862. She reared and educated three children: Clemmey (Mrs. Cyrus Cathey), Sallie (wife of Prof. Douglas Allen) and John F. (a Methodist Episcopal minister). Mrs. Thomas is the daughter of Rev. Felix and Ann McGaw.

JAMES M. THORNTON is a Virginian. and son of Reuben Thornton of the same State, born in 1797, and married to Mary Tiffen in 1818, by whom he had nine children. They came to Tennessee in 1833. and here the father farmed, and died in 1863. The mother died in 1864. James M. was born in 1822, and received a limited education in the district schools. but by desultory reading and study now has a good English and business education. At the age of twenty- one he became overseer for James Vance, with whom he remained three years. In the meantime, in 1844, he married Lucinda, daughter of William and Mary Vance. She was born in Alabama in 1825, and bore her husband eight children, seven of whom are living: William A., Mary E., John M., P. L., R. D., R. B., J. B., T. H. (deceased) and Laura J. Our subject was overseer for Mat Vance a number of years, and then came to Lincoln County, and for six years did business for Henry Kelso, and then entered the employ of Dr. B. Bonner, and looked after the interests of his plantation. After renting land two years he, in 1866, purchased 287 acres of land, which cost between $10,000 and $11,000. He afterward purchased 450 acres of land at a cost of $16,000 He gave this land to his four sons. Mr. Thornton began married life very poor in purse, but by industry and good business qualifications has a fine home and a comfortable competency He is a Democrat, and cast his first presidential vote for James K. Polk. He belongs to the Masons and has reached the degree of Chapter in that Order. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, and he and his sons are strong advocates of temperance.

JACOB VANCE is a native of the " Palmetto State." born in 1814, son of James and Nancy (Hill) Vance. of North Carolina. born in 1786 and died in 1848 and 1857, respectively. Of their six children four are living: Malinda (Mrs. Robert Crutcher, of Texas), Sarah (Mrs. Samuel Jones, of California), Maria (widow of Asbury McWilliams, of Giles County) and our subject, Jacob, who was reared and educated in Giles County and resided with his parents until twenty-two years of age. September 24, 1839, he wedded Mary Ann Eddings, daughter of Abraham Eddings. Mrs. Vance was born in October, 1821, in Alabama. To them was born one child--W. P. (deceased). In 1849 Mr. Vance purchased 400 acres of land in Giles County, but sold out in the fall of 1850, and the following year came to Lincoln County and purchased 478 acres near Fayetteville, where he is now residing. His farm is highly improved and furnished with good buildings and fences. Mr. Vance is esteemed as an honest and industrious citizen, and in his political views has been a life-long Democrat, casting his first presidential vote for Hugh L. White, in 1836. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. His son, W. P. Vance, died at the age of twenty-five years, when all earth's brightness was promised him. He was respected and loved for his many virtues by all who knew him, and idolized by his parents and relatives. His remains were followed to the tomb by the I. O. O. F. and the members of the Agricultural Association.

JOHN WARDEN was born in North Carolina in 1826, son of Robert and Elizabeth (Pilcher) Warden. His early education was very limited, he never having received more than six months' schooling during his life. At the age of six years he was brought to Tennessee by his parents, and made his home with them until he was twenty-one years old. October 27, 1847, he married Rachel Ashby. She was born in Lincoln County December 1, 1825, daughter of Alex Ashby. They have three children: Vina Jane (Mrs. George Millstead), John Wilson and Travis Alex. Mr. Warden resided in the Sixth District of Lincoln County until May. 1864, when he purchased 100 acres in the Seventh District, and there has since resided. He lost his wife May 9, 1854, and the following year he married Martha A. Duncan, daughter of Judge Duncan. They have six children: Martha Ellen, Mary Elenora, William James, Hardin Daniel, Judge and James Ebenezer Goodloe. Their mother died June 30, 1880, and March 20 of the next year he married Mary C. Ashby, a sister of his first wife. In 1861 Mr. Warden joined Company A, Forty-first Regiment Tennessee Infantry, and was in the battles of Fort Donelson, Raymond, Vicksburg, Jackson and Chickamauga. He was captured at Fort Donelson, and taken to Camp Morton, Ind., where he was retained seven months. He returned home in December, 1863. He is conservative in polities, and he and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church. His father was born in North Carolina in 1790, and was married in 1830. After living two years in Illinois he came to Lincoln County, Tenn. He died in 1862. The mother was born in North Carolina in 1799, and died in 1861. Of their eleven children eight are living: Hardin, Emeline (widow of John H. Steelman), John, Daniel, Jane (Mrs. James Isom), Darinda (Mrs. G. W. MeAfee), James M. and Franklin H.

