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Pea Ridge Relations 1 (Notes Pages)


Childress, George Elmer (b. 21 JUL 1918, d. 14 JUN 2002)

Note: on Pea Ridge.
Note: acquired after moving to Marshall County.
Note: named after Elmo Smith for reasons unknown.
Note: "The Pink House"
Source: (Birth)
Title: Interviews with Edith Odell (Dunn) Childress, Interviewer: John
Childress
Abbreviation: Dunn, Edith Odell
Author: Edith Odell DUNN
Page: 18 July 2000
Source: (Death)
Title: The Marshall Gazette
Abbreviation: The Marshall Gazette
Note: RIN#4624
Page: 18 Jun 2002, p:1, c:5
Occupation: self-employed. As a boy, G.E. trapped rabbits. He sold enough
pelts in Fayetteville to by a bicycle. His earlier years were
spent farming and peddling. He moved houses and did dozer work
for the public. He moved to Marshall Co. in August 1958 and
operated a dairy farm near Berlin. In 1970, he baught Belfast
Rock Co. on Hwy. 431. He sold it Rogers Group in 1994 and
reired.
Reference: 1
Change: Date: 17 JUL 2002

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Dunn, Edith Odell (b. 27 JUN 1922)
Occupation: Housewife. When Elmo Childress met her, she and her folks were
living in Smith Towry's rental house near Frogville.
Reference: 2
Change: Date: 23 AUG 2002

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Childress, Emma Jean (b. 27 FEB 1943, d. 28 JUN 1949)
Note: Struck by a car as she was crossing the highway
Reference: 3
Change: Date: 26 SEP 1997

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Childress, James Marion (b. 10 APR 1944)
Note: In the beginning, Marion did dozer work for the public. In
1971, he
became part owner of Childress Concrete Co. in Lewisburg, Tenn.
Since 1990, he
has managed the plant in Fayetteville.

Occupation: businessman
Reference: 4
Change: Date: 07 JUL 1992

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Childress, David Arthur (b. 21 AUG 1945, d. 17 FEB 1946)
Note: Suffered from a rash
Reference: 5
Change: Date: 26 SEP 1997

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Childress, John Wesley (b. 18 FEB 1948)
Note: as child in Pea Ridge.
Note: in college and Nashville.
Note: Marshall County Commissioner from the 3rd. District 1978-86.
Candidate for State
Representative in 1980.
Note: Employed at Belfast Rock Co. since 1974.
Occupation: office-manager
Reference: 6
Change: Date: 26 JUL 2000

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Childress, George Elmer (b. 19 DEC 1949)
Note: as called while growing up.
Note: Since 1972, employed at Belfast Rock Co.
Graduation: Date: ABT 1972
Place: Knoxville, Tenn.
Note: University of Tennessee
Occupation: Plant supervisor
Reference: 7
Change: Date: 02 DEC 1997

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Childress, Deborah Sue (b. 02 FEB 1951)
Graduation: Date: ABT 1974
Place: Nashville, Tenn.
Note: Peabody College
Occupation: teacher; taught kindergarten before marrying.
Reference: 8
Change: Date: 10 DEC 1997

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Childress, Paul Marshall (b. 04 NOV 1952, d. 24 AUG 1995)
Note: part owner of Childress Concrete Co. in Lewisburg, Tenn. Active
in
County and State politics.
Occupation: businessman
Reference: 9
Change: Date: 02 DEC 1997

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Childress, James Wesley (b. 07 NOV 1888, d. 04 AUG 1947)
Note: Try this on.
Note: played the fiddle. Talkative. A born salesman. He spent most of
his life on the road, peddling apples, sweet potatoes,
canteloupes and watermelons in the Fayetteville -
Huntsville area.

As a young man, Wes lived a fairly wild life. He liked
buggy-racing and drinking among other things. He spent money
as fast as he made it. When he married, all that changed.
Under the orders of Grandma Beadie, he cut back his drinking to
one bottle of whisky on Christmas and began to prosper.

In those days, there was no tv or ballgames to pass the time
off. During the nearly idle Winter months, farmers were
accustomed to hanging around the Frogville store. The more
restless engaged in pranking that often led to scuffles and
knife fights. Mose was a veteran scuffler and bore the scars
to prove it. In one incident, he stood on the barn near Wes'
house flapped his wings, crowed like a cock and mooned Wes as
he passed. But, the big problem seems to have been some
ungentlemanly remarks Mose made about Wes' pretty young wife.

