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Updated January 15, 2002

 

Local Notes.

     Mrs. W. Illingsworth, who died last Tuesday, after a protracted illness, was interred at 2 p. m. yesterday, at Trinity cemetery. The funeral was largely attended.

- January 1, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 9, col. 2.
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Death of Mr. Knox.

     Mr. W. A. L. Knox, one of the founders of the Farm and Ranch, died last Tuesday evening of consumption at the residence of Mr. Charles E. Brown on Bryan street. The deceased was 35 years old and a native of the county of Armagh, Ireland. His remains lie embalmed at Mr. Ed C. Smith's undertaker's establishment, awaiting the arrival from New York today of his brother, Mr. John Armoy Knox, one of the editors of the Texas Siftings and the author of several successful plays. The deceased leaves a wife, but no children.

- January 2, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 2, col. 6.
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Funeral Notice.

     KNOX--Wm. A. L. Knox died Tuesday, December 30, 1891, at 7:30 p. m.
     He will be buried with Masonic and Knights of Pythias honors Saturday, January 3, 1891, the funeral procession form at the residence of Charles K[?] Brown, No. 76 Bryan street, at 10 a. m., proceeding to Trinity cemetery, where the interment will take place.

- January 2, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 4.
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Society Meetings.

     There will be a called meeting of Tannehill Lodge No. 52, A. F. & A. M. at the Masonic hall, corner of Main and Murphy streets, at 9 o'clock, a. m., for the purpose of attending the funeral of our deceased brother, W. A. L. Knox.
A full attendance is earnestly requested. Visiting brethren are cordially invited.
                                                          J. M. Young, W. M.
W. Shirley, Secretary

- January 3, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 3.
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Local Notes.

     Mrs. M. E. Schooler died yesterday morning of pneumonia at her home, 1216 Young street.
     Justice Braswell, yesterday inquested the remains of Lenora Edwards, colored, who died suddenly on Pacific avenue of hemorrhage of the lungs.

- January 3, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 6, col. 3.
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Personal.

     John Armoy Knox, of New York, one of the editors of the Texas Siftings, and James Knox, of Hubbard City, arrived in Dallas last night to attend the funeral of their brother, W. A. L. Knox, this morning.
Judge U. F. Short has returned from a Christmas visit to relatives in Missouri.

- January 3, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 6, col. 3.
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Dallas City Council.

     The city secretary reported he had issued nine death certificates for the past week--four for adults and five for children filed.

- January 4, 1891, Dallas Morning News, Sec. II, p. 12, col. 1.
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Local Notes.

     Mrs. Lula S. Aldrich, wife of Barrett A. Aldrich, died yesterday afternoon of consumption.

- January 8, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 2.
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Died.

     ALDRICH---Lulu S. Aldrich, wife of Barret A. Aldrich and daughter of Mrs. S. A. Smith, died Wednesday, January 7, 1891, at 1:30 p. m., aged 40 years and 5 months. Funeral will take place this Saturday at 10:00 a. m., from family residence, corner Wood and Harwood streets.
     LONG -- On the 9th instant, at 6:15 p. m., Mrs. Eugenie Long, aged 45[?] years, wife of Ben Long, deceased, formerly mayor of Dallas. Funeral notice announced later.

- January 10, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 4.
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Record of the Courts.
Probate Matters.

     In re estate of J. N. Clark, deceased, the annual accounts of the executrix were approved.
     In re estate of Henry M. Morris, deceased, the report of the administrator of the renting of the lands of the estate was approved.

- January 10, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 2.
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A DEAD JOURNALIST.
______

Oscar Dietzel Passes Away at His
Home in This City.

[small portion of article is missing]

     Mr. Oscar Dietzel, editor of the Texas Post, and the founder of German journalism in Texas, died last night at his home on Ross avenue after a long spell of illness.
     Mr. Deitzel was born at Meiningen, Germany, in 1843. In his tenth year, he bid farewell to kinsmen and country and came to the United States, in company with his father and brother, Henry Dietzel. They came directly to Dortz, a small town in southern Texas.
     At the age of 15, Mr. Dietzel went to work on the Victoria Advocate as a printer. In 1859, his father, brother and himself founded the Texas Democrat, the first German paper ever published in Texas. In 1866, they published the Democrat at Galveston. In 1869, they published the Texas Post, which they moved from Galveston to Dallas in 1887. During his career as a journalist, Mr. Deitzel had many hard trials. When editing the Texas Democrat, it was burned out three times and was finally forced to abandon it in the days of reconstruction.
     Mr. Dietzel was a gentleman in every sense of the word, and had a host of friends who deeply mourn his loss and will ever revere his memory for the good he has [done].
     His funeral will take [place to-mor[row afternoon at 3 [p. m.] ______ friends and acquaint[ances are invited] to attend.

- January 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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CHARLES BRADY DEAD
_______

His Life Cut Short by a Christ-
mas Gun.

     During Christmas, at Wilmer, John Arnold, for sport, fired his pistol with unfortunate results. The ball passed through the leg of a boy named Rumfelt and lodged in the leg of a gentleman by the name of Charles Brady. Arnold was arrested, but gave bond.      Blood-poisoning set in, in Brady's leg, and the wound became dangerous. Arnold was re-arrested and placed in the Dallas jail. Sheriff Lewis was notified yesterday of Brady's death. Rumfelt's wound was very slight, and when last heard from, had about recovered.

- January 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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City Notes.

     The funeral of O. Deitzel, late editor of the German Post, took place yesterday afternoon and was largely attended.

- January 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
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Banker Flippen Dying.

     The many friends of W. H. Flippen, the well-known banker, will be pained to know that he is lying at the point of death at his home in this city. He was reported very low at 2:30 p. m. and his death is hourly expected.

- January 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
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Funeral Notice.

     The funeral services of Mamie, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. Haughton, who died at the residence of parents at corner of Lemmon and McKinney avenues this morning, will take place to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock from the family residence. Relatives and friends are invited to attend.

- January 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
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Personal.

     Mr. C. E. Veeland and her son, J. W. Veeland, of Louisville, Ky., are spending a few days with the family of J. W. Strauss, corner Ross avenue and Masten street, and attending the funeral of Mrs. Veeland's father, Capt. Quint, to-day. They will leave for home Saturday. J. W. Veeland is the traveling representative of the Farmers Home Journal of Louisville.

- January 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
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CHILD BURNED TO DEATH.
_______

Little Irene Lane of Chestnut
Hill the Victim Last
Evening.

______

The Particulars of the Sad
Affair and Dire Distress
of the Parents.

     The residence of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Lane of Chestnut Hill, was shrouded in gloom last night.
     Early in the evening, their beautiful little daughter, Irene, while at play in the sitting room, where her brothers and sisters, was decorated with garlands made of paper and other combustible material. The children were romping and having a jolly time, when Irene passed too near the stove and a flying spark ignited the paper and set fire to her clothing, enveloping the poor child in one mass of flames.
     The clothing of the little girl was removed as quickly as possible, and a physician summoned. Her injuries were of a fatal nature, however, and at midnight, death relieved the agony of the unfortunate child.
     The bereaved parents and relatives have the heart felt sympathy of a large circle of friends in the sad affliction which has visited upon them.

- January 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
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Funeral Notice.

     The funeral of Irene, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Lane, will take place from the family residence, Holmes street, Chestnut Hill, to-morrow morning at 10:30 o'clock. Friends of the family are invited to attend.

- January 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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CAPT. QUINT'S FUNERAL.
_______

Brief Sketch of the Life of the
Departed.

     The funeral of Capt. A. P. Quint, who died last Saturday at Garland, will take place at 3:30 o'clock this afternoon from the residence of J. W. Strauss, and all of his friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.
     Capt. Quint was born at Brunswick, Me., where he spent the first fourteen years of his eventful life. Brunswick is a seaport town and the little lad playing on those historic shores and listening to the songs of the waves chasing each other on the deep, fired the boyish ambition to become a sailor. When he had reached his fourteenth year, he was treading a deck on the stormy Atlantic. His life was an unusually adventurous one, even for a sailor, his feet pressing many wild and unknown shores and seeing many a brave ship go down.
     Capt. Quint made his home in Louisville for many years, and during that time, served as captain of some of the largest steamboats that ran between that city and New Orleans.
     Several years ago, he came to Dallas and made it his home until his death. He made many friends here who mourn his loss. He was 80 years old.

- January 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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ALMOST DEAD.
_______

A Man Escapes From the Hos-
pital While Sick, and
is Found in Bad
Condition.

     Last night, John Ragan, a man recently moved to Dallas, was found on the outer edge of the city, nearly frozen, and was taken to the hospital. Two days ago, he was taken to the hospital sick and recently off of a spree. He became violent and escaped from the hospital, the combined strength of a number of men not sufficient to hold him. Since that time, he has been exposed to the wet and cold, and when found, was nearly dead from exposure, and it is doubtful if he lives.

- January 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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Funeral Notice.

     DIED.-- William H. Flippen entered into rest at half past eleven on Saturday morning, January 17th. Funeral services at St. Matthew's Cathedral Sunday, January 18th, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

- January 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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PASSED AWAY.
_______

Death of Banker W. H. Flippen

     W. H. Flippen, of the banking house of Flippen, Adoue & Lobit, died at his home in this city to-day. He has been ill a long time, and death was not unexpected. For a number of years before locating in business in Dallas, Mr. Flippen was engaged in the banking business at Galveston. He was a gentleman highly esteemed in business and social circles, and his death will be sincerely mourned.

- January 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     William Humphreys, colored, charged with killing S. J. Dillard of Mountain Creek, Ellis county, on March 14, 1890, was acquitted yesterday.

- January 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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In Memoriam.

     Mrs. Ben Long, whose death was published in the papers of the city on the 8th of January, was a native of Belgium. She was Miss Eugenia DeVleschondere. Came to this country in 1856 with the family of her stepfather, Mr. Goetsels, and married Mr. Long at the residence of Mr. Jacob Nussbaumer, in the spring of 1862. They had four daughters and one son.
     Mr. Long, who was a native of Switzerland, came the year previous on the same vessel with Mr. Henry Boll. He was a highly esteemed citizen, having served two terms as mayor of Dallas and at the time of his death in 1876, held the office of United States commissioner.
     Naturally of amiable and affectionate disposition, Mrs. Long was a most devoted wife, and after the death of her husband, made it the object of her life, not only to maintain her children, but to instill into their characters, all good principles, as well as to afford them every opportunity in her power to acquire a good education.
     After an illness of 18 weeks, she died and left to her children the memory of her pure and lovely character, and her devotion as a mother.
     She also leaves her mother, three sisters and a brother to mourn her loss and to her friends, the remembrance of a true, steadfast and loving friend. All mourn ____ ___ her family are inconsolable in [their] bereavement.
     They have the sincere sympathy of all who knew her.

- January 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 6.
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FATAL QUARREL.
______

A Murder Committed in a Va-
cant House Near Mesquite.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Jan. 19. -- What may develop to be a shocking murder was committed in an old unoccupied house about four miles southwest of this place yesterday morning. Parties who came in to-day to buy a coffin give the following particulars: W. B. Sparkes and one Ellis, both of Hill county, are partners in [the] peddling business. On the 15th, they stopped in the old house referred to above to spend the night, and yesterday morning, they became involved in a discussion as to the proper way to paint letters on a glass, about which they differed. The lie was passed and Sparks drew his knife, whereupon Ellis drew his pistol and fired three times, all the shots taking effect, the first striking in the right temple, passing though the head; one in the left shoulder and the other through the hand. Death was almost instantaneous. After the shooting, Ellis left on foot and, when a short distance from the house, met Jim Carver, to whom he told the circumstance, saying he was forced to do the act in self-defense. Esquire Fly was notified, and last night, held an inquest over the dead body of Sparks, the verdict being that deceased came to his death from pistol shots at the hands of Ellis.
     Sheriff Lewis was notified, and he is now on the lookout for Ellis, who has not been seen since yesterday morning.
     The peddling outfit consisted of one wagon, one sulky and three horses, all of which was left on the ground by Ellis, who went away on foot.

- January 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
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Mr. Flippen's Funeral.

     The funeral of the late W. H. Flippen, the banker, took place yesterday at 3 o'clock from St. Matthew's Cathedral. The house of God was thronged with friends of deceased and the floral offerings were very beautiful, the casket being fairly imbedded in flowers. The pall-bearers were Alfred Davis, Jules E. Schneider, J. F. O'Connor, C. F. Carter, Robert Gibson, J. Adoue, Judge Charles Fred Tucker and Col. J. R. Cole, with about thirty bankers at pall-bearers. Bishop Garrett, assisted by Rector Turner, officiated. "I Know That My Redeemer Liveth" was rendered by Mrs. E. P. Cowen, after which, the remains were interred in Trinity Cemetery. The city council, other city and county officials and many friends from other cities attended the funeral.

- January 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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LOCAL HAPPENINGS OF NOTE.

     The remains of unknown man were found in a vacant house near Scyene. An inquest was held by Justice J. P. Fly of Seagoville, but no light was shed upon the case.

- January 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3-4.
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Proceedings of the Courts.

     JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT. -- The case of J. R. Humphreys was called this morning. Humphreys killed a man by the name of Skaggs at Mesquite a year or two ago.

- January 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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In Memoriam.

     Resolutions adopted by the Vestry of St. Matthew's Parish upon the death of William H. Flippen.
     On Saturday last, the 17th day of January, 1891, at half past eleven o'clock in the morning, in the 52nd year of his age, at his home in this city, surrounded by his loving wife and children, William H. Flippen, for many years a member of this Vestry and treasurer of St. Matthew's Parish, closed his eyes and entered into rest, after a long and painful illness, which the utmost efforts of medical skill, and the tenderest care of loving friends, were powerless to resist. The pure and exalted character of the deceased; pure and exalted character of the deceased; his long and faithful services upon the Vestry; and the high example his life has furnished to those who survive him; make it proper that a minute should be entered upon the records of this Vestry, commemorative of his virtues and services, and expressing our profound sense of the great loss that we, his late associates in the Vestry, and the people of St. Matthew's Parish have suffered in his death. Therefore
     Resolved, that in the death of our brother, William H. Flippen, St. Matthew's Parish has lost one of its most arnest and devoted members. His ever open and generous purse, on many occasions, furnished to the Vestry, means, without which, the work of the Parish could not have been carried on. The press of his private affairs never caused him to fail to serve the Church whenever, and in whatever way, his services were rquared. Modest, gentel, just and generous, his daily walk and conversatin were without reproach. A devoted husband and father, an honorable, upright citizen, a christian gentleman, he had in the highest degree the respect, confidence and affection of all who knew him.
     Resolved, that we, his late associates in the Vestry do assure to the sorrow-stricken widow and children of our deceased friend and brother, our profound sympathy in their great bereavement.
Resolved, that this report be spread upon the minutes of the Vestry; that a copy thereof be delivered to the widow of our deceased brother, and that it be published in the daily papers of the city.
               C
HAS. FRED TUCKER,  }
               C
HAS. L. DEXTER,       } Committee.
               R
ICHARD MORGAN.     }

- January 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Proceedings of the Courts.

JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT. -- The court is hearing the testimony in the Humphreys case to-day. Humphreys killed a man named J. S. Staggs, in September 1888. The testimony, as far as taken, shows that both men where drinking on the day of the killing and rather quarrelsome, Staggs especially. Humphreys and Staggs had a quarrel some hours before the fight. No one was near them when the fight took place, the nearest witness being fifty yards away. One witness testified that he saw the men pass several blows and then saw Staggs sink to the ground with blood gushing out of his left shoulder, so it seemed to him. It was then that he noticed a knife in Humphreys' hand. Staggs was stabbed several times--once in the left shoulder, once or twice in the breast and once in the stomach. He lived forty-eight hours. Both men were married and had small families.