THOMAS J. WHITAKER, citizen and farmer of the Thirteenth District, was born in Lincoln County April 23, 1823, and is one of a family of seven children born to Benjamin and Mahaldah Whitaker, and the grandson of John Whitaker, who built the first gristmill in Lincoln County. He was the first chairman of the county court, and will be remembered by many of the oldest citizens now living in the county. The father of our subject was born in Kentucky, and came to Lincoln County with his parents at a very early day. He was a farmer by occupation, and died in the Eighth District September 12, 1869, being over eighty years of age. The mother is supposed to be a native of Georgia, and died about 1840. Our subject received a good, practical education in the common schools near home, and in 1847 was married to Elizabeth R. Moores, a native of Lincoln County, Tenn., born November 19, 1821, and died November 30, 1880. By this union six children were born, four of whom are living: W. N., M. E., Susan. Dora and In 1847 our subject bought 167 acres of land in the Thirteenth District, where he has since resided. The place is pleasantly located, well improved, and is near Fayetteville Elkton road, twelve miles west of Fayetteville.

ALEXANDER J. WHITAKER, son of Joseph and Ann (Jeffries) Whitaker, was in Lincoln County in 1833. The father was born in Kentucky in 1788, and was of English extraction. He was married twice, the first Hughes, by whom he had six children, only two of whom are living. Mrs. Whitaker died in 1830, and in 1832 Mr. Whitaker married his second wife, by whom he had two children: Julia F., wife of T. D. Hill, and the subject of this sketch. The father died in 1874 and the mother in 1863. Alexander was reared at home, and received his early education in the district schools but later attended the academy at Mulberry for about seven years, where he took quite a thorough course. January 10, 1855, he wedded Sarah J. McMillen, daughter of Dock and Madeline McMillen, and by this union became the father of eight children, five of whom are living: Joe D., Charley B., Edna, Fannie E. and Henry. Soon after marriage our subject located on his father's farm, and in 1867 purchased 150 acres of land, on which he is now residing. In 1865 Mr. Whitaker was elected magistrate, and has held the same office ever since. At the breaking out of the war Mr. Whitaker enlisted in the Fifth Kentucky Infantry, and took an active part in the battles of Shiloh and Chickamauga. He is independent in polititical belief, a Mason, K. of H., and both he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

HON. W. W. WILSON is the son of William and Susan Wilson, natives of Kentucky and North Carolina, respectively. The father was born in February, 1799, and came to Lincoln County with his parents when but six years of age. He followed agricultural pursuits as a livelihood, and was quite successful at this. He died in March, 1856. The mother was born in 1797, and departed this life in 1845. Our subject was born in Lincoln County, April 28, 1827, and received his education in the school near his country home, and at Viny Grove, under Prof. Erwin. In 1848 he married Miss A. Whiting, a daughter of Robert and Mrs. Whiting. She was born in Robertson County in 1829. Mr. Wilson began teaching, and has followed that occupation for about ten years. In 1851 he bought ten acres of land in the Thirteenth District, where he located, and has since lived. He now owns 250 acres in a very desirable place, and is doing a good business. About 1858 he was elected magistrate, and again in 1864. He has held the office considerable of the time since, up to 1880, when he refused to accept the position any longer. In 1872 he was chosen by the people to represent them in the State Legislature He is a man well known throughout the county, and his being elected to offices of trust at different times shows that the public appreciates his services. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mrs. Wilson is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

