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Pea Ridge Relations 57 (Notes Pages)


Walker, William Alfred (b. ABT 1818, d. ABT 1909)

Source: (Name)
Title: 1870 U.S. Census (Federal); Tennessee: Lincoln County, Film
Abbreviation: 1870 U.S. Census
Publication: Heritage Quest Genealogical Services, Bountiful Utah
Page: Dist. 19, Page 26, Line 6
Source: (Name)
Title: 1860 U.S. Census, Lincoln County, Tennessee: my Extracts
Abbreviation: 1860 U.S. Census: My Extracts
Note: This is a partial transcription of a transcription from the
Fayetteville-Lincoln County Library.
Page: Page 295
Source: (Name)
Title: 10th U.S. Census, 1880; Vol. 20, Tennessee: Lawrence (part),
Lewis, Loudon, and Lincoln (part) Counties, Record Info: also
digitized to CD, Film Number: T9-1267
Abbreviation: 1880 U.S. Census LCT CD
Publication: Heritage Quest Genealogical Sources, Bountiful, Utah
Note: The CD version does not have Lincoln County past sheet 250 B.
Page: Dist. 19, Page 5, Line 39
Source: (Death)
Title: Records of Suzanne Walker Hallstrom
Abbreviation: Records of Suzanne Walker Hall
Publication: 3227, Live Oak Lane, Port Pierce, Fla. 34981
Note: RIN#12340
Reference: 1167
Change: Date: 29 SEP 2002

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Walker, Peter Tiffin (b. 22 AUG 1820, d. 28 JUL 1863)
Source: (Name)
Title: Records of Tom T. Walker
Abbreviation: Records of Tom T. Walker
Publication: 70 Porter Rd., Bastrop, Tex. 78602
Note: RIN#11080
Reference: 1168
Change: Date: 29 SEP 2002
Census: Date: 1860
Place: Limestone Co., Ala.

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Walker, Elizabeth (b. )
Source: (Name)
Title: Lincoln County, Tennessee Will Book
Abbreviation: Lincoln Co. Will Book
Note: RIN#861
Page: page 67 (172)
Reference: 1169
Change: Date: 08 MAY 1991

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Walker, Nancy C. (b. ABT 1830)
Reference: 1170
Change: Date: 08 MAY 1991

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Wilburn, James (b. )
Reference: 1171
Change: Date: 16 SEP 1989

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Walker, Lucy S. (b. ABT 1835)
Source: (Name)
Title: Lincoln County, Tennessee Will Book
Abbreviation: Lincoln Co. Will Book
Note: RIN#861
Page: page 67 (172)
Source: (Individual)
Title: Lincoln County, Tennessee Will Book
Abbreviation: Lincoln Co. Will Book
Note: RIN#861
Occupation: teacher
Reference: 1172
Change: Date: 20 AUG 1998

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Minyard, Junathie (b. ABT 1858)
Reference: 1174
Change: Date: 12 SEP 1990

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Taylor, Nellie (b. ABT 1879)
Reference: 1175
Change: Date: 17 SEP 1989

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Taylor, Nance or Nima (b. ABT 1882)
Reference: 1176
Change: Date: 12 SEP 1990

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Walker, Stephen Thomas (b. 06 MAR 1832, d. 21 FEB 1924)
Source: (Name)
Title: Records of Suzanne Walker Hallstrom
Abbreviation: Records of Suzanne Walker Hall
Publication: 3227, Live Oak Lane, Port Pierce, Fla. 34981
Note: RIN#12340
Source: (Individual)
Title: The 1910 Census has Steve Walker living with his daughter
Minnie Woods' familyon Bright Street..p.pIn 1989, Myrtle Lou
Walker Howard remembered her grandfather as a very old manwho
owned several rental houses in Fayetteville. He lived in a big
house justoutside of town and spent much of his time lying on a
cot in his front yard.Early he would lie there reading his
bible until his servant cook called forbreakfast. After
breakfast, he took out his bible again and read until
themailman came. He read the newspaper through then returned to
his bible tilllunch, and so on. Stephen sold Minnie and
husband the Rev. Woods a tract of land in LincolnCounty 27
Nov., 1906. In 1914, he sued them in Chancery Court
fornon-payment and the property was sold at auction.
Abbreviation: The 1910 Census has Steve Walk
Source: (Birth)
Title: 10th U.S. Census, 1880; Vol. 20, Tennessee: Lawrence (part),
Lewis, Loudon, and Lincoln (part) Counties, Record Info: also
digitized to CD, Film Number: T9-1267
Abbreviation: 1880 U.S. Census LCT CD
Publication: Heritage Quest Genealogical Sources, Bountiful, Utah
Note: The CD version does not have Lincoln County past sheet 250 B.
Page: Dist. 19, Page 11, Line 39
Source: (Death)
Title: The Fayetteville Observer
Abbreviation: Fayetteville Observer
Note: RIN#689
Reference: 1177
Change: Date: 29 SEP 2002
Census: Date: 31 JUL 1860
Place: 21st Dist., Lincoln Co., Tenn.
Census: Date: 26 APR 1910
Place: 8th Dist., Lincoln Co., Tenn.