- January 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     D. W. McKee, a well known butcher, was buried yesterday.

- January 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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[No Heading]

     William Gardner, aged 40 years, who died Wednesday, was buried by the Knights of Honor yesterday. He leaves a widow and several children. Deceased was formerly of Houston and a brother-in-law of Alderman W. J. Brady.

- January 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mrs. Walker of Lancaster died yesterday. On January 13, some miscreant fired into the door of the Walker residence, and the poor woman was actually scared to death.

- January 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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Died.

     Mrs. Louis Hathaway, wife of W. R. Hathaway, of Chestnut Hill, died of pneumonia, superinduced by la grippe yesterday morning, after a brief illness. She was only 16 years of age and had just been married a year to the day. Mr. Hathaway is down himself with la grippe, but is not dangerously ill. The remains will be shipped north for interment.

- January 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     The remains of Mrs. W. R. Hathaway, whose death was announced in these columns yesterday, were shipped to Raymond, Texas, for burial.

- January 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Mysterious Case.

_________

A Farmer Found Dying in the
Woods.

     On Monday, S. E. Weatherford, a farmer residing two miles from Wilmer, left his home to go to the timber for the purpose of cutting wood. Yesterday, he was found in the brush in an unconscious condition with a deep gash in the back of his head and other injuries. He was taken to his home and it is believed will die.

- January 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

A Victim of La Grippe.

     On Friday last, R. A. Rowland, a juror in the Fourteenth judicial district court, complained of being ill and showed strong symptoms of la grippe. Clerk Stewart paid him off for five days service and advised the sick man to go to his home. This morning, news was received that Mr. Rowland died at the home of his brother, Representative James Rowland, of Richardson, last night. He was well known and very popular and is the first victim to the dread disease, which as claimed so many victims in the northern states, in Dallas county.

- January 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE CITY IN GENERAL.

     Capt. T. A. Arnold died yesterday of pneumonia.
     J. H. Wilde, a laborer, died yesterday at the city hospital.

- January 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Death of David Tichenor.

     David Tichenor, a well-known citizen of Dallas, died at his residence, of pneumonia, yesterday morning. The funeral took place in the afternoon. Deceased was a native of Alabama and came to Dallas fifteen or sixteen years ago. He was superintendent of waterworks for several years and held other positions of trust. In local political circles, he was well-known and was a man well-liked by all who knew him.

- January 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Last Saturday, Charles Mayer, a butcher, while ill, escaped from his nurse at 1016 Elm street. Yesterday afternoon, after the forms of the TIMES-HERALD had been sent to press, the body of the unfortunate man was found in the Trinity river, a mile south of the Oak Cliff bridge, by a party of fishermen. The deceased was 36 years old, a native of Germany and unmarried.

- January 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -
 

City Notes.

     Mrs. Sally Moore died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. M. A. Morrill, 424 Ross avenue, yesterday, in the eighty-fifth year of her age. Deceased had resided in Texas for the past thirty-five years, and was one of the old landmarks of the Lone Star state.

- February 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

SUDDEN DEATH.
________

George D. Martin Dies This
Morning.

     George D. Martin, of the firm of Rodgers & Martin, a well-known and popular business man, died at his residence in this city this morning. Funeral announcement later.

- February 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The funeral of the late George D. Martin will take place at 2:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 6, from 206 Bryan, corner of North Ervay streets. Friends of the family are invited to attend. Rev. Mr. McLaughlin of the Tabernacle M. E. church will conduct the services.

- February 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The remains of John P. Carroll were taken to St. Louis for burial.
     Pleasant Taylor, an aged and respected citizen of Dallas, died yesterday at the home of his daughters, Mrs. Reuben P. Aunspaugh, on Ross avenue. Deceased was born in Knoxville, Tenn., in 1817. In 1843, he located at Lancaster, and in 1872, he came to Dallas and has resided here continuously since that time.

- February 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

SHE MADE GOOD HER OATH.
________

EDDIE GILBREATH KILLED BY
ADELINE SCROGGINS.

_______

The Terrible Tragedy Which
Closed a Negro Ball in the
Darky Quarter Last
Night.

     Sallie Worthington, colored, who lives on Fuqua street, gave a ball last night which was ended up by a diversion that was not on the programme of amusement--a bloody tragedy.
     Adeline Scroggins and Eddie Gilbreath, enemies of long standing, were at the ball and met each other in the yard and engaged in a fight which ended in Eddie Gilbreath's death.
     There were several witnesses to the fight whose statements conflict. Several of them say that Eddie Gilbreath was talking to another woman in the yard and that Adeline Scroggins approached them and contradicted a statement made by Eddie Gilbreath and the two began quarreling. After passing a few words with her disputer, Eddie Gilbreath turned to enter the house when Adeline Scroggins whipped out a dirk from the folds of her dress and plunged it into Eddie Gilbreath's breast, just above the heart. The stabbed woman then ran through the house, pursued by the other. She ran out of the house into the yard, again where she caught up [with] an axe and dealt her slayer a blow over the head and a second later, fell to the earth, a corpse.
     Adeline Scroggins says that Eddie Gilbreath began the row and used the axe on her before she had made any attempt to fight. When Eddie Gilbreath struck her with the axe, she drew the knife and dealt the deadly blow.
     A T
IMES-HERALD reporter went out to the scene of the conflict and learned the following: Eddie Gilbreath was 21 years old and the wife of Frank Gilbreath, an honest, hard-working young darky.
     Adeline Scroggins is about 20 years old and unmarried.
     The two had a fight last summer, in which Adeline Scroggins slashed Eddie Gilbreath across the arm with a knife. She has since sworn to kill Eddie Gilbreath, and last night, made good her oath.
     Officer Gates went out last night and brought Adeline Scroggins to the lock-up where she was found by the reporter this morning, with her head in a sling.
     Eddie Gilbreath was built out of fighting material and led her husband a gay life.

- February 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o-

DEATH OF AN OLD SETTLER.

Special to The Times-Herald.
     L
ANCASTER, Feb. 6.--Tidings reached us yesterday from Stephens county, of the death of old man Pleas Taylor. He was partially paralyzed for several years before his death. He has long been known as one of the early settlers of Dallas county, and in an around this town, has a numerous family relationship. Several years ago, two of his sons, with their wives and children, moved to Stephen's county, and he soon followed them and established a home near them, where he died. He leaves a wife and many descendants to mourn his loss.

- February 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Sad Death.

     Bedrey Porter and his wife lost their two-year-old child this morning by the hand of death. The people live in the country, and this morning, started to the city with the child for medical treatment, but the child died in the wagon before the city was reached.

- February 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Died.

     John W. Ballard died at his residence, corner of Tenth and Ballard streets, yesterday. Mr. Ballard was about 30 years of age.

- February 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

DIED.
______

Death of Mrs. Ben Tanner.

     At 10:30 last night, at her home on Washington avenue, Mrs. Ben F. Tanner, wife of Deputy Constable Ben Tanner, expired after an illness of several days. The funeral will take place to-morrow between the hours of 12 and 1 o'clock from Caruth Chapel, six miles north of the city.
     Mrs. Tanner was a woman beloved by all who knew her, and the bereaved husband and family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.

- February 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

In Memorium.

     Died, on Thursday, February 11, 1891, at his home in Oak Cliff, Mr. John M. Ballard, son of Col. J. S. Ballard, an old and prominent citizen of Dallas, and a member of the city council for many years. The deceased was born in Dallas county thirty years ago and had hosts of friends in all circles. Six years ago, he was wedded to Emma, the second daughter of Col. W. D. Wylie, another old resident, of this city. A sweet little boy and girl [were] the result of this union, aged, respectively, two and six years. The loss falls heavily upon his devoted wife and tender children, as well as his aged father, mother, brother and sister. The funeral ceremonies were performed in a most tender and touching manner by Dr. A. P. Smith, of the Presbyterian church and his remains were followed to their last resting place in Trinity cemetery by a large number of sorrowing friends.

- February 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

[City Council]

     The city secretary reported twelve deaths for the week.

- February 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2-4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The young man, referred to as under the care of the Y. M. C. A., is dead. Undertaker Linskie has charge of the body. It is thought deceased resided at Pine Ridge, Mo., but even that much is not known to a certainty.

- February 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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SHOT DOWN LIKE A DOG.
______

ED T. YOUNG KILLED BY W. C.
CASH.

______

A Story That Began in Ken-
tucky and Ended in
Dallas.

______

"He Seduced my Wife and Dis-
graced My Children" Says
the Killer.

______

"I Came Here to Kill Him and
I am Glad That He is
Dead."

______

Particulars of the Sensational
Affair--The Parties and
the Motive.

     Edwin T. Young, the well-known Main street liveryman, was shot and killed just across from his place of business at 7:30 last night, by W. C. Cash, a stranger in the city. The killing was cold-blooded and the street was thronged with people who were eye-witnesses to the tragedy. The murderer was determined and came to Dallas to kill. Young had just come from the restaurant in the rear of Brady's saloon and was crossing the street in the direction of his place of business, when he was halted by a stranger to the eyewitnesses.
     "Hello, Ed!" was the salutation.
     Young turned around and the stranger advanced, peered into his face, quick as a flash, drew a revolver and began firing. Three shots were fired in quick succession. Young reeled and fell to the ground. His dying words were:
     "For God's sake, do not murder me."
     Hanging over the dying man like an avenging Nemesis, the murderer cast aside the gun in his hand and drew another, a 44-calibre gun and savagely said, "You've ruined my wife and robbed my four children," and then sent another leaden missile of death crashing through the head of the prostrate man.
     By this time, the excitement was intense and hundreds rushed to the scene of the tragedy. Young was lifted up tenderly by his friends and those who had witnessed the bloody deed and was borne to the drug store of Shook & Boykin. The undertaker's establishment would have been the proper place. The vital spark had fled. The golden chord had been severed by the leaden messengers of death and the soul of Edwin T. Young had been ushered into the presence of the judge of the court of last resort, there to enter a plea for life's virtues and follies and receive sentence to which all humanity must bow as final.
     The murderer was seized by Officer Milner. He made no resistance. He viewed the body of the fallen man. He gave a yell of exultation, fairly hissing, I have killed him. I did not think that he was mean enough for lead to injure. I am a Kentuckian, I killed him and he should have died long ago."
     Officer Milner hurried the excited man to the central police station, where he was searched. Two large revolvers, two dirk knives as sharp as a keen-cutting Damascus sword and $265 in cash were found on his person. Station Keeper Mullin and Officer Gates were present. The prisoner was placed in a cell and people began to pour into the building. Before entering his cell, the prisoner drew a note book and pencil from his pocket and penned the following, which he handed to a T
IMES-HERALD reporter:
     "E. T. Young has been guilty of the seduction and the alienation of the affections of my wife, and I wish to say to the good people of the city of Dallas and state of Texas to just take me and do as they please, for my life, caused by this said Young, is a living death. My mind is in a state of wild unrest and my heart is beating high. A sickening feeling of dread invades my heart all the while. Though my bosom heaves madly with the wild beating of my heart, it is filled with love for my little children, which are a nice little set of folks, if I do say it myself. Respectfully, to the world,
                    [Signed] W. C. C
ASH."

     At this time, several of the friends of the dead man entered the station. One remarked, in a loud voice, noticing that the prisoner had been placed in a cell, "D----n him, the ------- k -------- ------, it is lucky that you have him in a safe place."
     Officer Gates sized up the field at once and declared that the proper place for Cash was in an iron cell, enclosed by stone walls, in the county jail. The station house was cleared, the prisoner taken from the cell, and accompanied by three officers, was hurried to the county jail. The route was Akard to Jackson and thence to the bastille.
     Young's friends were notified and the remains were taken to the undertaking establishment of Pat Linskie to be prepared for burial.
The crowds on the streets dispersed when it became whispered around that Young had been slain, shot down like a dog for, dishonoring the home of a friend in Kentucky, before coming to Dallas, the men who were clamoring for Judge Lynch to step in and pronounce sentence upon the murderer subsided and their wrath disappeared.

CASH'S STORY!

     A TIMES-HERALD reporter visited the jail at 9 o'clock last evening and obtained admittance. The prisoner was found in a cell in the second tier with seven or eight companions in crime. The reporter asked for a short interview and Cash readily assented:
"Your name, age, occupation and place of residence, please?" said the scribe.
     "My name is W. C. Cash; I am 47 years of age, originally from McKinney, Lincoln county, Kentucky; my business that of farming and stock dealing. I am as fine a farmer as ever turned a furrow. I was a soldier in the confederate service, serving four years in the famous Fourth Tennessee cavalry."
     "You have killed Ed Young. What explanation have you to offer--what mitigating circumstance in extenuation for the killing?"
     "Is he dead? Well, a meaner man never died in Dallas. Take me out and hang me if I deserve it. He debauched my wife, disgraced my children, broke up my home. He induced my boy to leave home, taught him to drink whisky and other evil habits, and I found the lad working on the railroad after a long search. My life is a hell--" and the prisoner broke down and began to shed copious tears and rock himself to and fro.
     "Were you friends?"
     "Friends? Bosom friends, and I loved that man at one time as I would a brother. In 1881, we were neighbors in McKinney, Lincoln county. I had as fine a farm as laid out doors and sold mules and horses throughout the south. I am known there and have powerful friends in Kentucky and also in Dallas. Young debauched my wife, entered my home like a snake, and dishonored me. I did not come in possession of the facts until July 22, 1889, when my wife and I separated, and later in the year, I obtained a divorce on the ground of adultery in the circuit court for the McKinney district."
     "Young had, in the meantime, left Kentucky and come to Dallas, had he not?"
     "Yes, and he and took dinner at the same hotel the day he departed. He was my guest and I paid for the dinner. Young afterward remarked that he never 'felt so ashamed in his life; as to dine with me, at my expense, after his perfidious betrayal of my confidence and the black spot he had placed on my honor."
     "How many children have you?"
     "One by my first wife and four by the woman whom Ed Young ruined. The eldest of the four is a girl of 11 years and the baby is a girl of six years?"
     "Where are they at present"?
     "A year or more ago, I resolved to leave Kentucky and I sold out my possessions. I took my children to Kansas City, Kan. They reside at 107 Chestnut avenue, and their mother, my divorced wife, is now caring for them. I pay her $2.50 per week and foot all the bills."
     "What have you been doing in the meantime?"
     "Engaged in farming and the stock business in Sumner county, Kan., and in the territory. There has been a [good] deal of correspondence between Young and myself, and I have all of his letters. Two weeks [ago], I notified Young and a relative of his residing in Dallas, that I had made up my mind to come to Texas and square accounts with him."
     "You came to Dallas determined to slay Young?"
     "Yes, I did. I came here to kill him and I killed him. I believe with Sam Jones that sin should be destroyed. In killing Young, I destroyed sin."
     "When did you arrive in the city?"
     "At 11 o'clock to-day, I had a photograph of Young's stable and knew my ground. This evening, I saw him enter a saloon. I followed him. He took a drink and stepped outside. I followed him, called, "Hello, Ed. Young!" He turned and faced me. The wrong I suffered at his hands maddened me. I drew my gun and shot him. To make sure, I shot him with a larger gun."
     "You have been drinking hard, have you not?" was asked.
     "I have kept up on stimulants for the past three months. For the past two weeks, I have not partaken of sufficient solid food to keep a canary alive. But, my work is done. He brought disgrace on my children and they shall not be the only ones to suffer."
     "Were you connected with the Cash family of South Carolina, noted for their killing propensities?"
     "Yes, I claim kinship with them, but am a Kentuckian by birth."
     Cash is a man of medium height, well-proportioned and good address. He has dark hair, slightly-tinged with gray, dark moustache and side-whiskers and piercing black eyes. He talked like a man on the verge of insanity, or one just recovering from a protracted spree. At no time did he show the slightest regret in connection with the death of the man he so bitterly hated.

