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APPENDIX A - SELECTED FRAGMENTS

Aspie (Espey, Espy), Mr. James on 2 January 1783, claimed 640 acres north of the Cumberland beginning "200 yards below a Sinking Spring . . . and joyning [sic] a Claim of Daniel Turner now claimed by John Thomas [also a member of the congregation], and running North for Compliment."1 Espy was a signer of the 1780 Cumberland Compact and was listed on the 1787 Davidson County tax roll with one taxable.2 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.3 In 1792 he bought from Robert Carrothers "a negro fellow named Harkless"4 and, in 1793, from Isaac Pierce, bought "one negro fellow named Ned."5

Barnette (Barnett), Robert is listed on the Davidson County 1787 tax roll with one taxable.6 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll. He married Margaret Young 31 July 1789.7

Bell, Mr. Robert was appointed overseer to clear the trail from Kasper (Mansker's) Creek to Drake's Creek "sufficient for wagons to pass and the most direct way so as not to touch on any persons enclosures. . . . "8 He bought land on the Duck River 30 June 1788.9 "Inventory of estate of Robert Bell, deceased."10

Blackamore (Blakemore), Capt. John obtained, for £ 10 per 100 acres, a land grant from North Carolina 17 April 1786 above the mouth of Dry Creek.11 He is listed on the 1887 Davidson County tax roll with 8 taxables.12 Appointed an attorney to receive some slaves his new wife, Lucy Carter Blackamore, had sold.13 "Settlement of estate of John Blackamore, Jr., deceased"14 "Appraisement of estate of Jeremiah Hardin, deceased. Returned by John Blackamore, Andrew Davis and George Blackamore."15 "Appraisement of estate of Edmund Carnes, deceased. Made by John Blackamore, George Blackamore and Presley Hardin."16 "Will of John Blackamore, deceased. To Elizabeth Hudson's daughter Cinderella all and every part of my property . . . except such articles herein after bequeathed." To William Blackamore land lying "above the Bledsoe Lick Road up the Kentuck [sic] Road on Dry Creek also my still and tubs." His "smith tools" were left to George Blackamore and his cross cut saw, hand mill and all implements were left to Andrew Davis. Most of the real estate was left to Elizabeth Hudson.17

Blakmore (Blackamore, Blakemore), Captain George was the commander of a party of fifty men dispatched to attempt to catch the murderers of Major George Winchester, who had been "killed and scalped on the public road from his own house to the court house in Sumner County." Because they were riding "on good stolen horses" and enjoyed a full day's head start, the Indians escaped.18 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.19 John Marney sold to Thomas and George Blackamore "one negro man named Will and the plantation whereon I now live containing 234 acres."20 "George Blackamore" bought from Ephriam Hubbard a negro boy named Will.21 "Appraisement of estate of Jeremiah Hardin, deceased. Returned by John Blackamore, Andrew Davis and George Blackamore."22 "Appraisement of estate of Edmund Carnes, deceased. Made by John Blackamore, George Blackamore and Presley Hardin."23 "George Blackamore of Davidson County sold unto Susannah Blackamore of same place a negro boy named Manuel."24 "George Blackamore sold unto Nicholas Raymon, Samuel Chapman, and George Hall four negroes, namely, Will, Grace, Sall and Thomas, also one bay horse and other items.25

Blackamore, Captain William purchased "one negro woman" sold by "Sampson Williams, Sheriff of Davidson County on 15 Feb 1793 by virtue of an execution by me directed at the instance of Andrew Jackson, Esq. against William McGuinnis."26 "William Blackamore of Davidson County sold unto William Frazer of Sumner County, TN, a negro fellow named Harry."27

Boan (Bowen), Capt. William was born in Virginia in 1742 and by age 35 had "accumulated quite a handsome estate." He fought in the Colonial Army of Virginia against the French and Indians, in the Battle of Point Pleasant on 10 October 1774, at Fort Randolph in 1775 and had been with Russell's Rangers when they helped relieve the besieged fort at Watauga. During the Revolutionary War he served in the cavalry protecting the frontiers in Virginia and Tennessee from the British, Indians, and Tories, At the end of the war he, with 15 other soldiers of the Continental army, traveled "all through Kentucky and the Cumberland country" prospecting for the best places to locate their land warrants. Captain Bowen claimed land in what is now Smith County, Tennessee "but the larger portion in Sumner County, about twelve miles from Nashville," where his family joined him in 1784. For two years they lived in a double log house and then built the first brick house west of the mountains. In good condition, it stands today in the Moss-Wright Park at Goodlettsville.28 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.29 One "negro boy who is the possession of William Bowen" was sold to Andrew Jackson by George Augustus Sugg,30 and "William Bowen of Davidson County Mero sold unto Andrew Jackson a negro girl named Peg."31

Bosley, Captain James had served during the American Revolution as Captain of the Horse under Light-Horse Harry Lee.32 On 12 December 1783 he declared himself "bound to William Mecklin, Sr." for £1000 to guarantee Bosley's marriage to Rebeccah Mecklin and to name her as heiress of one third of Bosley's estate.33 He purchased, for £10 s10, Lot 55 "in ye town of Nashville," 6 July 1785.34 He was listed on the 1787 Davidson County tax roll with 17 taxables.35 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.36 Having "sold to Elijah Robertson, negroes,"37 he obtained a North Carolina land grant 10 July 178838 on which date was also recorded the sale of "one negro man named Sam and one negro girl named Dark."39 Bosley's Station is said to have been Northwest of the Bluff.40 In 1789 he sold four more slaves.41 He bought, from Thomas Smith, two stills containing 72 gallons, the other 91 . . ."42 Bosley's name appears frequently in the volumes of Davidson County Tennessee Wills and Inventories as a buyer and seller of lands and slaves. "The old Revolutionary soldier, Captain James Bosley . . . died in 1823 at the ripe old age of one hundred and four years."43

Boyd, Andrew is listed on the 1787 Davidson County tax roll as one taxable.44 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.45 Boyd, James is listed on 1787 Davidson County tax roll showing 1 taxable.46 In 1801 he bought from Richard Mirick "a negro named Judy."47

Boyd, John, born in Halifax County, Virginia 24 April 1780,48 he came to the French Lick with the Donelson flotilla.49 Signatory to the Cumberland Compact,50 he purchased "Lot No. One in ye Town of Nashville in ye State of North Carolina" for "four pound [sic] lawful money of ye said State," 16 August 1784.51 He is listed on the 1787 Davidson County tax list showing 2 taxables.52 Boyd sold "one negro fellow named George" to Frederick Stump in 1790.53 Surveys made of sundry lots being divided among the children "of John Boyd, Sr.54" He was the Sheriff of Davidson County from 1802 to 1807.55