Wes and Mose had a scuffle in Fayetteville on one First Monday.
But, it didn't end there. Mose followed Wes home from
Frogville store one day, when things took a more serious turn.
Apparently, Wes could take no more. He turned around, pulled
out a revolver and fired until there were no more bullits. All
six bullets found a place in Mose's behind. That's how G.E.
Childress (Paw Paw) tells it.

August 9, 1924, Wes was indicted by the Grand Jury of Lincoln
County for felonious assault in the February shooting of Mose
Jean. At the trial, Attn. Gen. C.D. Lamb presented the
testimony of Mose Jeans, Mrs. Mose Jeans, Dr. J.A. Patrick,
Mrs. Elsie Boyd, Will Towry and Shields Towry. Jury foreman
R.C. Smith brought back a verdict of not guilty. Wes was
acquitted, but apparently had to serve a short jail sentence
for "carrying a pistol."

As part of an unwritten agreement with the Law, Wes moved away
from Frogville. His father, Jim, had property on the Lincoln
Road near where the new Huntsville Highway is now. The family
lived there for a time, but moved in with Jim Childress some
time later. Jim was getting too old to live alone, it was
said.

In 1940, Wes tore down the house where his father Jim lived and
gave Herman Fife $1,600 to build a modern brick home in its
place. Jimmie Beddingfield layed the bricks. At that time
there was no other brick building between there and
Fayetteville.

In the 1940's Wes suffered greatly from arthritis. There is
some reason to believe that his careless use of insecticide on
his apple orchard contributed to his early death in 1947. Wes
always had a cigarette in one hand and a cup of coffee in the
other. That may have played a part as well.

Note: was indicted by the Grand Jury of Lincoln County for felonious
assault in the February shooting of Mose Jean. At the trial,
Attn. Gen. C.D. Lamb presented the testimony of Mose Jeans,
Mrs. Mose Jeans, Dr. J.A. Patrick, Mrs. Elsie Boyd, Will Towry
and Shields Towry. Jury foreman R.C. Smith brought back a
verdict of not guilty. Wes was acquitted, but apparently had to
serve a short jail sentence for "carrying a pistol."
Reference: 10
Change: Date: 10 DEC 1997
Census: Date: 14 JAN 1920
Place: 19th Dist., Lincoln Co., Tenn.

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Putman, Beadie (b. 04 MAY 1894, d. 12 MAR 1957)
Note: was very young when her mother died. She spent much of her
youth in the households of various relatives, virtually as a
servant. After her father died, she went to live with her Aunt
Hattie McMillan. They lived on the right just as you enter the
Fair grounds in Fayetteville.

Grandma Beadie had no real home of her own. Probably because of
this, she became extremely serious, frugal and hard-working.
She would work in the cotton fields with the men, then come
home and prepare a large meal. She was an exceptionally good
cook.

Grandma Beadie was a beautiful young woman, intelligent,
hardworking. She went from nothing to having a home, family
and money. Yet, because of childhood scars, she was never to
feel secure and life was always a bleak place for her.
Source: (Name)
Title: 1910 U.S. Census, Tennessee, Lincoln County (on CD)
Abbreviation: 1910 U.S. Census LCT CD
Publication: Heritage Quest
Page: Dist. 08, Page 121A, Line 30
Reference: 11
Change: Date: 25 AUG 2002
Census: Date: 05 MAY 1910
Place: 8th Dist., Lincoln Co., Tenn.

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Dunn, Henry Luther (b. 30 NOV 1893, d. 31 JUL 1972)
Note: was a renter farmer (share-cropper) in his younger days. He and
his family moved around a lot. Bought a farm in Howell as the
Great Depression was beginning. Quickly lost it. In 1940, he
bought out Martin Routt's and Mary Gilliam Brook's shares in
the old Polly Taylor place and settled down there. The
grandchildren always remembered visiting this place and playing
in the creek, hunting Easter eggs in the front yard or eating
mulberries off the tree in back next to a big sink hole. The
house is still there.

His daughter Edith remembers Grandaddy as overbearing. A strict
disciplinarian. The children were pleased when he went to town
by himself on Saturdays to watch movies, leaving them alone. A
bit of a bully, but knew just how far to go before his hand was
called.
Note: Died after several months paralyzed by a stroke. He was never
told when Mammy died.
Note: In 1930, Luke Dunn bought a farm on Prospect Road in Howell
Hill community. In 2002, the old house and barn are still
standing behind the Howell Hill Missionery Baptist Church.
There is a small brick residence on the North side of it. The
old house in poor condition and filled with trash.