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Ashworth, Julia (b. 02 JUN 1839, d. 19 JUN 1888)
Source: (Name)
Title: Thomason, Lois Wanda
Abbreviation: Thomason, Lois Wanda
Author: Lois Wanda THOMASON
Source: (Name)
Title: Rope, Margaret Elain
Abbreviation: Rope, Margaret Elain
Author: Margaret Elain ROPE
Source: (Birth)
Title: Records of Suzanne Walker Hallstrom
Abbreviation: Records of Suzanne Walker Hall
Publication: 3227, Live Oak Lane, Port Pierce, Fla. 34981
Note: RIN#12340
Reference: 1178
Change: Date: 08 AUG 1998

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Ashworth, Clarissa (b. 09 AUG 1834, d. 11 FEB 1905)
Note: Mary Phillips Nale's memory is that Clarissa came to care for
her sister and family when the latter became ill. After her
sister's death, Stephen Walker suggested they mary so that she
could stay on.Person Source
Source: (Individual)
Title: Conversation with Mary Nale
Abbreviation: Mary Nale
Author: Mary Evangeline PHILLIPS
Reference: 1179
Change: Date: 08 AUG 1998

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McEwen, William (b. )
Reference: 1180
Change: Date: 10 JUN 1990

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Bonner, Eleanora (b. ABT 1841)
Reference: 1181
Change: Date: 17 MAR 1992

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Bonner, Judge Jesse Willis (b. 08 DEC 1849, d. 13 JAN 1924)
Source: (Name)
Title: The Fayetteville Observer
Abbreviation: Fayetteville Observer
Note: RIN#689
Page: VOL.LXXI, No.3
Source: (Individual)
Title: The Fayetteville Observer
Abbreviation: Fayetteville Observer
Note: RIN#689
Occupation: lawyer
Reference: 1182
Change: Date: 23 SEP 1989
Census: Date: 1850
Place: Lincoln Co., Tenn.

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Bonner, Ida (b. ABT 1854)
Reference: 1183
Change: Date: 21 SEP 1992

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Bonner, Moses (b. ABT 1856)
Reference: 1184
Change: Date: 29 SEP 2002
Census: Date: 1860
Place: Lincoln Co., Tenn.

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Walker, Jane (b. ABT 1827)
Source: (Individual)
Title: 1870 U.S. Census (Federal); Tennessee: Lincoln County, Film
Abbreviation: 1870 U.S. Census
Publication: Heritage Quest Genealogical Services, Bountiful Utah
Source: (Birth)
Title: 1870 U.S. Census (Federal); Tennessee: Lincoln County, Film
Abbreviation: 1870 U.S. Census
Publication: Heritage Quest Genealogical Services, Bountiful Utah
Page: Dist. 19, Page 23, Line 31
Reference: 1185
Change: Date: 29 SEP 2002
Census: Date: 29 JUN 1860
Place: 19th Dist., Camargo, Lincoln Co., Tenn.
Census: Date: 24 JUN 1870
Place: 19th Dist., Camargo, Lincoln Co., Tenn.
Note: Sheet 447, 181, 176, $400, $250

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George, John Coleman (b. ABT 1848)
Note: The Fayetteville Observer. December 3, 1868, Page
3
.p
--------------------------
.p
A Man Killed for a Dog.
"We are informed that a rencontre between two neighbors
residing about 11 miles South of this place, near the Alabama
line,
resulted in the almost instant death of one of the parties, on
last
Sunday evening. A day or two preceding, John George was
passing
along the road with his dog, and when opposite the residence of
Hosea Towery, another dog rushed out and a fight followed. To
separate them, George grasped apiece of rail and begun beating
the
new-comer. So said Towery on his return home, he having been
absent at the time of the fight, and being much incensed, he
proclaimed that George should thereafter pass that road only
under
penalty of whipping. Sunday evening the parties met, and after
a few
words, George shot Towery with a pistol, the ball entering near
the
left nipple, passing through the body, and coming out near the
right
shoulder blade. As we have said, death immediately insued.
George
left forthwith, and has not been seen since in the
neighborhood."