Boyd, Robert was called to jury duty in Davidson County in 179056 and owned land on Drake's Creek in Sumner County.57 The "Will of Robert Boyd, deceased, left his estate to his wife Anne, sons William and John, and daughters Lettice, Catherine, Sarah and Mary. The instrument was witnessed by Andrew Boyd, John Hays and Thomas B. Craighead.58

Buckhannon (Buchanan), Mr. Archibald, born in Augusta County, Virginia 1748, is listed on the 1787 Davidson County tax roll with 2 taxables.59 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.60 He willed to his grandchildren "$1.00 to be divided equally," to daughters Lily Wills and Mary Jones $1.00 each, to daughter Ellen Buchanan $20.00, to his brother Robert 320 acres of land and to his son, James Buchanan, the remainder of his estate.61

Cackendall (Keykendall, Kuykendall, Kyrkendall), Capt. Simon was called for jury duty from Sumner County, where his land adjoined Mansker's,62 In 1788.63

Campbell, Alexander's name appears on the 1787 military payroll64 and he was called for Davidson County jury duty in 1790.65 He bought "a negro woman named Venice" from James Ross, another member of the congregation.66 He was the G-G-G-Grandfather of Madisonian Dorothy Boyd Dale (Autograph in her copy of Fulcher). In 1804 he signed a legal document dividing the lands of Thomas Cotton, deceased, to Allen Cotton and Noah Cotton, legatees.67 Jennet Walker bequeathed to her "loving daughter Marget Campbell", wife of Alexander, "one brass hackle, one black handkerchief and one muslin handkerchief."68 Alexander Campbell was one of several signers of a document ordering "her dower land" be laid off for Mary Beck, widow of John Beck.69

Cartwright, Robert was born in Princess Anne County, Virginia 22 February 1722. Cartwright came to the Bluff with the Donelson flotilla, signed the Cumberland Compact and is listed in 1787 with five taxables. He bought land on Dry Creek in 1788,70 Putnam mentions a Cartwright in connection with the Coldwater Expedition in 1787 but does not make clear whether or not Robert, who would then have been 65 years old, was among the troops.71 Robert Cartwright's will was dated 24 October 1809.72 His children "Thomas, Jacob, James, Robert, David and Jesse Cartwright and Elizabeth Rutherford" agreed to an equal division among them "of all the cotton, flax, hemp, flax seed, all the salt, wheat and all the fat hogs fit for pork."73

Clark (Clarke), Lardner opened, in 1786, the first dry goods store in the settlements.74 An "Obligation" was recorded in 1786 stating that Clark was "bound unto John McPherson . . . for one thousand Spanish Mill dollars" involved in a land sale "adjoining the Public Square in the town of Nashville. . . . "75 He was listed on the 1887 tax roll with one taxable.76 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.77 He bought Lot #7 in Nashville 3 July 1787.78 Sold to Thomas B. Craighead 200 acres "on the south side of Cumberland River in the big bend below the mouth of Stone's River. Joining Col. Armstrong's tract."79 He was called for jury duty in 178880 in which year he also bought "a negro man named Augustus."81 A few months later he also bought "a negro girl named Jemima" from Joshua Hadley.82 He served as a justice on the County Court in 1791.83 On 16 August 1802 the sale of the "estate of Lardner Clark, deceased" took place "at the house of Elizabeth Clark . . . admrx."84 Conner, Mr. William was on the 1787 tax roll with 1 taxable.85 Frazer (Frazier, Frazor), George bought land in 1788 on Sycamore Creek in what is now Robertson County.86 He was summoned for jury duty in the Superior Court of Law and Equity in 1789.87

Frazer (Frazier, Frazor), John was shot through the leg during an attack by 60 Cherokee upon a surveying crew at what is now called Defeated Creek in Smith County 2 March 1786.88 His name is listed on the 1787 tax roll with 1 taxable.89

Gillespie (Galaspy, Galespie, Gallespy, Gallespie), Mr. William was a recipient of two land grants.90 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll91 and he was called for jury duty November 1788.92 William "Gillaspie assee of Daniel Chambers assee of Jesse Rentfro" obtained a preemption of 640 acres on the Red River above Rentfro's Station.93 "William Gallaspie of Davidson County, NC" appointed an attorney to attend to sale of his negro man supposed to be a prisoner among the Creek Nation of Indians.94 William Gallaspy of Sumner Country took steps to collect "sums of money due me in the District of Natchez in the Dominion of his Catholic Majesty&c."95

Hall, William was a signer of the Cumberland Compact.96 Assisted by James Harrison and William Gibson, he erected a station in 1785 "a short distance above Bledsoe's Lick."97 He was appointed Magistrate of Sumner County at its inception in 1787.98 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.99 "At a short distance above Bledsoe's Lick [in 1787] they killed William Hall and his son, and another person."100 Putnam places "Gen. Wm. Hall" at Bledsoe's during the 20 July 1788 attack which resulted in the death of Anthony Bledsoe.101 General William Hall, who witnessed and described the death of his brother102 and referred to the death of his father, both killed by the Indians,103 culminated a military and political career as Governor of Tennessee from 16 April 1829 until 1 October of that year. His name appears in connection with an attack 27 April 1793 on one of the stations.104 He was among those assessed in 1816 for taxes in Civil District Number Sixteen.105

Hampton, Major may be the "M. Hampton" who was killed and scalped 29 November 1794 "on the northern frontiers of Sumner country."106 Hugh and Cornelia Walker's Index to the reprint links the "M" to Michael. The index to Clayton lists a Capt. Hampton involved in the Creek War in 1813107 and later in connection with a legal question.108

Hardin, Capt. John's name appears on the 1787 military payroll.109 He was called from Sumner County for jury duty on the Superior Court of Law and Equity in November of 1788110 and was excused.111 He served as the Recorder for that court in the May term of 1789.112 He bought land in Sumner County in 1790113 and was appointed Magistrate of Sumner county in 1787.114