It was a difficult year for the Dunn family. Mammy was pregnant
with Horace. Gene cut open his foot. Garland broke his arm
cranking the T-Model Ford. The Great Depression was just
starting. Luke couldn't make his bank payment and lost the
farm. It was the last time the family ever had to settle down
on their own place.
Note: In 1929, Luke Dunn rented the big Otis Howell house on the
South corner of the Old Lincol Road and Howell Hill Road.
Source: (Residence)
Title: Conversations with Eugene Dunn, Interviewer: John W. Childress
Abbreviation: Dunn, Gene, Talks
Author: Eugene Dunn
Page: 9 Aug 2002
Source: (Residence)
Title: Interviews with Edith Odell (Dunn) Childress, Interviewer: John
Childress
Abbreviation: Dunn, Edith Odell
Author: Edith Odell DUNN
Page: 23 Aug 2002
Reference: 12
Change: Date: 05 DEC 2011
Census: Date: 04 FEB 1920
Place: 6th Dist., Lincoln Co., Tenn.

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Routt, Margaret Wilson (b. 25 JAN 1897, d. 05 MAY 1972)
Note: , though occasionally referred to as "Wilson".
Note: by all her children and grandchildren.
Note: In 1930, Luke Dunn bought a farm on Prospect Road in Howell
Hill community. In 2002, the old house and barn are still
standing behind the Howell Hill Missionery Baptist Church.
There is a small brick residence on the North side of it. The
old house in poor condition and filled with trash.

It was a difficult year for the Dunn family. Mammy was pregnant
with Horace. Gene cut open his foot. Garland broke his arm
cranking the T-Model Ford. The Great Depression was just
starting. Luke couldn't make his bank payment and lost the
farm. It was the last time the family ever had to settle down
on their own place.
Note: In 1929, Luke Dunn rented the big Otis Howell house on the
South corner of the Old Lincol Road and Howell Hill Road.
Source: (Residence)
Title: Conversations with Eugene Dunn, Interviewer: John W. Childress
Abbreviation: Dunn, Gene, Talks
Author: Eugene Dunn
Page: 9 Aug 2002
Source: (Residence)
Title: Interviews with Edith Odell (Dunn) Childress, Interviewer: John
Childress
Abbreviation: Dunn, Edith Odell
Author: Edith Odell DUNN
Page: 23 Aug 2002
Reference: 13
Change: Date: 05 DEC 2011

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Maynard, Anna Maria (b. 06 DEC 1955)
Occupation: Housewife
Reference: 14
Change: Date: 06 SEP 1989

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Routt, Mary Gilliam (b. 18 SEP 1909, d. 13 JAN 1986)
Reference: 16
Change: Date: 20 SEP 2002

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Routt, Richard Marion (b. 13 MAY 1865, d. 09 NOV 1938)
Note: to just about everyone. His daughter Mary Gillum even thought
it was his real name and put it on his tombstome.
Note: to his kids and grandchildren.
Note: owned a steam driven traction thresher and did threshing for
other farmers. Mama Routt and Grandma Taylor would have a tizzy
when he drove it around and tore up their yard.

At first, May lived on Routt hill (upper Cowley Hollow) in the
house where Mammy was born. About 1920, he bought the old Polly
Taylor place at Fussy Hill. His first house there caught on
fire and burned down. Aunt Dana Routt was on a visit just then
and by the time Papa got her and her wheelchair out, he wasn't
able to save anything else.

May donated a lot across the hill for the Pleasant Grove
Church (Fussy Hill). Then, he deeded over the remainder of his
place to his three children. Granddaddy Dunn and Mammy lived
there a long time after buying out the shares of Martin Routt
and Mary Gillum Brooks.
Source: (Birth)
Title: Kelso Family Bible
Abbreviation: Kelso Family Bible
Note: RIN#694
Source: (Residence)
Title: Interviews with Edith Odell (Dunn) Childress, Interviewer: John
Childress
Abbreviation: Dunn, Edith Odell
Author: Edith Odell DUNN
Page: 21 July 2002
Source: (Individual)
Title: U.S. Census for Lincoln County, Tennessee on Digital Microfilm
Abbreviation: 1930 U.S. Census LCT
Publication: 2000
Reference: 17
Change: Date: 20 SEP 2002
Census: Date: 11 APR 1930
Place: 23nd Dist., Lincoln, Tenn.
Note: Sheet 252, 115, 115, "Fayetteville & Winchester Road"