J. B. WILSON, the proprietor of a furniture and undertaking establishment in Fayetteville, Lincoln County, Tenn.; was born in that place February 3, 1834. He is the eldest child of a family of five children--three sons and two daughters--born to Union A. and Mary (Shanks) Wilson, and was educated in Fayetteville. At the age of sixteen he began learning the cabinet-maker's trade in his father's shop, and continued working for him until 1854, when his father, his brother, C. S. Wilson, and himself entered into a co-partnership of undertaking and dealing in furniture, in which they continued until 1859. He was married to Miss M. A. Whitaker October 6, 1856, and eight children were born to this union--six daughters and two sons--of whom only four are living: Martha A., Mary M., James B. and Myrtle C. At the breaking out of hostilities between the North and South our subject enlisted in Company C, Forty-first Tennessee Regiment Confederate States Army, in December, 1862. For his second wife he took Mrs. Lucy A. (McDaniel) Fullerton May 10, 1882, who was born April 28, 1850. She was first married to Robert G. Fullerton December 1, 1868, by which marriage there were three daughters born, only two now living: Willa A. and Lucy G. J. B. Wilson is a practical business man and has an extensive trade. He has been the leading furniture dealer and undertaker in Fayetteville for the last twenty years. He has been a life-long Democrat, is an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and is also a member of the I. O. O. F.

C. S. WILSON. In 1858 C. S. Wilson established a sale and feed stable in Fayetteville, Tenn., and soon after, on a very humble scale, engaged in the livery stable business. He steadily prospered in his undertakings, and in March, 1885, owned twenty-six vehicles and twenty horses. On the 4th of that month the building caught fire, and the building, thirteen buggies and fifteen horses were consumed. Mr. Wilson immediately began erecting a much larger building. 82x125 feet, with a capacity of feeding sixty-eight horses. He is doing an extensive business, meeting with the success efforts deserve. He was born in 1835 in Fayetteville, and is a son of Union A. and Mary (Shanks) Wilson. When about fourteen years of age he began learning the cabinet-maker's trade, continuing eight years. In 1869 he became proprietor of the Shanks House, and managed that hotel for four years. In 1879 he purchased 200 acres of land, which he has managed in connection with his stable. In November, 1861, he and M. E. Lauderdale were married. She was born in 1840, and is the mother of four children: Charles, Beulah, Augusta and Fannie. Mr. Wilson has been a business man of Fayetteville for the past twenty-five years, and is in every respect an honest and worthy citizen. He is a Democrat, and belongs to the K. Of P. His father was born in Tennessee in 1813, and was a cabinet-maker by trade. In 1882 he married, and after his first wife's death he wedded Rebecca Price, who yet survives him. He was the father of thirteen children, and died in 1875.

J. W. WOODARD, a native of Lincoln County, was born March 9, 1843, son of M. C. and Lucinda Woodard. The father was of Irish descent, and was born in Lincoln County in 1810. He was a blacksmith and farmer by occupation, and died in September, 1860. The mother of our subject was also born in Lincoln County about 1818, and now resides at the old home-place in the Thirteenth District with her son, W. S. Our subject received his education in the schools near home, and remained with his parents until the breaking out of the late war. In 1861 he enlisted in Company F. Forty-fourth Tennessee Infantry, and took part in the battles of Shiloh, Chiekamauga, Murfreesboro, Petersburg, and was captured at this place and taken to Fort Delaware, where he remained about four months. He returned home in July, 1865, after over four years' service, and was in many of the hottest battles of the war without receiving a single wound. In 1866 he married M. E. Hampton, a native of Lincoln County, born in 1845, and the daughter of Samuel and Annie Hampton. To our subject and wife were born six children: Samuel M., James G., John H. F., Lillian, Robert M. and Martha L. After remaining on the old home-place about four years our subject purchased about 100 acres of land in the Thirteenth District, where he located and remained about thirteen years. In 1883 he bought 135 acres in the Sixteenth District, where he located. He still retains the farm in the Thirteenth District and owns 485 acres of valuable land. He also owns a mill and is doing a good business in grinding grain and sawing lumber. Besides this, he looks after the interest of the farm. He is a Democrat, a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