Hays, Col. Robert was born in North Carolina about 1758 and married Jane Donelson 27 January 1786.115 He bought land 6 January 1785.116 He is listed on the 1787 tax roll with 4 taxables.117 He received North Carolina Land Grants.118 "Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Hays . . . acted under Colonel Robertson . . . " in the punitive expedition against the Indians near Muscle Shoals in 1787.119 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.120 On 7 August 1794 "Robert Hays bought a negro man named Dick from Finis Ewing. Wit. Thomas Hudson."121 Hays was one of the original members of the Board Of Trustees of the Davidson Academy122 and resigned from the Board in 1805, having "served nearly twenty years and had seldom been absent from the meetings. . . . "123 James Robertson, Robert Hays, John Gordon, and Samuel Barton were present at the last meeting of the County Court of the Territorial Government on 16 April 1796. There appears a Nota Bene that "Robt. Hays is wanting." Hays was one of the signers Putnam calls "the Invincibles, or Silver Grays,"124 of an undated document which concludes " . . . we agree to embody ourselves, aged and infirm as we may be, and to offer our services to our country in support of its laws and constituted authorities."125 The signature on that document of "Joe Coleman, Mayor of Nashville," would suggest a date between 1806 and 1808, during which years Coleman was the first mayor of Nashville. Hays owned two Town Lots in Haysborough.126

Hodge, Mr. Francis was a signer of the Cumberland Compact and a preemptor who had defended the settlements and who was granted 640 acres with no payment involved.127 Listed on the 1787 tax roll with 1 taxable, he served on the first grand jury.128 His name as "Francis Hodges" appears on the 1787 military payroll.129 "John Kirkpatrick of Davidson County sold unto Francis Hodge of same place a mulatto girl named Chain."130

Hope, Mr. John is listed on the 1787 tax roll with one taxable. He bought land from Lardner Clark and from John Johnston.131 On 4 November 1793 he bought from Reese Porter "a negro man named Sam."132 On 9 February 1796 a Bill of Sale recorded that Hope bought of John Nichols "a negro woman named Hannah and her child Nelly."133 He served as Justice in 1799.134 On 26 January 1803 he bought from Gideon Johnston of Rockingham County, NC "a negro man named Ben."135 The will of John Hope, deceased, left land and negroes to various family members and to "my daughter Frances my town lot in Haysborough."136

James, Mr. Thomas came to these parts from Natchez. "It should be mentioned here that accessions came to the Cumberland settlements . . . from the lower Mississippi." Refugees from the revolt against the Spaniards under Gen. Lyman, British subjects had captured Fort Panmure, on the Natchez bluff. When news came that the Spaniards had won at Pensacola and were racing up the Mississippi, Lyman's people "resolved to save their lives by timely flight." Those who had friends on the Cumberland evidently came up the Natchez Trace, from "forty miles above Natchez, through the Choctaw nation crossing the Tombigbee, Tennessee and other rivers, to the settlements on the Cumberland." Thomas James was among them.137 On 14 October 1799, he sold "unto Benjamin Drake a negro man named Sambo."138 Thomas James was in 1802 one of the trustees of Zion (Methodist) church on Lower White's Creek.139

John, Bn is not mentioned elsewhere.

Kirkpatrick, Mr. John is listed on the 1787 tax roll with two taxables. His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.140 He served as Justice in 1788.141 "John Kirkpatrick of Davidson County sold unto Francis Hodge of same place a mulatto girl named Chain."142 On 18 July 1801 he sold to Martin and Benjamin Greer 279 acres of land on Richland Creek.143 John Kirkpatrick's family is mentioned as one of the earliest in Civil District Number 19.144 He married Martha Buchanan in 1789145 and bought land. 146 During the October term of 1806 Martha Kirkpatrick and John Edmondson recorded the "Inventory of the estate of John Kirkpatrick, deceased."147

Linn (Lynn), Adam, listed on the 1787 Davidson County tax roll with one taxable, he received a Land Grant.148 A Justice in 1788,149 he was an early settler of Civil District Number Eighteen,150 the northern boundary of which coincides with the southern boundary of Civil District Number19.

Loggins (Loggans), Mr. William came by land, settled at Heaton's Station151 and was a recipient of a North Carolina land grant.152 He is listed on the 1787 tax roll with one taxable.153 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.154 Loggins served under Captain Rains' command in the Coldwater Campaign155 and served as juror in November of 1788.156 He obtained on 2 January 1783 a preemption on the East Fork of White's Creek "about 1/4 of a mile from the mouth of said fork." He signed (by "his mark") with James Hollis, Julius Sanders, Jonathan Drake and William Pruit a pledge, "We, the subscribers, do hereby promise to deliver to the Committee [of Notables] for the inhabitants, such horse or horses as they shall think proper to commit to my care, at any time they may order; and for the true performance of this, we do bind ourselves in the penal sum of twenty pounds specie. As witness our hands and seals this 1st day of March, 1783."157 In 1791 Loggins bought "one negro girl named Jenny" from James Cooper.158 On 15 August 1792 he sold "unto John and George Deaderick two negroes, a man named Yarrow and a woman named Fanny."159 From John and George Deaderick in 1794 Loggins bought "a negro woman named China."160 On 24 February 1795 he sold "unto William Condry of Hawkins County a negro man named Amos, another man named Ceasor, a negro woman named Chainey, one bay horse and other items."161 On 14 October 1795 Nicholas Perkins Hardiman, Sheriff of Davidson County entered a Bill of Sale "John Erwine against William Loggins be garnished by John Marney" for 11£, 19 shillings and 10 pence "being cost" and Andrew Jackson against Loggins "marked $8,37" for he "did expose to sale a negro woman named Chaney. . . . "162

MacAllister (McAllister, McAlister), James is listed on the 1787 Davidson County tax roll with one taxable.163 The name "James McColester" appears on the 1787 military payroll.164 The name appears as a creditor or credit "of the estate of Robert Patterson, deceased."165 On 13 February 1804 he sold unto Joseph Phillips "a negro man named Jacob."166

MacCutcheon (McCutchen), Patrick, a signer of the 1780 Cumberland Compact,167 is listed on the 1787 tax roll as were James and Samuel, each with one taxable. His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.168 He was the executor of the will of his brother John,169 and a recipient of a North Carolina land grant.170 He married Hannah Marshall 24 March 1789.171 In 1794 McLane, Robert Hays and Lardner Clark signed the estate settlement of Christopher Lightholder, deceased.172 With Joseph Hannah and William Murry he signed the "Appraisement and division of the estate [total $365.00] of Joshua Thomas, deceased.173

McLane (McLean, McClean), Ephriam preempted, as "assee of Thomas Fletcher," on 3 January 1783 640 acres on Brown's Creek.174 A recipient of a North Carolina land grant,175 he is listed on the 1787 tax roll with one taxable as is Ephriam McLane (2d).176 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.177 He purchased land from Green Hill,178 and served on the original Board of Trustees of Davidson Academy, at the first meeting of which he was chosen Treasurer. He was also chosen to superintend the surveying of the 240 acres of land given the school by the State and was appointed agent to rent out those lands.179 "Ephraim McLean, Sr." is mentioned as having sold "two farms and lands adjoining them" to the testator in the will of Philip Philips, deceased.180

