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(Updated June 26, 2002)

 

DEATH STATISTICS.
_______

Record of Mortality in Dallas and
Oak Cliff from Dec. 26
to Jan. 2.

________

    Below is given the week's mortuary statistics of Dallas for the week Dec. 26 to Jan. 2, as compiled by the local undertakers:
    The majority of the deaths noted are either from pulmonary disease, or had their origin in the variable weather conditions lately prevailing, which have been active agents in the spread of la grippe and pneumonia.
    The list follows:
    Inge, Ollina Marie, 3 months, 18 days, Victoria Hotel, Jan. 1; la grippe.
    Williamson, Mrs. Elizabeth Adella, 60 years, 182 Cochran street, Jan. 2; phthisis pulmonatis.
    Davis, Mrs. _______, colored, [age, place or date of death, or cause of death, not given]

- January 3, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4-6.
- o o o -

RECORD OF DEATHS.
________

Increased Mortality in the City for
the Week Ending Saturday.

________

    The mortuary record for the past week shows considerable increase over previous weeks, owing doubtless to the sudden changes in the weather, which have been experienced within the last few weeks, and which have entailed an increased amount of sickness, the most prevalent maladies being pneumonia and la grippe.
    The record of deaths in the city as reported by the local undertakers is as follows:
    Davis, Mrs. Carrie, colored, Jan. 1, 62 years, South Central avenue; pneumonia.
    Hedgepeth, James, Jan. 2, 25 years, Main and Akard streets; pneumonia.
    Johnson, Caroline, colored, Jan. 2, 38 years, North Dallas; morphine poisoning.
    Wilson, Mrs. Elizabeth, Jan. 2, 60 years, 182 Cochran street; phthisis pulmonalis.
    Rowley, Mrs. F., Jan. 3, 53 years, 210 Gano street; liver complaint.
    Oliver, J. D., Jan. 3, 35 years, 271 Germania street; pulmonary trouble.
    Robinson, Jessie L., infant of, Jan. 3, 4 months, 271 Wall street; infantile paralysis.
    Day, Winton, Jan. 4, 9 months and 7 days, 239 South Ervay street; cause unknown.
    Bishop, Sarah, Jan. 5, 53 years, corner Hawkins and Elm street; pneumonia.
    Eason, Bolivar, Jan. 5, 71 years, 115 Willow street; catarrhal fever.
    Johnson, Mrs. A. A., Jan. 5, 56 years, Fairmount avenue; cause not given.
    Willard, Sarah, Jan. 6, 17 months old, daughter of D. S. Willard, 191 McKinney avenue; convulsions.
    Lemon, Francis Catherine, Jan. 6, 7 months, 343 Routh street; cause not given.
    Toole, Miss Margarette, Jan. 6, 80 years, 781 Ross avenue; old age.
    Foy, Dr. Samuel M., Jan. 7, 58 years, 213 Annex avenue; pneumonia.
    Scruggs, Mrs. G. F., Jan. 7, 81 years, 387 Live Oak street; old age.
    Crosier, Mrs. Wm., Jan. 8, 21 years, 762 Main street; la grippe.
    Stanley, Bessie May, Jan. 8, 5 months, 113 Pauline street; cause unknown.
    Keeling, Mrs. Lizzie, Jan. 9, 65 years, 208 North Akard street; pneumonia.
    Borgus, Ella, colored, Jan. 9, 2 years, 407 Hall street; death caused from a burn.

- January 10, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6-7.
- o o o -

SIXTEEN DEAD.
________
The Buckner Horror Assumes Even
Greater Proportions Than
at First Thought.

_______

Fifteen Graves Dug in One Day in the Home
Burial Grounds.

_________

MELANCHOLY WORK OF RECOVERY WENT ON ALL SATURDAY
________

Eight Inmates in the Hospital--Substantial Do-
nations Sent Out Saturday Over the
T. and P.--Relief Measures Set on
Foot Within the City.

______

DEAD.

Bertie Britton, 17 years.
Marvin and Milton Britton, twins, 10 years.
Carlos Jones, 6 years.
Willie Richards, 9 years.
Grover Cleveland Yarbrough, 12 years
Oscar Jackson, 12 years.
Preston Kribbs, 10 years.
Williame Miller, 7 years.
Virgil Nelson, 9 years.
Eugene Black, 9 years.
Richard Marks, 9 years.
Arthur Edwards, 10 years.
Oscar Cowherd, 7 years.
Roy King, 6 years.
Chas. O'Bannon, 13 years.
_______

INJURED.

Dick Richards, 10 years, face, hands, feet and body burnt; not expected to live.
Dan Gray, 6 years; badly burned about waist, feet and hands; will die.
Charley Frind, 10 years; burned fatally about face, arms and body.
Frank Chaffin, 7 years; burns not serious.
Jim Scott, 8 years; not fatally burned; expected to recover.
Earl Doodle, 7 years; condition not serious.
Sammy Henderson, 11 years; face, hands and body burned; will recover.
Sudie Britton, 18 years; ankle and back sprained.

(to view entire article, click here)

- January 17, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5-7; p. 10, col. 7.
- o o o -

DEATH LIST.
_______

Mortuary Record for the Week
Jan. 9 to Jan. 16.

_______

    The following deaths occurred during the week as reported by the local undertakers:
    Bell, David, Jan. 9, 21 years, North Dallas; pneumonia.
    Banks, Mrs. Mary, colored, Jan. 10, 33 years, Akard street and Santa Fe Railway; cause unknown.
    Cox, Harry, Jan. 10, 53 years, M. K. & T. Railroad yards; struck by an engine.
    Reidel, Gustave, Jan. 11, 52 years; pneumonia.
    Marriatt, Mrs. Emma, Jan. 11, 60 years, corner Cole avenue and Caroline street; cancer.
    Wells, Miss Minnie E., Jan. 11, 21 [years], ________ streets.
    Gabrel, Allie, infant of, Jan. 12, 2 months, 300 Peabody avenue; asthma.
    Walker, John, infant of, colored, Jan. 12, 409[?] Boll street; premature birth.
    Anthony, J. W., Jan. 12, 52 years, North Dallas; heart failure.
    Weatherington, King, colored, Jan. 13, 46 years, Maple avenue; consumption.
    Morville, Mrs. Bridgett, Jan. 14, 53 years, corner Crowdus and Sutton streets; la grippe.
    Buer, William, Jan. 14, 26 years, North Central and Pacific avenues; overdose of laudanum.
    Whitfield, Sarah A., Jan. 15, 75 years, 451 Jackson street; la grippe.
    Bohny, Leopold F., Jan. 15, 57 years, 273 Cochran street; diabetes.
    Cox, Mrs. M. J., Jan. 15, 38 years, 595 Elm street; la grippe.
    Smith, Miss Fayette, Jan. 16, 22 [years]; [con]sumption.
    Braden, Joe, Jan. 16, 43 years, North Dallas; consumption.
    Black, Anthony, colored, Jan. 16, 9 years, 123 Paris street; death resulting from burns.

OAK CLIFF.

    Hoya, Wilber Vonda, Jan. 11, 1 year, 1 month, corner Fourth street and Jefferson avenue; meningitis.
    Thurmond, Mrs., Jan. 16; Fifth street; cause of death not given.

WEST DALLAS.

    Wright, J., Jan. 11, 12 years; pneumonia.
    Lindenblatt, Mrs. Justine, Jan. 14, 55 years; pneumonia.

- January 17, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 4.
- o o o -

RECORDS OF DEATH.
_______

City in Particularly Healthy Con-
dition the Past Week.

_______

    During the week just ended, twelve deaths were reported to the local undertakers as occurring within the city. The various physicians say that the general health of the city is excellent, it being practically free from any contagious or infectious diseases. The cases of la gripe, so numerous last week, have sensibly decreased in number.
    Smith, Miss Fayette, Jan. 16, 22 years old, 681 McKinney avenue; consumption.
    Weems, Marion Allen, Jan. 16, 3 months, 17 days, 135 Henry street; broncho-pneumonia.
    Fendrich, Charlie, infant of, Jan. 17, corner Montezuma and Hawkins streets; inanition.
    Scripture, Mrs. R. M., Jan. 17, 36 years, 205 Cantegral street; septic poisoning.
    Unknown colored child found in Caruth's pasture, north of the city; premature birth, Jan. 18.
    Kronz, Annie, Jan. 18, 5 years, 101 Ardrey street; laryngitis.
    Stone, Gus, infant of, Jan. 18, week old, corner Hickory street and Central avenue; inanition.
    Holden, Benjamin F., Jan. 19, 37 years, 262 Browder street; consumption.
    Cane, Mollie, colored, Jan. 20, 30 years, 387 Canton street; consumption.
    Tackitt, F. M., Jan. 20, 64 years, 180 Bookhout street; la grippe.
    Belsterling, William, Jan. 21, 73 years, 167 North Pearl street; general debility.

- January 24, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

SUDDEN DEATH
_______

Farmer Strickland Expires
Without Warning.

_______

In the Presence of His Son--Death
Due to Heart Trouble Caused
by Injuries Received.

_______

     T. W. Tucker and his brother, J. W. Tucker, living about three and a half miles east of Dallas on White Rock creek, came to town Saturday to make arrangements for the burial of their father-in-law, Mr. M. Strickland, who died unexpectedly Friday afternoon.
     The deceased, who was 64 years old, lived with his son, John Strickland. He had been in good health till about two months ago, when he was injured in a runaway, since which time he had been complaining of pains in the heart and fluttering of the heart.
     Although complaining, he was not confined to his bed, and Friday afternoon, went out in the yard and began sawing wood.
     He had been working but a few minutes, when he stopped suddenly, reeled and exclaiming "Wait a minute," fell to the ground and almost immediately expired. He was carried into the house by his son, who witnessed the occurrence and a doctor summoned, who pronounced death to be due to heart failure.

- January 31, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 1.
- o o o -

MORTUARY LIST.
_______

Record of Deaths in the City and
Oak Cliff During the Past Week.

______

    The following are the mortuary statistics for the week just ended as reported by the local undertakers:
    Adams, Lillian, Jan. 24, 3 months, corner Pearl and Williams streets; inanition.
    Heaton, Mrs., Jan. 24, 63 years, 166 N. Lamar street; la grippe.
    Holden, Era, Jan. 24, 2 months, 144 McKinnon street; inanition.
    Darby, Ed S., Jan. 24, 47 years, 109 Seeger street; pneumonia.
    Tarantino, Ludwig, Jan. 24, 73 years, 126 South Jefferson street; heart disease.
    Gale, Mrs. Irene, Jan. 25, 51 years, 151 Live Oak street; cancer.
    Unknown white infant about three weeks old, picked up at the intersection of Akin and Motley streets, Jan. 25; cause of death unknown.
    Scott, Cora Louise, Jan. 25, 6 months, 314 Hawkins street; spinal trouble.
    Noren, Charles, infant of, Jan. 26, 2 weeks, 462 Young street; inanition.
    Smith, Pearl, Jan. 27, 2 years, 142 Nettie street; cause not given.
    Behl, George, Jan. 28, 21 months, 393 Williams street; pneumonia.
    Washington, Isaac, colored, Jan. 30, 49 years, 684 Elm street; pneumonia.

OAK CLIFF.

    Hulme, G. J., Jan. 26, 82 years, 147 Jefferson street; old age.

- January 31, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 2.
- o o o -

MORTUARY MENTION.
______

Record of Deaths Within the City
for the Week Just Ended.

______

    The record of deaths in the city the past week, as compiled from the death certificates in the hands of the local undertakers, is as follows:
    Lloyd, E. C., colored, Jan. 30, 19 years, Oak Lawn; consumption.
    Lytle, Isaac, colored, Jan. 30, 11 years, 256 Wood street; consumption.
    Barbee, W. F., Jan. 3, 74 years, 543 Elm street; Brights disease.
    Stapleton, Mrs. M. A., Jan. 31, 57 years, 119 Hunt street; consumption.
    Johnson, Pearl, Jan. 31, 23 years, South Pearl street; causes not given.
    Schoepel, Otto, Jan. 31, 24 years, 237 Caroline street; malignant jaundice.
    Cooper, Mrs. Lizzie, Feb. 1, 51 years, corner Corinth street and H. & T. C. Ry.; pneumonia.
    Miles, Mackey, infant of J. H. Miles, Feb. 1, 2 months, 123 Burford street; jaundice.
    Burge, Mrs. Sallie J., Feb. 2, 69 years, 197 Eakin street; la grippe.
    Storer, Mrs. Leola, Feb. 2, 17 years, corner Allen and Juliette streets; tuberculosis.
    Clark, Lonnie, colored, Feb. 2, 15 months, 399 Cottage Lane; inanition.
    Mayfield, J. F., Feb. 3, 56 years, corner Maple avenue and Mahon street; Brights disease.
    Ekerly, J. W., infant of, Feb. 3, 2 months, 114 Colby street; congestion.
    Caruth, Capt. Walter, Feb. 3, 71 years, Ross avenue; paresis.
    Sanders, R. W., Feb. 4, 46 years, 178 Beaumont street; complication of diseases.
    Jenkins, W. H., Feb. 5, 61 years, 149 St. George street; asthma.
    Burroughs, Mrs. Mary, Feb. 5, 42 years, 119 Dexter avenue; cancer of stomach.
    Jones, Emmett, infant of, colored, Feb. 6, 249 Boll street; still born.

OAK CLIFF.

    Fielding, Samuel, Feb. 5, 40 years, Ninth street; pneumonia.

- February 7, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6-7.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     The infant of Emmett Jones, colored, died yesterday at ___ Boll street.
     Samuel Fielding, a resident of Oak Cliff, died Friday at his home on Ninth street. He was 40 years old and death resulted from an attack of pneumonia.

- February 7, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 4.
- o o o -

MORTUARY STATISTICS.
______

Official Death List of the City for
the Week Just Ended.

________

    The list given below shows the mortality of the city for the week ending Saturday, Feb. 13, as compiled from the records of the various undertakers.
The list, which is as follows, is very light:
    Jones, Ernest, infant of, colored, Feb. 6, 249 Boll street; still born.
    Williams, Mrs. George, Feb. 7, 24 years, 558 Gaston avenue; cause not given.
    Carter, Mrs. J. M., Feb. 7, 68 years, 493 Live Oak street; effects of la grippe.
    Robinson, Alice, colored, Feb. 9, 36 years, South Browder street; cause not given.
    Haney, Ernest B., infant of W. M. Haney, Feb. 9, 10 months, 125 Caroline street; inflammation of the brain, caused by teething.
    Sharpe, E. H., Feb. 10, 51 years, Gaston avenue; complication of diseases.
    Sapp, Nancy, Feb. 10, 7 months, 311 Boll street; pneumonia.
    Tanke, Nannie, Feb. 10, 4 months, corner Kentucky and Burns streets; cause not given.
    Childress, Gertie, Feb. 11, 18 years, 202 Jefferson street; consumption.
    Davis, Mrs. Lillie, Feb. 11, 24 years, 310 Commerce street; morphine poisoning.
    Chambers, John, colored, Feb. 12, 714 Main street; infirmities attendant on old age.

- February 14, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

PERSONAL.

    John Chambers, an old-time colored resident of Dallas, died Friday night at his home, 714 Main street. He was 73 years old.

- February 14, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

DEATH LIST.
_______

Falling Off is the Matter of Mor-
tality Noticeable This Week.

_______

    The mortuary record for the week shows a smaller number of deaths than any previous week for three months.
    The following is the list of deaths as furnished by the local undertakers:
    Hughes, John, Feb. 15, 50 years, corner Crowdus and Sutton streets; pneumonia.
    Leachman, Mrs. Elizabeth, Feb. 18, 73 years, 141 Beaumont street; infirmities attendant upon old age.
    Corbett, William, Feb. 19, 32 years, corner Grand and Central avenues; tuberculosis.
    Smith, Mamie, colored, Jan. 20, 24 years, 279 N. Lamar street; cause not given.
    Murry, Thomas, Jan. 20, 87 years, 178 Sumpter street; general debility.
    Burns, Jim, Jan. 20, 55 years, Main street; morphine poisoning.

OAK CLIFF.

    Smith, Raymond, Feb. 15, 3 years, near Lake hotel; pneumonia.

- February 21, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE WEEK'S RECORD.
______

Persons Who Died in the City
Last Week.