M. W. WOODARD, attorney at law, of Fayetteville, Tenn., was born in Lincoln County, in 1846, the third son of Robert S. and Mary (McKinney) Woodard, born in Tennessee and North Carolina, in 1821 and 1825, respectively. The father was a teacher and farmer in early life, and was married in 1842. In 1847 he was elected tax-collector of Lincoln County, serving one term. In 1856 he was elected clerk of the circuit court, and held the position until the late war. In 1864 he was re-elected and held the office until 1868. Soon after the organization of the Lincoln County Savings Bank he was chosen assistant cashier, but at the organization of the First National Bank he was chosen its cashier, which position he held until his death in 1877: During the many years he was in public life he was the administrator of many large estates. His father, Reuben Woodard, was born in 1792, in North Carolina, and was a pioneer settler of Tennessee. He was a brick-mason, and lived to be eighty-six years of age. Our subject's mother, since her husband's death, has resided on the old homestead with two of her children. Their family consisted of eleven children: James L., Galen D., M. W., Annie B. (Mrs. Thomas Dryden), Mary E. (Mrs. Dr. O. R. Hatcher), A. B., Robert P., J. Reuben, W. E., Addie (Mrs. Eugene Higgins) and one deceased sister (Mrs. Sallie Francis). Our subject was educated in Milton College, Fayetteville, and in 1868 began studying law, and in 1871 was admitted to the bar and began immediately to practice. In 1878 he was appointed judge of the county court, and filled the position for eighteen months. In 1883 he and Hon. R. L. Bright formed a law partnership, and the firm is known as Bright & Woodard. They constitute one of the leading law firms of Lincoln County, and our subject is one of the leading and useful members of society. October 25, 1871, he married Ida L. Hatcher, who was born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1854. The following are the names of their children. Irene; Octa L., Bessie, Robert S., Bernard H., Fannie, John and Ida. Mr. and Mrs. Woodard are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat and belongs to the Masonic fraternity and I. O. O. F.

ELDER J. G. WOODS was born in Franklin County, Tenn., in 1823, and is a son of William and Mary (Harris) Woods. Wm. Woods was born in Virginia in 1776, and Mary Harris, his wife, was born in Kentucky in 1782. They died in Franklin County, Tenn., in 1838 and 1840, respectively. Wm. Woods was of Scotch-Irish descent, and a tiller of the soil, and for upward of thirty years was a Primitive Baptist minister. He was one of the earliest settlers and largest land owners of Franklin County. Of his large family of children, only three are living: Mourning S., Mary A. (widow of John Miller), and J. G., who is the youngest. J. G. Woods was educated in the pioneer log schoolhouse of primitive days. After his parents' death he resided on the home farm about three years, and on November 30, 1843, he was married to Susan J. Boyce, daughter of Joseph and Martha J. Boyce, who was a daughter of Paul Dismukes. Susan. J. was born in Madison County., Ala., in 1825. J. G. and Susan J. Woods had six children, to wit: James H., Archibald M., William E.. Joseph G., Mary A. and Hattie E. Archibald M. died in infancy, and Mary A. died after she was grown. Since 1844 Mr. Woods has been a resident of Fayetteville. He and James H. Cobb were engaged in the tanning, saddlery and harness business for a number of years, and they were also engaged in buying and shipping produce South. In 1850 they erected the first livery and feed stable in the town, and two years later they closed their partnership business, after which our subject served as constable and justice of the peace for several years. during which time he studied law and was admitted as a practicing attorney in 1858. He continued to practice law until 1875. In 1857 or 1858, upon the re-organization of the Winchester & Alabama Railroad. he was elected one of its directors, and continued a director until the road was sold by the State. Ha was also president and receiver of the road for some time. At the organization of the First National Bank of Fayetteville he was elected one of the directors, and in November, 1874, was elected president of the same, but resigned in January, 1885, owing to ill health. He was licensed to preach by the Primitive Baptist Church in the fall of 1873, and ordained in 1874, and has been actively engaged in the ministry from that time until the present, except when prevented by bad health. His wife Susan J. died in 1866, and the following year he married Lou S. Webb, who is a daughter of Hartwell and Nancy Webb, and was born in 1825. He has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since about 18,51.