McWhorter (McWhirter, McQhirter, Machirter), William, a signer of the Cumberland Compact,181 William "McQhirter" obtained 10 March 1783 a preemption of 640 acres on the north side of the Cumberland River on the fork of Sinking Creek.182 William McWhirter witnessed the signing of the will of Daniel Hackney.183 "We, George McWhirter, George Pirtle and Mary McWhirter, all of Davidson County being the only legatees of William MacWhirter, (sic) deceased, agreed to lay aside the will of said William McWhirter, deceased, and act with regards to the estate as if such Will had never existed. We also agree to divide the real estate into three equal parts &c, and we agree to sell the personal property at public sale and divide equally. This 16 Sept 1802. Wit: Thomas Harney and John Coffee."184

Mansko (Mansco, Mansker), Col. Gasper (Casper, Jasper, Kasper, Kaspar), one of the earliest (1769) Long Hunters,185 and explorers (1771) on the Cumberland,186 was the leader of a party which joined with that of James Robertson in planting the first corn near the French Lick Sulphur Spring in 1779.187 A signer of the Cumberland Compact,188 which allowed Mansker's Station two representatives in the "Tribunal of Notables," or "General Arbitrators."189 He was one of the 21-man "sallying-party" which rode out of Fort Nashborough on 2 April 1781 in pursuit of the enemy during the Battle of the Bluffs.190 He was chosen by the Committee of Notables to be "Lieutenant" at Mansker's Station, while the Captain chosen was Isaac Bledsoe.191 His name appears twice on the 1787 military payroll.192 By an act of the Assembly in 1783 he was made Captain.193 He served on the first grand jury in Davidson County.194 Mansker served as a Colonel in the 1795 Creek War.195

Mars, Mr. James and Mr. William are not mentioned elsewhere. The name James Mairs appears on the 1787 military payroll.196 A John Mays bought "one negro man named Bob" from Olive Shaw, John Renfro and Josiah Love on 8 August 1793.197 A William Marrs bought land from Anthony Crutcher adjoining James Marrs' corner on White's Creek in 1790.198

Martin, Mr. Archibald, listed on the 1787 tax roll with one taxable,199 was called from Davidson County for jury duty on the Superior Court of Law and Equity in November, 1790.200

Martin, Mr. Joseph was one of the commissioners for the United States at the Treaty Of Hopewell, the terms of which were such that "the progress of settlements was much retarded."201 Listed with one taxable on the 1787 tax roll,202 he was called from Davidson County for jury duty on the Superior Court of Law and Equity in November of 1788,203 served as Coroner of Tennessee County,204 and bought land from William Loggins and from Samuel Martin.205 In 1798 Jos. Martin witnessed a bill of sale conveying from James Shepherd to James Martin Lewis "twelve negroes, Bell, Charity, Ben, Hannah, Simon, Mary, Amy, Isom, Lucy, Job, Chaney and Cherry."206

Mitchel (Mitchell), Mr. James is not mentioned elsewhere. Neely, Mr. Isaac, a member of the Donelson flotilla,207 a signer of the Cumberland Compact,208 gave a deposition before the Committee of Notables on 18 January 1783 concerning the sale of a bed.209 He was one of the heirs of William Neely, deceased.210

Ore (Oar, Orr), Mr. William was called from Sumner County for jury duty on the Superior Court of Law and Equity meeting in Nashville in November of 1790.211 Philip Walker, deceased, left to "my son-in-law William Orr that negro girl that is now in his possession also 100 acres of land that I bought from Hays."212

Purtle, Mr. George obtained a preemption of 640 acres on the South side of the Cumberland river and on the West side of the West fork of Mill Creek.213 He was a signer, as "Pirtle," of the Cumberland Compact.214 On 9 September 1780 "Peter Renfro transferred over to George Pirtle all my Right Title and interest of Head Rights for 840 acres of land on the Cumberland."215 "We, George McWhirter, George Pirtle and Mary McWhirter, all of Davidson County being the only legatees of William MacWhirter, [sic] deceased, agreed to lay aside the will of said William McWhirter, deceased, and act with regards to the estate as if such Will had never existed. We also agree to divide the real estate into three equal parts &c, and we agree to sell the personal property at public sale and divide equally. This 16 Sept 1802. Wit: Thomas Harney and John Coffee."216

Rice, Sr. Mr. John was the defendant in a lawsuit for slander by John Montgomery before the Committee of the Cumberland Association in 1783. The case was dismissed by plaintiff before trial.217 "John Rice of town of Hillsborough, Orange County, North Carolina" was involved in land dealings in 1785218 and 1786.219 John Rice administered the inventory of the estate of James Moore, deceased at July court 1786.220 "Bill of Sale. We, John and Elisha Rice both of Davidson County, NC sold to Edgar and Faitt a negro girl named Nancy."221 From John Sappington Rice bought "one negro nam [sic] named Will."222 A merchant, he was the defendant in a case before the Superior Court of Law and Equity in November of 1790.223 On 14 June 1784 Rice devised his last will and testament, bequeathing to various survivers 21,000 acres of land.224

Robertson, Col. Elijah, brother to General James Robertson,225 was born 4 April 1744 in Brunswick Co. Virginia and there married Sarah Maclin in 1780.226 "We, Moses Shelby, Martin Armstrong and Anthony Crutcher of Davidson County, NC, are bound to Elijah Robertson of same county for 5664 $ 6 shillings and 8 pence."227 "I, Eusebus Bushnell of Davidson County, NC, is [sic] firmly bound to Elijah Robertson for forty thousand pounds."228 Signatory to 1776 Petition to South Carolina to annex the East Tennessee settlements.229 Assembled troops to pursue Indians who had wounded Col. James Robertson.230 Named an executor of the will of Rebecca Bosley, deceased wife of Captain James Bosley,231 he was listed on the 1787 Tax Roll with six taxables.232

Robertson, Col. James, "the founder of Nashville, and the Father of Tennessee,"233 was born 28 June 1742 in Brunswick County, Virginia. He married Charlotte Reeves and settled in East Tennessee in 1771.234 He was a member of the committee which drew up the 1776 Petition requesting North Carolina to annex the East Tennessee settlements.235 He led a party of explorers to the French Lick in 1779,236 and the party of emigrants from East Tennessee via the Wilderness Road to the French Lick later in the same year.237 He led a small party in 1781 to replenish the settlers' supply of ammunition.238 He was the President of the Committee of Notables, Justice of the County Court when Davidson County was organized in 1783 and the first representative of the County to the North Carolina Assembly.239 He procured acts to establish a land-office at Nashville; inspect tobacco; establish the Davidson Academy; establish the Superior Court for Law and Equity in the county; raising and sustaining a military force to protect emigrants to the settlements and for defense of the settlements.240 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.241 After resigning his military commission in 1795, he became the agent to deal with Indian affairs in 1796 and negotiated the treaty which terminated the Indian wars. He died in 1814.242

