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Amasa Hadlock Family
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Alternate Spellings - none found

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Contacts - Amasa Hadlock was second great uncle of Selma, who furnished information on the parents of Amasa Hadlock and on his first marriage. She is descended from Amasa's sister Miriam Theresa Hadlock. Note: Some of the information is from a biography of Amasa in the Rock Island, Illinois County History. County histories are notoriously inaccurate so beware.



Amasa Hadlock was born October 11, 1823 in Cayuga County, New York, per the Rock Island County History. Amasa married first to Hannah Matilda Taylor on June 11, 1846 in Lake County, Ohio. According to the 1850 census Matilda was born about 1830 in Pennsylvania. They had two children.

Amasa and Matilda Hadlock are found in 1850 in Summit Township, Crawford County, Pennsylvania: #69 Amasa Hadlock, 26, farmer, born NY; Matilda, 20, born Pa; Frances M., 3, female, born Pa; Harriett C., 2, born Pa. There are other Hadlocks born New York in the 1850 census in Crawford County - they were probably relatives of Amasa; there is even another Amasa Hadlock, age 30, born New York. Amasa's parents are found in Hayfield Township, Crawford County: #35 Peter Hadlock, farmer, 48, born NY; Sally, 47, Ma; Louisa, 17, NY; Orville, 16, NY; Marion [Miriam], 18, Pa; M. J. [Mary Jane], 11, Pa; Frances (f), 8, Pa; Walter, 6, Pa; Hiram, 4, Pa.

By 1856 widower Amasa had arrived in Mercer County where he married Sarah Bishop, daughter of Edwin and Sarah Meeker Bishop, on 5/4/1856 (we will be putting up a Bishop page). Sarah Bishop Hadlock was born 7/20/1838 in Pennsylvania and died 4/13/1874 in Mercer County. She is buried in Eliza Creek Cemetery.

Amasa and Sarah Bishop Hadlock are found in 1860 in Eliza Creek Township: #2732 Amos Hadlock, 37, farmer, born New York; Sarah, 22, born Pa; Frank, 13, born Ohio (this was actually female Frances); Harriet, 12, born Pa. They are still in Eliza Township in 1870: #66 Amasa Hadlock, 46, farmer, born New York; Sarah E., 30, born Pa; Almira A. Hadlock, 8, born Il. They are living just a few doors from Sarah's parents, Edwin and Sarah Bishop. Amasa's daughter Frances Hadlock is in Keithsburg in 1860, working as housekeeper for a James Scott family.

Daughter Harriett is not listed in Mercer in the 1870 census but she married Aaron Hamilton, Jr. on 10/31/1875 in Mercer County. They are not readily found in the 1880 census.

Daughter Almira A. Hadlock married Lowell L. Morse on 3/27/1876 in Mercer County. She married at the age of 14. Selma tells us she later George Nelson on July 23, 1885 in Louisa County, Iowa.

Amasa Hadlock next married a widow, Sarah J. Hammon [Hammond?]on 4/8/1875 in Muscatine County, Iowa, but they continued to live in Eliza Township. Perhaps the arrival of a stepmother in the household prompted Almira to marry at such a young age. The Rock Island County History tells us Sarah was Mrs. Sarah J. Wood, born in Wayne County, Michigan, February 22, 1828. It is unclear whether Wood was Sarah's maiden name or whether she was previously married to a Wood.

Amasa and Sarah Hammond Hadlock are found in Eliza Township in 1880: Amasa Hadlock, farmer, 56, born New York, father born New York, mother born Vermont; Sarah J. Hadlock, wife, 54, born Michigan, parents born New York; Annie B. Hadlock, daughter, 9, born Il; Effie V. Hammond, stepdaughter, 18, born Il. Annie was actually a daughter of Sarah Bishop Hadlock. Stepdaughter Effie V. Hammond married Andrew Smith on 10/24/1882 in Mercer County.

The Rock Island County History indicates that Amasa had eleven children, one boy and ten girls but we have not been able to locate more than the above listed children of Frances, Harriet, Almira and Annie. The History tells us that Amasa arrived in Rock Island on May 6, 1877 and owned 60 acres of land there. Selma tells us that Amasa died in the Knox County, Illinois, Almshouse April 10, 1904 and is buried in the Almshouse cemetery with no stone.





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