,p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. July 9, 1874, Page
3
.p
--------------------------
.p
Untitled
"Judge Hickerson arrived in town Monday evening, had
Circuit
Court called immediately, ordered one hundred and fifty men
summoned as jurors, and charged the grand jury.- the case of
John
C. George,indicted for murder, was taken up Tuesday morning,
but
owing to the absence of a witness of a witness,was deferred
until
Wednesday. The State vs. various parties for carrying pistols,
occupied Tuesday till evening, when a jury was empanneled to
try
Pleas Sugg, col.,for murder."

.p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. July 16, 1874, Page
3
.p
--------------------------
.p
[Untitled]
"In Circuit Court last Saturday,... "John C. George,
charged
with murder, was next placed on trial -Monday the testimony was
concluded,and the argument of counsel followed. Wednesday
morning
the jury rendered a verdict of murder in the first degree."
.p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. July 23, 1874, Page
3
.p
--------------------------
.p
Death Sentence of John C. George.
"The trial of John C. George for the murder of Hosea
towery
concluded Wednesday morning of last week, with a verdict of
guilty
of murder in the first degree. Application was made for a new
trial, and Thursday evening, Judge Hickerson announced his
decision. He said he desired to grant all the opportunity for
defence that law and justice would permit, but upon examining
competent authorities, and reviewing the evidence, he could
find no
sufficient reason for granting the request, and it was,
therefore,denied. - He then asked the prisoner if he had
anything
to say why sentence of death should not be pronounced upon him,
and
the reply was - "nothing." George was then ordered to his
feet,
when the sentence was pronounced, concluding with the
announcement
that it was"the judgement of this Court that the sheriff of
this
County take him from the jail of Lincoln county on Friday the
25th
day of September,1874, between the hours of 10 o'clock A.M. and
2
o'clock P.M., to some convenient place within one mile of the
court-house at Fayetteville, and hang you by the neck until
dead,
and may God have mercy on your soul!" George during the
pronouncing
of his sentence, manifested as little emotion as any one in the
court-room; indeed, except a little tremor at the beginning, he
seemed to be rather indifferent, though having but little
interest
in the proceeding. He has appealed to the Supreme Court, which
meets in December."

.p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. July 23, 1874, Page
3
.p
--------------------------
.p
Circuit Court.
"John C. George, murder, guilty,sentenced to be
hung."Fayetteville fined $5 "for creating a public nuisance, in
hauling and leaving carcasses near Elk river bridge..."

.p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. September 10, 1874, Page
3
.p
--------------------------
.p
[Untitled]
"John Coleman George, who is under sentence of death for
the murder of Hosea Towery, was baptised in the Methodist
Church of
this place last Sunday evening by Rev. Mr. Fisher,and partook
of
the sacrament."

.p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. October 29, 1874, Page
3
.p
--------------------------
.p
Broke Jail and Gone!
"John C. George escaped from the second story of the jail
of
this county last Thursday night about 10 o'clock, and is now at
large. With a piece of wire taken from the rim of a pan, the
mortar was picked from around a rock weighing about four
hundred
pounds, which was drawn in and dropped on the bed. The
blankets,
previously tied together,were fastened to the rock and the
other
end passed out of the opening,and George speedily followed.
The
falling of the rock awakened the jailor, Mr. Wilson, who
without
waiting to dress, ran out and saw George running across the
rear
enclosure. An alarm was raised and a son of the jailor
appeared
with a pistol as Gilbert, another prisoner,was crawling out.
He
was ordered back, without effect, when a shot was fired and he
went
in, pulling the blankets after him. Irons were at once placed
upon
the remaining prisoners. Gilbert says that in two hours from
the
time they began work,the rock was out. George was sentenced to
be
hung, at the last term of our Circuit Court,for killing Hosea
Towery. He appealed to the Supreme Court, and his case would
have
been considered at the approaching December term.Gilbert killed
a
blind man on Swan,and his trial will be had, unless postponed,
at
our November term. Our county officers are not to blame for the
escape of prisoners. An examination last Friday showed that
there
are nearly one hundred rocks in the outside wall of our jail
that
can be removed by prisoners in a short time, with the aid of a
small wire or splinter."
.p
.p
The Goodspeed Histories of Tennessee (1886), page 773
------------------------------------
.p
"In 1862 John George was sentenced to be hung for murdering
Hosea
Towry. He escaped from jail."