Ross, Mr. James, a signer of the Cumberland Compact243 and Justice of the County Court in 1791,244 he sold to Alexander Campbell, another member of the congregation, "a negro woman named Venice."245

Scott, James, a recipient of a North Carolina land grant246 and was listed on the 1787 Tax Roll with one taxable.247

Shannon, Mr. Samuel received a North Carolina Land Grant.248 He bought land from James Shannon.249 "Obligation. I, Samuel Shannon of Davidson County, Mero, bound to John Forde for 2000£ this 7 July 1780." The deal involved lands on Mill Creek and in Sumner County.250 His name appears in the 1787 Davidson County tax roll251 and he bought land on White's Creek.252 Appointed Coroner of Davidson County May, 1790,253 he served on a committee to settle a land dispute in 1801254 and served as Justice of the Davidson County Court in 1806.255 S. Shannon, justice of the peace, on 16 May 1816 married Frederick Stump, then 93 years old, to Catherine Gingery, a 25 year old bar maid.256 The "Will of Samuel Shannon, deceased, of Davidson County" dated 22 January 1808 was recorded in 1811.257

Shaw, Mr. Joseph is listed as one taxable on the 1787 Davidson County roll.258 The name appears in "Persons listed: to wit," in the "Inventory of sale of chattels of Jesse Morris, deceased."259

Stewart (Stuart), Mr. William may have been with the Donelson flotilla which included _________Stewart260 or ________ Stuart.261 A Stewart won a grievance before the Committee of Notables 18 January 1783.262 On 4 March 1783, Stewart obtained a pre empt of 640 acres on the East side of Stones river.263 10 March 1783, Stewart obtained a pre empt of 640 acres lying on Spring Creek about five miles from Cumberland river.264 . Stuart probably lived on White's Creek.265 Stuart called for jury duty in May 1789.266 Stewart killed by Indians near White's Creek 8 October 1792.267

Stump, Mr. Frederick was a signer of the Cumberland Compact.268 On 31 December 1782 he obtained preemption number one, 640 acres on White's Creek.269 This included his plantation begun in the year 1780 where Stump's Road, the Clarksville Trace,270 crosses the creek at a rocky ford. Stump was involved in a lawsuit before the Committee of Notables about land near Heatonsburg.271 On 5 August 1783 he was involved in trial concerning a quantity of iron.272 He was listed with four taxables on the 1787 Davidson County tax roll.273 His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.274 "Captain Stump had a real good dam, and a real good mill, and made right-down good corn meal, at his mill on White's Creek."275 A "Bill of Sale" records the purchase of "three cows and calves &c also other items."276 From Eusebius Bushnell he bought "two negro fellows."277 Daniel Young "sold unto Frederick Stump . . . two negroes, Emmanuel and Bob, and one mare."278 On 6 February 1790 he "sold to John Hynds six negros."279 In 1790 he bought from Isaac Thomas "a negro woman named Winefred and child named Sally. Wit: Robert Nelson."280 Stump reached agreement on a complicated real estate swap with David Rounsvall to make way for the mill Stump was "about to erect."281 In transactions with John Boyd and George Augustus Sugg, Stump bought "one negro fellow named George" and "a negro man named Jim," both recorded on the same page.282 "Bill of Sale. I, Lardner Clark of Davidson County, Mero, sold unto Frederick Stump, Sr. of same place a negro girl named Sall."283 About 1792 he established a distillery284 which was burned by Indians on 8 October 1792.285 In October of 1793, he was fined for overcharging for milling corn.286 Stump administered the estate of "Pleasant Lockett, deceased."287 On the next page is recorded his purchase of "a negro boy named Myars" from John Mays.288 23 August 1793 "Alexander Drumgold (Drumgoole) sold unto Frederick Stump a negro girl named Phillis."289 In 1797 "Josiah Erwin of Guilford County, NC sold unto Frederick Stump . . . a negro boy named Peter, two negro women named Easter and Rose."290 In 1801 it was recorded that as a result of a complicated land deal, "We Robert Nelson and Frederick Stump . . . are bound unto John Edmondson of Washington County, Virginia for ten hundred pounds of lawful money." On 17 June 1802 "Isaac Kittrell of Granville County, NC sold unto Frederick Stump a negro wench and child named Fanny and Rachel the wench."291 Stump was assessed for land taxes in District Number Twenty-Three (Whites' Creek area) in 1816.292 Frederick, age 93, was married to Catherine Gingery on May 16, 1816, by S. Shannon, justice of the peace. Catherine was twenty-five years old and a barmaid in his tavern.293 See also entries in our index.

"Thomas, John, William, Isaac, [and] John" are listed together as 4 taxables.294 Assuming the two Johns to be father and son, and assuming that the father would be in a better position to pledge 4 pounds, 7 shillings and 3 and 3/4 pence than would the son, we note: he served on first Davidson County grand jury.295 On 2 January 1783 he laid claim to land North of the Cumberland which had been claimed earlier by Daniel Turner.296 On 4 January 1783 he obtained a pre empt of 640 acres on the North side of the Cumberland about 4 miles above Nashboro.297 He was involved in a suit before the Committee of Notables 7 January 1783 concerning "two good cows, or heifer with calf."298 The name appears twice on the 1787 military payroll.299 In 1803 Joseph Brown returned his "Inventory of the chattels of John Thomas."300

Titus, Ebenezer was a signer of the Cumberland Compact301 and a member of the Committee of Notables.302 He was listed on the 1787 Davidson County Tax roll with 2 taxables.303 Member of the first Davidson County Grand Jury 7 October 1783.304. On 31 January 1797 Titus bought of Isaac Bateman "a negro girl named Jude"305 and on 8 June 1798 from the same Bateman, he bought James.306 On 3 June 1803 "I, Ebeneezer Titus of Davidson County, for love and good will for my son James Titus, I give one negro man named James."307 On 3 June 1803 "I, Ebeneezer Titus, for love and good will I bear my son George Titus, give unto him a negro man named Lewis."308 On 28 September 1803 "I, Ebeneezer Titus of Davidson County and not being able in health to transact my business has [sic] appointed James Titus, my son, my attorney."309