THE DEAD MAN.

     Edwin J. Young was well-known in Dallas. He came here three years ago and has made money in the livery business. He was a tall, finely formed man, in the prime of life, and was looked upon as a dangerous citizen when in his cups. Still, he was popular with those who were not aware of the "skeleton in the closet" of his private life. He had a most accomplished wife and interesting family. The former comes from one of the best families of Kentucky, and her relations in this city are among the prominent people. Young himself was highly connected and well educated. He was a man of violent passions, however, and wrecked his own life, if the sad truth must be told. He drank heavily at times and was uncontrollable when under the influence of liquor. A month or six weeks ago, he departed suddenly for Hot Springs without deigning to say a word to his family. It may not be proper to touch upon the private life of a man who is not here to speak for himself, but the truth is that, according to those in possession of the facts, Young was cruel in his treatment and neglected those who, by every time, appealed to his manhood for protection and care. His wife and children are now in Kentucky with their relatives, Mrs. Young having become discouraged when her husband took his flight to Hot Springs. Relatives of the dead man admit that the origin of the trouble which led to the tragedy of last evening had its date in Kentucky ten years ago, and it was known that when Cash and Young came together, one or the other, and perhaps both, would bite the dust.
     The dead man knew that there was trouble brewing and he was anxious to dispose of his property in Dallas. He had been heard to say at intervals that he wanted to sell out and go elsewhere and had been negotiating for the sale of his stable and other property.
Public sentiment which, at first, was strongly against Cash, has changed, and when the alleged facts became known, the tide began to turn in his favor. Of the dead man, but little more remains to be said. He is dead and the grave is supposed to hide from the eyes of mankind the good and the evil deeds of men. If her erred, if he wrecked the home of a friend and brought disgrace upon his name, the penalty he paid was his life. The Mosaic law, "A tooth for a tooth and an eye for an eye," has been put into execution and the crime avenged. The law of men will deal with the slayer.
     "The wages of sin is death," and the man who died with his boots on is a dead advertisement of the truth of the scriptural saying.
     He was unarmed, unprepared and not ready to die. No mercy was shown him, no pitying hand stayed the arm of the slayer. He died as he lived--but, it is safe to bet that, had he been armed, there would have been a man named W. C. Cash in a coffin to-day, instead of being an inmate of a cell in "Murder's Row."

VIEWED BY THE CORONER.

     Justice Braswell, to-day, began taking testimony, as a coroner, and will conclude the work this evening. He viewed the remains last night. Any one of the four shots would have caused death. Three bullets passed through the body and the fourth drilled a large hole in the back of the head. The verdict will in accordance with the facts. Mrs. Young was notified last night of the tragic taking off of her husband. It is understood that interment will take place in Dallas.
     Cash, the slayer, is more cheerful today, but has no regrets. He sent for an attorney this morning and had a long interview with the legal gentleman. His examining trial will be held in Justice Braswell's court Friday or Saturday.
     Cash has a bundle of letters, it is said, which furnish undisputable evidence of the charges which he made against the man whose candle of life he snuffed out with his pistol. It is alleged that many of these letters are of a recent date, and, no doubt, their contents will be divulged at the trial.

- February 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4-5, continued on p. 8, col. 2-4.
- o o o -

Proceedings ot the Courts.
Probate matters.

     In re -- estate of Mary Kienzle, deceased, the bond of W. B. Thompson, Jr., as guardian ad litem for the Stietel[?] minors was approved.

- February 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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Local Notes.

     H. L. Goldman, Jr., died yesterday at his home on Akard street.

- February 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
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Died.

     Mrs. E. M. Beach, mother of Mrs. Theodore F. Wallace, and a most estimable lady, died at her home, 216 Park avenue, this morning.
Deceased passed away at 3 a. m. after an illness of one h our.      Deceased was born in Mobile, Ala., 71 years ago and was the widow of Samuel C. Beach, in his life-time, a prominent Mobilian and official. She had resided in Dallas about fourteen years, was a prominent member of St. Matthew's Cathedral and the funeral will take place at 3 o'clock to-morrow from that place.

- February 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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Died.

     Mrs. E. M. Beoch [Beach], mother of Mrs. Theodore F. Wallace, and a most estimable lady, died at her home, 216 Park avenue, this morning.

- February 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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Resolution of Respect.

     DALLAS, Tex., Feb. 23. --- We, the officers and teachers of St. Matthew's Sunday school, to hereby express our grief and offer our sympathy to our fellow teacher and treasurer, Mrs. T. F. Wallace, for the sad death of her mother, Mrs. E. M. Beach, who passed away for better land and rest forever, on Feb. 21, 1891. Respectfully, Col. W. S. Simkins, superintendent; W. Thompson, assistant superintendent; G. R. Noguina, secretary; Mrs. T. Miers, Miss D. Mosher, Miss L. Jones, Miss L. Snodgrass, Miss Jarvis, Miss Aumspaugh, Miss Scoggins, Mr. J. A. Pope, Prof. Connington, teachers.

- February 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
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MRS. SAULSBURY ON TRIAL
______

FOR THE ALLEGED MURDER OF
MRS. FROMLETH.

_______

The Facts in a Rather Sensa-
tional Murder Case
Given.

     The case of Catharine Salsbury, charged with the murder of Mrs. Mary Regina Fromleth went to trial this morning. The killing occurred on August 9, 1888, in front of Mrs. Salsbury's house. Mrs. Fromleth was running the old Crutchfield hotel, situated on the corner of Main and Houston streets, and Mrs. Salsbury lived next door. The two women, so it seems, had been at daggers points for some previous to the killing. Mrs. Salsbury wanted Justice Braswell to place Mrs. Fromleth under a peace bond. Justice Braswell continued the case to see how the women conducted themselves before taking final action.
     Just before the killing took place, Mrs. Fromleth walked down the street past Mrs. Salsbury's house. Mrs. Salsbury was standing in her door, so a witness testifies, and spit as Mrs. Fromleth meandered by. Mrs. Fromleth thought Mrs. Salsbury was surely spitting at her and looked upon it as an ominous sign--a sign that something was going to occur. Laboring under this apprehension, she wended her way down to the ice factory where Mr. Salsbury worked and told him not to allow his wife to do anything rash. As she was returning, Mrs. Salsbury stepped out in front of her house, it is alleged, and without warning, began shooting at Mrs. Fromleth. Mrs. Fromleth ran and Mrs. Salsbury went in pursuit with her artillery at work. She fired four or five shots, two of them taking effect in Mrs. Fromleth.
     The shooting occurred on Thursday and Mrs. Fromleth lived until five o'clock the Saturday evening following.
     The defense will attempt to establish the fact that Mrs. Fromleth, somewhat on the order of Hantippe, the wife of Socrates, the Athenian philosopher, and made things happen when her husband and other folks did not do to suit her. The cases against her in Judge Braswell's court will be offered as evidence to sustain this allegation.
     Col. Williams, the regular county attorney, is disqualified to prosecute the case owing to the fact that he was not the county attorney at the time of the killing and gave the defendant some legal advice. He and Harry Obenchain are making sinners quake in the county court to-day.

- February 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
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Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     The case of Claude Stewart, colored, charged with the killing of Joel Fish, went to trial this morning. The killing occurred on June 9, 1890. Fish was running a bottling establishment and had Stewart employed. On the day of the killing, Stewart demanded higher wages. Fish refused to pay him higher wages and paid him up and turned him off. Stewart walked out of the office and a few yards away to the railroad, stopped and stood on the track. After hanging around for some time, he re-entered the office and demanded fifty cents more, which he claimed was due him. Fish told him that he had paid h im every cent due him. After considerable wragnling, Fish put Stewart out of the office. As soon as he was outside, Stewart caught up a large rock and threw at Fish, striking him in the temple. Fish fell to the ground unconcsious. He was removed to his home, and after remaining for several hours in an unconscious state, departed this life.
     Stewart was arrested and held for his murder. Stewart is a cheese-colored negro about 18 or 20 years old.

- February 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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ONLY THREE MURDER CASES
_______

NOW ENGAGING THE ATTEN-
TION OF JUDGE BURKE.

_______

Two in the Hands of the Jury
and "Big Mac" on Trial.
Other Proceedings.

     In Judge Burke's court, the case of Jim Scott, charged with the murder of a man named McDonald, known as "Big Mac," went to trial this morning. The killing occurred in November, 1885. Scott married McDonald's step-daughter and family trouble developed into the killing of McDonald by Scott. At the time of the killing, Scott was a guard over county convicts. He rode away from the convict camp with his shot gun loaded with buck shot, across his saddle, and went to McDonald's house and called him out. An angry conversation took place, which was ended by McDonald turning on his heel and walking back towards the house. He had made only a few steps when Scott raised his shot gun and fired, killing McDonald instantly.
     The case of W. E. Murf, charged with the murder of Nathan Greer, was called this morning and continued until to-morrow.
     In Judge Burke's court, there are now two juries out in murder cases, a murder case on trial, and a murder case pending to be taken up as soon as the one on trial goes to the jury, which is very much out of the usual order of things.

- February 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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A SAD CASE.
_______

A Case of Human Misery De-
veloped.

     At 218 Jefferson street yesterday, Dr. Wilson, the health officer, was called to a most pitiful scene of human misery--a mother half-clothed with a babe just born, dying on her breast. When Dr. Wilson arrived, the woman was lying on her wretched bed with a few old dresses tucked about her, and too weak to do anything for her little one, which died a few moments after the doctor's arrival. As the woman was too sick to be removed to the hospital, she was made as comfortable as possible where she was.

- February 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

 

Died.

     At 6 o'clock a. m. March 2, 1891, Mrs. R. A. Horne, wife of A. M. Horne. Funeral services at residence 326 (new number) Masten st., at 10 o'clock a. m. Tuesday, March 3. Friends of the family invited to attend.

- March 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     John Browning, one of the oldest citizens of Dallas, died yesterday at the residence of Mrs. Minerva Patton, 685 Cedar Springs avenue. He was born in Georgia in January, 1799, moved to Alabama in 1833 and to Dallas in 1870. Three years ago, he made a division of his property among his heirs. He was familiarly known as "Uncle Jack."

- March 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
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THE YOUNG CASE.
______

The Dead Man's Friends In-
dignant at His Old
Home.

     A well-known citizen of Dallas has received a letter from Judge Bascom of Owingsville, Ky., the former home of Edwin T. Young. The judge is a brother-in-law of deceased and one of the leading citizens of Owingsville. He denounces the killing of Young unsparingly, and characterizes it as "cold-blooded assassination," saying that Young had his faults, but was not near as black as he had been painted in Texas, and a far better man in every respect than his murderer. The writer asserts that Young had no intimacy with the wife of Cash until after she had separated from her husband, and points to the suits brought against eight other men in Kentucky by Cash for damages for "destroying the happiness of his home," as an evidence that Young was not slain by Cash to avenge the blot alleged to have been placed on the honor of his family. Young's people are among the first families in Kentucky, and the murdered man was very popular. Mrs. Cash has relatives residing in Dallas, although she never visited the city.
     The Outlook, a weekly newspaper published in Owingsville, denounces Cash as a dangerous man and denounces the killing of Young in unmeasured terms.

- March 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mrs. R. A. Horne died yesterday at her home on Masten street.

- March 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

The Mortuary List.

     Eight deaths were reported to City Secretary McGrain last Saturday. Four reported from pneumonia and two from la grippe.

- March 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Infanticide.

     The remains of a dead male white child was found near the electric light works on Pacific avenue this morning. It had been born live and deserted by its heartless mother.

- March 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

A Farmer's Sudden Death.

     John Davis, a farmer residing a few miles east from Lancaster, died suddenly on the afternoon of the 3d inst. He had been sick for some weeks, but was able to walk about the house and yard. He felt thirsty and drew a bucket of water from the well, took a drink, walked into the house and sat down in a chair. In a few moments, he was dead. Apoplexy was the probable immediate cause of his death.

- March 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

A BOOK AGENT SHOT DEAD.
_________

JOHN A. WEBB THE VICTIM OF
A GARLAND MAN.

________

The Murderer Arrested and
Jailed---Result of the Lo-
cal Option Election.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     G
ARLAND, Tex., March 7.---John A. Webb, a book agent living near Rowlett, was shot in one of the saloons here at 5:30 p. m. yesterday. The ball entered the abdomen and death ensued in a few minutes from internal hemorrhage.
     Immediately after the shooting, W. B. Meater, the bar tender, secured a horse and made good time in getting adway. Officers quickly followed and overtook him three miles from town and returned with him at dark.
     The shooting is presumed to be the result of a former quarrel about two months ago, in which Mealer shot at Webb in the same saloon, but fortunately missed his mark.
     The decision in the inquest and preliminary trial have not yet been made public.
     An election on local prohibition is in progress in the town and precinct to-day and it is presumed that the killing yesterday will change many votes in favor of prohibition.

- March 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

FATALLY SHOT.
________

J. A. Webb Killed at Rowlett
Station by W. B. Meater.

Associated Press.
     G
ARLAND, Tex., March 7.---J. A. Webb, a young man living near Rowlett station, five miles east of Garland, was shot in Lilliard's saloon this evening by W. B. Meater, the bar tender. The ball entered the abdomen, severing the splenic artery, and death ensued in ten minutes.
Webb had been drinking.
     The shooting was a result of a former trouble, in which Meater shot at Webb in the same saloon, but missed him. This occurred about two months ago.
     Meater mounted a horse immediately after the killing and left town in a gallop. Officers are in pursuit.

- March 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     MORGAN -- The little son of William B. Morgan of Geneva, died at that place Saturday and will be buried here Monday afternoon from the residence of W. F. Shook.

- March 9, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

LOCAL NOTES.

     John D. Roberts of Kentucky died yesterday at the home of his brother-in-law, 151 Ross avenue.

- March 11, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 4.
- o o o -

Found in a Dying Condition.

Southern Afternoon Press.
     G
RAND PRAIRIE, Tex., March 11.--Mr. John Holden of St. Joe, Mo., left Mr. J. Shelton's, at whose house he was stopping, and did not return in due time. Parties went in search and found him in an outhouse in a dying condition. A physician was called, but he died at 3:15 p. m.

- March 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     John D. Roberts, of Kentucky, died yesterday at the home of his brother-in-law, 1515 Ross avenue.

- March 12, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Record of the Courts.
14th District - Honorable R. E. Burke, Judge.

     Mack Massey, charged with the murder of Mose Burton in Stringtown in 1888, was convicted of murder in the second degree...this is his fourth trial.

Probate Matters.

     T. S. Miller appointed administrator of the estate of Robert Tooms, deceased.

- March 12, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

     ROBERTS - At the residence of Pat Roberts, 1515 Ross avenue, John D. Roberts of Meade Co., Kentucky. Funeral services to-day from residence.

- March 12, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     Lee Herring, a native of Missouri, died at the city hospital last night. He had been in Dallas one week.

- March 14, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     The infant child of Mr. D. C? Burk, who lives on Pearl street, died yesterday morning.

- March 15, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 11, col. 5.
- o o o -

Sudden Death.

     William Crim, a vegetable dealer on Elm street, near the Union depot, died suddenly yesterday evening at his place of business. Crim has been in feeble health for some time and was subject to heart disease. It is supposed that an attack of his old trouble carried him off.

- March 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

DIED.

     McPHAIL--In this city, on the morning of March 17, 1891, Henry A. McPhail, in the 36th year of his age.
     The deceased was a native of Canada, but for many years before coming to Dallas, was a resident of Nashville, Tenn. For the past three years, he has been a resident of Dallas, and built around him a circle of friends, who will hear of his death with feelings of genuine and sincere regret. Quiet and unassuming in his manners, warm and loyal in his friendship, he was a man whom to know was to respect and esteem. Only two months ago, he was wedded to an estimable young lady of this city, who, ere the honeymoon, had waned, is called upon to don the sombre and melancholy weeds of widowhood. May God in his infinite goodness, temper the affliction with his mercy.
     Funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 3 o'clock, from the residence of Mr. W. H. Clark, No. 1305 Main street. Friends are invited to attend without further notice.