_______

    During the week just ended, six deaths were reported to the local undertakers as having taken place within the city. The weekly record of mortality is as follows:
    Bledsoe, S. T., infant of, Feb. 21, one month, 449 Elm street; la grippe.
    Balay, Mrs. W. L., Feb. 21, 36 years, corner Allen and State street; fever.
    Newport, Mrs. Sarah C., Feb. 22, 75 years, corner Crockett and Juliett streets; la grippe.
    Peters, Frank A., Feb. 23, 48 years, 531 Elm street; heart trouble.
    Kennedy, Mary, colored, Feb. 23, 45 years, 686 Main street; heart failure.
    Evarts, Annie Bernard, Feb. 23, 7 months, near corner of Worth street and Haskell avenue; pernicious fever.

- February 28, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 3.
- o o o -

COMMITTED SUICIDE.
_______

Josie Woodville, Pauper, Takes
Her Own Life.

_________

     Josie Woodville, a pauper on the county farm, died yesterday from an overdose of morphine taken with suicidal intent. She was an invalid, and had an allowance of three pellets of morphine a day. She saved the pellets up until she accumulated enough to kill her.
     The deceased was 37 years old, and had led a fast life in Dallas.

- March 1, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

 

CITY NEWS NOTES.

    E. K. Love, a traveling man who died last week in Fort Worth, was buried here yesterday from the residence of his brother, W. B. Love, 125 Gano street.
    Frances Slaughter, colored, aged 23 years, died yesterday afternoon at 108 Indiana street.
    Mrs. Jessie Hawkins, the wife of Clyde Hawkins, an employe of W. Peters, a meat market man, died yesterday at the residence, corner McKee and Snodgrass streets. The deceased was 18 years old.
    Mrs. Sarah E. Todd, the wife of I. H. Todd, living at 178 Cockrell avenue, died Sunday, aged 52 years.
    The seven weeks' old child of Earl Burnett, died yesterday at the home of its parents on Stafford street, West Dallas.

- March 1, 1897, p. 8, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

MYSTERIOUS DEATH
_______

Albert Reinhardt Murderously
Assaulted

________

SATURDAY NIGHT IN NORTH DALLAS.
________

Head Crushed by Blows with a
Club-The Details of the
Homicide.

________

     The details of the mysterious killing of Albert Reinhardt, Saturday night on College Hill, in North Dallas, a necessarily brief notice of which was given in Sunday's Times Herald, were obtained yesterday from the sheriff's office and the friends of the deceased.
     Reinhardt met his death some time between 10 and 11 o'clock and was found in a dying condition only a few steps from the house of John Buhrer, who lives just north of the Episcopal college. He had spent the evening at the Buhrer residence, having gone out there on the 8 o'clock car. Mr. Buhrer was not at home when he arrived and, Mrs. Buhrer, after inviting him in and sitting awhile, left to get her husband, who was visiting his sister, Mrs. Fred Mosher, who lives in the neighborhood. Mr. Buhrer returned, accompanied by Will Mosher and Ernest Slackman, and the four men sat down and played cards until 10:30 when Rheinhardt rose to go, saying he must catch the last 11 o'clock car back to his boarding-house in East Dallas, run by Tom McChristy and known as the Missouri House.
     Mosher and Slackman, who work for Buhrer, who is a dairyman, and sleeps in the barn on the premises, accompanied Rheinhardt to the gate, some twenty steps from the door and then entered the barn some seventy-five feet north of the gate.
     Some ten or fifteen minutes after the three men had gone, Mrs. Buhrer told her husband that she thought she heard someone calling her name directly south of her window. Mr. Buhrer, who was about ready to retire, got up and went out into the yard at her request and was horrified to find Rheinhardt lying near the fence, crying and moaning: "I'm hurt, badly hurt! Can't you get me to the house?"  In the darkness, Buhrer could not make out what was the matter and he ran to the barn and called Mosher and Slackman, who were just ready to go to bed. The three men secured a lantern and went over to Rheinhardt, who lay where he first found moaning and crying.  By the light, it was seen that he had been terribly used, his whole forehead and nose being crushed in seemingly from the effects of a terrible blow.
     Blood flowed freely from his face and dripped along the ground as he was carried to the house. He was apparently suffering great pain, so much so, as to be in a semi-conscious state and incapable of making any statement sufficiently clear to elucidate the mystery of the assault.  He fainted as he was being carried into the house, and although every effort was made to revive him, he died unconscious at 2:10 Sunday morning.
     The news of the killing reached Dallas about an hour later and within half an hour, Sheriff Cabell and his deputies were on the ground.
     The instrument that was used on Rheinhardt was a heavy oaken stick, which was picked up by the sheriff at the point where the unfortunate man was found.  Further investigation establishes the fact that the stick must have been taken from the Buhrer wood pile, which is west of the house, while Rheinhardt was clubbed south of the yard fence.
     Sheriff Cabell believes that the man was killed without a struggle and not from motives of robbery, as money was found on his body, along with a watch.  He was evidently struck by someone deliberately and given no opportunity to defend himself, the first heavy blow crushing all consciousness out of him in its descent.
     The Mosher and Slackman boys, who were in the barn, heard no cries although they were no further off than was Mrs. Buhrer.
     Rheinhardt was employed by the Hughes Bros. Manufacturing Company on South Ervay street, and was about 38 and 40 years old and unmarried.  He was a native of Switzerland, where he has a brother, and came to America about four years ago.  He had the reputation of being industrious and of good habits, and is now known to have had any enemies who would have reason to seek his life.
     Justice Skelton held an inquest over the remains of the murdered man yesterday, the verdict of the jury being that the deceased came to his death at the hands of a party or parties unknown.
     The funeral took place yesterday afternoon under the auspices of the Sons of Hermann, of which the deceased was a member. The interment was at Greenwood cemetery.
     Sheriff Cabell and Deputy Sanderson were met this morning riding in from the scene of the homicide, but stated that there were no further developments in the case and that no arrests had been made.

- March 1, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE REINHARDT KILLING
_______

Sheriff's Department Working on
the Case but No Arrests.

     The mystery shrouding the killing of Albert Reinhardt, in North Dallas Saturday night, still remains intact. There are no new developments in the case, and so far, the sheriff's department has made no arrests, although the officers are still working on the case for additional facts.

- March 2, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Mr. J. W. Bowman, father of Mr. E. L. Bowman, died this morning at 7:10 o'clock. Funeral from residence on Oakley avenue at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning.
     Mr. J. W. Bowman, a well known resident of Dallas, died of quick consumption at his home on Oakland avenue, near the cemetery at 7:15 o'clock this morning, aged 53 years. He leaves a wife and five children, Edgar, Harry, Arthur, Mrs. Charlie Marder and Mrs. Adolph Marder. The funeral will be held Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock from the house.

- March 2, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

DEATH LIST.
_______

The Weekly Record of the City's
Mortality Officially Reported.

_______

    The following is the record of deaths occurring in Dallas for the week February 27-March 6, as reported by the local undertakers:
    Hawkins, Mrs. Clyde, Feb. 28, 18 years, corner McKee and Snodgrass streets; septic poisoning.
    Slaughter, Frances, colored, Feb. 28, 23 years, 108 Indiana street; consumption.
    Todd, Mrs. Sarah E., Feb. 28, 52 years, 178 Cockrell avenue; consumption.
    Reinhardt, Albert, Feb. 28, 38 years, North Dallas; concussion of the brain.
    Barker, R. T., March 1, 45 years, corner Lamar and Main streets; hemorrhage of the lungs.
    Shoulman, Max, March 1, 32[?] years, 152 Jefferson street; general debility.
    Bowman, J. W., March 2, 53 years, Oakland avenue; quick consumption.
    Clark, Vina, colored, March 4, 25 years, 463 San Jacinto street; heart disease.
    Cole, Alice, infant of, March 4, 300 Peabody avenue; still born.
    O'Bannon, Mrs. C. A., March 4, 68 years, 505 Live Oak street; tuberculosis.
    Nitchman, Daisy Lillian, March 4, 12 months, 145 Trinity street; pneumonia.
    Stegmann, Albert, March 5, 27 years, North Dallas; pistol shot wound.
    Ramsey, Ed. C., March 5, 214 Masten street; cause not given.
    Fahrlander, Stephen, March 5, 45 years, corner Crowdus and Williams streets; cancer.
    Brockman, Mrs. Susan, March 6, 70 years, 607 Browder street; cause not given.
    McDonald, Merle, March 6, 7 months, 129 Lincoln street; cause not stated.

WEST DALLAS.

    Burnett, Earl, infant of, Feb. 28, 7 weeks, Stafford avenue; cause not given.

- March 7, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 6.
- o o o -

MORTUARY MENTION.
_______

Record or Deaths in the City for
Week Ending Saturday.

_______

    During the week just ended, the following deaths were reported to the local undertakers as occurring within the city:
    McCray, Ben, March 7, 22 years, 506 Main street; uremia.
    Houseman, Elsie, March 8, 5 months, 232 Caroline street; cause not given.
    Campbell, Lizzie, colored, March 8, 25 years, 822 Commerce street; cause not given.
    Traylor, Royal Lockett, March 8, 11 years, 261 North Harwood street; purpura.
    Talley, Laura, colored, March 8, 28 years, 551 Commerce street; puepural fever.
    Williams, Leslie, March 9, 9 years, corner Haskell avenue and Worth street; fever.
    Bullus, Irene, March 12, 1 years, 119 Dexter avenue; cause not given.
    Stewart, Elihu, colored, March 12, 12 years, corner Pacific avenue and Harwood street; septicemia.

FAIRLAND.

    Ross[?], Addie, March 9, 24 years, congestion of the brain.

- March 14, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 2.
- o o o -

MORTUARY RECORD.
_______

The Number of Deaths in the City
During the Week No-
ticeably Small.

    During the past week, but a small number of deaths occurred in the city. Those reported by the local undertakers at the close of the day Saturday were as follows:
    Cullum, Mrs. Elizabeth J., March 14, 58 years, 626 Cedar Springs road; cause not given.
    Stewart, John, March 15, 23 years, Maple avenue; consumption.
    Hinsdale, Mr. and Mrs. C. M., infant of, March 16, 3 days, 338 Cole avenue; inanition.
    Storey, J. C., March 17, 61 years, 449 Wood street; congestion of the stomach.
    Ewing, T. B., March 19, 43 years, 244 Main street; intestinal congestion.
    Putnam, Mrs. Kezrah, March 19, 24 years, 175 First avenue, Exposition park; pulmonary tuberculosis.
    Crim, J. L., March 19, 67 years, 426 San Jacinto street; congestive chill.
    Snelling, Mrs. L. E., March 29, 56 years, 436 Pacific avenue; nervous prostration.

OAK CLIFF.

    Webster, Mrs. Jane S., March 18, 52 years, 151 Grand avenue; congestion of the brain.

- March 21, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 7.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Mrs. L. E. Snelling, a widow aged 56 years, died Saturday at her home, 436 Pacific avenue, of nervous prostration. The deceased had no relatives in the city and the remains will be shipped to-morrow to Bremond, Texas, for interment.

- March 21, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 2.
- o o o -

DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS.
_______

Were Instituted by John Buhrer
Saturday.

________

     What is probably the final chapter in the double tragedy that culminated in the death of Albert Reinhardt and the suicide of his slayer, Albert Stegman, was a suit for divorce filed in the District court, Saturday by John Buhrer from his wife, Elizabeth, or Elise Buhrer. Mrs. Buhrer is the woman of whom young Stegman and Reinhardt were both enamored, a love fatal to both in the end. Her husband is a dairyman and they live on a farm just east of the Episcopal college.
     Buhrer sues for divorce on the ground of unfaithfulness. In his petition, he states that they were married in September, 1885, by Rev. H. De Gelfeld (sic), of Dallas, and have lived together up to the current month; that the defendant, during the last year, has utterly disregarded her marriage vows and kept company with other men and has been guilty of unfaithfulness to her marriage vows with the deceased, Albert Stegman, on a number of occasions specified in the petition.
     The most sensational part of the petition is as follows:
     "That on the 27th day of February, 1897, co-respondent, Alfred Stegman, in a frenzy of jealous rage, committed the crime of murdering one Albert Reinhardt on the premises of plaintiff, and that thereafter, when the officers of the law were hunting for the murderer, the defendant concealed him on the premises of plaintiff, and that being discovered, the said murderer killed himself by a shot fired into his head out of a pistol in his own hand.
     "That defendant having frequently declared that she could not live without her said paramour, the aforesaid Alfred Stegman, and in the event of his leaving her, would kill herself, she did immediately after the suicide of him, the said Alfred Stegman, swallow a deadly dose of sulphate of morphine, and that the prompt efforts of a physician only prevented her from accomplishing her suicidal attempt."
     The petitioner, for these varied reasons, accordingly prays that divorce be granted him.

- March 21, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 7
- o o o -

Death of a Union Veteran.

     T. W. Hill died this morning at 4 o'clock at his home, 358 Williams street, of paralysis, from which he had been a sufferer for several years.  He was a dyer and had a shop on Main street. He was 56 years old and leaves a wife and several children.  Hill was a Union soldier and the interment will take place this afternoon at Greenwood, in the G. A. R. lot, under the auspices of the local posts.

- March 22, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

MORTUARY MENTION.
_______

The Record of Deaths Within the
City Small Last Week.

________

    During the week just ended, thirteen deaths occurred within the city, none of them being from either infections or contagious diseases. The mortality was quite light compared with that of other weeks.
    The deaths reported to the local undertakers were as follows:
    Snelling, Mrs. L. E., March 20, 56 years, 436 Pacific avenue; marasmus.
    Hall, Mrs. Theresa C., March 20, 59 years, 263 Gaston avenue; dropsy.
    Hill, John T. W., March 21, 55 years, 358 Williams street; paralysis.
    Mitchell, William B., March 22, 3 years, 307 Pacific avenue; concussion of the brain.
    Smith, Mandy, infant of, colored, March 22, 1 day, 288 Swiss avenue; inanition.
    Tines, Laura, March 22, 37 years, Good street, near Bryan; cause not given.
    Wilson, Grant, infant of, colored, March 22, 3 days, Montezuma street; abnormal development.
    Owens, Samuel, March 22, 1 year and 9 months, Hall street and Swiss avenue; drowning.
    Davis, Mrs. Lula E., March 23, 21 years, 432 Browder street; tuberculosis.
    Burns, Mrs. H. E., March 24, 30 years, Chestnut street; tuberculosis.
    Fisher, Thos. B., March 26, 63 years, Haskell avenue; cystitis.
    Culley, Mrs. Minnie, March 26, 22 years, 212 Cockrell avenue; cause not given.
    Akins, Cordelia, colored, March 26, 4 months, 185 Live Oak street; spinal meningitis.

OAK CLIFF.

    McAdams, Mrs. N. J., March 23, 43 years, 154 Twelfth street; cancer.

- March 28, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

RESOLUTIONS OF SORROW.
_______

The G. A. R. Post Remembers a
Dead Comrade.

_______

    The following resolutions were adopted at the last meeting of the G. H. Thomas Post No. 6, G. A. R. held at their headquarters:
whereas, it has seemed good to an All Wise Providence to remove from our midst, our worthy and beloved comrade, Patrick Lamar.
    Whereas, the fraternal and social relations and that comradeship which is cherished by the comrades of this Post for Comrade Lamar makes it fitting that we record our appreciation of his many noble qualities of heart and mind.
    Resolved, That in the death of our comrade, our order has lost a good man and our country and the flag, a true defender.
    Resolved, That we extend a comrade's sympathy to the family and the friends of the deceased.
    Resolved, That a copy of the foregoing resolutions be transmitted to the family of deceased and that our Post charter be draped in mourning for thirty days.

 W. F. COTTMAN,
 W. E. DAUFORTT,
 J. R. HARNED,
 Committee.

- March 28, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     H. Jansen, aged 44 years, died this morning at his home, 975 Elm street, after a six months' illness. Death was due to tuberculosis.

- March 29, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 6.
- o o o -

MORTUARY ITEMS.
_______

A Small Week's Record of Deaths
in the City.

_______

    The mortuary statement for the week just ended, shows a record of five deaths occurring within the city. The list for the city and suburbs is as follows:
    Rose, Victoria, colored, March 27, 25 years, 191 Canton street; consumption.
    Dunnegan, Leona, colored, March 28, 15 years, corner Porter and Henry streets; cause not given.
    Jansen, Hans, March 29, 44 years, 975 Elm street; tuberculosis.
    Crutchfield, Henry, colored, March 30, 48 years, corner Lamar and Young streets; cause not given.
    Hieatt, Marie, April 1, 4 years, 494 Flora street; meningitis.

WEST DALLAS,

    Moore, Sylvester, April 1, 2 years; cause not given.
    Drew, Mary, April 2, 21 years; meningitis.

OAK CLIFF.

    Fakes, C. O., infant of, April 3, Betterton circle; premature birth.

- April 4, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

MORTUARY MENTION.
_______

Seven Deaths in the City for the
Week Just Ended.