Walker, Mr. John was one of the two persons so named who were on the Cumberland frontier before 1800. One of them is listed on the 1787 Tax Roll with 2 taxables.310 He was called for jury duty on the Superior Court of Law and Equity in November of 1788 and again in May 1789.311 The other and presumably younger John Walker is listed with Phil Walker and Samuel Walker in the 1778 Tax Roll with 3 taxables.312 In 1796 John Walker signed as "Test:" in a slave sale.313 On 23 July 1802 Philip Walker sold to Jannet Walker, "widow, relict of Philip Walker, Sr., lately deceased, a negro woman named Hannah and one bay mare and colt" which had been the property of John Walker, Philip's brother.314

Walker, Mr. Philip is probably the Phil Walker mentioned above. His name appears on the 1787 military payroll.315 On 24 August 1797 he sold unto John Johnston "a negro woman named Famer."316 The will of Philip Walker leaves to "my beloved wife Jennet Walker a decent way of living on my estate also a negro girl named Feb. . . . " Oldest son John; sons-in-law Alexander Campbell, William Orr, Matthew McKance and William Neely; and nephew Enos Walker were left land and some negroes; the remainder of the estate was left to his son Philip.317

Wells, Mr. Heyden (Heydon, Headon) was a signer of the Cumberland Compact318 and a member of the Committee of Notables in January of 1783.319 A member of the first Grand Jury,320 he was listed on the tax roll in 1787 with 1 taxable. 321 On 27 April 1787 Arthur Macadoe, in "Letters of Attorney" appointed Haydon Wells to pay and recover debts and to convey land "on Macadoes Creek adjoining Wells Preemption."322 He sold "land in the District of Kentucky . . . together with all advantages and profits that I myself might or could enjoy under the laws of Virginia. . . . "323 He was called for jury duty on the Superior Court of Law and Equity in May of 1789,324 in which year he was appointed executor of the estate of Christopher Lightholder.325 "Letters of Attorney. I, Headon Wells of Davidson County, NC executor of the estate of Christopher Lightholder, deceased, appoint General Winchester, Esq. of Sumner County, NC my lawful attorney to sue for me and to recover any monies due to the above estate."326 "Bill of Sale. I, Jonathon Skinner of Davidson County, NC sold unto Headon Wells of same place one copper still, still caps, worm and furnace door. Test: James Williams and Robert Wells."327 "Inventory of estate of Christopher Lightholder, deceased. Returned by Headon Wells, admr of the estate as follows, to wit: one note on James Lenier for a negro man, a note on John Montgomery for $978.00, a note on James Lenier for 22£, also one note of James Lenier for 8£.328 "Settlement of estate of Christopher Lightholder, deceased. Made by Headon Wells, admr. This Aug 13, 1794. Signed by Ephraim McClain, Robert Hays and Lardner Clark."329 On 17 November 1799 "Haydon Wells of Montgomery County, TN sold unto John Erwine a negro man named Aaron."330

White, Mr. John arrived with the Donelson flotilla.331 On 4 March 1783 John White obtained a preemption of 640 acres lying on a creek called half pone on the North side of the Cumberland river.332 He was a witness in a lawsuit before the Committee of the Cumberland on 6 May 1783.333 White was killed by Indians in the Cumberland Mountains 15 July 1791.334 "John White of Camden County, NC" recorded a land deal for "571 acres being on the waters of Little Harpeth River . . ."335 "Bill of Sale. I, Zaphaniah Burges of Camden County, NC sold unto John White of Davidson County three negroes, China, Flora and Clara. This 1 Sept 1796. Wit: Benjamin White and John Perkins."336 On 29 September 1797 he bought of William Billings "a negro fellow named George."337