- March 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Who is Responsible?

     There died in this city this morning, Henry A. McPhail, who, it is alleged, was the victim of a certain specialist in this city. This is a most grave and serious charge--one which should be investigated, alike in the interest of justice and of humanity. The deceased was a robust man, in the vigor of youth and manhood. A certain operation was deemed essential to the elimination of a threatened complication of disease. A well-known specialist was called in and it asserted by reputable physicians that to that operation the death of the unfortunate man is to be attributed.
     The T
IMES-HERALD has no comments to make. The facts are here submitted. Let those interested with the execution of the laws do their duty.

- March 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 4.
- o o o -

Death of Mrs. Willmans.

     Mrs. C. I. Willmans, wife of Mr. Chas. I. Willmans, died last night at their home on Swiss avenue. Mrs. Willmans was about 60 years of age and has been sick now for a year and a half. She was a most estimable lady, loved by all who knew her, a devoted wife and fond mother. She leaves six sons, all of whom, though grown, remain with their parents, one complete and happy family till death called the mother to perfect rest and eternal happiness. The funeral takes place this afternoon from the family residence.

- March 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

 

Proceedings of the Courts.

JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     The case of Jim Scott, charged with killing a hack driver by the name of McDonald, and known as "Big Mac," was called and went to trial yesterday. The killing occurred in 1885. Scott married "Big Mac's" stepdaughter. The marriage became unhappy and Scott charged "Big Mac" with being the cause of the family trouble. On the day of the killing, Scott, as he claims, left his work where he was guarding county prisoners and started for home, taking with him his shot gun to clean it up. He went by "Big Mac's," where his wife was to see her. "Big Mac" came out and the two men quarreled. Scott claims that "Big Mac" attempted to draw a revolver and he shot him. When the killing occurred, the grand jury was in session, and did not find a bill against Scott. A subsequent jury did, however, and he was re-arrested, tried and sentenced to serve ten years in the state penitentiary. He got a new trial and received a five-years' sentence. He was again given a new trial, which took place in this court during last term and Scott was sentenced to three years' in the penitentiary. He was allowed a new trial once more, which is in court now. The case will probably go to the jury to-night.

- March 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

MURDERS AT MESQUITE.
_______

IKE ALLEN CUTS THE THROAT
OF JIM WEATHERFORD.

_____

Bud Weatherford Kills Allen
With a Pistol ball Through
the Heart.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., March 20. -- The little town of Mesquite was thrown into great excitement last night by a terrible double tragedy. Ike Allen and Jim Weatherford, two young farmers who were in attendance at a literary society at Edwards school house, became involved in a quarrel, the exact nature of which is not known. Allen whipped out a knife and cut Weatherford's throat. Bud Weatherford, a brother of the wounded man, pulled a forty-four calibre pistol at this juncture and shot Allen, the ball taking effect just below the left nipple, and lodging in the back. Allen died in about four hours.
Weatherford is still alive, but his physicians declare that he cannot live through to-day.
     Sheriff Lewis and Deputy Willock were telegraphed news of the killing. They arrived at the scene of the tragedy at 3 o'clock this morning and placed Bud Weatherford under arrest. He made no effort to escape.
     Particulars as to the origin of the difficulty, which has resulted so sadly, are very meagre. Last fall, Allen and Weatherford had some dispute at a dance about a hat. It is supposed that a feud grew out of this trouble, which was renewed last night. The parties are all young men and farmers, 21 to 23 years of age, and the community is thrown into deep gloom by the tragedy.

- March 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

"ACTED IN SELF-DEFENSE."
_______

INTERVIEW WITH THE KILLER
OF IKE ALLEN.

_______

Now Confined in the County Jail
Pending an Investigation.

     M. W. Weatherford, who shot and killed Ike Allen near Mesquite, in this county, last night, is in cell No. 1 in the upper tier in the county jail. Sheriff Lewis and his deputies came in with the prisoner at noon.
     A representative of the T
IMES-HERALD called at the jail and secured a brief interview with the prisoner, who is a modest appearing county lad of 20 years--a beardless boy, with a keen appreciation of the terrible trouble into which he has been plunged and deeply cast down over his critical position. In answer to an interrogatory propounded the prisoner, came forth from the interior of his cell, and said:
     "I'm Weatherford. What do you wish?"
     "The T
IMES-HERALD would like to obtain your statement of this terrible affair."
     "I've no statement to make beyond what is already known. Allen drew his knife on my brother without provocation, and cut him down. Then, he made at me with his hand on his hip-pocket, and I drew my pistol and host him in self-defense."
     "Was the row the outgrowth of an old feud--had there been trouble between your brother and Allen before the fatal meeting last night?"
      "I have told you all that I wish to say. I shot Allen in self-defense, to save my own life."
     "Are you a native of Dallas county?"
     "Yes, Sir, I was born and reared in Dallas county. My parents are dead. I shall be twenty years of age next month. Good day," and the prisoner retired to the solitude of his cell.
     Young Weatherford, according to those who have known him from infancy, is a simple country lad, peacefully inclined and has never before figured in a difficulty of any nature. He is a farmer, like the other actors in the bloody drama, in lustrous, well-disposed and well-liked by all his associates and acquaintances.
     On the telegraphic pages of the T
IMES-HERALD will be found a graphic account of the terrible tragedy in the little country school house.
     Three young men--or rather, three boys--were participants. One is dead. Another is hovering on the very brink of the grave with the chances of recovery all against him. The third is in a felon's cell.

- March 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Comrade Schilling was buried to-day with G. A. R. honors.

- March 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death of a Prominent Merchant.

     Henry Cahn, a well known business man, died at the residence of his brother-in-law, Sigmond Loeb, last evening of pneumonia. He was born in Louisiana in 1851 and had been a resident of Dallas for 18 years.

- March 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The funeral of Mrs. A. M. Penry, nee Mollie V. Beck, who died at the residence of her sister, 309 N. Harwood, Saturday last, took place yesterday at 3 o'clock at Trinity cemetery.

- March 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

SKULL CRUSHED BY A BLOW.
______

JIM LEWIS, AN EX-POLICE OF-
FICER, JAILED TO-DAY

______

On Charge of Having Hastened
the End of H. T.
Hunter.

______

The Dead Man, the Live Man
and Particulars of
the Affair.

     James Lewis is in the county jail, charged with the killing of H. T. Hunter, or at least inflicting blows that resulted in the death of the latter at the city hospital this morning.
     At 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon, near the corner of Live Oak and Ervay streets, the men were conversing. Hunter was seated in a wagon and Lewis was standing on the sidewalk. Eye-witnesses assert that Lewis picked up a wagon shaft and struck Hunter on the head, smashing the bludgeon. Hunter reeled over in the wagon and fell from his seat.
     The police were notified, the ambulance was sent for and Hunter was taken to the city hospital.
     Lewis was arrested and held at the central police station until 8 o'clock, when he was released on bond, it being understood that Hunter's injuries were not of a serious nature. At an early hour this morning, Health Officer Wilson telephoned Chief Arnold that Hunter's condition was precarious and the chances were that death would ensue in a few hours.
     The chief, at once, issued orders for the re-arrest of young Lewis. He was found at his home by Police Officers Waller and Pegues, and taken to the county jail.
     Hunter, as above stated, died at 5:30, having never recovered consciousness. An autopsy was held on his remains. The scalpel knife disclosed that his skull had been crushed in a shocking manner, and that death resulted from the blows inflicted by Lewis with the club.
     A T
IMES-HERALD reporter called at the jail and found Lewis in conference with his brother, Dr. Lewis, the well-known dentist, and a relative named Austin. He did not betray any unusual excitement or evince any great concern over what had transpired.
     "Jim," said the scribe, "the T
IMES-HERALD would like to publish your statement, beginning with your trouble with Hunter, who now lies dead in the city hospital?"
     "I have not yet consulted with my lawyer and do not care to talk until I have conferred with him."
     "Who is your lawyer?" was asked.
     'Bob Seay. I expect him shortly.'
     Dr. Lewis, here interposed, remarking that he did not deem it advisable for James to talk until he had consulted with his lawyer. "It will do no good," said he: "a man often injures himself by saying too much."
     "That's so," said Jim, "but after I see Bob Seay, I will furnish the T
IMES-HERALD a statement with pleasure."
     The representative of the people's paper withdrew. Lewis is a young man not more than 28 year of age, with more than the average share of the intelligence. He is passably good-looking, has dark eyes, dark hair and mustache, and is a good dresser. He has been a resident of Dallas for seven years, and three of that time, served as a member of the police force, retiring about six months ago. He has been looked upon as a peaceably disposed young fellow and his own worst enemy.
     H. T. Hunter, the dead man, was 54 years of age, a widower with two children, a boy of 17 and a girl of 10 years. He had been a resident of Dallas about ten years, coming to this city from Tennessee. He was employed as a driver of a wood wagon by Jim Godsby, who conducts a wood yard, corner Harwood and Pacific avenue. It is said that he was a short of a shiftless character and left his children to provide for themselves.
     Both men, according to parties in the vicinity, had been drinking yesterday. One story afloat, is that they quarreled over politics; another that Hunter used vile language in the presence of Lewis' relatives; another that Hunter applied to Lewis a vile name and still another that the quarrel arose over the refusal of Lewis to purchase a pony owned by Hunter.
     The coroner is taking testimony this afternoon and will return his verdict to-morrow.

- March 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
COUNTY COURTS.
MOTION DOCKET.

PROBATE MATTER. -- The will of W. H. Flippen, deceased, was admitted to probate, and Mrs. Elizabeth FLippen was appointed executrix without bond as directd in the will. J. B. Adoue, Jules E. Schneider and Charles J. Grant were appointed appraisers.
     The report of the commissioners of partition in the estate of Mary Kienlle [sic], deceased, was approved, and the property ordered to be sold.

- March 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

 

Local Notes.

     L. Boro died on Bryan street Sunday morning.

- March 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

DEEDS OF TRUST
_______

Field in the Office of the County
Clerk To-Day.

     Adolph Cahn, the surviving partner of the firm of Cahn Bros., dry goods merchants, doing business at 635 and 637 Elm street, filed a deed of trust in the county clerk's office this morning at 8:25 o'clock, naming Sigmund Loeb as trustee.
     Mr. Cahn gives the following reasons for making the deed of trust: Being desirous of winding up and settling the affairs and business of said firm, and for the purpose of discharging the debts of said firm herein mentioned, I have granted, bargained, sold and delivered to Sigmond Loeb, the stock of goods belonging to the firm.
     Following are the creditors and their amounts:
     Estate of Fannie Cahn, deceased, $7000 with accrued interest.
     Flippen, Adoue & Lobit, $7750.
     R. Leibman, president of the Texas Paper Company, $675.
     Louis Meyer of New York, $1586,89.
     Fourth National Bank of Dallas, $9000.
     The value of the stock of goods owned by the firm is as follows: Dry goods, $30,000, booths and shoes, $8,000, hats and caps, $5,000, gents clothing, $2,000, office fixture, $100.
     Mr. Loeb is authorized to take charge of the stock of goods at once and dispose of them for cash to the best advantage of all concerned, and the proceeds of sale to be applied as follows: First, the payment of just expenses in executing the trust created, including 3 per cent of all monies paid out by the trustee as compensation to him.
     Second, the payment of all creditors named.
     Third, the balance of the proceeds, after all debts are settled, shall be paid to Adolph Cahn, surviving member of the firm.

- March 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5-6.
- o o o -

Not a Police Officer.

     Jim Lewis, jailed yesterday for the alleged killing of H. T. Hunter, was never a member of the regular police force of this city. He acted as a special officer for a time and was engaged in the highly-romantic pastime of lassoing stray stock that roamed at large in violation of the laws of the city and state.

- March 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Died.

     J. B. Davis, aged 69 years, at his home on South Prather street. Funeral from residence at 3 o'clock p. m. tomorrow. Burial in Trinity cemetery. Mr. Davis is an old resident of Dallas and an ex-English army officer.

- March 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Gossip from Richardson.

     William Armstrong, the 18-year-old son of Mr. Frank Armstrong, was painfully, and, it is thought, fatally injured by being kicked in the face by a vicious horse.

- March 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

DEVOURED BY THE FLAMES.
_______

TERRIBLE SCENES AT THE FIRE
THIS MORNING.

_______

The Georgia Hotel, Corner La-
mar and Camp Streets,
Destroyed.

_______

One Man Loses His Life and
Several Persons Are Injured.

     This morning at 3:09, the boarders at the Georgia hotel in the J. W. Barton building, corner Lamar and Camp, were awakened by a cry of fire, fire, fire! that rang through the building. The cry was followed by loud knocks at the bed-room doors and the voice of a boarder by the name of James McAllister, saying: "Save yourselves," caused the inmates of the house to jump from their beds in terror, some hurriedly donning their clothes, while others rushed down stairs or leaped from the windows in disabille[?]. The excitement was intense. Persons were dashing past and after each other through the hallways, accepting any egress of escape that presented itself. Those who were quick to take the alarm, got out of the building before the flames had made much headway on the second floor. Many who stopped to dress, or were not aroused by the first alarm, were met at every turn by the fast-increasing flames.
     The scene on the street was scarcely less intense than in the building. The firemen had promptly responded to the alarm and were making every effort to check the flames. The streets were packed and a thousand men with baited breath watched the progress of the fire and the heroic efforts of the firemen. The flames of the burning building shone on a thousand upturned faces watching its inmates jumping from the windows or rushing down the fiery stairway.
     There was one brave soul that never appeared at any opening--James McAllister, who gave the warning cry that saved a dozen lives and fell himself a victim to the flames. It was not until the firemen had drowned out the flames that his fate was known. In the excitement, he was not missed. All thought he had escaped as his was the voice that gave the alarm. He probably would have escaped had he been not crippled. About two weeks ago, he had an ankle badly sprained and could only hobble about. It is thought that he awoke and discovered the house was on fire and hobbled out of his room in his night clothes to alarm the house. After awakening every one, he returned to his room to dress, not realizing what fearful headway the fire was making. He was found in his room lying on the floor. One foot, his hands and face were badly burned. His face was not burned beyond recognition, however. It is though he was suffocated by the smoke and that he was not reached by the flames until after he was dead. His body was removed to Undertaker Linskie's this morning, where a T
IMES-HERALD reporter viewed it. James McAllister was an Irish American, but his birth place is not known. He has been in Dallas about eight years, and came, it is thought, from St. Louis. He was 32 years old, of medium height and build, and had black hair and mustache. He was a plasterer by trade, and up to the time of spraining his ankle, two weeks ago, he worked for Messrs. Laing & Smoot on the reservoirs.
     There were several others who escaped poor James McAllister's fate very narrowly. There were fifteen person in the building when the fire broke out.
     Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Davis were the first to hear McAllister's alarm. Mrs. Davis said: "My husband and myself were awakened by Mr. McAllister's voice, which we recognized saying save yourselves. He knocked loudly on our door. We quickly dressed and ran downstairs before the flames had reached the stairway.
     Henry Kuhlman, the proprietor of the hotel, was also among the first aroused and got out of the building safely.
     Mrs. W. E. Baird, who had her face and right hand badly burned, said: "I was not well and was lying on the bed with my dress on. I heard Mr. McAllister crying fire, and I jumped from my bed and rushed out in the hallway. The hall was full of smoke, and almost choked my breath away. I started for the stairs, which were ablaze. I started down and fell and rolled down the stairs. Mr. and Mrs. Davis carried me out." Mrs. Davis is suffering very much this morning. She is being cared for at the Lancaster house on Lamar street.
     Willie Baird, the 17-year-old son of Mrs. Baird, when he heard the alarm, leaped through a window out upon the awning. Mr. Kuhlman, who stood on the street, told him to jump, saying he would catch him. The boy jumped and Kuhlman got out of the way, letting him fall on the street. He struck the ground on his back and the shock rendered him unconscious. He is unable to walk this morning and is suffering considerable pain. He is at the National hotel. Willie Baird and his mother and father came to Dallas about six months ago from Carthage, Mo.
     Ed Kreea, another board, leaped from a window and lit in a pile of stove wood and had his back and right ankle badly sprained and will probably be laid up for some time to come.
     The hotel was on the second floor, and the household goods and hotel fixtures were valued at $1400 and insured for $600 in the British America. Everything was destroyed.
     The lower floor was occupied by a saloon owned by D. Chamberlain. His stock was valued at $1500 and insured for $1000. He had about $500 worth of goods destroyed.
     The building was owned by Mr. J. W. Barton. It was valued at $6000 and insured as follows: One thousand dollars in the Niagara, $1000 in the Citizens' company of St. Louis and $1000 in the American of St. Louis. Mr. Barton will rebuild immediately. He said: "I do not know what sized building I will put up yet. It may be a two story or a four story. I am going to try and make it compare with that depot that rumor has it Gould is going to build one of these days."