_________

    The record of mortality within the city last week was small:
    Only seven deaths were reported by the local undertakers. The list is as follows:
    Beard, A., April 7, 44 years, 145 Latimer street; consumption.
    Fletcher, Frank, 45 years, April 7, 566 Main street; typhoid fever.
    Unknown infant, April 8, 3 weeks, Preston Street Infants' Home; inanition.
    Raube, E. L., April 9, 30 years, Live Oak street, near Pacific avenue; meningitis.
    Anderson, Lena, infant of, April 9, corner Austin and Columbia street; still born.
    Baldridge, Mrs. W. F., April 9, 49 years, 232 Live Oak street; hemorrhage of the lungs.
    Gravitt, Robert H., April 10, 37 years, 147 Collin street; pulmonary tuberculosis.

- April 11, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.
_______

     Mrs. W. F. Baldridge, aged 49 years, the wife of a traveling salesman, died suddenly of hemorrhage of the lungs Friday morning at her home, 232 Live Oak street. She had lived in the city about two years. The remains were shipped over the north bound Central this morning to Plano for interment.
     Robt. H. Gravitt, well known among Dallas printers, died yesterday at 147 Collin street. He was 37 years old and had been suffering from consumption for a long time. Of late, he endeavored to restore his health by traveling. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon from the First Congregational church and will be held under the auspices of the local typographical union.

- April 11, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

MORTUARY RECORD.
_______

Marked Falling Off is the Death
List Last Week.

_______

    There was a marked falling off in the death rate of the city the past week, according to the mortuary reports made by the local undertakers.
    The death record was as follows:
    Powers, Rev. R. M., April 11, 57 years, Cedar Springs road; heart trouble.
    Cason, Elihu, April 13, 72 years, corner Commerce and Broadway; carbuncle.
    Ford, Mattie, infant of, colored, April 15, 128 Peake alley; premature birth.
    McCord, Mr. and Mrs. D. C., infant of, April 15, 9 days, Fitzhugh street; inanition.
    Robinson, Mattie, colored, April 17, 60 years, 542 Marilla street; heart failure.

OAK CLIFF.

    Foster, Mr. and Mrs. infant of, April 13, 2 days; inanition.

- April 18, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6.
- o o o -

MORTUARY RECORD.
________

The Death List for the City for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    During the week just ended, twelve deaths were reported as occurring in the city.
    The official list, as compiled from the certificate in the hands of the local undertaker, is as follows:
    Wilson, Helen, April 18, 3 years, 165[?] South Akard street; cedemia of larynx and glottis.
    Treadwell, Mrs. Edward, colored, April 18, 25 years, 434 Young street; Brights disease.
    Unknown infant, April 19, 1 month, Preston street home; cholera infantum.
    Dean, May C., April 20, 52 years, 111 Veal street; jaundice.
    Prescott, H., April 20, 36 years, Oak Lawn; tubercular abscess.
    Weimer, Mrs. A. P., April 20, 49 years, corner Commerce and Harwood streets; pulmonary hemorrhage.
    Ross, Pena, colored, April 20, 37 years, Ashland street, near Alamo; tuberculosis.
    Nichols, Mrs. W. J., April 21, 29 years, 125 Clark street; consumption.
    Blackburn, Mrs. George, April 22, 24 years, 185 Ross avenue; consumption.
    Unknown infant, April 22, 1 month, infant's home on Preston street; inanition.
    Moore, Claude, April 23, 7 months, Preston street home; cholera morbus.
    Cornette, Eddie, colored, April 23, 17 years, Duncan street; consumption.

OAK CLIFF.

    Brittain, Fay, April 23, 4 years, Betterton circle; congestion of the stomach.

- April 25, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 7.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     The two-and-a-half months old infant of Minnie Horigan died last night at the Rescue Home on Peabody avenue. It had been ailing for some time.

- April 27, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

 

MORTUARY RECORD.
_______

Deaths in the City for the Past
Seven Days.

_______

    During the week ending Saturday, ten deaths were reported to the local undertakers as occurring in the city.
    The list of the week follows:
    Meinert, Joseph Leo, Jr., April 24, 10 months, 119 Highland street; cause not given.
    Lincecum, Abe, April 26, 51 years, East Dallas; pneumonia.
    Delfraise, Ernest Jules, April 25, 18 months. 131 Crockett street; cerebral meningitis.
    Horigan, Winnie, infant of, April 26, two and a half months, 300 Peabody avenue; marasmus.
    Meggs, Stephen, infant of, April 26, Smith street; inanition.
    Rodearmiel, Jacob, April 27, 30 years, 187 Patterson avenue; consumption.
    Hinkson, Sam, April 28, 29 years, 100 Ardrey street; cause not given.
    Hunter, Cora, infant of, colored, April 28, 2 months, Haskell avenue, near fair grounds; croup.
    Hepple, Wm, April 28, 70 years, 1167 Main street; strangulated hernia.
    Cupinall, Mrs. R. J., April 30, 60 years, 139 Cottonwood street; cause not given.

OAK CLIFF.

    Johnston, H., child of, April 28, 6 years; brain fever.
    Martin, Mrs. E. F., April 29, Seventh street; cause not given.

OAK LAWN.

    Jones, T. N., April 28, 58 years; acute mania.

- May 2, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 2.
- o o o -

MIDNIGHT SHOOTING.
_______

J. A. Wright and C. H. Springer Ex-
change Shots.

_______

THE SHOTGUN VS. THE SIX-SHOOTER.
________

Jules Baker, Colored, Accidentally Killed by
Springer in the Scrap, Which Was
Over a Cheap Buggy.

     Just after 12 o'clock last night, there was an exchange of shots between J. A. Wright and Charles H. Springer, the former using a shotgun and the latter, a revolver, at the home of Mr. Wright, 157 N. Akard street, where Springer is a boarder and lodger. The house is the two story frame next to the little brick on the southwest corner of Akard and Emma streets. Mr. Wright was in the back yard and Mr. Springer in the small ground room on the north end of the building in the rear of the small front room, which he occupied as a lodging. The room Springer shot from is unfurnished and used as a store room.
     Neither of the principals was wounded, but Jules Baker, a negro who was with Mr. Wright, was shot through the head and instantly killed, presumably from a bullet from Mr. Springer's pistol.

______

     Immediately after the shooting, Mr. Wright reloaded his gun and with the weapon in his hand, started down town to find an officer to surrender to. Failing to meet one, he stepped into Apperson's drug store and asked the night clerk to telephone for an officer, but before the clerk could do so, Mr. Wright left the store and walked to the jail, where, after entering, he complained that he never saw such a town; that he had walked all over it in search of a policeman, deputy sheriff or constable, but failed to find one. Mr. Wright stated that he knew there was a dead negro and he believed also a dead white man at 157 North Akard street.
     Deputy Sheriff William Work and Constable Powers, of precinct No. 4, proceeded to Wright's home.
     The body of the negro was found just inside the rear door of the vacant brick building. The bullet had taken effect at the root of his nose and come out at the back of his head.
     Mr. Springer was found in his room. The screen of the window of the vacant room in the rear of Springer's room had been cut with a knife. One charge of shot had passed into the room and lodge in a sewing machine, and another had lodged in the window frame.
     By this time, a number of police officers and citizens had assembled. Mr. Springer stated that he heard a noise in the rear room, and gathering his pistol, he entered it to see what had produced the noise. He noticed that the screen of the window looking to the north had been cut, and on looking out, saw a man level a shotgun at him. He ducked out of the way and fired two shots with his pistol just as the man with the shotgun opened up and fired four shots. Mr. Springer looked no more.
     Mr. Springer was arrested and conducted to the county jail.
The body of the negro was turned over to Undertaker Loudermilk, and was inquested by Justice Skelton.

________

     A Times Herald reporter called at the jail this forenoon to interview the men. Mr. Wright was in a cell on the third floor. He declined to make a statement in regard to the events of the night, but wanted to know if the negro was dead; and, in reply to the question, said the negro had been working for him for two years; that he was unmarried. When asked how the negro came to his death, Wright said his death was not the result of an accident, but he refused to throw any further light on his taking off.
     Mr. Springer, who was found in the office of the jail talking with a lawyer, said he did not wish to make any statement for publication.

________

     Mr. Wright, about 40 years old, has lived in Dallas twelve or thirteen years and is a house mover by occupation. He has a wife and two daughters.
     Mr. Springer, a single man, 30 or 32 years old, is a traveling salesman and has made Dallas headquarters for seven or eight years. Lately, he has been city salesman for Powell's cigar factory.

_______

     The negro Baker came originally from Clarksville, where his parents and other relatives live. Undertaker Loudermilk has wired the father of deceased for directions to disposal of body.

______

     Mr. Walter Middlesworth, proprietor of the saloon at the corner of Akard street and Pacific avenue, and a roomer at Mrs. Wright's house, said to a Times Herald reporter:
     "I room at the house occupied by Mrs. Wright and, for some time, Mr. Springer and myself roomed together and have been warm, personal friends. From what I know and can learn of the trouble between Wright and Springer, it all arose over a buggy transaction. Springer and Wright, previous to a few days ago, have been the closest of friends--chums, you might call them. They were constantly together when unemployed, have gone on fishing and hunting expeditions and been constantly in each other's company and were seemingly very agreeable. Several weeks ago, Springer secured a position as city salesman for a cigar factory. Mrs. Wright owned a little bay mare, which was standing idle most of the time and Mr. Wright asked her to let Springer use it in canvassing the city, saying that it was standing up there getting fat and a little exercise would do it good, or words to that effect. Mrs. Wright consented and Springer bought a light single buggy--buckboards, I believe they are called--to which to drive the horse. He had used the mare for several days, or perhaps a week or so, when Mr. Wright called his wife's attention to the fact that the mare was getting thin and told her to make Springer quit using it. Mrs. Wright informed her husband that she would do nothing of the kind, telling her husband that if he wanted Mr. Springer to quit driving the mare, to go and tell him himself. Mr. Wright made some remonstrance, but did not tell Springer to quit using the mare. I am informed, however, that he made his daughter do it for him. Springer was therefore without a horse, and as he did not with to buy one, he run his buggy in a shed and made his rounds on foot. Mr. Wright wanted to buy the buggy and Springer set a price of $15 on it. Wright offered $14, but Springer would not take it. A few days ago, Friday or Saturday, I believe, Springer sold the buggy to another party for $15. This angered Wright considerably and he upbraided Springer for his action, and some little trouble began to brew. Saturday morning, Wright began drinking. Soon afterwards, he appeared on the streets with a shotgun, cursing and using boisterous language. He was arrested later on and remained in the holdover until late in the afternoon. After his release, he began drinking again and has kept it up since that time. Sunday afternoon, I am told, Springer was sitting in the dining room reading. Wright entered the room from Mrs. Wright's apartments holding in his hand a double-barreled shotgun, which he leveled on Springer, saying, ":Look out, Springer; I am going to kill you." Springer thought he was joking and told him to be careful. Wright cocked both hammers of the gun and started to level it again, saying, "Springer, I am sorry this has come up," at which Springer darted under the table. Witnesses interfered and the trouble ended.
     "For the last three days, Wright has been drinking heavily and has been hanging around here, part of the time having his shotgun with him. He has been heard to mutter such things as "I'll fix him;" "he acted the s--- of b----h with me, and I'll get him," but he was regarded as being nutty over drink and but little attention was paid to him. Last night, he came into my place several times and held conferences with Jules Baker, the negro, at the end of one of which, Baker told me that Wright wanted him to go to his (Wright's ) wife and patch up their differences, adding that he thought Wright was nutty.
     "I thought no more of the matter until I was informed of the shooting last night and learned of the subsequent developments. I have known Mrs. Wright for a number of years and know her to be a perfect little lady, who has been badly treated by a worthless husband."

______

     Mrs. Wright was seen at her home by a Times Herald reporter this morning. She is a very small woman, black hair, brown eyes, olive complexioned, about 40 years of age, and is very good looking. She was busily engaged in preparing dinner, and seemed but little agitated over the occurrences of the night.
     "Mrs. Wright, I would like to get your version of last night's tragedy," said the reporter.
     "I have no version. The first I knew of the occurrence was when I was awakened by the pistol shots, and after everything was over, some of the gentlemen told me I had better go up stairs and remain there. Later on, Mr. Middlesworth came and aroused us and then I learned more about the occurrence," she replied pleasantly.
     "Have you no idea what caused the trouble between your husband and Mr. Springer, which led to the shooting?"
     "I have not. I don't know what the trouble was."
     "Did you know of this buggy transaction, and do you believe that caused it?"
     "Yes, I knew of the buggy transaction and knew that Mr. Wright was awful angry at Mr. Springer for selling the buggy, but I regarded that as merely a children's quarrel and never thought of it seriously. In fact, Mr. Springer told my husband that if he was mad at him for that, that he (Springer) would go down and buy the buggy back and make him a present of it."
     "Did not Mr. Wright level a gun at Mr. Springer in your house Sunday and threaten to kill him?"

[approximately four lines of text missing]

...know from what I have heard that Mr. Wright did draw a gun on Mr. Springer and threaten to kill him."
     "Do you believe that the trouble between Mr. Wright and Mr. Springer was caused by the buggy transaction and nothing else?"
     "So far as I know, this is the only difference between them, and as I said before, I didn't regard it seriously. I knew that my husband was very angry. He was also drinking heavily and I believed, that as soon as he got straight, everything would be all right."
     "You and your husband do not live together, do you?"
     "No. He treated me so mean, and so bad, that I just told him that I was getting too old to have so much trouble heaped upon me and that I had rather take my two daughters and make a living for myself, although it would be mighty hard work, rather than be subjected to his cruel treatment. So, he packed up his things Sunday night and moved out. The little mare that Mr. Springer used was my individual property and Mr. Wright came around her Monday morning and began cursing and beating it for spite. He then took it down to Stone's livery stable and put it in there with instructions to let nobody have it. I went down later and tried to get it out, but couldn't without legal papers, and I didn't have the money to get them."
     "Did your husband send the negro, Jules Baker around here last night to ask you to make up with him?"
    "He came himself and I met him out at the fence in the front yard. I told him that I hoped the time would never come when I would have to live with him and that I had to work too hard and had too much trouble to live with and be mistreated by him. He then went away and I have not seen him since. this was about 9 or 9:30 o'clock." Mrs. Wright could scarcely control her emotion as she made this statement, and past recollection seemed to force the tears into her eyes.
     "Mrs. Wright, the suspicion so far aroused by the developments in this case reflect on you, and I hope you understand the necessity of placing the facts before the public in the proper manner."
     "I know they do," and here the little woman, no longer able to control her feelings, burst into tears, "and I have heard that my husband has said unkind things about me, but God knows I have stood enough mistreatment and have been caused enough trouble without having any reflections, of which I am innocent, cast upon me. I know nothing about the trouble except what I have told you."
     The reporter was then shown through the house. Adjoining the large dining room, in which Sunday's trouble originated, on the north side, is the room occupied by Mrs. Wright and daughter, Maud, and west of this room, is the kitchen. On the north side of Mrs. Wright's room with a door opening in to her room, is a little room used for a sewing or storage room with a window in the north side. East of this room, with a door opening into it, is where Springer was sleeping. The screen on the window in the little room is the one which was cut. Through this window, the shots were fired and Mrs. Wright and daughter were only few feet away. The negro was found dead in a little brick building adjoining Springer's room.
     Circumstances seem to justify the conclusion that Wright went there prepared to kill somebody and took the negro along for some purpose. A stray bullet from Springer's pistol ended the negro's life.

_______

     Justice Skelton, who viewed the body of Baker, has not yet taken any testimony, and has, of course, reached no conclusion. He, however, says there is no doubt Baker was killed by a pistol ball passing through his head.

_______

     At 3 o'clock this afternoon, Police Officer Henry Waller appeared before Justice Skelton and made affidavit against Wright and Springer, charging them with shooting with intent to kill.
Neither of the prisoners has, up to this afternoon, asked for a hearing for to give bond, though they will probably do so before night.

- May 6, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-3.
- o o o -

PERSONAL.

     Mrs. H. C. Fallon, a daughter of the late Dr. J. C. Storey, died yesterday evening at her home, 441 Jackson street. Death was due to an attack of pleuro-pneumonia.

- May 6, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

BLOOD POISONING.
_______

A Boy's Death Caused by a Bois
d'Arc Thorn in His Foot.

     Andrew Foster, the 12-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Foster, living on a farm two and one-half miles south of Oak Cliff, died this morning from the effects of blood poisoning.
     Three weeks ago yesterday, the little fellow, who was a nephew of Justice of the Peace J. A. Creel, of Oak Cliff, stuck a bois d'arc thorn in his left foot. The foot began to swell and became so painful that the boy had to take to his bed. Yesterday, the foot was amputated, but too late to save the boy's life.