1 Griffey, Preemptors 2.
2 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
3 Griffey, "Payroll Of Militia Officers and Soldiers on an Expedition Against the Chicamauga Indians in 1787 from Davidson and Sumner Counties, Tennessee," Preemptors 52. Hereafter cited as Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.
4 Comp. by Helen C. and Timothy R. Marsh, Davidson County Tennessee Wills & Inventories Volume I - 1783-1816 (Greenville, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1990) 36. Cites vol. 1, page 269 dated 17 December 1792. Hereafter cited as Marsh, Wills and Inventories.
5 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 37. Cites vol. 1, page 273 dated 7 May 1793.
6 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
7 Davidson County TN Marriage Book I 4.
8 Mrs. John Trotwood Moore, ed. Tennessee Records, Sumner County Minutes, Volume I, 1787-1790 (Works Progress Administration: Tennessee State Library, 21 July 1936) 13.
9 Land Records, 1788-93, W.P.A. ts. Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville. 1. Hereafter cited as Land Records.
10 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 249. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 447 dated 23 April 1816.
11 Davidson County TN Deed Book A, 211.
12 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
13 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 24. Cites vol. 1, page 189 dated 11 April 1791.
14 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 31. Cites vol. 1, page 240 dated 9 June 1791.
15 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 71. Cites vol. 2, page 117 dated 9 April Term 1798.
16 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 72. Cites vol. 2, page 123 dated 9 June 1791.
17 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 112. Cites vol. 2, page 325 dated 6 December 1803.
18 Putnam, History 473-74.
19 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 49.
20 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 53. Cites vol. 2, page 38 dated January Term 1788.
21 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 31. Cites vol. 1, page 240 dated 9 June 1791.
22 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 71. Cites vol. 2, page 117 dated 9 April Term 1798.
23 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 72. Cites vol. 2, page 123 dated 9 June 1791.
24 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 167. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 16 dated 7 November 1808.
25 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 168. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 19 dated 18 November 1808.
26 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 38. Cites vol. 1, page 279 dated 13 August 1793.
27 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 135. Cites Will Book No. 3, page 63 dated 9 April 1806.
28 Jay Guy Cisco, Historic Sumner County (1909; Nashville: Charles Elder - Bookseller, 1971) 231-32.
29 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 49.
30 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 31. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 240 dated 21 December 1791.
31 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 36. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 269 dated 3 January (1793).
32 Sarah Foster Kelley, Children of Nashville . . . lineages from James Robertson (Nashville: Blue & Gray Press, 1973) 108.
33 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 3-4. Cites vol. 1, page 36 n.d.
34 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 17.
35 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
36 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 49
37 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 7. Cites vol. 1, page 67 dated 9 April 1788.
38 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 33.
39 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 9. Cites vol. 1, page 78 dated 10 July 1788.
40 Putnam, History 339.
41 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 10. Cites vol. 1, page 84 dated 7 Jamuary 1789.
42 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 11. Cites vol. 1, page 90 dated 13 December 1788.
43 Sarah Foster Kelley, West Nashville: its people and environs (Nashville: Sarah F. Kelley, Publisher, 1987) 58.
44 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
45 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 49.
46 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
47 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 120. Cites vol. 2, page 366 dated 15 June 1804.
48 Edythe R. Whitley, Rosters and Soldiers ­ The Tennessee Society of the American Revolution. Hereafter cited as DAR Roster.
49 Clayton, Davidson County 29.
50 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
51 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 29.
52 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
53 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 21. Cites vol. 1, page 163 dated 13 August 1790.
54 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 105. Cites vol. 2, page 283 dated 25 August 1802.
55 Clayton, Davidson County 92.
56 Davidson County Court Minutes A 27.
57 Davidson County Will Book 1 300
58 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 41-42. Cites vol. 1, page 300 dated 9 June 1791.
59 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
60 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.50.
61 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 143. Cites vol. 3, page 120 dated 7 October 1806.
62 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 150.
63 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 3
64 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors. 50.
65 Davidson County TN Court Minutes A 27
66 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 43. Cites vol. 1, page 313 dated 21 May 1794.
67 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 123. Cites vol. 2, page 379 dated 10 September 1804.
68 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 139. Cites Will Book No. 3, page 98 dated 24 June 1806.
69 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 231. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 230 dated 26 May 1815.
70 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 187
71 Putnam, History 259
72 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 181. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 82 dated 19 February 1810.
73 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 181. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 84 dated 21 February 1810.
74 Clayton, Davidson County 197.
75 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 103. Cites vol. 2, page 270 dated 5 February 1786.
76 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
77 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.51.
78 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 9. Cites vol. 2, page 264 dated October Term 1802.
79 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 311
80 Davidson County TN Court Minutes A 1
81 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 9. Cites vol. 1, page 80 dated 28 October 1788.
82 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 10. Cites vol. 1, page 84 n.d.
83 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
84 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 102. Cites vol. 2, page 264 dated October term 1802.
85 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
86 Land Records, 1788-1793 10
87 Davidson County Court Minutes A 8.
88 Putnam, History 246.
89 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
90 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 110, 152.
91 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 53.
92 Davidson County TN Court Minutes A 1.
93 Griffey, Preemptors 7.
94 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 24. Cites vol. 1, page 190 dated 3 July 1786.
95 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 46. Cites vol. 2, page 11 dated 23 January 1795.
96 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
97 Putnam, History 231.
98 Putnam, History 253
99 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.54.
100 Putnam, History 256
101 Putnam, History 298 n.
102 William Hall, Early History of the South-West (1852; Nashville: The Edward Ward Carmack Sumner County Public Library, 1968) 15. Hereafter cited as Hall, Early History.
103 Hall, Early History 17.
104 Putnam, History 416.
105 Clayton, Davidson County 373.
106 Putnam, History 494.
107 Clayton, Davidson County 81,
108 Clayton, Davidson County 104.
109 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 54.
110 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 3.
111 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 2.
112 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 7.
113 Land Records 23.
114 Putnam, History 253.
115 DAR Roster.
116 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 31.
117 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
118 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 206, 308-09.
119 Putnam, History 258.
120 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors. 54
121 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 51. Cites vol. 2, page 29 dated 14 August 1795.
122 Putnam, History 410.
123 Putnam, History 234.
124 Putnam, History 580.
125 Putnam, History 581.
126 Davidson County TN Deed Book E, 184.
127 State Record of NC XIV 629-30.
128 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
129 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 54.
130 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 41. Cites vol 1, page 299 dated 21 February 1794.
131 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 279, 342.
132 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 42. Cites vol 1, page 311 dated 20 May 1794.
133 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 58. Cites vol 2, page 55 dated 9 February 1796.
134 Clayton, Davidson County 89.
135 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 108. Cites vol 2, page 305 dated 2 July 1803.
136 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 129. Cites Will Book No. 3, page 17 dated 23 May 1805.
137 Clayton, Davidson County 42.
138 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 82. Cites vol. 1, page 311 dated 20 May 1794.
139 Clayton, Davidson County 325.
140 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.55.
141 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
142 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 43. Cites vol. 2, page 162 dated 2 December 1799.
143 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 139. Cites Davidson County TN Will Book No. 3, page 93 dated 19 June 1806.
144 Clayton, Davidson County 373.
145 Davidson County TN Marriage Book. I 3.
146 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 282.
147 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 146. Cites Davidson County TN Will Book No. 3, page 162.
148 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 217.
149 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
150 Clayton, Davidson County 373.
151 Haywood C and P 198, 232.
152 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 156.
153 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
154 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 55.
155 Clayton, Davidson County 61.
156 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 50.
157 Putnam, History 184.
158 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 30. Cites vol. 1, page 234 dated 13 July 1791.
159 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 40. Cites vol. 1, page 294 dated 20 September 1793.