.p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. May 23,
1907
.p
--------------------------
.p
Legal Executions
"In 1867 Hosea Towry was killed on Sunday Afternoon by
John
George near Camargo over a dog fight. Six years later he was
arrested in Jackson Co, Ala., brought back, convicted, and
sentenced to hang. In 1874 a few weeks before the date set for
the
execution, George broke jail and escaped to the Indian
Territory
where he is said to have died."


.p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. August 19,
1943
.p
--------------------------

.p
Jail Break In Earlier Days
------------------

,p
In the fall of 1874 John George, under sentence to be
hanged,
escaped from the Fayetteville jail. On Sunday afternoon he
stopped
at the gate of Hosea Towry and calling to him,fatally shot him
as
he came within pistol range. He was arrested and tried before
circuit court, and the jury which heard the case regarded it a
cold-blooded murder and exacted the extreme penalty -- that he
be
hanged until dead, George professed religion while awaiting in
jail
the day of the execution and was baptised.

The jail at that time was a stone structure without steel
lining to the cells. George and Campbell McIntosh occupied the
same
cell. They were successful in their endeavor to work one of the
large stones from the wall. The jailer was aroused by the dog
and
coming out after George had gotten out and was on the way to
liberty, he shot at McIntosh who was coming out and the latter
went
back. The dog was gun-shy and the shot stopped its pursuit of
the
fleeing prisoner.

It was said that George made his way to the home of a
friend
who kept him concealed until the officers stopped their hunt
for
him. He made his way to West Texas. He was cordial and friendly
to
every one so that all of the people in that then wild and wooly
section were his friends.

Jim Davis, the man-hunter, learned of his location, went
after
and ar-rested him. A man named Nix, a smith, who went from
Kelso to
that region was back here on a visit and told us that a
conspiracy
was hatched in his shop to release George. The plan was for
George's friends to disguise themselves as Indians and kill
Davis.They got hold of him and entered in-to a compromise with
Davis, that they would release him if he would make oath that
he
would never again molest George. As it was a matter of life or
death Davis agreed to all of their demands, a promise which he
rigorously kept until he met his death at the hand of an
assassin
near McMinnville.


.p
.p
The Fayetteville Observer. August 26,
1943
.p
--------------------------

.p
Early Day Events

-------------------
Captain Jim Davis

.p
Mr. Davis began his career as an officer of the law by
breaking up a gang of horse thieves soon after the War Between
the
States in the south-western part of the county which included
John
Williams, Campbell McIntosh and others whom we cannot recall.
Williams was later killed at Golightly, Ala.

Davis drifted into the revenue business and was a terror
to
wildcatters.At one time he and his posse were barricaded by the
catters in a hut near Cookeville. Davis started out at night to
get
reinforcements. He was crawling through a cabbage patch pushing
his
gun ahead of him. He got dirt in the muzzle and when he fired
at a
man ahead of him the gun exploded with the roar of a cannon.
The
man took to his heels with the speed of the wind, leaving the
way
open for Davis to get out and get the badly needed help. Davis
and
his crew were at hurricane with his saddle girth-broken which
he
said he would have mended at McMinnville. On the way a man
laying
behind a log took a shot at him which took effect in his
overcoat
which was folded and across his shoulder. The horse jumped at
the
re-port throwing the saddle off and Davis with it. The man
fired
again as he laid on the ground literally blowing the top of his
head off.

Att'y Gen. Fairbanks told us it was an open secret as to
who
slayed Davis,but being alone they could not unearth any
testimony
as to his guilt. Dr. Wm. Holmes told us that he conducted the
service at the man's funeral.

It was alleged, the truth of which we cannot vouch, that
one
of Davis' posse, Bill Clark, engineered the assassination.
Clark
afterward did along stretch in the Alabama penitentiary and was
said to be an unruly prisoner, always a leader in the effort to
escape.
Source: (Individual)
Title: The Fayetteville Observer, Dec. 3, 1868; July 9, 1874; July
16,1874; July 23, 1874; Sept. 10, 1874; Oct. 29, 1874; May 23,
1907;Aug. 19, 1943; Aug. 26, 1943..p.pThe Goodspeed Histories
of Tennessee (1886), page 773.
Abbreviation: The Fayetteville Observer, Dec
Reference: 1186
Change: Date: 18 SEP 1992

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George, Manerva (b. 1850)
Source: (Name)
Title: 1870 U.S. Census (Federal); Tennessee: Lincoln County, Film
Abbreviation: 1870 U.S. Census
Publication: Heritage Quest Genealogical Services, Bountiful Utah
Page: Dist. 19, Page 23, Line 32
Reference: 1187
Change: Date: 03 JUL 1998

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