OTHER LOSSES.

     Pat McCarthy, a laborer, had a miraculous escape. He jumped from the second story window in the rear of the building and landed in a pile of wood. McCarthy, in speaking of his jump, said: "It seemed that my legs were driven up into my body. They are badly sprained and my back hurts me."
     Cora Baird, the little daughter of the lady injured, crawled out of the second story window and dropped off, falling into the arms of a policeman. She escaped without injury.
     There were other close calls and miraculous escapes. All the inmates lost their effects, several escaping in their night clothes.
     The building adjoining, owned by J. B. Scruggs, was slightly damaged by fire and water.

- March 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4-6.
- o o o -

Nothing in it.

     It was reported this morning that a woman had died under suspicious circumstances on South Crowdus street, and that her son, Charles Batz, refused to permit the neighbors to visit the house. Chief Arnold, Justice Lauderdale and Health Officer Wilson investigated and found that the woman had died from natural causes and the son was in possession of a physician's certificate to that effect. Interment is delayed to enable relatives from a distance to attend the funeral.

- April 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

SUICIDED WITH A RAZOR.
______

A. G. CAMPBELL PERISHES BY
HIS OWN HAND.

______

Tragic Ending of the Life of a
Well-Known Insurance
Man.

______

An Interview With a Former
Employer -- Facts in
the Case.

     A terrible suicide took place at 223 Live Oak street, the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell, at 2 o'clock this morning. A. G. Campbell, one of the best known insurance men in the state, cut his throat from ear to ear with a razor while laboring under an attack of mental aberration, super-induced by ill-health. The wound was a most ghastly one, the head being almost severed from the body. Justice Braswell was notified and inquested the remains. Interment will follow in the city cemetery at 5 o'clock this evening.
     Deceased had been for many years in the employ of Cochran & Trezevant, and a representative of the T
IMES-HERALD called at the office of the firm, corner Main and Poydras streets, and obtained an interview with Mr. J. T. Trezevant. The following statement was obtained from that gentleman:
     "Campbell came to my office in 188[3?] from Caledonia, Iowa, where his brother, J. M. Campbell, now resides. His father died a year ago, and his mother, when he was a child. His brother and sisters reside in that state. He has no relatives in Texas.
     "He remained in my office seven years and became one of the best insurance men in the state, being widely known. In January, 1888, he resigned his position with our firm and was elected secretary of the state underwriters association of Texas and performed the duties attached to the position for one year, when, he was compelled to retire owing to ill-health. He was [troubled] with consumption _____ on an outdoor ______ the ravages of the disease and ____ cure ___ possible. He __ on a ranch out west for a time, then [acquired] a responsible position with the United Fire underwriters of New York City.
     "Ill-health forced him to resign the position, and three weeks ago, he returned to Dallas. Yesterday afternoon, he called at my office, [Noticing] that I was very busy, he said 'we'd take a ride this evening and ___ talk with you.' I accepted the invitation and we were together for an hour, driving about the city. We talked of his plans for the future and the condition of his health. He desired to go to Galveston and embark in business. I advised against this and suggested that he go to Washington and place himself under the care of Dr. Hammond, the noted specialist, for a year. He agreed to this and last evening he wrote a letter and forwarded it to Dr. Hammond at Washington, It was his determination when we parted to become an inmate of Dr. Hammond's infirmary for a year.
     "During our conversation, he was very nervous and excitable and said he had obtained no sleep for three weeks. At 10 or 11 o'clock, Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell were summoned to his bedside. He was evidently suffering from an attack of nervous prostration. He asked that his physician be summoned and that a messenger be sent for me. Dr. Eagon was called in and prescribed for him. Campbell went into a peaceful sleep.
     "Mr. Mitchell remained at his bedside for an hour or more and then left him quietly sleeping. At 2 o'clock this morning, Mr. Mitchell heard strange noises emanating from the room occupied by his guest. It sounded to him like a man gasping for breath. He hurried to the room and a terrible sight presented itself. Campbell had taken a razor and had severed his throat from ear to ear.
     "The act was not premeditated. While suffering from a second attack, which resulted in a temporary dethronement of reason, he had taken his own life. He had saved some money and was not financially embarrassed."
     Mr. Trezevant spoke feelingly of the deceased and paid a warm tribute to his many virtues. Deceased was assistant general agent of the company when he resigned. He enjoyed the confidence of his employers, the esteem of his associates and the respect of a large circle of friends. His relatives have been notified.

- April 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -
 

Died.

     Mrs. Patsy Ballard, aged 67 years, aunt of Mr. J. C. Jones, died at Fairland last night at 8:30 o'clock. Will be buried at 4 o'clock this afternoon at Trinity cemetery from the residence.

- April 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mr. Emmet E. Craig at his residence on Bryan street, late yesterday afternoon. While he was an invalid, his death was very sudden and unexpected. He had many friends throughout Texas and in his old home in Mississippi, and enjoyed the friendship of many country merchants in Texas with whom he had done business. His estimable wife, daughter and son have the sympathy of their large circle of friends in this city. The remains will be taken to Paris for interment.

- April 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mrs. Sam Freshman died yesterday at her residence, corner of Corinth and Carter; aged 19 years.

- April 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

WHY HE KILLED HIM.
_______

WHELESS MAKES A STATEMENT
FOR THE

______

Times-Herald Readers Concern-
ing the Killing of Chicken
Thief.

     T. W. Wheless, who, this morning, shot and killed a negro supposed to be W. M. Robinson, was, to-day, taken before Judge Braswell and bound over in the sum of $1000 to await the action of the grand jury. Wheless made the following statement:
     I was awoke about 6:30 o'clock by the barking of my dog, and went and raised a window and called the dog off. I then dressed myself and walked out to the lot to get wood for morning fire. Dog ran ahead and barked in the barn. I went up and saw an object in a squatting position, with something in hand. I ask him what he was doing here and he replied: "I am sick and wanted to get out of the rain" and staggered out past me. I went into the other stall. The dog was smelling something in the stall where the man had been. I kicked the bundle, and finding it to be soft, took it up and brought it to the light and emptied it of four of my hens. My first thought when he staggered out was that he was drunk, and I let him go, but when I found my chickens, my thought was to catch him, and I took out after him and overtook him on the railroad track, followed him to Hickey street and ordered him to stop. He broke into a run. I followed him across to Park street and then to the railroad, calling for help at every step. As I passed down the railroad, a man ran out and handed me a pistol. I called again to him to halt a number of times and then fired one shot to stop him, but he ran on. Ordered him to halt two or three times and then fired the last shot, thinking to wing him, as he was outrunning me. At second shot, I ordered him to throw up his hands. He dropped overcoat and threw up both hands. I must have run him 300 yards. I was bearheaded [bare-handed?] at the start and had no weapons. It was in the early morning light and could hardly tell the man from a box in the barn.

- April 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6 col. 3.
- o o o -

F. W. Instead of Lon Wheeless.

     In report of shooting of a negro chicken thief, on second page of first edition, an error was made in the name of Mr. Wheeless. It should have been F. W. instead of Lon. Lon Wheeless is with Emerson, Tolcott & Co.

- April 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

MESQUITE MENINGITIS.
______

The Disease Spreading -- The
Citizens Very Uneasy.

Southern Afternoon Press.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., April 8. -- The spotted fever, or mine glitis, which as been among our people for several days, does not let up any. This morning, Mr. John Brisendine, aged about 35 years, died. He was only sick about thirty-six hours.
     A child of J. A. Bland, a farmer living three miles south of town, died today, and another one is sick. There is one new case in town now. Some of the people are becoming alarmed, one family has left, and others are talking of leaving. The case in town above referred to, has just died. It is looking gloomy for our people, indeed. Business is almost suspended, and men are in knots on the street discussing the matter. The doctors fail to check it.

- April 8, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

DEAD IN BED.
______

Joe Howell Passes Over the
Divide.

     Joe Howell, a saddler, was found dead in his bed in his room over Bell's grocery store on Houston street near the court house. Howell was about forty years old and a saddler by trade. He had been in Dallas about fifteen years. He had been a hard drinker for many years and got on a big spree last night and from that state, departed this life. He was occupying a room with Ex-County Surveyor Archer. Justice Lauderdale held an inquest over the body this morning and gave a verdict of death from excessive dissipation.

- April 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

SPOTTED FEVER.
______

Not Many Cases of Deaths, but
a Terribly Frightened
People.

Southern Afternoon Press.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., April 10.--The spotted fever continues its deadly work among our people, but there seems to be a little let up. Up to this writing, 5:30 p.m., there has been no deaths to-day, and only one yesterday. There are now two cases, one in town, and one in the country. There are hopes of the one in town getting well. Over one-half of the population is gone and others are going.
     The citizens held a meeting and decided to have Dr. Eagon of Dallas and Dr. L. M. Stroud, of Terrell, to meet in consultation with the physicians of Mesquite and adopt some means to perfect sanitation and prevent any further development of the disease, the treasurer to pay for the services out of the town funds. Dr. Stroud, of Terrell, met with Drs. Cullum and O'Callahan of this place, and they agreed on the following preventative measures: Boil all drinking water, also cow's milk, and disinfect the room by burning sulphur, advise sleeping upstairs, etc.

- April 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

ARSON AND MURDER CASE.
_______

H. KUHLMAN, PROPRIETOR OF
THE GEORGIA HOTEL.

______

Indicted by the Grand Jury and
Arrested and Jailed
This Morning.

     Henry Kuhlman, at one time proprietor of the Georgia Hotel and Jumbo chop house, is an inmate of the county jail to-day, charged with two most atrocious crimes.
     Two weeks ago, the Georgia Hotel, corner Lamar and Camp streets, caught fire early one morning. All the guests escaped with the exception of James McAllister, who perished in the flames. Several of the inmates received serious injuries in escaping from the burning building. All lost their personal effects.
     Kuhlman, the proprietor of the hotel, had his effects insured for $1400. The building was owned by Mr. J. W. Barton.
     Chief of Detectives Kirby was satisfied the fire was of incendiary origin, and at once, began a rigid investigation. Bud never "hunts ducks with brass bands" and he worked quietly. He became satisfied in his own mind that Kuhlman had fired the building. He gathered a mass of evidence, which was presented to the grand jury. Last evening, Kuhlman was arrested. He declined to make a statement. This morning, the grand jury returned true bills against him and the sheriff landed him in the county jail to await trial.
     Kuhlman has resided in Dallas for a number of years. He has a wife and several children. Heretofore, he has born a fair reputation.
     Detective Kirby says the evidence against the prisoner is almost conclusive, and that it will go hard with him.

- April 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

More Hopeful in Mesquite.

Southern Afternoon Press.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., April 11. -- There has been one death, a little son of J. M. Gross. There are no other cases in town. No deaths yesterday. One new case about four miles out in the country, a little son of D. A. Davis. The people are becoming much more hopeful, no others having left since yesterday. We hope the end is near, or even here.

- April 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

DIED IN POVERTY.
______

William Hatley, a Carpenter,
Died This Morning.

     William Hatley, a carpenter, died at 108 Texas street last night in dire poverty, leaving his family wholly unprovided for. Deceased was a carpenter and went out on strike last spring. After the trouble was over, he was unable to obtain work at his trade and earned a scanty subsistence by picking up odd jobs. He professed religion before dying and was consoled by a man of God. To-day, a Samaritan passed around the hat and men of the world chipped in to give the body a Christian burial. The family are left in deplorable circumstances.

- April 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

FATAL ACCIDENT.
_______

Andreas Bauer, the Flute Player
Dead.

     There was a fatal accident on Crowdus street Saturday night. Andreas Bauer, a German musician, was thrown from his horse and his head struck on the hard pavement with such force, that he was rendered unconscious. The patrol wagon picked him up, but before it arrived at the station, the unfortunate man expired. An examination showed that his skull had been fractured. He was buried yesterday afternoon by the Sons of Herman.

- April 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 6.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mrs. W. C. Hodges died at Oak Cliff yesterday after a long illness. She will buried at Mexia.

- April 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 6.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The funeral of Andreas Bauer took place yesterday. Deceased was one of the finest performers on the flute in the state and very popular with his country men, as well as all others with whom he came in contact.
     Mesquite is suffering from an epidemic of spotted fever or meningitis. There have been many cases and fifteen deaths the past two weeks. The Cedar Hill Mail says: "At Mesquite, meningitis is raging, Mrs. Hall and her two children, Mrs. Rice, Mrs. Tishie Dean, Tom Quinn's two children, Jim Bland's son and John Brisendine, have all died within the past week. And, Geo. Quinn's baby is quite sick. We sympathize with our neighbor town."

- April 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -
 

PROMINENT EDUCATOR DEAD.
______

His Watch Stopped Running
When He Expired.

     Prof. John Burnett, one of the most prominent citizens of Oak Cliff, died at his home Saturday night of pneumonia. Prof. Burnett had charge of the Mt. Airy school in Northwest Oak Cliff, and was considered an able instructor.
     A strange coincidence is coupled with his death. A watch he had carried for twenty years stopped running the very moment that he expired and has, ever since, refused to run.

- April 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

WHISKY KILLED HIM.
_______

Death of an Old Man Last
Night.

     An old man by the name of Edwin T. Miller died at his home last night while on a protracted spree from congestion of the brain. He had been working until quite recently in Nussbaumer's meat market, on Main street, near the court house. While there, he drank continually and lost his place on that account. He has several children, all of whom are married.

- April 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

MENINGITIS.
______

Four More Deaths Near Mes-
quite--The Town of Mes-
quite Very Quiet.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., April 15. --- Since the report of Monday, there have been four deaths as follows: Miss Amanda Alcorn, at Scyene, four miles west of this place; a five-year-old-son of Dick Keen, near Hously, six miles north; the twelve-year-old son of J. A. Bland, and the five-year-old son of Natt Holly, both living about three miles south of town. Near Hously, there is one new case, Mr. Dick Keen, who was taken to-day while his little boy was being buried. Mr. Bland has lost every child, four in number. The town is yet free from any cases whatever, as is the adjoining country for three miles around.
     Fears are entertained that the damp, cold weather will have a tendency to give the disease a new start. All of our people who did not leave are standing their ground right well, and there is less excitement and fear than for some time.

COPEVILLE ALARMED.