160 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 44. Cites vol. 2, page 1 dated 21 August 1794.
161 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 51. Cites vol. 2, page 30 dated 15 August 1795.
162 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 53. Cites vol. 2, page 35 dated 24 November 1795.
163 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
164 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.56.
165 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 106. Cites vol. 2, page 362 dated 12 June 1804.
166 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 119. Cites vol. 2, page 35 dated 24 November 1795.
167 Clayton, Davidson County 35.
168 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 56.
169 Wills & Inventories, I, 1784-1794 W.P.A. ts. Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville 92.
170 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 245.
171 Davidson County TN Marriage Book I 31.
172 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 45. Cites vol. 2, np dated July term 1794.
173 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 53. Cites vol. 2, page 36 dated October term 1795.
174 Griffey, Preemptors 4.
175 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 177.
176 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
177 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 56.
178 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 177
179 Putnam, History 639-40.
180 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 64. Cites vol. 2, page 85 dated 3 February 1797.
181 Clayton, Davidson County 35.
182 Griffey, Preemptors 39.
183 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 113. Cites vol. 2, page 330 dated 10 Deceember 1803.
184 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 127. Cites vol. 2, page 399 (No date).
185 Clayton, Davidson County 15.
186 Clayton, Davidson County 16.
187 Clayton, Davidson County 20.
188 Clayton, Davidson County 35.
189 Putnam, History 90.
190 Clayton, Davidson County 30-31.
191 Clayton, Davidson County 37, 53.
192 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors 56.
193 Clayton, Davidson County 53.
194 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
195 Putnam, History 520.
196 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.56.
197 Marsh, Wills and Inventories39. Cites vol. 1, page 285 dated 13 August 1793.
198 Davidson County TN Deed Book B, 28
199 Clayton, Davidson County 58
200 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 27.
201 Clayton, Davidson County 56.
202 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
203 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 1.
204 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 11.
205 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 185.
206 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 30. Cites vol. 1, page 231 dated 3 March 1802.
207 Clayton, Davidson County 23.
208 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
209 Clayton, Davidson County 37.
210 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 97. Cites vol. 2, page 140 dated 30 November 1798.
211 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A 28.
212 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 76-77. Cites vol. 2, page 140 dated 30 November 1798.
213 Griffey, Preemptors 6.
214 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
215 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 20. Cites vol. 1, page 155 dated 13 August 1790.
216 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 127. Cites vol. 2, page 399 nd
217 Tennessee Historical Society File T44 Tennessee State Library and Archives.
218 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 3. Cites vol. 1, page 34 dated 23 August 1785.
219 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 4. Cites vol. 1, page 42 dated 7 November 1786.
220 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 5. Cites vol. 1, page 47 July court.
221 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 11. Cites vol.1, page 89 dated ­­ March 1789.
222 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 94. Cites vol. 2, page 94 dated 25 March 1787
223 Davidson County TN Court Minutes A 31-32)
224"Will of John Rice, deceased," Marsh, Wills and Inventories 32. Cites vol. 1, page 249 dated 11 August 1792.
225 Putnam, History 677.
226 DAR Roster.
227 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 3. Cites vol. 1, page 29 dated 8 July 1785.
228 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 3. Cites vol. 1, page 31 dated 30 August 1785.
229 Putnam, History 48.
230 Putnam, History 316.
231 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 5. Cites vol. 1, page 51 dated 15 May 1786.
232 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
233 Clayton, Davidson County 133.
234 Clayton, Davidson County 126
235 Clayton, Davidson County 128
236 Putnam, History 64
237 Putnam, History 66
238 Clayton, Davidson County 129
239 Clayton, Davidson County 130.
240 Clayton, Davidson County 130-31.
241 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.58.
242 Clayton, Davidson County 131-33.
243 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
244 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
245 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 43. Cites vol. 1, page 313 dated 21 May 1794.
246 Davidson County TN Deed Book A 115.
247 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
248 Davidson County TN Deed Book A, 131.
249 Davidson County TN Deed Book A, 181
250 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 21. Cites vol. 1, page 161 13 August 1790.
251 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
252 Land Records 1788-1793.
253 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes A, 18.
254 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 93. Cites vol. 2, page 213 dated 22 January 1801.
255 Clayton, Davidson County 89.
256 Julia Cook Guice, Frederick Stump: The Rest of the Story (Biloxi, MS: Published for the author, 1991) 83. Hereafter cited as Guice, Stump.
257 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 197. Cites Will Book No. 4, page 161 dated 26 November 1811.
258 Clayton, Davidson County 58
259 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 109. Cites vol. 2, page 309, Spring Term 1803.
260 Clayton, Davidson County 23
261 Putnam, History 75
262 Minutes, Committee of the Cumberland Association, Tennessee Historical Society File T44 Tennessee State Library and Archives.
263 Giffey, Preemptors 27.
264 Giffey, Preemptors 36.
265 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes Book A, 27.
266 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes Book A, 7
267 Putnam, History 389
268 Clayton, Davidson County 35
269 Giffey, Preemptors 1.
270 Haywood C and P 98, 126.
271 Putnam, History 189.
272 Putnam, History 192.
273 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
274 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.59.
275 Putnam, History 168.
276 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 10. Cites vol. 1, page 84, 24 February 1788.
277 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 17. Cites vol. 1, pages 126-27, dated 19 October 1789.
278 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 23. Cites vol. 1, page 179, dated 13 January 1790.
279 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 22. Cites vol. 1, page 172, dated 15 November 1790.
280 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 18. Cites vol. 1, page 132, dated 13 April 1790.
281 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 19. Cites vol. 1, page 144, dated 17 April 1790.
282 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 21. Cites vol. 1, page 163, dated 13 August 1790.
283 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 35. Cites vol. 1, page 258, dated 9 November 1791.
284 Putnam, History 384.
285 Putnam, History 389.
286 Putnam, History 411.
287 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 45. Cites vol. 2, page 8, Oct Term 1794.
288 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 45. Cites vol. 2, page 9, 20 November 1794.
289 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 48. Cites vol. 2, page 20, dated 29 May 1795.
290 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 62. Cites vol. 2, page 75, dated 22 May 1797.
291 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 100. Cites vol. 2, page 254, dated 26 August 1802.
292 Clayton, Davidson County 375.
293 Guice, Stump. 83.
294 Clayton, Davidson County 58
295 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
296 Giffey, Preemptors 6.
298 Putnam, History 182
299 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.60.
300 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 114. Cites vol. 2, page 335, dated 15 December 1803.
301 Clayton, Davidson County 35.
302 Clayton, Davidson County 37.
303 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
304 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
305 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 60. Cites vol. 2, page 71, dated 26 May 1797.
306 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 71. Cites vol. 2, page 120, dated 8 June 1798.
307 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 119. Cites vol. 2, page 363, dated 12 June 1804.
308 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 120. Cites vol. 2, page 364, dated 12 June 1804.
309 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 118. Cites vol. 2, page 353, dated 28 March 1804.
310 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
311 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes Book A 1, 7
312 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
313 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 58. Cites vol. 2, page 55, dated 9 February 1796.
314 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 104. Cites vol. 2, page 275, dated 10 March 1803.
315 Griffey, "Payroll," Preemptors.60.
316 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 84. Cites vol. 2, page 169, dated 13 May 1800.
317 Metro Archives, holograph, Phillip Walker.
318 Clayton, Davidson County 35
319 Clayton, Davidson County 36.
320 Clayton, Davidson County 88.
321 Clayton, Davidson County 58.
322 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 26. Cites vol. 1, page 216, dated 5 April 1791.
323 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 8. Cites vol. 1, page 70, dated 3 July 1788.
324 Davidson County.TN Court Minutes Book A 7.
325 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 12. Cites vol. 1, page 96, April Term 1789.
326 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 17. Cites vol. 1, page 129, dated 9 January 1790
327 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 27. Cites vol. 1, page 221, dated 13 November 1790.
328 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 29. Cites vol. 1, page 230, July Term 1791.
329 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 45. Cites vol. 2, no page, July Term 1794.
330 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 82. Cites vol. 2, page 161, dated 30 November 1799.
331 Clayton, Davidson County 23.
332 Griffey, Preemptors 31.
333 Minutes of the Committee, File T44 Tennessee Historical Society Tennessee State Library and Archives.
334 American State Papers I, 323.
335 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 43. Cites vol. 1, page 310, dated 20 May 1794.
336 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 61. Cites vol. 2, page 69, dated 25 May 1797.
337 Marsh, Wills and Inventories 77. Cites vol. 2, page 142, dated 8 February 1799.

Research was conducted by Guy Alan Bockmon and Deborah Oeser Cox.

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