- May 6, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

MORTUARY RECORD.
_______

The Death List for the Week Just
Ended in Dallas.

    During the week just ended, sixteen deaths took place in the city. Only four of these were children, the remainder being adults.
    The death list reads as follows:
    Jackson, J. J., colored, May 1, 25 years, Grand avenue; pneumonia.
    Jones, Sallie, colored, May 1, 40 years, 553 Central avenue; dropsy.
    Washington, Ella, colored, May 1, 26 years, corner Boll and Bryan streets; consumption.
    Streidenberger, S. L., May 2, 69 years, corner Main and Cadiz streets; Bright's disease.
    Gilbert, A., colored, May 3, 28 years, 273 South Lamar street; epilepsy and congestion of the brain.
    Moore, Robert L., May 3, 16 months, 1165 Commerce street; cause not given.
    Slaughter, Leona, colored, May 4, 12 years, 108 Indiana street; phthisis.
    Powers, Mariah, colored, May 5, 40 years, 214 Young street; poison.
    Fallon, Mrs. H. C., May 5, 441 Jackson street; pleuro pneumonia.
    Cockrell, Henry, colored, May 5, 78 years, 128 Cockrell avenue; cause not given.
    Baker, Jules, colored, May 6, 26 years, 157 North Akard street; gunshot wound.
    Hunter, Green, colored, May 6, 45 years, Prather street, between Commerce and Jackson streets; tuberculosis.
    Manachil, Antonio, infant of, May 6, Central avenue, near the corner of Swiss and Pacific avenues; inanition.
    Zeigler, Byron, May 6, 5 months, 668 Commerce street; dysentery.
    McKinney, M. L., May 7, 23 years, Oriental hotel; peritonitis.
    Allee, J. B., May 7, 33 years, 869 Elm street; inflammation of the stomach.

OAK LAWN.

    Dorsey, M., May 6, 48 years, Maple avenue; consumption.

- May 9, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 4.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.
_______

     The friends of the late Tom B. Fisher, county commissioner, will dedicate a monument to his memory this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Cox grave-yard, near Fisher station on the Missouri, Kansas and Texas railway. All friends of the deceased, the public generally, and especially the members of Camp Sterling Price No. 31, United Confederate Veterans, are cordially invited to be present and participate in the ceremonies.

- May 9, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

DEATH RECORDS.
_______

List of Deaths Falling Within the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    The records of the local undertakers show that ten deaths took place in the city last week.
    The record as compiled from the burial certificates granted by the city physician is as follows:
    Eason, Mr. and Mrs. J. T., infant of, May 9, corner Pearl and San Jacinto streets; inanition.
    Bingham, Charles, infant of, colored, May 9, 8 days, corner Houston and Wood streets; inanition.
    Martin, Wm. Thomas, May 11, 58 years, 235 Marilla street; cause not given.
    Cooley, infant named, May 1__, 8 years, Louise street; typhoid fever.
    Smith, Ollie, May 12, 45 years, 293 Peak avenue; stomach trouble.
    Bunch, Norris Eugene, May 12, 7 days, Exposition avenue; tetanus neosiotorium.
    Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. J. C., infant of, May 12, 6 months, 115 Willow street; cause not given.
    Lemmon, A. C., May 12, 59 years, 318 Cole avenue; Bright's disease.
    Scheffler, Mrs. Carrie, May 13, 31 years, 107 Kentucky street; consumption.
    Baird, Mrs. Agnes E., May 14, 78 years, 623 Ross avenue; cause not given.

WEST DALLAS.

    Hetson, Robert, infant of, May 15, 9 days; yellow jaundice.

- May 16, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6.
- o o o -

MORTUARY REPORT.
_______

Record of Deaths for the Week
as Copied from the Under-
takers Records.

    Thirteen deaths took place in Dallas last week, the percentage of infant mortality being more than half.
    The official death list is as follows:
    Simpson, T. M., infant of, May 16, 8 months, 494 South Lamar street; inanition.
    Eason, Mrs. J. T., May 17, 28 years, corner Pearl and San Jacinto streets; exhaustion from burns.
    Buchanan, Adeline, colored, May 17, 252 Wood street; bronchitis.
    Price, Albert, May 17, 17 years, Maple avenue; bilious fever.
    Eakins, Jr., Jno. J., 13 years, South Dallas, exhaustion attendant upon an operation.
    Fox, Mrs. Ellen, infant of, May 17, 295 Pacific avenue; still born.
    Wallace, Mrs. Dora, infant of, May 17, corner Jackson and Houston streets; cholera infantum.
    Alexander, W. C., infant of, May 18, 7 months, Commerce street; cholera infantum.
    Mollenkopf, Lizzie, May 18, 13 months, 132 Nussbaumer street; cholera infantum.
    Unknown infant, May 19, 6 months, Preston and Fairland street baby's home; cause not given.
    Brown, John, colored, May 19, 26 years, Main street; consumption.
    Turner, Helen, colored, May 20, 5 months, 285 Camp street; cause not given.
    Wade, Henry B., colored, May 21, 6 months, 220 Leonard street; cause not given.

- May 23, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5-6.
- o o o -

DEATH OF MRS. FISHER.
______

Took Place This Morning at Her
Home East of Town.

     Mrs. Eliza Fisher, the widow of a well known citizen of the county, died this morning at her home near Calhoun, some miles northeast of the city. She was 54 years of age, and had been ill for some time.
     The deceased was well known and highly esteemed and had a large family connection in the county.
     She was the mother of four sons and two daughters, one of the latter being the wife of County Judge Foree. She was the sister-in-law of the late County Commissioner T. B. Fisher, and the mother of Dr. Fisher. The funeral will be held to-morrow afternoon, the interment taking place at Pleasant View cemetery.

- May 26, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

R. S. HAWKINS' FUNERAL.
________

     The funeral of the late R. S. Hawkins, who was drowned in Pease river at Vernon Monday evening, will take place at Fort Worth to-morrow morning, and the interment in Marshall in the afternoon.
The deceased was 28 years of age, and was station agent of the Fort Worth and Denver railroad at Vernon at the time of death.

- May 26, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

SUDDEN DEATH.
________

     James H. Herman, the man who attended to the hats of the guests at the Oriental, died suddenly this morning at an early hour at his home on St. Louis street. He was 27 years old, married, and in fairly good circumstances.
      His death was investigated during the day by Justice of the Peace Skelton, and although no verdict was rendered, it is supposed that death was due to acute rheumatism suddenly striking the heart. Herman had worked at the hotel since January, and is said never in that time to have made a mistake in the hat of a guest. He was greatly liked by his fellow employees and looked upon as a very painstaking employe by the hotel management.
     According to Headwaiter Sanders, Herman made a hearty meal about 9 o'clock last night just before going home. He also ate considerable ice cream.
     The waiters have purchased a magnificent floral cross, which will be laid upon the dead man's coffin this afternoon, the funeral taking place at St. James' church. They will also act as pall bearers.

- May 26, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

THIS WEEK'S MORTALITY.
_______

Vital Statistics for the Week End-
ing Saturday.

_________

    The official mortality report for the week ending Saturday is given below. Number of deaths in the city, 17.
    The list is as follows:
    Lee, J. H., May 22, 55 years, St. George street; consumption.
    Deatherage, James Cole, May 22, 1 year, 270 North Pearl street; cause not given.
    Reed, Mattie, colored, May 23, 37 years, 574 Cochran street; consumption.
    Barr, Hazel Lucille, May 23, 4 months, 201 Trinidad street; cholera infantum.
    Washington, John, colored, May 24, 10 months, 377 Bryan street; teething.
    Unknown female infant, May 25, 5 weeks, Fairland infants' home; stomach trouble.
    Tiner, J. B., infant of, May 25, 19 months, 444 Main street; gastritis.
    Boswell, Scott, colored, [date not given], 30 years, 130 Fuqua street; phthisis pulmonalis.
    Herman, James, colored, May 26, 27 years, 268 St. Louis street; cause not given.
    Thacker, Mr. and Mrs. J. E., infant of, May 26, 3 weeks, 132 Phelps street; cause not given.
    Hodnett, Frank W., May 26, 47 years, 457 Main street; brain fever.
    Layton, Thomas, May 26, 77 years, 396 Griffin street; cause not given.
    Lane, H. E., infant of, May 26, 2 days, 607[?] Browder street; inanition.
    Hall, Frank, May 27, 11 years, South Lamar street; internal injuries.
    Hutchison, Mrs. Minnie, May 28, 22 years, 191 Houston street; pneumonia.
    Daugherty, Miss Nora, May 28, 20 years, 214 Masten street; Bright's disease.
    Robinson, Mary, infant of, May 28, Windsor hotel; premature birth.
    Armstrong, Mrs. C. M., May 28, 70[?] years, 199 Simpson street; cancer.

- May 30, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 7.
- o o o -

WEEK'S MORTALITY.
_______

The Death Record for the City
from May 29 to June 5.

_________

    The mortuary record for the city of Dallas, for the week ending Saturday, June 5, as compiled from the certificates in the hands of the local hands of the local undertakers shows a total of nine deaths.
    The list follows:
    Baker, Peter I., May 29, 6 months, 182 Holmes street; cholera infantum.
    West, Ella, June 1, 21 years, Parkland hospital; tuberculosis.
    Williams, Frank, infant of, June 2, 4 months, 367 Pierce street; smothered to death.
    Mackay, Mrs. Hector, June 3, 39 years, 200 McKinney avenue; tuberculosis.
    Tague, Edna Dale, June 3, 18 years, Oak Lawn; shock attendant on a surgical operation.
    Simon, Adolph, June 4, 17 years, 685 Main street; typhoid fever.
    Villareal, Maria Evelina, June 4, 12[?] years, corner Main and Ervay streets; typhoid fever.
    Graves, Myrtle, June 4, 9 months, "Mother" McCarley's Fairland hospital; teething.
    Moore, Nettie, colored, June 4, 42 years, 145 Fuqua street; dropsy of the heart.

WEST DALLAS.

    Miller, Frank, infant of, June 1, 18 months; fever.

- June 6, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 6-7.
- o o o -

DEATHS FOR THE WEEK.
_________

The City's Mortality for the Week
Ending Saturday.

_______

    During the week just ended, 13 deaths took place within the city. The official list is given below, as follows:
    Green, Isaac, colored, June 6, 70 years, 245 McCoy street; cause not determined by the acting coroner.
    Ohlson, David May, June 6, 3 years, 131 Caroline street; malarial fever.
    Thomas, George, infant of, June 6, 3 days, 715 Commerce street; inanition.
    Edwards, Robert, infant of, colored, June 6, 248 South Lamar street; premature birth.
    Mays, _______, colored, June 6, 20 years, Oak Lawn, Bright's disease.
    Powers, Tommie, June 7, 11 years, 163 Polk street; appendicitis.
    Finnegan, Timothy, June 7, 62 years, South Ervay street and Santa Fe crossing; cholera morbus.
    McDade, James, colored, June 7, 26 years, 265 Austin street; kidney disease.
    Neel, Albert, colored, June 8, 1 month, rescue home; spasms.
    Minahan, John, June 8, 66 years, 193 North Lamar street; cause not learned.
    Bostwick, D. F., child of, June 8, 3 months, 139 Alamo street; [cause not given]
    Redman, John, June 11, 50 years, Parkland hospital; gunshot wound.
    Saxon, Hugh J., June 12, 93 years, 189 Floyd street; old age.

- June 13, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 4.
- o o o -

FOR THE WEEK.
_______

Mortuary Statistics for Dallas as
Prepared by the Undertakers.

________

    Twelve deaths took place in the city during the week ending yesterday. The list as compiled from the records of the local undertakers as follows:
    Ware, Louis, infant of, colored, June 12, 8 days, Hall street; pulmonary atalectris.
    Tripp, A., June 13, 66 years, Oak Lawn; cause not given.
    O'Malley, John, June 13, 70 years, 5155[?] Swiss avenue; cause not given.
    Mouser, Kathleen, June 13, 5 months, 301 Elm street; cause not given.
    Correnti, Josephine, Italian, June 15, 9 years, 116 Swiss avenue; cause of death not learned.
    Moore, T. P., June 15, 48 years, 253 Caruth street; neck broken and internal injuries, the result of a fall from a house.
    Wilhite, Mrs. Mary Ann, June 15, 76 years, 243 Snodgrass street; general debility.
    Knight, G. B., infant of, June 15, 6 days, 256 Cochran street; cause of death not rendered.
    Robards, Augustus M., June 17, 38 years, 146 South Haskell avenue; typhoid fever.
    Mayfield, Leslie, June 17, 4 months, 117 Burlington street; cholera infantum.
    Hogan, William C., June 18, 25 years, corner Polk and Pearl streets; bowel trouble.
    Drake, Leona, June 19, 1 month, 222 Hawkins street; inanition.

WEST DALLAS.

    Meyers, Joseph, infant of, June 17, 4 months; cause not given.

- June 20, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 3.
- o o o -

LATE DEATHS.
______

Mortality in the City Since Yesterday.

     Willie Blessing Mansfield, the 19 months old child of W. H. Mansfield, a notary public at 461 Elm street, died yesterday.
     Carrie Sparkman, aged 22 months, died this morning at 134 Burford street.
     Mrs. Sallie Fowler died at an early hour this morning at her home on Gillespie avenue, Oak Lawn. She was 38 years old and death resulted from meningitis.
     Clarence D. Campbell, the 4-year-old son of J. D. Campbell, died yesterday evening at his home, 255 Elm street.

- June 23, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

FELL DEAD.
______

Lis Humphrey, an Old Settler, Ex-
pires Suddenly.

     Mr. Lis Humphrey, aged 65 years, fell dead while at work in his field near Mesquite this forenoon, either of heart disease or sunstroke, the doctors have not yet announced which.
     Mr. Humphrey was one of the oldest settlers, having located in Dallas upward of 40 years ago, coming from Kentucky. He was a well to do farmer and respected citizen.

- June 23, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

DEATH CAME SUDDENLY.
______

An Old Man Dies Suddenly of a
Paralytic Stroke.

     J. H. Chambers, aged 64 years, expired suddenly at an early hour this morning in a room in the Y. M. C. A. building, where he had lived to himself for the last six or seven years. Death was due to a paralytic stroke that came upon him suddenly. Little is known of the old man other than that he came to Dallas a number of years ago from Houston, where he was once in the lumber business. He was a native of Maryland and unmarried.

- June 23, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Charles Ford Derner, the 6-months-old child of George L. Derner, living near Farmers' Branch, died this morning of stomach trouble.
     Joseph Clinton Bryan, son of F. D. Bryan, died yesterday morning at the residence of Dr. Thomas G. McClelland, in St. Louis. The remains will be interred at Kaufman to-morrow afternoon.
     A. F. Lewis, a carpenter, aged 27, died this morning at his home, 178 Exposition avenue. Death was due to consumption.
     Mrs. Emma Berry of Denton, Texas, attended the funeral of her sister, Fay Templeton, last Tuesday at the Florence Crittenton Mission. She was quite heartbroken over her sister's death.

- June 24, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

MORTUARY RECORD.
_________

Record of the Grim Reaper in Dal-
las for the Week Ending
Saturday.

    Eleven deaths was the mortuary record of the city of Dallas for the week ending Saturday. Over 50 per cent of these were infants and all, with the exception of one, resulted from natural causes. According to the local physicians, the city was never healthier than now.
    The record of deaths is as follows:
    Birdsong, Stella May, June 20, 8 months, 727 Main street; cause not given.
    Harding, Ruth, June 20, 5 weeks, 604 Main street; inanition.
    Murray, Harriet, infant of, colored, June 20, 281 Lamar street; still born.
    Oliver, John, colored, June 21, 66 years, 135 Peak alley; congestive chill.
    Templeton, Fay, 19 years, June 21, Parkland hospital; overdose of morphine.
    Mansfield, Willie Blessing, June 22, 19 months, 461 Elm street; pernicious remittent fever.
    Campbell, Clarence D., June 22, 4 years, 255 Swiss avenue; cause not given.
    Sparkman, Carrie, June 23, 22 months, 134 Burford street; enteritis colitis.
    Chambers, J. H., June 23, 64 years, 298 Elm street; paralysis.
    Bryan, Joseph Clinton, June 23, 27 years, 213 North Ervay street; cause not given.
    Lewis, A. F., June 24, 27 years, 178 Exposition avenue; consumption.

OAK LAWN.

    Fowler, Mrs. Sallie, 38 years, June 23, Gillespie avenue; meningitis.