     COPEVILLE, Tex., April 15.--The citizens of this place and the entire community are greatly alarmed. Last Saturday, Joe Moon came to this place with a sick child from Dallas county, and it died about twelve hours after its arrival at Copeville. Two other children of the same family were complaining at the same time, and in less than twelve hours, three of them were dead. Our community is greatly alarmed about the disease that caused their death. All the physicians pronounce it meningitis, or spotted fever. The family have had but little attention in their distress, as nearly every one are afraid to go about them.

- April 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE WORST OVER.
_______

The Citizens of Mesquite Very
Hopeful.

     Calhoun Knox of Mesquite is in the city to-day. To a TIMES-HERALD reporter, he said: "The people of Mesquite are breathing easier now. There has not been a death in Mesquite for eight days and not a case now exists in the village. Joe Amlin, living four miles east of Mesquite, died yesterday, and a Miss Mary Staton, residing at Scyene, is very low. There have been 24 deaths in the Mesquite neighborhood, but the doctors say that there is no more danger."

- April 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

BURGLARIES AT GARLAND.
_________

A Good Local Paper Prospering
----Other Items.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     G
ARLAND, April 15.--- Mr. G. G. Thompson, a well known and highly respected citizen of this community, was buried yesterday evening. Mrs. Mallabone was also buried yesterday evening.

- April 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Court.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

PROBATE MATTERS.

     J. W. Barton was appointed temporary administrator of the estate of Clara A. Barton, deceased, and his bond fixed at $6000.
     In re estate of T. H. Robinson, deceased, the claims of Bankers and Merchants' bank, T. H. Robinson stationery compnay, Chas. T. Ogden, Mann Johnson & Co., W. M. Coonradt, Gray Cumtery, J. L. Thompson, Wm. Ogden, Jas. Ogden, Vendig Bros. and J. T. Ogden were approved.

- April 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

Death of R. R. Cordell.

     R. R. Cordell, a car inspector for the Santa Fe, died this morning, at his residence on Annex avenue. Deceased leaves a widow and three children. He will be buried under the auspices of the Masonic order, from the East Dallas Baptist church, at 10 o'clock to-morrow morning.

- April 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

SAM EWING DEAD.
______

The Victim of Freeland Betters'
Gun a Corpse.

     Last Monday evening, Sam Ewing was shot by Freeland Betters in the new Idea saloon, a darkey joint. Betters fled. Ewing died last night and was buried to-day. Both parties are colored.

- April 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Masonic Notice.

     There will be a special communication of Tannehill Lodge No. 51, F. and A. M., at 9 o'clock sharp to-morrow morning, for the purpose of attending the funeral of our deceased brother, R. R. Cordell.
J. W. H
ARRINGTON, S. W.
W
M. SHIRLEY, Secy.

- April 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

ACCUSED OF INFANTICIDE.
_______

Laura Wicks Accused of a Terrible Crime.

     Yesterday, officers were informed by a negro named George Johnson, of a case of supposed infanticide. He piloted Officer Alexander to a place on Masten street, where he said the crime was committed, and the body of an infant was found in a gutter covered with brush. Signs of violence were discovered on the infant by the officer.
     The negro who gave the information to the officers says he lives next door to where a colored girl is a servant. One night, he heard an infant's cries in the barn belonging to the place where the girl works, and sent a negro girl to investigate. She reported to him that she saw the colored girl living next door, kill a babe.
     The girl under suspicion was arrested. She admitted to being the mother of the child, but said she did not kill it. She gave her name as Laura Wicks.

- April 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

BEING TIRED OF LIFE.
______

H. H. Burns Commits Suicide
by Taking Laudanum.

     H. H. Burns, a cripple and a beggar, arrived in the city yesterday after an absence of three years and left it again this morning forever. He was given a room in the Central Depot Hotel last night and was found this morning in a dying condition with a bottle near him labeled laudanum.
     A physician was summoned and the dying man was removed to the hospital, where he expired at 10 o'clock this morning.
     He left no communication to account for his act. He was about 35 years old.

- April 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The 7-months-old son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Black, of 154 Ardrey street, died at 7:40 last night and was buried at Trinity cemetery at 1 o'clock this afternoon.

- April 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

News Notes.

     Miss Mary Staton died of spotted fever at Scyene yesterday.

- April 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

ANOTHER MURDER TRIAL
_______

JOHN ARNOLD OF WILMER AR-
RAIGNED.

________

Charged With Killing One
Boy and Crippling An-
other.

     John Arnold was arraigned in the forty-fourth judicial district court his morning on charge of murder. The state announced ready, the defense followed suit, and the work of securing a jury began. A special venire had been ordered and "twelve good and true men" will be selected to sit in judgment on the prisoner.
     On Christmas eve a year ago, John Arnold fired into a crowd of young men and boys who where shooting fireworks at Wilmer station. Charles Brady was pierced by a leaden missile and killed. A boy named Rumfelt was also struck by a ball and seriously injured. According to the state, there was no provocation.
     The grand jury indicted Arnold for murder and also for assault with intent to murder. The prisoner will be tried for the killing of Brady first.
     Col. D. A. Williams and his assistants, Miller and Obenchain, are prosecuting. It is not likely that a jury will be obtained before to-morrow.
     Arnold is a young man, a farmer, and has rather a prepossessing countenance.

- April 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

The Spotted Fever Plague.

Southern Afternoon Press.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., April 21. -- There has been one other death from spotted fever. A three-year-old daughter of Mr. John Mathis, living about four miles east of town. There is one case, a child of Mr. B. F. Rudy, who lives three miles east of town.

- April 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Garland Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     G
ARLAND, Tex., April 21. -- Mrs. W. M. West died yesterday evening at her home near the fair grounds. The remains were taken to Garland this afternoon for interment. The deceased was a sister of Hon. T. F. Nash, of Garland. She leaves a husband and five children to mourn her loss.

- April 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 5.
- o o o -

ADALINE SCROGGINS ON TRIAL
_______

FOR THE MURDER OF EDDIE
GILBREATH.

_______

John Arnold Cleared from a
Charge of Murder on a
Plea of Former
Jeopardy.

     The case against Adeline Scroggins, colored, charged with the murder of Eddie Gilbreath, colored, was called and went to trial this morning in Judge Tucker's court.
     The killing occurred at a negro "shindig" in Freedmen town on February 5th of this year.
     The two women had been at dagger points for some time, and during last summer, the friends of Eddie Gilbreath say that Adeline Scroggins stabbed her with a knife and swore she would kill her some time.
     The enemies met at the party and got into a fight, which resulted in the death of Eddie Gilbreath.
     At the examining trial held before Justice Braswell a short time after the killing, the testimony was very conflicting. A number of Adeline Scroggins' friends swore that Eddie Gilbreath rushed upon her, with an axe and struck her with it, when she drew the knife from her bosom and began cutting. Eddie Gilbreath's friends swore that the other began the fight and used the knife before Eddie Gilbreath picked up the axe. Justice Braswell fixed Adeline Scroggins' bond at $1000.
     John Arnold, who was tried in Judge Tucker's court yesterday for the killing of Charles Brady at Mesquite last Christmas, an account of which was given yesterday, was set at liberty.
     The case presented a very peculiar feature which was fortunate for the defendant as it secured a decision of not guilty.
     The defendant, it seems, while in a hilarious state of mind, drew his revolver and fired it, slightly wounding a boy and killed Brady. As he fired at no one, it was a case of negligent homicide.
     When brought in court on charge of wounding the boy, he plead guilty and was fined $25, with trimmings.
     When the testimony was heard yesterday, the attorneys made a plea of former jeopardy, claiming that the defendant had been tried and convicted for firing his Christmas gun, and that he could not be tried and convicted of it again, according to law.
     The judge held likewise, and instructed the jury to return a verdict of not guilty.

- April 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Laura Wicks Held.

     Laura Wicks, the colored girl arrested a few days ago on the charge of infanticide, had an examining trial before Justice Braswell yesterday, who sent her back to jail without bond.

- April 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

PIERCE MAKES A PLUNGE
_______

INTO ETERNITY FROM AN ELM
STREET HOSTELRIE.

_______

He Was a Justice of the Peace,
Loved Whisky and Could
Not Provide for His
Family.

     J. J. Pierce, justice of the peace in Fate, Rockwall county, held court in his breast, and after weighing his sins and sorrows against his desire to live and a gloomy future, he pronounced death sentence on himself and chose last night for the execution and launched his soul into a dark eternity.
     This morning at sunrise, he was found in his room at the Texas & Pacific boarding house, corner of Elm and Lamar streets, all but dead. Dr. Burton[?] was hastily summoned and responded in haste, but before he reached Pierce's bedside, his spirit had departed for the great beyond.
     Pierce came to Dallas three days ago and put up at the boarding house where he suicided. He was in depressed spirits and drank a great deal. To an old acquaintance, R. B. Willis, he threatened killing himself several times by going and jumping off the railroad bridge. He had a wife and child in Rockwall county whom he talked about continually and said he could not take decent care of them and desired to kill himself for that reason.
     Yesterday, after having spent all of his money for liquor, he borrowed $1 from Wills and invested part of it in morphine, which Wills took away from him.
     Last night, the two went up to their room and went to bed. They talked from their beds until Wills dropped off to sleep. During the night, Willis was awakened by a noise and found Pierce up, who said he was going to step out for a moment. Willis went to sleep again and when he woke this morning, found Pierce dying with signs of morphine plentiful. He summoned a physician with fruitless results, as stated above.
     Pierce was about 25 years old and a Mississippian by birth. He was born and raised on a farm which he left and came to Texas several years ago. It is said that he was a bright fellow, and when he could let whisky alone, was a fine business man and made money.
     His wife, at Fate, and a sister in Forney, will be notified of his suicide to-day.
     A royal good fellow with a bright mind, but couldn't stop drinking.

- April 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

DR. SEEGAR DEAD.
________

He Died at Lancaster This
Morning.

     Dr. J. A. Seegar, formerly a resident and highly respected citizen of our city, more recently residing about 16 miles southwest of town, died in Lancaster at 11:07 o'clock last night. The remains will be brought to Dallas to-morrow. Funeral services at Commerce street Christian church at 10 o'clock a. m., same day.

- April 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

MARTIN PLEADS INSANITY.
_______

THE SLAYER OF MRS. CLOSE
ON TRIAL TO-DAY.

_______

Experts Will be Summoned
Other Proceedings in the Courts.

     The case of George Martin, charged with the murder of Delia Close, went to trial this morning.
     The killing took place on the 16th of March of this year.
     It is said that Martin and the woman had been living together, but quarreled and she left him and went to the house of Mrs. Covington on Jackson street to live. Martin called to see her two or three times, but the woman refused to see him. One evening, late, he gained entrance to her presence and directly afterwards, shots were heard. Martin was seen to leave the house and disappear. The lady of the house and others rushed into the room and found the woman on a sofa half sitting, half reclining, with blood gushing from wounds in her heard. She was past speaking and could tell nothing. Her little six-year-old daughter ran screaming through the house, saying that Martin had killed her mother. What disagreement or reproaches that led to the horrible tragedy so quickly after Martin entered the house, is not, and may probably never be known, as Martin, under charge of murder, locks the secret in his breast and the woman carried her story to eternity.
     Martin was captured during the night in a half-dead condition, having taken some poisonous drug to end his misery. When placed under the care of physician, he soon recovered from the effects of his deadly does.
     His attorneys will set up a plea of insanity.

JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     The case of Adaline Scroggins, charged with the murder of Eddie Gilbreath, went to the jury about 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The jury returned a verdict of guilty and assessed her punishment at two years and nine months in the penitentiary.

- April 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

DIED OF MORPHINE.
--------
The Sad End of a Justice of the Peace
from Rockwall.

     Yesterday morning, J. J. Pierce, a justice of the peace from Rockwall county, was found in a dying condition in the Texas and Pacific boarding-house, corner of Elm and Lamar. A physician was summoned, but Mr. Pearce expired before his arrival. The deceased came to Dallas last Monday and put up at the Texas and Pacific, where it was noticed that he was suffering from depressed spirits. To R. B. Willis, an acquaintance, he said that he proposed jumping off the railroad bridge in order to put an end to his existence. He spoke feelingly of his wife and child in Rockwall and seemed to be at outs with the world. Mr. Willis attempted to rouse him from his languor, but in vain. Last Wednesday evening, Pearce, who had got out of money, borrowed a dollar from Willis, with a part of which, he purchased morphine, which Willis took from him. Later on, Pearce managed to secure morphine. The men retired at the same time and during the night, Willis awoke to find Pearce up, but the latter told him that he was only going to stop out for a moment. Yesterday morning, when he awoke, he found Pearce dying. The deceased was only 25 years old and was a native of Mississippi. His wife was notified of his death.

- April 24, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

[No heading]

     Cecle Merri Armoutt, aged 3 years, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Armontt, 194 Park ave., died this morning. The funeral took place at 4:30 this evening.

- April 25, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     The Mooney Weatherford murder case was reset for Friday next. Weatherford is a young chap about 18 years old and killed a fellow about his own age in March, near Mesquite. The deceased was Ike Allen, who had just stabbed Mooney Weatherford's brother, when he received an avenging bullet that set all his earthly cares at rest.

- April 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Little Minnie, the six year old daughter of R. F. Beeler of Dallas died yesterday at Mineral Wells, where she had been living with her grand parents since the death of her mother.
     Eugene B. Howell, the young son of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Howell, died yesterday afternoon after a lingering illness covering over six months. The funeral will occur to-morrow at 10 o'clock from the family residence in East Dallas. Rev. A. M. Simms, pastor of the First Baptist church, of which Mr. Howell was a member, will conduct the services.

- May 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

ACCIDENTALLY KILLED.

     Joe Lee Hughes, son of Joseph Hughes, who resided eight miles northwest of Dallas, was shot and killed Monday evening by Will Collier, at the residence of the latter.
     Collier had purchased a pistol a day or two before and was exhibiting his new pet to his friend, when it was accidentally discharged, the ball striking Hughes in the left side, and instantly killing him.
     The coroner's jury returned a verdict of accidental killing. Collier is almost heartbroken over the sad affair. The funeral of the unfortunate young man took place yesterday.
     He was 24 years of age and leaves a widow and two children.
     Eighteen months ago, while fooling with a pistol, Collier shot himself in the right leg, breaking the bone and crippling him for life.
     It is about time that he dispensed with firearms.

- May 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     An old man by the name of Perez, who lives near the Howard Oil mills, while crawling under a train of cars in the afternoon yesterday to get across the track, had a leg horribly mangled. The train started while he was under it and he was caught. He is 85 years old and he is not expected to live.

- May 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Mrs. Mary Bassett of Anderson, Grimes county, is visiting the family of Mr. W. R. Howell on Gaston avenue. Also, T. C. Buffington of the State University at Austin. They were here to attend the funeral of Mr. Howell's little Eugenia, yesterday morning.

- May 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Card of Thanks.

     The undersigned returns thanks to the friends of the late W. M. Esteb for the many kind attentions shown him during his last illness, andalso for words of condolence to those bereaved. Beleive me, these evidences of friendship will never be forgotten. His son,
E. J. E
STEB, of Topeka, Kansas

- May 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

     Dr. William Boll at Green Springs, Ohio, on May 8th. Notice of funeral, which will take place in this city, will appear Monday morning.

- May 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Government Notes.

     Mrs. Greer, living near Lisbon, died yesterday of the la grippe.

- May 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Charles A. Haney, a painter 22 years of age, died at 188 Collin street yesterday afternoon.

- May 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

FRANK QUINN ACQUITTED.
_______

Not Guilty of the Murder of
Ben Nelson.