JAMES H. WRIGHT is one of twelve children of Jacob and Nancy Wright, and was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., in 1812. His father was of English descent, born and married in Virginia. He came to Tennessee and followed the life of a farmer, and died when about ninety-six years of age. The mother was born in Ireland, and came to the United States with her parents. James H. obtained the rudiments of his education in the schools near his home, and in 1839 married Nancy, daughter of John and Elizabeth Trantam. They have thirteen children: Elizabeth (Mrs. John Alsup), Josie (Mrs. John Myers), Fannie (Mrs. Ruf. Smith), Ethlinda (Mrs. Robert Maury), W. L., A. W., S. H., J. H., R. L.. D. N., J. H. and Cordelia, and one son, Marshall, who was killed at the battle of Chattanooga. Mr. Wright has always farmed, and by the sweat of his brow has become the owner of 300 acres of valuable and well improved land. He has been successful. He has reared a large family of children and given them good educational advantages, and has a comfortable competency. Mr. Wright is a Democrat, and he and Mrs. Wright are members of the Christian Church.

WILLIAM R. WYATT, farmer and miller of Fayetteville, Tenn., was born in Lincoln County, in 1844. His father William Wyatt was of English-Irish descent; born in 1802 in South Carolina. He came to Tennessee in 1804, and to Lincoln County in 1807 or 1808, and was a teacher and farmer by occupation, being very successful in both occupations. He married Sallie Breckenridge in 1834, and died in 1880. His wife was born in South Carolina in 1804, and died in 1884. The Wyatt family came to Tennessee when the country was almost a wilderness. The bottom lands were covered with cane, and the country was infested with Indians and many wild animals. They did their share in helping to settle and clear the lands of Lincoln County. Of the seven children born to William and Sallie Wyatt, three are living: Margaret Jane, Mollie E. and William R., who received such education as could be obtained in the old fashion schoolhouses of his boyhood days. July 4, 1864, he and Sallie McCown were united in marriage. She was born in South Carolina in 1845, a daughter of Joseph I. and Mary (Bryson) McCown. Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt have six children: Eva, Delia, Lizzie, Jennie, Joseph and Flora. Mr. Wyatt resided with his parents four years, and in 1868 purchased 200 acres of land about five miles from Fayetteville, where he settled and resided until January 1, 1886, when he moved to town to educate his children. By energy and industry Mr. Wyatt is the owner of 400 acres of land. He is a Republican in polities, and his first presidential vote was cast for U. S. Grant in 1868. He and wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church. In 1884 he purchased a saw-mill which he operates in connection with his farm.

JOHN YOUNG, lumberman and builder, was born in New Hampshire March 24, 1842, and is one of nine children born to Benjamin and Melinda (Everett) Young. Our subject remained at home until he was eighteen years of age, and received his early education in the district schools of New Hampshire. After immigrating to Illinois he attended a graded school, where he received a good practical education, and after this he was engaged in farming and threshing for several years. He was in the army, and served several years in the quartermaster's department. In 1867 he came to Lincoln County, and settled at Flintville, where he purchased some property. In 1870 he wedded Sarah M. Bradford. and the fruits of this union were five children. four of whom are living: Sarah, George, John and James. In 1879 Mr. Young purchased a milling property, and has since been engaged in sawing lumber and grinding grain. Although commencing life with but little of this world's goods, Mr. Young now owns, exclusive of town and mill property, about 200 acres of land near Flintville. The father of our subject was born in New Hampshire about 1810, and was of English origin. He received a good business education, and engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1856 he moved to Illinois, and is living there at the present time. The mother of our subject was also born in New Hampshire, about 1810, and is still living.


Transcribed by John W. Childress 5/11/97 Pea Ridge Relations