- June 27, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 3.
- o o o -

TWO KILLED--ONE WOUNDED.
__________

Sensation and Lurid Scene at Pleasant
Valley Church Yesterday.

______

A. A. GARRISON AND FRANK JONES KILLED.
_______

Tom Jones Mortally Wounded--Frank Jones Had Wronged
Miss Garrison--Nervy Sixteen-Year-Old Boy--Sor-
row in Two Households.

_______

     An unusually large congregation assembled at the Pleasant Valley church, five miles east of Garland, yesterday forenoon to hear the Rev. Dr. Patterson, of Ellis county, preach.
The preliminary service of song and prayer was over, and the preacher was about to announce his text, and the men and boys on the outside were throwing away their quids of tobacco and cigarette stubs and getting ready to go inside, when Augustus A. Garrison appeared in front of the church, and walking up to Frank Jones, said:
     "Now, d--n you, I've got you," and shot him dead.
     Tom Jones, brother to Frank, who was close by, pulled a pistol, whereupon Garrison proceeded to shoot at him, the second shot from Garrison's pistol shattering Jones' left thigh bone, felling him to the ground. But Jones, raising himself on his elbow, continued to shoot, but it was not until the sixth shot he got Garrison. The bullet entered near Garrison's heart and ranged upward, killing him instantly.
     The congregation stampeded in the wildest fashion. The women screamed and fainted, children were run over and trampled upon, excited men rushed hither and thither and horses and mules broke loose and ran away, tearing up vehicles, and the utmost confusion reigned.
     Garrison's brother got hold of his dead kinsmen's pistol, and Will Jones, a brother to Frank and tom, appeared on the scene with a big 45 gun, and there would undoubtedly have been additional bloodshed had not neighbors interposed and kept the men apart.
     Tom Jones, in a dying condition, was removed to his home. The surgeons announced that the bone of the left thigh was shattered for a distance of six inches and that the patient was dangerously wounded, and his condition rendered still more critical by the great loss of blood.
     The bodies of the dead were left as they fell until Justice Swim, of Garland, could come out and view them, when they were removed to their respective homes, and prepared for interment.

_______________

     August A. Garrison was 25 years old, and the son of Widow Garrison. There are three surviving brothers and several sisters. Frank Jones was 20 years old and Tom, 16. The latter were the sons of Jesse Jones, who lives a mile from the church and half a mile from Widow Garrison, both families highly respectable and well-to-do. They have lived neighbors for years. The children grew up together, attending the same school and same Sunday school from the time they were carried to church as sleeping infants until yesterday.
The boys in both families were sober and industrious; they lived in a local option precinct, and whisky had nothing to do with the tragedy.

_______________

     Frank Jones had seduced, or was charged with having seduced Garrison's sister, the young lady giving birth to a child last spring. August Garrison told young Jones at the time that if he did not repair the wrong by marrying the girl, he would kill him.
     In order to avoid a collision, Jones left the neighborhood and did not return until last Saturday. Sunday morning, he went over to the church, as he had been in the habit of doing all his life. He was probably expecting trouble, as he had a six-shooter on him, but did not get to use it, as Garrison shot him three times and killed him before he could pull it.

_______________

     The funeral of Garrison took place this forenoon and that of Frank Jones will occur this afternoon, both from the same church and to the same cemetery near the church. The people in the neighborhood turning out on both occasions and extending their sympathies and condolence to both stricken families.

_______________

     Constable C. P. Bane, of Garland, who was in the city, said to a Times Herald reporter:
     "Frank Jones, who was shot three times by Gus Garrison, did not make an attempt to pull his pistol, and it would have done him no good if he had, as it would not work. It was a fine pistol, but it had become so rusty that it could not be cocked. It was a 38-calibre Winchester Colt, and had only two loads in it.
     "Garrison and Tom Jones did their shooting at very close range, but tom did very poor shooting. Garrison shot him down and was standing nearly over him and would, undoubtedly, have killed him the next shot, had not Tom got in a vital shot, which made him drop his pistol, which he was pointing, and in the act of shooting, stagger and fall.
     "Jones quickly reloaded his pistol after he got Garrison with the last cartridge in it. Garrison's brother ran up and picked up the pistol Gus had dropped and a third Jones brother put in an appearance with a pistol in his hand, but the people stopped further bloodshed.
     "There was one cartridge left in Garrison's pistol and he had another pistol he had not used. Garrison fired five shots, and Tom Jones six.
     "Two of Tom Jones' bullets lodged in the church door, which the congregation had fortunately closed. Most of the people in the church jumped out of the windows.
"Miss Garrison, who was the cause of the trouble, is a very young girl, not over fifteen years old."

- June 28, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

FUNERAL NOTICE.

     The funeral of Dr. J. H. Titterington will take place Wednesday at 10 a. m. from the residence of James Bently, 821 Ross avenue. Interment at Greenwood.

- June 29, 1897, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Mrs. R. S. Nash, aged 65 years old, the mother-in-law of A. C. Seawell, died last night at the home of her son-in-law, No. 388 Live Oak street. Death was due to softening of the brain.
     Dr. J. H. Titterington, well known in Dallas, died Sunday at Las Vegas, New Mexico. The remains will reach here this evening and the funeral will take place to-morrow.

- June 29, 1897, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

 

A PIONEER GONE.
______

Mrs. Elizabeth Haskell, 30 Years in
Dallas, Died at 2 O'clock
To-day.
_______

     Mrs. Eliza Haskell, wife of H. H. Haskell, died at her home, 118 North Haskell avenue, shortly before 2 o'clock to-day. She was about 65 years old.

- June 30, 1897, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mrs. Oliver Coesh, aged 63, died last night at her home, 145 Cottonwood lane.  Death was due to heart trouble, from which she had been a sufferer for some time.  Her husband was formerly engaged in doing some team work for the city.

- June 30, 1897, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

MORTUARY TOPICS.
_______

The Record of Deaths in Dallas for
the Week Just Ended.

_______

    The week ending Saturday closed with ten deaths reported as occurring within the city during that period. Of these, only two were adults.
    The official list for the week reads as follows:
    Jones, Mary, infant of, June 27, 300 Peabody avenue; still born.
    Meeks, Lawrence, colored, June 27, 14 years, Cottonwood Lane; pernicious fever.
    Early, Mr. and Mrs. H. C., twin infants of, June 28, 6 hours, Cochran street; inanition.
    Nash, Mrs. R. S., June 28, 65 years, 388 Live Oak street; softening of the brain.
    Coesh, Mrs. Oliver, June 30, 63 years, 145 Cottonwood Lane; heart disease.
    Haskell, Mrs. Eliza, June 30, 65 years, 118 North Haskell avenue; dropsy.
    Wells, Lamb, June 30, 3 days, 355 Live Oak street; convulsions.
    Jackson, Grant, colored, July 2, 9 days, 312 Junius street; cause not given.
    Merewether, Wilmot Orford, July 3, 2 years, 119 Leonard street; congestion of the brain.

OAK CLIFF.

    Tuebner, Ed., July 2, 1 years, 13 Eleventh street; cholera infantum.

WEST DALLAS.

    Williamson, Mr. and Mrs., infant of, [no date given], 5 weeks; inanition.

- July 4, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 3.
- o o o -

[CITY NEWS NOTES]

     The five-weeks-old infant of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Williamson of West Dallas, died Saturday.

- July 4, 1897, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 4.
- o o o -

TO-DAY'S KILLING.
______

William Harbrecht Shoots and Instantly Kills
Walter Stover,

______

WHO LICKED HIM IN A FIST-FIGHT.
_______

Witnesses Decline to Talk--Both Parties Were
Young Men and Employed by the
Lemp Company.

_______

     At 1:50 this afternoon William Harbrecht shot and killed Walter Stover, in front of the saloon of Harbrecht's brother on the northwest corner of Elm and Crowdus streets.

_____

     While a number of men witnessed the killing, they begged to be excused from talking when approached by a Times Herald reporter. The barkeeper said:
     "All there was about it was they met here and had a fist fight which they wound up outside the door, where I couldn't see. Then Mr. Harbrecht ran in here and got the pistol and killed him."
     Several others said it started with a fist fight, of which Stover, though much the smaller man, got the better and that when Harbrecht got whipped he ran in and got his gun.

_______

     Harbrecht fired one shot, the bullet taking effect in Stover's right chest. The wounded man exclaimed: "My God," and fell. He lived about ten minutes and expired just as his father arrived.

_______

     Justice Skelton held the inquest and the remains were taken charge of by Undertaker Smith.

________

     Stover was twenty years old, and a small man. He was employed on one of Lemp's ice delivery wagons. He lived with his parents on St. George street.

_______

     William Harbrecht is 26 years old, and single. He has been making a crop near Lancaster. He got through with it three or four weeks ago and coming to town, went to work on one of Lemp's beer wagons.

________

     A Times Herald reporter found a number of the ice men at the factory. While they refused to make any statements for publication, they appeared to be unanimously of the opinion that Harbrecht was not justified in shooting Stover who, though not much more than half his size, had licked him in a fair fight. Stover was unarmed.
     A Times Herald reporter called at the Calaboose in the city hall to get Harbrecht's version of the killing, but he positively refused to make a statement, dismissing the reporter with a wave of the hand and the simple statement: "I don't want nothing to do with you all."
     Harbrecht is a stockily built fellow, standing about 5 feet 11 inches in his stocking feet and weighing in the neighborhood of 180 pounds. He was dressed in the garb of laborer, wearing a jumper, jeans, pants and a slouchy hat. He wears a small stubby mustache. His face looked the worse for his fist fight with Stover.

- July 6, 1897, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

List or Deaths Reported for the
Past Week.

________

    The following deaths were reported during the last week:
    Henry, Mrs. Willie, infant of, July 5, aged 5 hours, No. 146 Phelps street; cause not given.
    Sweet, Louise, colored, July 6, 294 Cottage Lane, aged 11 years and 11 months; marasmus.
    Martin, James A., July 6, 230 Williams street, 38 years old; apoplexy.
    Tobolowsky, Mrs. Dora, [date of death not given], Alamo street, 35 years; consumption.
    Wilson, Corneal, colored, July 7, 104 Indiana street, 6 months; inanition.
    Augustus, Francis, Carroll avenue; still born. [no other data]
    Crump, Matilda, infant of, [date of death not given], Martin street, 2 years and 6 months; teething.
    Mason, John, July 8, [date of death not given], 152 Reynolds street, 1 years and 14 days; spasms.
    Romans, Hazel, colored, 115 Boll street, 7 months; meningitis.
    Martino, Mrs. J. F., [date of death not given], 201 Cochran street, 35 years old; tuberculosis.
    Heaney, Claude, July 10, 340 North Harwood street, 14 months old; cause not given.
    Jones, Mary, infant of, July 7, Rescue Home, 3 weeks old; inanition.
    Merewether, Will Mott Orford, [date of death not given], 119[?] Leonard street, 2 years old; brain fever.
    Achenbach, Boyd Mary, [date of death not given], 195 Second avenue, Exposition park, congestion of the brain.
    Stover, James Wallace, July 6, Elm and Crowdus, 19 years old; shot.
    Minet, Routh, July 9, 536 San Jacinto street, 14 months old; inanition.
    Mitchell, D. C., July 8, 535 Commerce street; congestion.
    Lindsey, Mrs. V. R., July 9, San Jacinto street, 21 years; brain fever.

- July 11, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 7.
- o o o -

THE DEATH ROLL.
_______

Record of the Grim Reaper for the
Week Ending Saturday.

_______

    The following deaths took place in Dallas for the week ending Saturday night, as compiled from the records of the local undertakers:
    White, Robert Rufus, July 11, 14 years, 525 Lake avenue; spinal meningitis.
    Malloy, John, July 11, 6 years, Parkland hospital; intermittent fever.
    Leonard, John, colored, July 12, 1 year, Poydras street; injury to brain from a blow.
    Hart, J. D., infant of, July 12, 10 hours, 291 Collin street; inanition.
    Jones, Alvin, infant of, colored, July 13, 2 months, 227 Hill avenue; whooping cough.
    Peters, J., July 15, 34 years, Maple avenue; auricular rheumatism.
    Williams, Annie, July 15, 3 years, Huguley street; cause not given.
    Unknown Mexican woman, July 15, 28 years, Parkland hospital; bowel trouble.
    Crister, Ben A., July 16, 15 years, 148 Polk street; consumption.
    Blaser, May, July 16, 2 months, 122 Montgomery street; cause not given.
    Fuller, Peter, colored, July 17, 68 years, Akard and Wood streets; dropsy of the heart.
    Garner, Mary Parlee, July 17, 10 months, 232 North Lamar street; cause not given.

WEST DALLAS.

    Cross, N. J., July 17, 60 years; dropsy.

- July 18, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE DEATH ROLL
_______

For the City for the Week Just
Ended.

________

    The following is the official mortuary report for the city of Dallas for the week ending Saturday, Aug. 24, as compiled from the records of the various undertakers:
    Morrison, Minerva, July 18, 70 years, 301 Pacific avenue; consumption.
    Fortune, John H., July 19, 23 years, corner Jackson and Lane streets; overdose of morphine.
    Flynn, Gertrude, July 19, 8 months, 291 Williams street; tubercular meningitis.
    Johnson, Charles I., July 21, 21 years, 214 Floyd street; typhoid fever.
    Harris, Mr. and Mrs. G. T., infant of, July 21, 160 Ardrey street; [cause not given].
    Forrow, Jesse, colored, July 21, 67 years, 240 Belleview street; heart disease.
    Smith, Lillian T., colored, 3 years, 125 Burford street; cerebritis.
    Haffron, John, July 23, 44 years, Oak Lawn; consumption.
    Holland, J. E., July 23, 25 years, Maple avenue; continued fever.
    Brown, J. L., infant of, July 23, 2 months, 451 Masten street; marasmus.
    Eaton, R., July 24, 65 years, 115 Hayes street; cause not given.

- July 25, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

A PIONEER GONE.
_______

Rufus J. Eaton who Came Here in
the Seventies Passes Away.

_______

     Rufus J. Eaton, an old land mark of this city, well and favorably known throughout Dallas, died at his residence, 115 Hays street, yesterday at 12 o'clock. Mr. Eaton was born at Worcester, Mass., 65 years ago. Tiring of his New England home, he decided to cast his fortune with the South, and accordingly, in the year 1878, he moved to Dallas, where he resided ever since. Before his health became impaired, he was one of the most successful building contractors in Dallas.
     He was a gentleman of sterling worth and Christian character, and his death is deplored by all who knew him. He was a member of the First Baptist church of this city, and was, during his younger days, a great worker in church affairs. The funeral will take place at 4 o'clock from the family residence.

- July 25, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 7.
- o o o -

MORTUARY RECORD.
_______

For Dallas for the Week Ending
Yesterday.

________

    The following deaths were reported to the local undertakers for the week ending Saturday:
    Morville, Joe, July 25, 21 years, Oak Lawn; consumption.
    White, Forney, July 27, 24 years, 261 Bryan street; consumption.
    Hill, Charles, July 27, 21 years, 154 Main street; consumption.
    Brey, Willie, July 27, 6 months, Oakland avenue; congestive chill.
    Dixon, Sam, colored, July 27, 22 years, 478 Pacific avenue; consumption.
    Boutwell, H. T., July 27, 39 years, 206 Merlin street; typhoid fever.
    Shaw, Annie, July 28, 30 years, corner Austin and Columbia streets; congestion.
    Ely, Geo. W., July 28, 3 years, 135 Haskell avenue; slow fever.
    Campion, Mamie E., July 31, 5 years, 181 Germania street; pernicious malarial fever.

OAK CLIFF.

    Boswell, Seppie, colored, July 27, 23 years, Tenth street; malarial fever.
    Gentry, T. C., infant of, July 31, 1 week; yellow jaundice.

- August 1, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 5.
- o o o -

HE WAS ED KNOPFLEY
_________

The Man Taken from Trinity
Positively Identified.

________

A NOTE FOUND IN HIS ROOM
_______

Forecasted His Intention--The
Body Exhumed Saturday by the
Swiss Society and Reinterred.