     A year ago, Frank Quinn, colored, suspected his wife of infidelity to her marriage vows.
     He kept a close watch over the woman and one night spied her in a negro cabin in the embrace of one Ben Nelson, an African to him unknown.
     His vengeance was swift and terrible. Seizing an axe, he crept into the room and buried the sharp-edged blade into the brain of the sleeping man, splitting his head in twain. Nelson never moved a muscle. He was as dead as a herring.
     The profligate woman was awakened by the noise; she saw her blood-stained paramour dead by her side and an infuriated man standing over her with a bloody axe in his uplifted hands. She shrieked in terror. The axe descended and clipped a chunk of ebony-hued flesh from her right shoulder.
     Quinn, his work of vengeance over, surrendered to the police. On a former trial, the jury stood ten for acquittal and two for conviction. On Saturday night, at 12 o'clock, a second jury returned a verdict of not guilty. Quinn was discharged.
     Mrs. Quinn, it is said, is now a resident of Texarkana, her old home.

- May 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Charles A. Hannay, a painter, aged 22, and unmarried, died yesterday.

- May 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

SAD ACCIDENT.
_______

A Little Girl Killed Acciden-
tally.

     By the accidental discharge of a shotgun in the hands of Kenmore Kirksey, Saturday evening, Jessie Thurmond lost her life. The sad affair took place at the residence of Dr. W. J. Thurmond at Oak Cliff. Tilden Thurmond and Young Kirksey had been out on a hunt, had returned home, and were retracing their steps from the Thurmond residence. Little Jessie was standing in the window up stairs. The gun was discharged and the contents struck the little girl in the face, neck and head, inflicting injuries, from the effects of which, she died an hour later. Justice Whittaker held an inquest and returned a verdict in accordance with the facts.
     The circumstances surrounding the tragedy were particularly sad. The parents of the little girl, Dr. and Mrs. Thurmond, were absent from home. It was first thought that they were at New Orleans. Telegrams were sent to several points, and finally, it was ascertained that they were at Galveston. A sorrow-laden message was sent to their address and a reply was received. The parents were given a terrible shock by the blow which robbed them of their pretty little daughter. The bereaved couple arrived home from the Island City this morning.

- May 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

FRED BOTTO DROWNED.
_______

While Fishing in Winn's Lake
Saturday Night.

     A young man by the name of Fred Botto, was drowned in Winn's lake last Saturday night. He and a couple of friends were fishing and were in a boat running their lines about 9 o'clock when the boat capsized and the fishermen had to take to the water. One of them could not swim and held on to the boat while young Botto and the other struck out for the shore, but Botto never reached it. He is a young man, unmarried and lived near the lake with a married brother.

- May 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

Citation by Publication.
_______

THE STATE OF TEXAS,

To the Sheriff or any Constable of Dallas County -- Greeting.
     You are hereby commanded, That by making publication of this citation in some newspaper published in the county of Dallas for four consecutive weeks previous to the return day hereof, you summon Mary McDonald and Katie McDonald, who are non-residents of the State of Texas, to be and appear before the district court, to be holden in and for the county of Dallas, at the courthouse thereof, in the city of Dallas, on the 2d Monday in September, next, then and there to answer the petition of A. B. Lamb and Y. Q. Caldwell filed in said court, on the 6th day of May, 1891, against the said Mary McDonald and Katie McDonald and alleging in substance as follows, to-wit:
     To recover amount due on promissory note together with interest, which plaintiff alleges was executed and delivered to D. D. Dumas by R. T. McDonald as principal and A. B. Lamb and Y Q. Caldwell as securities, said note dated Paris, Tenn.,. February 25th, 1888, and payable twelve months after date thereof; that afterwards for value received said note was endorsed and delivered to plaintiffs; that said note was on its maturity presented for payment, the payment of which said McDonald refused, and subsequently said note was taken up by plaintiffs, as securities, by paying the sum of said note, $550, together with $36.66 interest then due thereon, as is shown by said endorsement; that to secure plaintiffs against loss by reason of his having become his securities, said McDonald executed and delivered to them a mortgage on a certain tract of land lying in Dallas county, Texas, the same being part of the Grigsby league and labor survey, and more particularly described in plaintiffs' original petition, reference to which is here made; that said McDonald died intestate, leaving surviving him his widow, said Mary McDonald and his daughter, said Katie McDonald, who are the only heirs of said R. T. McDonald; that said Katie McDonald is a minor and has no guardian of her estate in the State of Texas; that a partition has been had of the above-mentioned tract of land and lot No. 40 of the same was decreed to defendants in right of the said R. T. McDonald, deceased, and defendants are now seized land possessed of the same. Premises considered plaintiffs pray that a guardian ad litem be appointed to represent and protect the interest of said minor defendant and for judgment against defendants for their said debt, interests, costs of suit for foreclosure of their said mortgage and for general and special relief, &c.
     Herein fail not, but have you then and there before said court this writ, with you return thereon, showing how you have executed the same.
     Witness, J. H. Stewart, Clerk of the District Court of Dallas county, Texas.
     {L. S.} Given under my hand and seal of said court, at office in the city of Dallas, this the 11th day of May, A. D. 1891.
                        J. H. S
TEWART,
          Clerk District Court, Dallas County
By H. H. Williams, Deputy.

- May 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

DEATH ON THE RAIL.
______

MARTIN O'HARE IS CRUSHED
TO DEATH

______

By a Passenger Train Near the
North Dallas Stand
Pipe.

     Another man indulges the cup too often and meets with a tragic end.
     At 7 o'clock last night, the engineer on the north bound passenger on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas road, espied something on the track just as the engine turned the sharp curve near the stand pipe, just north of the city.
     The object had scarcely caught his eye, when it took the form of a man. He quickly reversed his engine, but the distance was too short and the man on the track was struck by the pilot of the engine and dragged for about ten feet, cutting off his right arm, just above the wrist, crushing an ankle, knocking his left eye out and cutting a furrow across his forehead. Death was instantaneous, the terrible shock on the head rendering life extinct the instant the pilot touched him.
     The body was removed at once to Undertaker Linskie's shop on Main street.
     The body was identified as that of Martin O'Hare, a native of the Green Isle, who has lived in Dallas a number of years and had been employed for a long time in the water works.
     O'Hare was about 35 years old, had a wife and one child, and lived in a tent near the stand pipe.
     He was in town yesterday with a number of friends and his convivial spirit caused him to taste too often, the tempting glass, and wen he parted with those friends about night, he had about as much aboard as he could navigate with.
     It is supposed that he started for home and became so drunk that he lay down on the track and dropped off to sleep to awaken in another world. His wife came to view the body and sobbed out her grief on the body of him who had been her all in all.
     The body will be interred in the Catholic cemetery at 4 o'clock this afternoon.
     In a tent near the stand pipe, there will be sadness for many days to come.

- May 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

DEATH OF A LITTLE WAIF.
---
Deserted by its Mother, it Falls
into Loving Hands.

     Bulah E. Houser, the little girl babe left on the doorstep of Mr. E. J. Freidlander, the butcher at Harwood and Bryan streets, February 5, and adopted by Mr. and Mrs. John Houser, 211 Bryan, died this morning of congestion of the brain.
     She was a bright little darling and Mr. and Mrs. Houser were deeply attached to her and truly mourn her loss.
     Though deserted by a heartless mother, she found a good home where all that love and kindness could suggest was done to save the little spark of life.
     Mr. and Mrs. Houser desire to thank their friends for their kindness and the many floral offerings, one a wreath of white roses from little Willie Lane, who always called her "My Baby," and to Dr. Farr, pastor of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, especially, whose eloquent sermon was truly appreciated.

- May 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     John W. Dargan died at the residence of Mr. Milton Dargan on Browder street yesterday. The body was taken to Sumpter, S. C., for interment.
     Mack O'Neal, a poor railroad laborer, aged 57, was knocked from the bridge by a Texas and Pacific train last night. He was removed to the hospital, suffering from concussion of the brain. Both legs were broken. He will die.

- May 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

In Memoriam.

     Died, on the 13th of May, 1891, Mrs. Dr. E. M. Farron, after a short but painful illness which she bore with Christian resignation and patience. Her life was but the record of good deeds--a devoted wife, dutiful daughter, a kind sister and a faithful friend. Her devotion to home and her husband was a striking characteristic of her life; those who knew her best loved her most. Many are the saddened hearts caused by the death of the above. We know our loss is her gain, for we have the promise of one who says, "Those who follow my commandments and do my will inherit eternal life and happiness." The sacred mound, 'neath which she lies, speaks well to the passer-by--lovely flowers are strewn in profusion around and about her resting place. May the dews of heaven fall gently on their beauty and fragrance. May the gentle rays of the setting sun linger long and last on her narrow bed, where quiet repose and rest now reign.
                                                                      A F
RIEND.

- May 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

MESQUITE MATTERS.
________

Glorious Rain--Growing Crops.
Personal Mention.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., May 18.-- The correspondent learns that Mr. John Cox, an old resident of Rylie, and postmaster of that place, died yesterday morning. He was well known here and everybody feels the loss.

- May 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

DIED FROM BURNS.
________

A Young Lady Whose Clothes
Were Burned From Her Dies
After Much Suffering.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     W
ILMER, Tex., May 20.--Miss Lou, second oldest daughter of T. J. Weatherford, Sr., died last night about 1 o'clock. The cause of death resulted from burns received about six weeks ago. Miss Lou was attending to her duties of cleaning the house, and while dusting around the fire-place, her clothes caught fire. She became frightened and ran out doors and the wind blowing strong, her clothes burned off of her, not leaving a piece as large as a man's hand.
     In places, she was burned terribly. Her burns were doing well, but it was almost impossible to get her to eat anything, and when she did eat, her stomach was too weak to retain it. The people extend Mr. Weatherford and family their heartfelt sympathies.

- May 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     John Burgess, the nineteen-year old son of J. W. Burgess, who lives near Five Mile Church, was drowned in the Trinity Saturday. His body was recovered Sunday.

- May 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

Death of Mrs. W. M. Warlick.

     Fannie G., the beloved wife of W. M. Warlick, of Oak Cliff, died at her home in that city this morning, after a brief illness.
     Mrs. Warlick was 30 years of age, a member of the Presbyterian church, and a lady held in high esteem by a large circle of friends for her womanly graces and christian character.
     She was a native of Wood county, Texas, grew to womanhood and was educated in North Carolina, but returned to her native state after her marriage to her now bereaved husband. Deceased was connected by blood ties with many prominent families of North Carolina and Missouri, and was a distant relative of Ex-Governor Henderson of Texas.
     Two small children are bereft of a mother's care and a devoted husband robbed of the love and companionship of a most worthy help-meet.
     The funeral will take place from the family residence at Oak Cliff at 4 p. m. to-morrow, Rev. W. L. Lowrance officiating. Friends of the family invited.

- May 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     In the case of Mrs. Julia Fowler's will, Judge Burke sustained the will. It will be carried to the supreme court.

- May 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

MESQUITE NEWS.
________

Gleaned by a Regular Correspondent.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., May 25.-- Mr. Beach, who lives a few miles north of this place, lost a child last week with the spotted fever. Mr. Wayne Futrell has a child down with the same disease, but it is getting well. With the exception of these two cases, the health of the community is excellent. The physicians have this disease under control now and the case above referred to is the only one that has died for some time.

- May 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

     Thos. Lee Warlick, aged 5 months, infant son of W. M. and Fannie G. Warrick, of Oak Cliff, died Saturday afternoon. Interment in Oak Cliff cemeterey yesterday.

- May 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     The case of Marie Antoine et al. vs. N. S. Eason et al. for $20,000 damages is on trial to-day. Marie Antoine's husband was killed by a Houston & Texas Central train on Christmas day, 1887.

- May 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Death from Scalding.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, May 30.--The little girl of Mrs. and Mr. Fuget, who lives near here, was fatally scalded by overturning a pot of boiling water, which her mother was using in washing. A physician was summoned, but nothing could be done and the little sufferer died in great agony. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved parents.

- May 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE NEWS IN A NUTSHELL.

     The child of Mrs. Fugate, was fatally scalded at Mesquite.
     William Porter, a Dallas negro, was assassinated at Warren.

- May 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

 

KILLED BY AN ENGINE.
________

A. G. Evans, a Drummer,
Meets With a Terrible
Death.

     A. G. Evans, who sells the Deering harvesters, was killed by a train in the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad yards about 2 o'clock yesterday morning. the accident occurred on the curve near the gas works. The engineer saw Evans, but too late to avoid running over him. Evans was terribly mangled when found. He was from Shelbyville, Tenn., about 26 years of age, and unmarried. With a party of friends, he had visited several resorts in the city Saturday night on a sight seeing tour. Early Sunday morning, he became separated from his friends and the next seen of him, he was found dead on the track. The remains were taken in charge by Undertaker Linskie and will be shipped to his old home for burial.

- June 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

TOM MORGAN'S CRIME.
_________

He Plants a Dagger in the
Heart of Noah Richardson.

     Two negroes, Noah Richardson and Tom Morgan, got into a game of cards in a house near the fair grounds and then into a scrap. Noah is dead. Morgan drove a dagger into his heart to the hilt and let out his ghost. Morgan made his escape. All this occurred Saturday night, and at 11:30 o'clock yesterday morning, the dead body was lying on the prairie near the house where the killing occurred.
     Morgan is a tough citizen and engaged in a shooting scrape on Main street, in a negro dive, about six weeks ago.
     The victim, as well as the killer, are unmarried.

- June 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     W. T. Nance, a well-known resident of Dallas county, having resided in Lancaster for many years, died at his home on McKinney avenue this afternoon. The remains will be interred at Lancaster to-morrow.

- June 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3
- o o o -

Notice of Thanks.

     To the kind friends and neighbors who so willingly befriended and shared with us our sorrow and bereavement in the death of our little dauther, Hazel, we wish to extend our most heartfelt thanks.
L. A. Hanchet and family.

- June 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     On Sunday, May 31, at 6 o'clock of cholera infantum, little Hazel, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Hanchet, at the tender age of 14 months and 3 days. She lingered for two weeks and then peacefully passed away.
     The funeral service was held on Tuesday at the family residence on Gano street, Reverend Dodson officiating. The remains were interred in Trinity cemetery.

- June 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     William Lagow et al. vs. G. W. Glover et al; suggestion of the marriage of M. E. Corven to W. H. Groggin; death of Ira A. Logan suggested.

- June 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death of Charles Garrett.

     At 5:30 o'clock this morning, after an illness of eighteen days, Charley Garrett, the 18-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. G. O. Garrett, died of typhoid fever at the family residence on Germania street. The many friends of this noble youth in the city were shocked on learning this sad news, as up to a few days ago, he was thought to be improving.

- June 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the City Council
in Regular Session Satur-
day Night.

     The city secretary's weekly mortuary report accounted for twenty-two deaths.

- June 8, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2-4.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     Sarah King et al vs. City of Dallas; continued by consent. Plaintiff suggests the death of Martha Crewel and leave granted for her personal presentation to make themselves parties.

- June 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

ANOTHER MURDER.
______

Ed Jackson Died This After-
noon.

     Ed Jackson, who was knifed by Sherman Lawrence, near the oil mills last night, died this afternoon.
     Lawrence is still at large.

- June 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     At his residence, 298 North Lamar street, Mr. Edwin Taylor, aged 72 years. Funeral from the Church of Incarnation to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock.

- June 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4.
- o o o -

Death of Mr. Jordan.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     G
RAND PRAIRIE, June 12.--Dr. W. D. Jordan, late of Jefferson City, Mo., died suddenly at this place about 4 o'clock this morning of heart disease. He had recently located here, to practice his profession and also had ministerial charge of the Baptist church at this place.

- June 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death From Heat.

     Mr. Buerger, an elderly gentleman residing at 300 Griffin street, was overcome with heat and died about 6 o'clock last evening. he was seated in front of his residence when he suddenly fell forward from his chair in an unconscious state. Medical aid was obtained, but the gentleman soon expired. The attending physicians said it was from over heat.

- June 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Obituary.