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Taylor, Mary Elizabeth (b. 02 DEC 1868, d. 19 NOV 1928)
Source: (Name)
Title: 1910 U.S. Census, Tennessee, Lincoln County (on CD)
Abbreviation: 1910 U.S. Census LCT CD
Publication: Heritage Quest
Page: Dist. 21, Page 019A, Line 47
Source: (Death)
Title: Lincoln Co., Tenn. Death Records 1925-39
Abbreviation: Lincoln Co., Tenn. Death Recor
Note: RIN#14919
Reference: 18
Change: Date: 20 SEP 2002

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Kelso, Henry (b. 25 SEP 1767, d. 27 FEB 1832)
Note: It's not clear how Henry accumulated his property. We know he
bought at least parts of Robert Buchanon's 640 acre grant and
Robert Henry's 300 acre grant (TG#5307 GB A, p.560), because he
later sold tracts from them to sons Jefferson (DB H-1, p354; DB
I-1)and John. (DB I-1, 220) The Buchanan tract had been bought
from James and Polly S. Walker. (DB G, p267) His property in
more modern times was called the Rambo farm. It was included in
a 2,550 acre tract owned by Robertson Clark that was sold in
1895 to settle his estate. (Chancery Ct. Book 18, pp.526-41) It
had come into the hands of Joseph R. Smith. Jr., who borrowed
$50,000 on it Oct. 1, 1921.
The property contained seven tracts. When Smith defaulted on
his five-year note, Equity Life Insurence bought it at the
courthouse door. Frank Rambo purchased it from them Sept. 10,
1936 and went to great expense to renovate the old house. The
acreage was calculated at 1,166.77 then. (Deed Book O-5, page
356) Frank sold off part of the propery in 1950 to Mary H.
Cunningham.
Note: was one of Lincoln County's founding fathers. He was present at
the first Court meeting 26 February, 1810 in Brice M. Garner's
house. He represented Stewart's Creek.

In those early days, a Justice of the Peace was appointed by
the State and served for life. His word was law in his
district. And Henry must have been well thought of, judging by
the number of Lincoln Countians named after him.
Reference: 19
Change: Date: 12 DEC 1997

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Kelso, Jefferson (b. 08 JAN 1806, d. 17 JUN 1871)
Note: came to Lincoln Co. in 1803. He owned a large tract of land on
Stewart's Creek.
Source: (Name)
Title: 1870 U.S. Census (Federal); Tennessee: Lincoln County, Film
Abbreviation: 1870 U.S. Census
Publication: Heritage Quest Genealogical Services, Bountiful Utah
Page: Dist. 21, Page 474A, Line 22
Reference: 20
Change: Date: 03 SEP 2002

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Kelso, Louisa Jane (b. 17 OCT 1834, d. 06 MAR 1892)
Note: The Old Routt place was originally part of the Parks land.
Allen Parks sold a 254 acre tract to Zangy McCartney March 8,
1858. He resold it to Austin Eslick Dec. 20, 1865. Louisa
bought a 150 acre tract from Eslick Feb. 4, 1879 for $2,500.
(DB Q-2, p.268) At that time, it was bounded by the properties
of G.W. Moyers, Benjamine T. Park and Robertson Clark. To this
was added a 2 acre, 80 pole tract John Routt bought from
William Roland Nov. 18, 1886 (DB R-2, p.447)

Louisa's will placed the tract in trust for the support of her
unmarried daughters. (WB 5, p.105) The heirs mortgaged it in
1899. (TDB p.194)

July 27, 1899, John Routt sold 26 acres on the west to John F.
Taylor. (DB GG, p.291) The property, now containing 126 acres,
together with an 8-9 year old sorrel horse and a spotted jersey
cow, was again mortgaged April 10, 1900. (TRB 20, p.393).

Dec. 5, 1903, May Routt paid the Routt heirs $200 for their
interest in a 18.92 acre tract (DB O-4, p.89)
and sold it ten days later to Blake & Newman Cowley for $1,800.

Dana Routt lived on the place and it was her only means
of support. After she died, in accordance with Louisa's will,
the remaining tract, totalling 107 1/2 acres, was sold at
auction to C.S. Martin. (DB L-5, p.187) By this time, John F.
Taylor's tract was owned by Wilson Taylor.
Note: After the battle of Chickamauga, Lou Routt heard that her
husband lay wounded just across the Tennessee River. She drove
a wagon all the way to Chattanooga and talked a Union guard
into letting her cross. This is how John Routt got home.
Reference: 21
Change: Date: 19 SEP 2002

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