________

     Saturday afternoon, after a careful inspection of the photograph taken of the unknown man found Friday morning in the Trinity river, Mr. Sam Hilbold, the mail carrier living at 345 South Preston street positively identified it as a likeness of his father-in-law, Edward Knopfley, who disappeared three days ago from the Bear hotel on Swiss avenue.
     The photograph was also exhibited to a number of Knopfley's intimate friends, who all agreed in the opinion that it was no other than that of the missing man.
     Accordingly, the remains were disinterred from the potter's field where they were buried Thursday, and buried in Greenwood cemetery by the Swiss society, of which the deceased was a member. It is understood that Knopfley carried a small sum on his life in the order, but the amount could not be learned.
     A convincing proof that Knopfley contemplated self destruction was found yesterday in his room at the Bear hotel by Mrs. J. J. Yost, the landlady.
In looking over the clothes left by the dead man, she came across a little note book, on a leaf of which was written a few words in German that forecasted his intention.
     The translation is as follows:
Dear friends and relatives:
      I am forsaken by my dear ones and have lost my hopes of employment and I long for a resting place. Bury me in quietness. Forgive all injuries I may have done. I find a welcome nowhere, so adieu, adieu.
                                                                 E
DWARD KNOPFLEY.
     Knopfley was well known at the Bear hotel, where he had boarded a number of times before. He had been there the last time for about five months and was well liked.
     A pathetic feature of the case was that on Thursday, the same day Knopfley left the house in a fit of despondency on account of his inability to obtain work, Mr. Chas. Meisterhans called at the hotel with a proffer of work. He had interested himself in behalf of his countryman, and it is likely that had he come before the unfortunate man left the house, Knopfley would be alive to-day. The case is a peculiarly sad one.

- August 8, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

MORTUARY RECORD.
________

List of Deaths Within the City Last
Week.

________

    During the week just ended, the following deaths took place within the city:
    Morrow, Harriet, colored, Aug. 1, , 46 years, 115 Union street; consumption.
    Benjamin, Calvin, colored, Aug. 1, 27 [years] [no other data]
    Zou?/Zon?, Mrs. May, Aug. 2, 37 years, 428 Pacific avenue; obstruction of the bowels.
    Bass, Becky, colored, Aug. 2, 56 years, Oak Lawn; dropsy.
    Johnson, Beatrice Goldie, Aug. 3, six months, 222 Corinth street; inanition.
    Whildin, Warwick, Aug. 3, 40 years, county jail; epilepsy.
    Armstrong, Prince, colored, Aug. 4, 85 years, 586 San Jacinto street; hemorrhage.
    Veith, Joseph, infant of, Aug. 4, three days, North Harwood street; inanition.
    McGuire, Robert, Aug. 4, 79 years, corner Houston and Commerce streets; general debility.
    Tucker, John W. Aug. 6, 70 years, 213 Griffin street; heart disease.
    Knopfley, Edward, Aug. 6, 55 years, Trinity river; drowning.
    Sanford, W. D., 66 years, 218 Highland street; fever.
    Gavin, Caroline, colored, Aug. 7, 78 years, 421 Central avenue; heart disease.

OAK CLIFF.

    Mansfield, Blanchard, Aug. 2, three years, No. 15 Pecan street; typhoid fever.
    Gillock, Mrs. J. M., Aug. 3, 22 years; pneumonia.

- August 8, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

MORTUARY.
_________

List of Deaths Reported for the
Past Week.

_______

    The following is a list of the deaths reported during the past week:
    Hudson, Mrs. W. A., Aug. 8, 255 Junius street; consumption.
    Melone, J. M., [no date], 139 Oak Grove street; effects of fall.
    Harvey, Miss, [no date], Polk street; surgical shock.
    McDougall, J. W., Aug. 11, Moroney Hardware company; congestion of the brain.
    Provamano, D., infant of, Aug. 11, corner Elm and Ervay street; cause not given.
    Sharpe, F. R., Aug. 12, 179 McKee street, 32 years old; consumption.
    Chisler, Louis, colored, [no date], six months old, 178 Poydras street; whooping cough.
    Burzell, Annie, Aug. 8, 21 years, 110 Wood street; cocaine.
    Reiger, Lorete, Aug. 13, 10 months, corner Henry and Williams street; teething.
    Smith, Blanch, Aug. 13, 25 years, Ervay street; pistol shot.
    Barbee, Alex, infant of, Aug. 13, age 16 hours, South Market street; inanition.

- August 15, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 3.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

Record of Mortality Within the
City for the Past Week.

________

    During the week ending yesterday, the following deaths were reported as occurring in the city:
    Badder, Mrs. H. C., Aug. 15, 35 years, 144 Reagan street; phthisis pulmonaris.
    Green, Johnnie, Aug. 15, 16 years, 324 Canton street; peritonitis.
    Tanner, Paul, Aug. 16, 17 years, 130 Texas street; typhoid fever.
    Kyles, Church, infant of, Aug. 18, corner Dove and Main streets; premature birth.
    Steele, James W., Aug. 19, 4 years, 142 Olive street; congestion of the brain.
    Smith, Jessie, Aug. 19, 6 weeks, 206 Carroll avenue; inanition.
    Murphy, Marcus Early, Aug. 19, 1 year and 8 months, Riggs street; pleuro pneumonia.
    Crabterre?/Crabtree?, K. D., Aug. 20, 2 months, 304 Floyd street; whooping cough.

OAK CLIFF.

    Price, James M., Aug. 19, 72 years, corner Adams and Highland streets; pneumonia.
    Hayden, Josie, Aug. 19, 14 years, Jefferson street, between Third and Fourth; cause not given.
    Raguet, Mrs. F. A., Aug. 20, 65 years, 169 Tenth street; cocoma.

- August 22, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

BURNED TO DEATH.
_______

A Little 5-Year-Old Girl's Clothing
Ignites from a Trash Pile.

_________

     Little Etta Sullsky, the five-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. I. Sullsky, living at 194 Caroline street, was burned to death yesterday afternoon, dying at 5 o'clock.
     About 11 o'clock yesterday, Mr. Sullsky raked up a pile of old trash in the back yard for the purpose of burning it up. The pile of trash did not ignite very readily and he poured a can of coal oil on it.
     Several children were standing around watching him and when a match was touched to the oil-soaked trash, the flames leaped up and caught the clothing of a little boy who was standing near. Mr. Sullsky grabbed the little boy and rushed with him to bucket of water without paying any attention to the other children. He succeeded in extinguishing the flames before any serious damage was done to the little boy, but before his task was completed, the screams of little Etta attracted his attention.
     He rushed into the yard and found her clothing in a light blaze and her mother trying heroically to put it out, but before the flames could be extinguished, the little girl was so badly burned, that death followed in a few hours.
     She was severely burned about the face and body and suffered intense agony until opiates were administered. Everything possible was done to alleviate her sufferings, but death alone relieved her.
     Mrs. Sullsky was badly burned about the arms and hands.

- August 29, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 3.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

Deaths Reported for the Week
Ending August 28.

_______

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending Aug. 28th:
    Howard, Thomas, colored, [no date], aged 40 years, corner Market and Wood street; lung trouble.
    Cadwell, Mertie, colored, Aug. 22, aged 1 year, No. 395 Corinth street; chronic diarrhea.
    Blackman, Amy F., Aug. 23, aged 16 years, corner Preston and Jackson; typho-malarial fever.
    Rousseau, Lawrence D., Aug. 24, aged 35 years, No. 183 N. Akard street; tuberculosis.
    Anderson, Simon, Aug. 24, aged 5 months, No. 113 Corinth street; convulsions.
    Williams, W. H., Aug. 24, aged 50 years, No. 379 Corinth street; dropsy.
    Sharpe, Mrs. M. A., Aug. 24, aged 52 years, No. 448 Main street; uterine carcinoma.
    Sturgis, Mr. and Mrs. H. M., infant of, Aug. 25, aged 5 days, corner Fairmount and Colby streets; inanition.
    Woods, Guy Alvin, Aug. 27, aged 2 years and 6 months, No. 221 Highland street; cause not given.
    Hutchinson, L. W., infant of, Aug. 24, aged 9 months, 808 San Jacinto street; [cause not listed].
    Averitt, J. D., Aug. 26, aged 53 years, 652 Ross avenue; [cause not given].

- August 29, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 5.
- o o o -

 

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

A List of Deaths for the Week End-
ing September 4th.

________

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending September 4:
    Dawkins, Leroy, Aug. 28, 130 Magnolia street, 13 months old; teething.
    Powers, Hannah, Aug. 29, 163 Polk street, 13 years old; appendicitis.
    McComas, M. M., child of, Aug. 30, 6-year-old boy; scarlet fever.
    Cour, John, Sept. 2, 96 Hughes street, Oak Cliff, 2 months old; abscess of liver.
    Campbell, J. E., Sept. 2, Oak Cliff, 26 years old; congestion of the bowels.
    McFadden, Miss Clara G., Sept. 3, 210 Park street, 20 years old; consumption.
    Edwards, Mitchell, colored, Sept. 2, 361 Hall street, 1 year; meningitis.
    Jefferson, Mary, colored, Sept. 3, 7 months old, 213 Juliette street; unknown.

- September 5, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

KILLED BY A MULE.
_______

T. C. Murray Dragged to Death at
Lagow's Yesterday.

________

     T. C. Murray, 17-year-old son of Mrs. J. E. Murray, of 139 Second avenue, Exposition Park, met with a horrible death near Lagow's schoolhouse yesterday afternoon.
     The young man was riding from the field to the barn, a mule with the harness on it. He sat sidewise on the mule, which shied at something, and threw him. His foot became fastened in the trace chain. The mule took fright and ran, dragging him to death.
     The remains were brought to the city. The funeral will take place at 10 o'clock this morning from the family home, 139 Second avenue.

- September 12, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
________

A List of Deaths for the Week End-
ing September 11th.

________

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending last night:
    Fullbright, Ada, colored, Sept. 5, aged 20 years, No. 372 Bryan street; pistol shots.
    Reynolds, Lottie, Sept. 5, aged 26, city calaboose; suicide.
    McGee, Bettie, colored, Sept. 5, age 38 years, 120 Porter street; sarcoma utria.
    Hall, Mrs. Eliza E., Sept. 8, aged 42 years, 431 Swiss avenue; [cause not listed].
    Norman, Callie, colored, Sept. 8, 478 Floyd street; aged 42 years; nephatis.
    Hitaffer, Mrs. R. C., Sept. 8[?], aged 84 years, 443 Bryan street; old age.
    Peters, William, Sept. 8, aged 40 years, 148 Polk street; struck by a locomotive.
    Wilmans, Mr. and Mrs. W. B., infant of, Sept. 7, 174 Caruth street; inanition.
    Fitch, Mrs., Sept. 9, St. George hotel; heart failure.

- September 12, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

PERSONAL.
______

     Mr. and Mrs. Ed Curlin and children, of Palestine, Texas, arrived in the city Thursday, to attend the funeral of Mr. Curlin's sister, Mrs. Kirk Hall.
     Mr. Tom Curlin, of Union City, Tennessee, father of Mrs. Kirk Hall, and Mr. Jim Curlin, arrived a few days before Mrs. Hall's death, and is now with the family in their affliction.

- September 12, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

    The following deaths are reported by the local undertakers for the week ending September 18:
    Sanders, Anderson, colored, Sept. 12, aged 24 years, Grand avenue; consumption.
    Boyd, Rachel, Sept. 13, aged 65 years, No. 234 Leonard street; inflammation of bowels.
    Flannagan, M. B., Sept. 15, aged about 65 years, corner Corinth and Cockrell; suicide.
    Houpt [Haupt], Mrs. Mary, Sept. 19, aged 80 years, 171 Ross avenue; old age.
    Fleming, Henry Mullin, son of M. E. Fleming, Sept. 16, aged 1 year and 6 months, 212 Floyd; congestion.
    Murray, Tom, Sept. 11, 196 Second avenue, 17 years old; killed by runaway mule.
    White, Roy, son of J. A. White, Sept. 12, 17 years old, corner Cole avenue and Knox street, Fairland; fever.
    Coombs, William R., son of Chas. E. Coombs, Sept. 15, West Dallas, aged 1 year, 6 months; [cause not listed].
    Kuhnapfel, Paul Edward, Sept. 17, aged 10 days; inanition.

- September 19, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    Kirby, J. R., Sept. 21, 547 San Jacinto street, aged 72; cause: infirmity.
    Knight, John A., Sept. 8, 154 Cedar Springs avenue, aged 28; consumption.
    Broadnax, R. M., infant of, Sept. 18, 170 Dexter avenue; cause unknown.
    Lewis, J. W., infant [of?], Sept. 24; [no other details].
    Mahoney, Bridget, Sept. 20, 60 years, Caruth street; pneumonia.
    Haupt, Mrs. Mary, Sept. 17, 171 Ross avenue, 79 years old; spasmodic asthma.
    Cagle, Clara, Sept. 19, 134 Jackson, aged 31; morphine poisoning.
    Todd, J. J., infant of, Sept. 20, 589 Cochran, aged 3 days; incomplete development.
    Oldham, T. G., infant of, Sept. 19, 295 Routh, aged 5 days; premature birth.
    Rainey[?], Mrs. Lem[?], [date not listed], 107 Highland street, aged 37; tuberculosis.

- September 26, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

________

    The following deaths have occurred in the city of Dallas since our last report:
    McDonald, Gabe, Sept. 30, [age not listed], near Cole avenue; paralysis.
    Sharp, J. P., Oct. 1, 73 years old, 112 Stevenson street; tuberculosis.
    Reis, H. C., Oct. 2, Young street, 70 years old; Bright's disease of the kidneys.
    Campbell, Mrs. H. M., Sept. 28, aged 24 years, No. 326 Corinth street; puerperal fever.
    Cook, Sarah R., Sept. 28, aged 66 years, No. 178 Sutton street; ascites.
    Stall, Henry, Sept. 29, aged 65, Oak Lawn; chronic dysentery.
    Roberts, Eunice E., Sept. 30, aged 1 year and 5 months, No. 242 Allen street; marasmus.
    Burden, Mrs. B., [date not given], 30 years old, fifteen miles northeast of town; catarrh of stomach.
    Brownlee, Mrs. Thomas F., Sept. 26, aged 29 years, No. 970 Elm street; tuberculosis.
    Giddings, Lucy, colored, Sept. 27, aged 6 years, 296 Beaumont street; typhoid fever.
    Long, Mollie, colored, Sept. 27, 400 Flora street; puerperal convulsions.
    Browning, Myrtle L. M., Sept. 28, aged 4 months, corner Young and Houston streets; bronchitis.

- October 3, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     The remains of Miss Annie Shaw will arrive from El Paso this evening at 6:30 o'clock on the Texas and Pacific.

- October 9, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending yesterday:
    Vaughan, W. A., son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Vaughan, [age not given], 94 Eads avenue, Oct. 4; cause unknown.
    Youngblood, Sutherland, Oct. 3, two years old, No. 375 North Harwood street; [cause not given].
    Bagby, Clara, colored, Oct. 6, 40 years old, No. 164 Marilla street; blood poison.
    Grey, Harrold, Oct. 3, 13 years old, No. 309 Gould street; gunshot wounds.
    Ruberb, Lizzie, infant of, Oct. 8, No. 683 Commerce street; premature birth.
    Echols, J. E., infant of, Oct. 8, five days old, East Dallas; inanition.
    Roberts, H. R., Oct. 3, 45 years old, [location not given]; consumption.
    Bull, M. M., infant of, Oct. 3, four days old, West Dallas; malarial fever.
    Connelly, Marguerite, Oct. 6, five days old, No. 321 Cottage Lane; typhoid fever.
    Banks, William, colored, Oct. 4, maple avenue, 26 years old; abscess of the liver.
    Unknown infant, Oct. 4, two and a half months old; No. 750 College avenue; malformation.
    James, Dan, infant of, Oct. 6, Young and Market streets; premature birth.
    Hawkes, Frances, colored, Oct. 9, [age not given], No. 584 Bryan street; [cause not given].

- October 10, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Elizabeth Washington, colored, 19 years old, died at No. 283 South Austin street, this morning of consumption. Funeral will be held under the auspices of St. Mary's Temple, a colored woman's organization.
     Hallie Thomas, aged 12 1/2 years, died last night at her home, No. 142 Indiana street, of consumption.
     The funeral of Miss Annie Shaw, who died in El Paso last Friday, took place from the Methodist church in Oak Cliff at 10 a. m. to-day.
     Charles Dansley, an Oak Cliff lad 14 years old, fell from a pecan tree Saturday evening last and broke his left leg, arm and two ribs. He was rendered unconscious and was still unconscious until a late hour last night.

- October 11, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

MEMORIAL SERVICES.

     Interesting memorial services to the memory of Miss Annie Shaw were held at St. Mark's Methodist church, Oak Cliff, yesterday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. The church was heavily draped in mourning and was filled with friends of the departed girl. Several of her favorite hymns were sung by a choir composed of Miss Mildred Harvey, Mrs. Price, Mrs. E. L. Spraggins and Messrs. Jackson and Peckham. Miss Harvey sang "Not Lost, But Gone Before," in a very sweet and impressive manner, after which Mr. W. M. Crow, Superintendent of the Sunday School of the church, read the following:
     To the Oak Cliff Methodist Sunday School: The undersigned committee, appointed to present resolutions expressing the feelings of this Sunday School upon the death of Miss Annie Shaw, respectfully submit the following:
     Resolved, 1. That in her death, this school has lost one of its most efficient, pure and consecrated teachers.
     Resolved, 2. That her brief, but devoted and unselfish life stands out as a bright recollection of all that is beautiful and true and will be to us a guide, a blessing and a holy inspiration. Her deep devotion to the principles of Christianity, her fidelity and zeal in the discharge of duty, her warm attachment and sympathy for little boys and girls and her great tact and success in controlling and elevating their lives, were among the most prominent features of her character. The sacred memory of her pure life is engraven on the hearts of all who ever felt the cordial grasp of her friendly hand, saw the genial and loving smile upon her face, shared in the sunshine of her benevolence and sympathy or in our own Sunday School, knelt with her in meek devotion at the hallowed shrine of the Word's Redeemer.
     Resolved, 3. That these resolutions be preserved with the records of our Sunday School and a copy furnished for publication to the Texas Christian Advocate and also the family of the deceased. Respectfully,
                                          M
ISS DAISY CUMMINGS,
                                          M
RS. JACKSON.
                                          M
RS. R. M. CLARK,
                                   Committee on resolutions.
     Miss Sadie Williams, for the Epworth League, read a tribute to the memory of the departed and Dr. O. L. Williams for the citizens of Oak Cliff and the neighbors of Mr. and Mrs. Shaw and family made a few appropriate remarks. This over, the pastor, Rev. T. H. Morris, paid a beautiful tribute to the departed. At its conclusion, Rev. Mr. Morris announced that the funeral would take place from the family residence this morning.
     The funeral took place this morning and was attended by a large concourse of friends. Many beautiful floral offerings were placed upon the grave.

- October 11, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Willie Carroll, aged 13 months, died at his home, No. 561 Commerce street, yesterday, of congestion of the stomach.
     The three weeks' old infant of Mrs. Smith, No. 214 Caroline street, died this morning.

- October 13, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

HERMAN F. DIETZ DEAD.
______

Committed Suicide in Ennis
This Morning.

______

TOOK FIVE GRAINS OF MORPHINE
_____

And Left a Note Asking That His
Friends in Dallas Be No-
tified.

     Ennis, Tex., Oct. 13.-- H. F. Dietz, said to be a well known business man of Dallas, committed suicide at the Lane hotel in this city this morning. Mr. Dietz arrived here last night on a business trip and registered at the hotel. He retired in the regular manner last night and seemed to be in good spirits. This morning, when the bell boy went to awaken him, he was found in a semi-conscious condition, and seemed to be suffering from poisoning.
     Drs. Margin and Edward s were summoned, who immediately pronounced it a case of morphine poisoning and went to work accordingly, but all to no avail, as he died at 12:25 p. m., after four hours of terrible suffering. The doctors announced that he took five grains of morphine. From all appearances, the dose was taken about 8 o'clock this morning.
     Dietz left a note in his room asking that Simpson & Doolittle of Dallas, be notified of his death. On his person was found several papers and a small amount of money. His remains are now at the hotel.

____

     Mr. Dietz was, for some time, in the employment of Sanger Bros. Subsequently, about three or four years ago, he embarked in business for himself, in the manufacture of spring beds, being the manger of the company. Later, he was engaged as a commercial traveler. He married some years since, Miss Emma Oppenheim, one of the foremost and most honored of the state's vocalists. His mind had been unbalanced for the past year or two, and his health seemed to give way under an unaccountable melancholia, which he could not account for, and which, in his brighter moments, he fully realized and deplored as much as the endeared ones about him.

- October 13, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4.
- o o o -

HOMICIDE AT GARLAND.
_______

Wood Smith Shoots Andrew
Spillers Four Times.

________

KILLING HIM ON THE SPOT,
__________

Because Spillers Declined to Listen
to Smith's Alleged Grievance
Against Abe Spillers.

_________

     Wood Smith shot and killed Andrew Spillers at Garland this forenoon.

_________

     Full particulars of the homicide have not yet reached Dallas. But, from what can be here gathered, it appears that Smith was a tenant on the farm of Abe Spillers, a brother to Andrew. Tenant and landlord had a falling out. Smith went to Garland last Saturday and proceeded to tell Andrew about his troubles with Abe. Andrew told him that he had nothing to do with Abe's business and didn't care to hear about it, whereupon Smith struck him with his fist. Spillers picked up a rock and proceeded to pound his assailant with it. Bystanders stopped the fight.
     This forenoon, Smith went to Garland, and meeting Spillers on the street, proceeded to shoot him four times with a six-shooter, killing him on the spot.

________

     Smith was arrested by Constable Pate Bane, who will bring him to Dallas on the evening train.

_________

     Smith has a wife and one child. The deceased was a widower without children. He was the senior member of the mercantile firm of Spiller Bros., in Garland.

- October 14, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Lillian A. E'Ablemont, aged 15 months, died this morning at the home of her parents, No. 365 Thomas avenue, of intermittent fever.
     Charley Dansley, the young boy who, on last Saturday, fell from a pecan treet near Oak cliff, died from the effects of the fall at his home on Eighth street in Oak Cliff, this morning. The remains will be buried to-morrow.

- October 15, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    The following deaths are reported for the week which closed yesterday:
    Thomas, Hattie, Oct. 10, aged 12 years, 142 Indiana street; consumption.
    Washington, Elizabeth, colored, Oct. 10, aged 18 years, No. 287 S. Austin street; consumption.
    Smith, Mrs. Lucy, infant of, Oct. 12, aged 3 weeks, No. 214 Caroline street; inanition.
    Rose, Mrs. Emeline, Oct. 12, aged 82 years, No. 248 S. Akard street; cancer.
    Douglass, Will, colored, Oct. 14, aged 25 years, Oak Lawn; heart disease.
    Bush, Fanny, infant of, Oct. 15, aged 2 days, 691 Washington avenue; spasms.
    Ablemont, Lillian B., Oct. 15, aged 1 year and 3 months, 365 Thomas avenue; congestion of brain.
    Franklin, Mrs. M. M., Oct. 11, 52 years old, No. 635 Elm street; dropsy.

OAK CLIFF.

    Dansby, Charles, Oct. 15, aged 13 years and 7 months, No. 50 8th street; concussion of brain.

WEST DALLAS.

    Absolem, Frances, colored, Oct. 15, aged 60 years; cancer.

- October 17, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

Necrological.

     Mrs. Isaac Dinkelspeel died yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the family home, 114 Cadiz street. She had been ill for the past week, and seemed to be recovering on Friday, but on Saturday evening, a change for the worse took place. This estimable and courageous woman leaves a city full of mourners at her loss.

- October 18, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

SAD ACCIDENT.
______

Willie Wray Run Over and
Killed by a Float.

     Willie H., 9 year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Wray, of 391 Pacific avenue, was run over and crushed to death by a float on Pacific avenue near his home this forenoon.
     The little fellow was attempting the popular boyish feat of hanging on behind the float. His hold gave way and the lurching of the float threw him under one of the hind wheels, which passed over him, crushing his chest so that he died with a few minutes.
The inquest was held by Justice Skelton.

- October 22, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 7.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

    The following is the death list for the week ending Oct. 23:
    Downs, Fred T., infant of, Oct. 17, No. 107 Burke street; still born.
    Adams, James, Oct. 17, aged 20 years, Cottonwood Lane; consumption.
    Winn, A. T., infant of, Oct. 17, aged 8 days, No. 628 Cochran street; pulmonary atalitous.
    Johnson, Bland, colored, [date not given], aged 6 years, corner San Jacinto and Washington avenue; consumption.
    Jackson, Charles, colored, Oct. 19, aged 39 years, No. 358 Flora street; malarial fever.
    Palm, Wm., infant of, colored, Oct. 21, aged 1 day, No. 241 Burford street; premature.
    Fair, Milton, colored, Oct. 22, aged 22 years, No. 241 Burford street; heart disease.
    Davis, Frank, infant of, Oct. 22, No. 44 Colby street, aged 1 month; broncho pneumonia.

- October 24, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

OLD SETTLER DEAD.
______

Mr. George W. Finley Dies of
Old Age.

     Mr. George W. Finly, aged 75 years, died last night at his home, 216 Swiss avenue, of old age. The interment took place at 3:30 this afternoon in Oakland cemetery.
     The deceased was born in Georgia, but came to Texas about sixty years ago, and was, therefore, one of the oldest settlers. He served with distinction on the Confederate side in the civil war.
     Mr. Ralf Finly, of the Times Herald force, is a son of the deceased.

- October 30, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_________

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending yesterday:
    Brown, J. B., Oct. 25, 28 years old, No. 169 South Akard street; septicemia.
    Hiegel, Joe, Oct. 26, 69 years old, Powhattan street; cancer of the stomach.
    Fair, Milton, colored, Oct. 22, 22 years old, No. 241 Burford street; fever.
    Stegal, Edner, colored, Oct. 24, 11 years old, No. 143 Poydras street; typhoid fever.
    Hill, Julia, colored, Oct. 30, 51 years old, No. 278 South Lamar street; burning.
    Finly, George W., Oct. 30, 75 years old, No. 216 Swiss avenue; old age.

- October 31, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

KILLED BY AN ELEVATOR.
_______

The Life Crushed Out of Ed
Young Yesterday.

_______

ELEVATOR BROKE LOOSE AND FELL
_______

And the Lifeless Body was Pulled
Therefrom--The Particulars
of the Accident.

_______

     Edward Young, colored, aged about 32 years, was killed in an elevator accident at the Dallas Packing house about 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon.
     Exactly how the accident which cost Young his life occurred, is not and will probably never be known. The elevators at the packing house are of the electric automatic kind. The one on which Young was killed runs from the basement to the top floor of the building and is in what is known as the beef department.
     At about the hour above indicated, Young stepped into the elevator in the basement pushing a pair of heavy trucks in ahead of him. He pulled the cord and the elevator ascended, but between the second and third floors, instead of continuing in the ascent, the elevator stopped, and, all the works seeming to give way at once, it dropped to the basement below with the velocity and force of a heavy body dropped into open space.
     Workmen rushed quickly to the rescue, the elevator was opened at once, and the mangled, bleeding body of a human being was drawn out, from which every spark of life had fled. the head was seemingly mashed almost to a pulp, the brain was oozing out in two or three places and his face and the clothing on his body was completely saturated with blood. The sight was indeed a sickening one and even those men who have watched hundreds of gallons of blood flow freely from the carcasses of animals without even a tremor, turned in horror from this ghastly scene.
     Undertaker Smith was notified, the "dead wagon" was immediately sent out and the mangled corpse was removed to its former home, corner Holmes street and Grand avenue.
     Young's family, consisting of a wife, a little child and a sister about 16 years old, had not been previously notified of the unfortunate accident, and when the wagon drove up and the young sister caught a glimpse of the lifeless corpse, she became almost hysterical, wailing and moaning loud enough to be heard all over the neighborhood. The wife was away from home at the time, but was soon attracted thereto by the cries of her young sister-in-law. At the sight of the blood-soaked body of her dead husband, she, too, became hysterical and joined in the wailing of the young girl. The continued cries permeated every section of the neighborhood and soon the house was filled with people, black and white.
     When a Times Herald reporter arrived on the scene, about 4 o'clock, there was still a large crowd of colored people about, but the remains had received the attention of the undertaker. The wounds which caused Young's death were confined solely to his head. The forehead and top part of the head was crushed and flattened out as if by a sledge hammer, and the side of his skull over his ear was cracked large enough to run a hand into. From these wounds, brains and blood were oozing.
     An interview with several men connected with the packing house failed to thrown any light on the manner in which these wounds were received, other than those above stated. All conclusions are problematical, but it seems that either he must have been thrown with great force against the heavy trucks, or the elevator rebounded when it struck the basement and his head came in contact with the facing of the stationary door to the elevator. One thing is certain, and that is that he never knew what struck him.
     It was stated that some employes noticed the elevator was acting queerly and yelled to Young to jump out, but for some reason, he failed to do so.
     Young was quite well to do. He had a nicely furnished home at the corner of Holmes street and Grand avenue, and was well liked by all the neighbors. He had lived there for a number of years.

- November 7, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending yesterday:
    Watkins, William, colored, Nov. 2, aged 35 years, Oakland street; heart disease.
    Smith, Bell, infant of, Nov. 3, 6 hours old, No. 361 Bryan street; premature birth.
    Traw, Mrs. Lula, infant of, Nov. 2, 5 hours old, South Haskell avenue; still born.
    Brancy, Cecil, colored, Nov. 1, 7 months old, No. 409 San Jacinto street; bronchitis.
    Cochran, Mrs. J. C., Nov. 1, 67 years old, No. 297 South Ervay street; heart disease.
    Barton, William, Nov. 5, aged 35 years, Parkland hospital; pistol shot.
    Boswell, James J., Nov. 6, aged 29 years, county jail; pistol shot.
    Carter, William, Nov. 1, 22 years old, Oak Cliff; kidney troubles.
    McLean, Miss Sallie R., Nov. 1, 75 years old, Oak Cliff; old age.
    Orr, Henry Lee, Nov. 2, 2 years old, No. 131 Kentucky street; cause not known.
    Osborn, John T., Nov. 4, 13 years old, No. 155 Belleview street; pernicious malarial fever.
    Tucker, Ethel, Nov. 4, 3 years old, No. 113 Ophelia street; congestion of the brain.
    Richards, Mrs. Katherine M., Nov. 5, No. 215 Worth street; cause unknown.
    Laskowsky, Mrs. Anna, Nov. 6, 32 years old, No. 7 Fitzhugh avenue; cause not given.
    Cotton, J. C., colored, Nov. 5, [age not given], corner Tenth and Greenwood streets, Oak Cliff; cause not given.
    Young, Edward, colored, Nov. 6, 30 years old, Dallas Packing house; elevator accident.

- November 7, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

BOSWELL IS DEAD
_______

And the Woman is Soon Like-
ly to Follow.

_______

     James Boswell, the wild man from Mississippi, who did a lot of reckless shooting on Germania street Thursday night, killing Will Barton, shooting Mrs. Lizzie Weideman, and then shooting himself in the chest, died in the hospital department of the county jail at midnight Friday night. The body was taken charge of by Undertaker Loudermilk, who is awaiting instructions from the relatives of the deceased at Holly Springs, Mississippi.
     Meantime, Mrs. Weideman is in a bad way at the Parkland hospital. Dr. Armstrong says she was shot through the body twice, besides catching a bullet in the fleshy part of her arm. Her condition was less promising last night than it had been at any time since she was wounded, and the doctor would not be surprised at any turn she might take, as he had no way of knowing just what amount of damage the bullets have done among her vitals.
     Whatever else may be said of Mrs. Weideman, she certainly did have a way of getting the men crazy stuck on her.

- November 7, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

 

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    The following deaths were reported last week:
    Brown, Rubie, Nov. 7, aged 2 years, 391 Flora street; tetanus.
    Morris, Robert Frank, Nov. 7, aged 27 years, No. 635 Elm street; [cause not given].
    Burke, Julian, Nov. 9, aged 48 years, No. 1117 Pacific avenue; congestion of bowels.
    Kirkendall, Arthur, colored, Nov. 11, aged 4 years, No. 480 Grigsby street; remittent fever.
    Waggoner, Marie, Nov. 7, aged 7 weeks, No. 40 Eleventh street, Oak Cliff; inanition.
    Johnson, Archibald M., Nov. 12, aged 6 months, No. 150 Ellis street; cause unknown.
    Lemmon, Marie Louise, Nov. 7, aged 2 years and 8 months, No. 343 Routh street; diphtheria.
    Belt, Mrs. W. D., Nov. 11, aged 38 years, No. 195 Patterson avenue; [cause not given].
    Lyons, Dave, Nov. 7, aged 1 year, corner Carter street and McKinney avenue; [cause not given].
    Young, Clay, [date not given], aged 21 years, corner Live Oak street and Central avenue; run over by train.

- November 14, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 6.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    The following deaths are reported for the week which ended yesterday:
    Baker, James, Nov. 14, aged 50 years, corner Market and Main streets; alcoholism.
    Shone, E. E., Nov. 16, aged 25 years, McLeod hotel, Main street; heart failure.
    Matthews, Cosby, Nov. 19, aged 2 years, 142 Junius street; lockjaw.
    Anderson, Mollie Irene, colored, Nov. 19, aged 5 months, 247 Boll street; entero colitis.
    Anderson, Miss Anna L., Nov. 19, [age not given], 301 Jefferson street, Oak Cliff; typhoid fever.
    Holloway, Mary, Nov. 15, 3 days old, 551 San Jacinto street; cause not given.
    Lott, Adolphus, Nov. 14, 70 years old, 134 Cora street; softening of the brain.
    Mollara, Matt, Nov. 14, 2 years old, [location not given]; inflammation of the bowels.
    Malcolmson, Mrs. Wilmot, Nov. 16, 87 years old, 254 Crockett street; old age.
    Levy, Mrs. Melanie, Nov. 18, 40 years old, [location not given]; killed by runaway team.

- November 21, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 6.
- o o o -

DAMAGE SUIT.
_______

Against the Queen City and the
Central Roads.

______

MRS. YOUNG WANTS $2000 DAMAGES
_______

For the Loss of Her Son, Killed at
Live Oak Crossing on the 10th Inst.

_________

     Mrs. Mary W. Young yesterday filed suit against the Queen City Street Railway company and the Houston and Texas Central Railway company for $15,000 actual and $5000 exemplary damages, and all costs of the litigation, for the loss of her son, R. C. Young, who, while standing on top of a freight car on the Central, was knocked off by a trolley wire of the Queen City company, stretched across the Central track on Live Oak street, and falling between the cars, was run over and killed November 10, 1897.
     In her petition, Mrs. Young states that there is a city ordinance requiring electric street railway companies to stretch their trolley wires twenty feet above the surface of the ground, where the wire which caused the death of her son is not exceeding fifteen or sixteen feet above the ground.
Crawford & Crawford are Mrs. Young's attorneys.

- November 21, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 7.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

________

    The following deaths are reported for the week which closed yesterday:
    Moon, Mrs. C. J., Nov. 24, 53 years old, No. 644 Main street; dropsy.
    Worthington, Allen, colored, Nov. 24, 65 years old, South Dallas; lung trouble.
    Theuliss, Alvin, child of, Nov. 26, [age not given], East Main street; cause not given.
    Polternestro, Liberio, Nov. 24, 27 years old, corner Bogel and Bryan streets; lockjaw.
    Johnson, Ella, child of, Nov. 25, 2 years old, No. 714 Main street; cause not given.
    Tripp, Sack, infant of, Nov. 24, 6 months old, No. 152 Swiss avenue; cholera infantum.
    Lyon, Edward, infant of, Nov. 26, No. 136 Harwood street; still born.
    Garner, Kless, colored, 45 years old, Nov. 26, No. 137 Cottonwood lane; heart trouble.
    Brazill, Daniel, Nov. 21, 29 years old, Parkland hospital; chronic dysentery.
    Manack, Will, colored, 21 years old, South Dallas; gunshot wounds.
    Blackburn, Dr. J. H., Nov. 24, 65 years old, Oak Cliff; Bright's disease.
    Wilson, J. T., infant of, Nov. 22, 3 weeks old, South Dallas; cause not given.
    Pawell, Lovaria, Nov. 22, 18 years old, No. 401 Williams street; consumption.
    Bridges, Mrs. Allie, Nov. 21, 27 years old, Young street; consumption.

- November 28, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 6.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

______

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending yesterday:
    Rose, Henry, Nov. 28, aged 71 years, No. 159 McKinnon street; cancer of stomach.
    Ritter, W. H. Nov. 28, aged 55 years, Oak Lawn; dysentery.
    Redenny, Robert, Nov. 28, aged 4 years, No. 301 Cottage lane; intestinal tuberculosis.
    Jackson, J. E., colored, Nov. 28, aged 32 years, Good street and Pacific avenue; knife wound.
    Norton, Joe, colored, Nov. 28, aged 60 years, No. 120 Cora street; heart disease.
    Moyer, Mrs. P. W., Nov. 28, aged 18 years, No. 164 Chestnut street; puerperal fever.
    Eva, Mrs. Martha, Dec. 1, aged 66 years, No. 152 Broadway street; heart disease.
    Osborn, Mrs. J. M., Dec. 1, aged 52 years, No. 152 Belleview street; typhoid fever.
    Farrill, Katie, infant of, [date not given], aged 6 days, Rescue Home; inanition.
    Murphy, W. Y., infant of, Dec. 2, aged 3
1/2 days, No. 214 Boll street; non viable.
    Darwin, Miss Ada, Dec. 2, aged 22 years, No. 397 North Harwood street; neuralgia of the heart.
    Christy, O. C., infant of, Nov. 29, Wall street, Wall street; membranous croup.
    Leake, Mrs. W. W., Nov. 29, 58 years, corner Canton and Browder streets; heart disease.
    McCord, Mrs. D. C., Dec. 4, aged 50 years, Fitzhugh avenue; heart disease.

- December 5, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10?, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Mrs. Tucker, a widow, 86 years old, mother of Mrs. Lash and John McComas, living six miles east of the city, died this morning of catarrh of the stomach.
     Mrs. Nannie Reedy Smith, wife of C. O. Smith, died at the home of Mrs. M. M. Smith, on Carter street this morning.

- December 8, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

FORBES MURDER CASE.

     The C. M. Forbes homicide case will go to the jury sometime this afternoon or to-night.
     Forbes killed his stepfather-in-law, Jack Redman.

- December 8, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending yesterday:
    Hodge, Maggie, infant of, Dec. 5, aged 1 month, No. 657 Main street; inanition.
    Hayden, S. H., infant of, Dec. 6, No. 152 Ardrey street; premature birth.
    Williams, Susie, infant of, colored, Dec. 8, No. 184 S. Harwood street; premature birth.
    Smith, Mrs. Mamie Reedy, Dec. 8, aged 22 years, corner Hord and Carter streets; consumption.
    Frost, Jack, Dec. 9, aged 7 weeks, No. 473 N. Haskell avenue; malarial fever.
    Sparkman, Mrs. Ada A., Dec. 10, aged 31 years, Lamar avenue; consumption.
    Henry, Dr. J. H., Dec. 10, aged 65 years, No. 222 Grand avenue, Oak Cliff; cause of death not given.
    Crawford, J. E., Dec. 10, 28 years old, corner Wood and Ervay streets; fell from a window.
    Felton, Mrs. G. C., Dec. 9, 44 years old, No. 385 S. Ervay street; heart disease.
    Eakin, Lee, Dec. 6, 30 years old, No. 386 South Harwood street; cause not given.
    Wilson, Dr. W. R., Dec. 8, 58 years old, No. 485 Ross avenue; cause not given.
    Witt, Dollie, infant of, [date not given], 2 months old, Montezuma street; cause not given.

- December 12, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

MORTUARY MATTERS.
_____

The Death Record for Dallas and Oak
Cliff for the Week Just Closed.

     The mortuary report for the week ending Saturday, Dec. 11, is as follows:
     Sinski, Mrs. S., 46 years, 470 North Pearl street; congestive chill; Dec. 4
     Hodge, Infant of Maggie, 1 month, 657 Main street; inanition; Dec. 5.
     Hayden, Infant of S. H., 152 Ardrey street; premature birth; Dec. 6.
     Williams, Infant of Susie, colored, 184 South Harwood street; premature birth; Dec. 8.
     Smith, Mrs. Mamie Reedy, 22 years, Carter street; consumption. Dec. 8.
     Wilson, Dr. W. R., 60 years, Ross avenue; cause of death not given; Dec. 8
     Crawford, J. E., 30 years, corner Wood and Ervay streets; fracture of skull; Dec. 9
     Felton, Mrs. Elizabeth, 44 years, 385 South Ervay street; cause of death not given; Dec. 9
     Frost, Jack, 7 years, 473 North Haskell avenue; malarial fever; Dec. 9.
     Sparkman, Mrs. Ada A., 31 years, Lemmon avenue; consumption; Dec. 10.
     Witt, Joseph, 2 months, 117 Montezuma street; congestion of the brain; Dec. 11.

- December 12, 1897, Dallas Morning News, p. 24, col. 4.
- o o o -

A TEXAS PIONEER.
______

Funeral of Dr. J. H. Henry in This
City Yesterday.

     The death of Dr. J. H. Henry, president of the Crowdus Drug company, was announced in these columns yesterday morning. He died at his home in Oak Cliff Friday afternoon. Death was unexpected and he succumbed to a sudden attack of heart disease.
     Dr. Henry was born in the town of Greenville, Ill., sixty-five years ago, and his parents were pioneer settlers of that state. Forty-six years ago, he accompanied his father to Texas, and for nearly half a century, he was identified with the state of his adoption, and witnessed its marvelous growth. In 1868, he married Miss Anna Crowdus. He was engaged in the drug business for more than forty years and was connected with the Crowdus Drug company from the date of its organization. Two sons and one daughter survive him--Mrs. Clyde Dewoody and Messrs. Will and Harvey E. Henry. The latter, who is attending school at Notre Dame, Ind., will arrive in Dallas to-night. Dr. Henry was a man of correct habits and sound business judgment, and had many friends.
     The funeral took place yesterday afternoon from the family residence, Oak Cliff. There were a number of beautiful floral offerings from relatives and friends of the family. The pall bearers were Messrs. Albert Tenison, J. W. Ayres, J. D. Padgitt, Frank Wilson, Albert Mann and Will Apperson. The remains were interred at Greenwood.

- December 12, 1897, Dallas Morning News, p. 24, col. 6.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
_______

The Number of Deaths for the
Week Just Ended.

_______

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending yesterday:
    Burford, Iona, colored, Dec. 18, 17 years old, No. 827 Commerce street; peritonitis.
    Bullington, William, Dec. 15, 16 years old, No. 162 Alexander street; peritonitis.
    Lewis, W. D., Dec. 16, 55 years old, West Dallas; heart disease.
    Moore, Daisy, infant of, colored, Dec. 13, 109 Magnolia street; premature birth.
    Gibbs, Dr. J. H., Dec. 17, 69 years old, No. 122 Cedar Springs road; Bright's disease.
    Leonard, Dollie, colored, Dec. 16, 17 years old, No. 693 Washington avenue; consumption.
    Sparkman, Mrs. Ada A., Dec. 10, 31 years old, Lemmon avenue; consumption.
    Waller, James, infant of, [date not given], Crockett street; cause unknown.
    Burden, Mrs. A. E., Dec. 13, 56 years old, No. 161 South Ervay street; cudo corditis.
    Fielding, A. J., infant of, Dec. 12, [age not given], No. 111 Ophelia street; cause not given.

- December 19, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 6.
- o o o -

BURNED HERSELF TO DEATH.

______

The Sad Case of Miss Ella N.
Breslin.

______

AN INMATE OF THE GIRLS' HOME.

______

Sets Fire to Her Bed and Lies Down
to Burn to Death.

     Miss Ella N. Breslin committed suicide by burning herself to death at 10 o'clock this morning at the Girls' Co-Operative (Home, No. 223 Ross avenue. That it was a case of deliberate suicide, there seems to be but little room for doubt.
     Miss Breslin was about 40 years of age. She came to the Co-Operative Home on the fourth day of last November. Previous to that time, she had been employed at the Episcopal college in East Dallas in the capacity of assistant house-keeper. Her health and strength failed her at the college, and she was sent to the Home to rest and recuperate.
     Since she has been at the home, she has seemed to be in very depressed spirits and in great mental trouble. On one or two occasions, she has remarked to the young ladies of the Home, that she had rather be dead than in her present condition.
     No attention was paid to these remarks beyond the expression of that sweet sympathy, which only a young woman can express, and no idea was entertained of there being any possibility of her doing herself serious bodily harm.
     Last night, she chatted with the young lady occupants of the Home in her usual mood before retiring. This morning, after breakfast, she conversed with the matron for a short while, and complaining a little of feeling bad, and being in some slight trouble, she retired to her room, presumably to rest.
     About an hour later, the matron though she discerned some unusual noise in the room and quickly ran upstairs to ascertain the cause. Opening the door without knocking, she was horrified almost beyond expression, to find the bed upon which Miss Breslin was lying, rapidly burning and Miss Breslin's clothing wrapped in flames.
     The matron called some mother ladies to her assistance, and together, they attempted to extricate the flames which were rapidly consuming her clothing and her life, but in this, they were met with stubborn resistance. Miss Breslin evaded them as best she could and resisted all their efforts to save her by exclaiming" "Oh, let me die!" Let me burn up!" "Take a knife and cut my throat!" and other such expressions.
     The bed-clothing was rapidly burning, and the room had caught in several places, but the fire department arrive don the scene about this time and the flames were quickly subdued, but not until the unfortunate woman had been burned beyond recognition about the head and face and terribly burned about the body.
     Although her sufferings seemed to have reached the unconscious stage, medical aid was summoned and everything possible was done by the matron and young ladies of the Home for the young lady, but she died about two hours later without giving any explanation or cause for the act.
     On her table was found a letter addressed to S. A. Harlan, Indianapolis, Ind. The letter, which was not sealed, or stamped, read as follows:
     Dallas, Dec. 18, 1897.--S. A. Harlan: I write to tell you that I did not know of my dear sister's danger. If I had known anything about it, I would have taken her place. I did not see her do anything wrong. I had no idea she was in danger from ----. I write this for her dear children's sake. This is my last testament.
                                                E
LLA N. BRESLIN.

______

     The remains were taken charge of by Undertaker Loudermilk. Justice Lauderdale held an inquest and returned a verdict in accordance with the facts. The funeral will take place some time to-morrow, sufficient money being on deposit to Miss Breslin's credit in the National Bank of Commerce to pay her funeral expenses.

_____

     The room in which the unfortunate affair occurred is located on the second floor of the main building of the Home, on the east side. There was no fire in the room at the time and Miss Breslin was not in the habit of curling her hair, so lamp theories are out of the question. From all indications, she first built a fire under the bed with paper and other inflammable material and then laid down on the bed to burn to death. But for the matron's watchfulness and acute sense of hearing, the Girls' Co-Operative Home might now be in ashes.
     This is the first accident that has befallen the Home since its organization, and is universally regretted by all who have learned of the unfortunate occurrence.

- December 21, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.
________

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending yesterday:
    Cosby, Charles V., Dec. 19, 52 years old, No. 153 Main street; heart disease.
    Childress, Eliza, infant of, Dec. 19, aged seven months, corner Wood and Akard; inanition.
    Hogan, Steve, Dec. 19, aged 50 years, Oak Lawn; consumption.
    Dyer, Joel, infant of, Dec. 19, aged five days, No. 646 S. Harwood street; jaundice.
    Breslin, Miss Ella, Dec. 21, aged 50 years, No. 223 Ross avenue; burned to death.
    Cornett, Andrew, colored, Dec. 22, aged 40 years, corner Preston and Paris streets; congestion of the lungs.
    Fawsett, Jessie, Dec. 24, aged nine years, No. 561 Juliett street; typhoid fever.
    Eastman, Mrs. Charles, Dec. 25, aged 37 years, No. 446 Pacific avenue; congestion of the brain.
    Payne, Samuel C., Dec. 20, 50 years old, West Dallas; tuberculosis.
    Burford, Tina, colored, Dec. 19, 17 years old, No. 827 Commerce street; peritonitis.

- December 25, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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ACCIDENTALLY KILLED.
_______

Will Deveraux Went Out with
the Old Year.

_______

     Will Deveraux, a colored waiter at the Coney Island restaurant, living with his aunt, Jennie Coleman, at 147 Jackson street, went out with the old year last night.
     With an old cap-and-ball pistol, Devereaux attempted to join in the midnight fusilade. The first shot he fired recoiled on him, the bullet passing through his head from forehead to occiput, killing him instantly. He fell on his aunt's front porch.
     Devereaux was 25 years old and a native of Texarkana, where his mother lives.

- January 1, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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NECROLOGICAL.

    The following deaths are reported for the week ending yesterday:
    Whittager, Henry, Dec. 30, age 60 years, No. 198 Kentucky street; cause not given.
    Foy, Nina Belle, Dec. 31, aged 2 years, No. 121 Holmes street; [cause not given].
    Aikin, Mary, Dec. 26, 5 days old, No. 122 Emma street; [cause not given].
    Williams, Ed, Dec. 28, 29 years old, No. 298 North Ervay street; [cause not given].
    Hodge, John, Dec. 26, aged 30 years, No. 366 Bryan, colored; killed in railroad accident.
    Dwyer, Phil, Dec. 29, aged 67 years, No. 107 Motley avenue; heart failure.
    Lawson, Mrs. Lizzie, Dec. 30, aged 23 years; Oak Lawn; consumption.
    High, Robt. L., Dec. 31, aged 32 years, No. 394 N. Pearl street; dropsy.

- January 2,1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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