     On the 31st of May, 1891, there died in Dallas, Mrs. Nora Ivy, aged only 18 years, the young wife of J. N. Ivy, and daughter of Mr. Thomas Martin of Scurry county, on the Staked Plains. This youthful wife, loved by all who knew her, died as a child of the Savior of men. Her father, being notified, came 300 miles to see her put to rest. She was buried at Forney in Kaufman county, alongside of kindred who have gone before. Her youthful husband and her family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.               A FRIEND.

- June 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

RYLIE RUMBLINGS.
_______

Numerous Small Thefts--A
Newsy Letter.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     R
YLIE, Texas, June 12.-- Since the death of her husband, Mr. J. H. Cox no longer wants the postoffice and there are two contestants for the position--Messrs. E. C. Sweet and M. Cory.
     Mrs. E. L. Watson, aged 83, who was visiting relatives at this place, died a few days ago. She had been a member of the Methodist church 65 years.

- June 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

MYSTERIOUS DEATH.
________

A Dead Body is Found on the
River.

     A fisherman by the name of Essence discovered a man lying under some willows on the bank of the river about half a mile below the Commerce street bridge two days ago. He though perhaps there was something the matter with the man and hailed him. The man did not answer, but turned over. The fisherman took no more notice of him. Yesterday, the fisherman discovered the dead body of a man on the spot where he had seen the man whom he had hailed. When the fisherman discovered the body decomposition had set in and a horrible smell filled the air.
     The authorities were notified, who turned the body over to Undertaker Linskie to bury.
     On the body was found a San Francisco hotel card and a note book. In the book was found these names: O. B. Orr, 5526 Liberty street and Bertha Lewison.
     A neat suit of dark clothes was on the body and a white hat lying near it.

- June 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

A MYSTERIOUS BURIAL.
______

NEAR BALE'S SCHOOL-HOUSE
SATURDAY EVENING.

______

The Last Sad Rites of an Infant
Performed Secretly by a
Young Couple.

     Jeff Lee is a darkey and lives about eight miles east of Dallas near Bale's school house.
     Saturday afternoon late, a buggy in which were a young man and woman, stopped at Lee's gate. The man asked the loan of a hoe, saying they wanted to dig some worms to fish with. The hoe was loaned and the couple drove off down the creek. In about half an hour, they came back, returned the hoe and drove off in the direction of Dallas.
     When the couple first appeared at the house and wanted a hoe, Lee's wife noticed flies swarming around a bundle in the buggy, and had her suspicions aroused. When the seekers for worms had returned the hoe and departed toward Dallas, the negro woman told her husband "that something was wrong about them white folks."
Jeff took his foot in his hand went over to Dick Lagow's and asked that gentleman to go with him and investigate. They followed the buggy tracks about 100 yards down the branch where they stopped.   A little inspection of the ground showed that the hoe had been used for a little mound was discovered, which gave every evidence that it had been freshly made.
     Mr. Lagow had Lee to dig up the mound, and after going about two feet, clothing was discovered. That settled it. There was something wrong. The dirt was thrown back and the pair departed.
     Justice Ed. Lauderdale was informed and went out to Lee's this morning, accompanied by Dr. L. C. Schofield. Lee conducted them to the susposed grave, which opened and disclosed a new born babe wrapped in a piece of cloth. Dr. Schofield pronounced the infant a day old.
     Lee says that man and woman were both young and well dressed and that the man had a black mustache. The rig was an elegant one and the horse driven was of a brown color with a white star in his forehead.
     Officers are investigating and some body may find themselves in trouble soon.
     Dr. Schofield took charge of the remains and will put them in alcohol.

- June 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Death of Warren Armstrong.

     At the home of his brother, Dr. U. P. Armstrong, last night, Mr. W. S. Armstrong, of Armstrong Bros., died of typhoid fever. Mr. Armstrong was a native of Tennessee, but has been away from his native state many years. He was, until his death, connected with the Armstrong grocery company. He was a talented business man and had a host of friends. The remains will be shipped to Louisville, Ky., for interment.

- June 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Clovis R., infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Armstrong, died at the family residence, 140 Montgomery street, yesterday at 1:30. The funeral took place from the cathedral this morning.

- June 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

The City Government.

     Although the physicians and undertakers of the city report business dull in their respective lines, the city secretary, last week, reported the death of nine adults and ten children; the week before, eleven adults and eleven children. Cholera infantum carries off the majority of the children, and the largest number of adults succumb to consumption, contracted before coming to Dallas.

- June 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Rylie News.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     R
YLIE, Tex., June 20.--There is a gloom cast over our little town by the untimely death of Miss Emma Moore, which occurred last evening. She was in the bloom of youth, and stricken down after a few days' illness.

- June 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Bountiful Crops--Good Rains--
Local Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     G
ARLAND, Tex., June 23.--A fine rain fell here last night, which was very beneficial, and especially to corn.
     Mr. Hogan Wordsworth, of the Mesquite neighborhood, died last Friday, at the age of 84 years.

- June 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

FOUND DEAD ON THE TRACK.
_______

An Unknown Man, Probably L.
W. Markel, Near Wilmer,
This County.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     W
ILMER, Tex., June 24.--This morning about 1 1/2 miles south of here on the Central railroad, was found a man dead. One side of his head was crushed in. The man is of low, heavy build, about 5 feet high and near 30 years old, light complexion, sandy hair and light mustache. He had several letters on his person addressed to "L. W. Markel, from C. Mutschink, financial secretary, Cigar Makers' Union, No. 216, Brenham, Tex." He also had a small book with numerous stamps in, representing dues and fees which seems to have been given him May 18th, 1889, from the Louisville order No. 32, with same name. He had $1.60 in money and money belt around him. It is supposed he was killed last night by some passing train as he was lying very close to the track when found.

- June 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE NEWS IN A NUTSHELL.

     Col. Howe Y. Payton died at Lancaster last evening.
     L. W. Markel, a union cigar maker, was found dead near Wilmer. Run over by the cars.

- June 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

Sudden Death of Maj. Riggen.

     Maj. O. S. Riggen died suddenly this morning about 6 o'clock in his room at the Windsor hotel. He was well-known about town, having resided her a number of years. He was interested with Messrs. Hodges & Wheelock in operating the Windsor, and he possessed some property, it is said.
     Maj. Riggen, who was about 40 years of age, came to Dallas from Owensville, Ky., where he was born and raised. His wife died last July, leaving him no children. His remains will be laid to rest by the side of his wife in Trinity cemetery.

- June 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The funeral of the late O. S. Riggen will take place from the Windsor Hotel at 10 o'clock to-morrow morning. Friends of deceased invited.

- June 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

NEW HOPE NEWS.
_______

Fine Crop Prospects--Old Cit-
izens Buried.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     N
EW HOPE, Tex., June 26.-- Mr. Hill Hamby and Uncle H. Wadsworth, two of Dallas county's most prominent citizens, were buried last week. Their funerals were the largest in attendance ever witnessed at the grave yard.

- June 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Sad Death.

     Vera, the bright and interesting little four-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Gano, died this morning at the home of her parents in North Dallas. The many friends of the bereaved parents deeply sympathize with them in their great affliction. Vera was a great favorite and her death is a sad blow to the family and friends. Funeral services will be held to-morrow, Sunday, at family residence in Oak Lawn at 5 o'clock p. m.

- June 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

LOST HIS LIFE.
______

A Gravel Pit Foreman Falls
From the Bridge.

     The Commerce street bridge, which is undergoing repairs, filled the part of a death trap last night between 11:30 and 12 o'clock.
     W. T. McPeak, a Scotchman, and foreman of the Oak Cliff gravel pit and an employe of Haraldson & Sharp and Laing & Smoot, while crossing the bridge on his way home, stepped through where the floor was torn up and fell nearly forty feet to the ground, striking on some timbers. A young negro by the name of Turner Lydea, who passed near the fatal spot a few moments later, heard the dying sufferer groaning. Lydea, after placing McPeak in the easiest condition possible, went for assistance.
     McPeak lived about two hours. His back was broken and badly bruised. He was able to tell his name and occupation. His body was taken to Undertaker Linskie's.
     Justice Braswell viewed the body this morning and wired Mrs. McPeak, who is visiting relatives in Jonesboro, Tenn., of the death of her husband and asked instructions in reference to the remains.
     McPeak was a poor man and leaves his wife and child in a sad situation.

- June 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Ryan Runnion, a plasterer, was drowned in Wynne's lake Saturday night. The body was brought to Dallas. Runnion was 30 years old and unmarried.

- June 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
________

W. J. SPROUSE OF GARLAND
ON TRIAL TO-DAY.

_______

The Facts in a Somewhat
Noted Case--Other Pro-
ceedings in the Courts
of Dallas County.

     In Judge Tucker's court this morning, the murder case of the State vs. Mealer and W. J. Sprouse was called. Mealer shot and killed J. W. Webb at Garland last winter, in a saloon. It is charged that Sprouse held Webb in a vice-like grip by the throat when Mealer shot and killed him. Sprouse was indicted as an accessory. The prisoners answered ready for trial. A severance was granted and Sprouse placed on trial and the work of empaneling a jury began. A special venire had been summoned. Hon. Tom Nash of Garland and Judge Muse of the firm of Bassett, Seay & Muse, are defending the prisoner, and Col. Williams, county attorney, is assisted by Harry L. Obenchain and City Judge Kenneth Foree. A large number of Garlandites are in attendance as witnesses. Sprouse is a young man, tall and slender, with jet black eyes, hair and moustache. He takes things unconcernedly, and evidently expects an acquittal.

- June 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CUTTING AFFRAY.
_______

Crop, Personal and Other Gar-
land News.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     G
ARLAND, Texas, June 29.-- Mrs. Charles Strassenburg, who has been sick for some time, died Saturday and was buried Sunday evening at the Masonic cemetery south of town. Also, Mr. W. T. Olinger, living north of town, died Saturday and was buried at Spring Creek cemetery. Mr. Olinger was an old and highly respected settler of Dallas county. Both deaths are deeply deplored by the community.

- June 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

DIED FROM AMPUTATION.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, June 30.-- Mr. Chase, whose limb was amputated a few days ago, of which mention was made in the TIMES-HERALD, died Sunday. So great was the shock, that he could not survive.

- June 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

Rowlett Local Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     R
OWLETT, Dallas Co., Texas,. June 29.-- Berry Page was buried at the Mills grave yard Friday evening. He died at the insane asylum at Terrell, Texas, where he had been confined for some months. His loss is mourned by many friends and relatives.

- June 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mrs. W. R. Hinckley died at her residence, corner of Browder and Gano streets, last night, aged 59.

- July 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The remains of Mrs. W. R. Hinckley and Mrs. Carrie May Ellsworth Kelley, were laid to rest to-day.

- July 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Notice of Administration.

Letters of administration on the estate of W. L. Wadsworth, deceased, were granted the undersigned May 5th by the Dallas County Court, therefore all persons having claims against said estate will present them within the time prescribed by law. W. H. HOWELL, Administrator, 221 Elm St., Dallas, Tex.

- July 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Taken to Sherman.

     The remains of W. T. Sadler will be shipped to Sherman for burial this evening. The printers will act as an escort from his late residence to the depot.

- July 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

LOCAL NOTES.

     Mr. Charles Tullis, a compositor in the office of the Western Baptist, died suddenly yesteday morning at 9 o'clock, aged 23. His remains were shipped to Jefferson, Tex., his old home, last evening.

- July 6, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Sudden Death.

     At 8:45 last night, Mr. William T. Sadler, a compositor in THE NEWS office, died suddenly of congestion of the stomach, being ill only a few hours. He was a favorite with his comrades and co-workers of THE NEWS force, being always genial, kindly and pleasant, and by his personal magnetism and amiability making friends wherever he went. He had twice been a representative to the International typographical union, once from Virginia City, Nev., and once from Houston, Tex. He was a step-son of Hon. George Dickerman of Sherman, who was, for a number of years, district clerk of Grayson county. His wife, with his three little children, only left home a day or two ago on a visit to her mother at Columbus, Tex. The Typographical union of Dallas, No. 173, will take charge of the remains, but it is not known, yet, whether the remains will be interred here, or in Sherman. His wife and relatives have been telegraphed the sad news, and when they are heard from, arrangements for the funeral will be made.

- July 6, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Charles Mier, a German, 40 years old, residing on Germania street, suicided on Junius street yesterday at 6 o'clock. Morphine. Despondency.
     Charles Tullis, a compositor in the employ of the Western Baptist, died suddenly yesterday morning. The remains were shipped to Jefferson, his old home.

- July 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     William T. Sadler, a well-known printer, and employed in the composing room of the Dallas News, died suddenly at 8 o'clock last evening of congestion of the stomach, after an illness of four hours. Mrs. Sadler and three children of the deceased are visiting relatives at Columbus, Tex. The sad news was communicated to the widow, and also relatives at Sherman, the native home of deceased. Mr. Sadler was popular with his associates and the craft generally and a leading member of the International Typographical Union. He had twice been a representative to national conventions, once from Virginia City, Nev., and once from Houston. Yesterday, he attended a meeting of Dallas Union No. 173 and declined a re-election as corresponding secretary. The Union has taken charge of the remains and arrangements for the funeral will be made to-day.

- July 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Under the Wheels
A Deaf Mute Killed by a
Train at Richardson

     ...no one knows his hame..lives over about Wylie, Texas.

- July 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE NEWS IN A NUTSHELL.

     Sam Hurt, a deaf mute from Wylie, was killed by the cars near Richardson.

- July 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

TYPOGRAPHICAL UNION
MATTERS.

________

Officers Elected--Funeral of a
Late Member.

LAID TO REST.

     The remains of W. T. Sadler [were] sent via the Houston & Texas Central to Sherman on the 7:30 p. m. train yesterday, accompanied by six members of the Dallas Typographical Union. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Dickerman, received the remains and he was interred this evening in the family burial ground at that place. Mrs. Sadler passed up this morning, from her parents home on the Houston & Texas Central to attend the funeral and was met at the Union depot by Mrs. Arch Cochran, Mr. R. T. Bibb and other lady friends of the deceased and Mrs. Sadler.

- July 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     T. P. Prewitt, a Dallas carpenter, at Ennis, was struck on the head by a passenger engine Wednesday night. He will die, it is though.

- July 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Elizabeth L. Vanderhurst vs. Supreme Lodge Knights of Honor for $2000, her deceased husband having held beneificiary certificate for that amount.

- July 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

ED HENNESSEY DEAD.
_______

A Widely-Known Sporting Man
Passes Away.

      Edward, or Ed Hennessey, as he was known to his intimate friends, died in his room in the Knepfly building at 6:04 last evening. He had been down six weeks with typhoid malarial fever. Wednesday, feeling this his race was nearly run, a good priest of the church in which was reared, was sent for, and the last rites were administered to the dying man. The remains were taken in charge by Undertaker Linskie and the funeral will take place at 4 o'clock this afternoon from the Bryan Street Catholic Church.
      Edward Hennessey was born in Ireland 52 years ago and came to America with his parents just 50 years ago. A brother and two sisters reside in Terre Haute, Ind., who were notified of his demise. He was well educated, serviced in the Federal army as a lieutenant during the war, and came to Dallas seventeen years [ago]. As a sporting man, he was as well known as any man in the south. "Ed Hennessey was a man of his word," said a well-known railroad official last night, "He never broke his word, his purse was ever at the disposal of the needy and distressed, he gave with a lavish hand when he had wealth to give and he died without an enemy in the world. He lived his own worst enemy, but he was a loyal friend, large-hearted, generous and kind and thousands will regret that he has paid the debt to nature we all must pay."
     Ed Hennessey was one of the strongest democrats in Dallas. His boast was that he had voted the ticket straight for thirty years and he had no sympathy with men of scratching propensities. During the red-hot campaign last spring, he was appealed to on numerous occasions to throw his influence against the Democratic ticket. "No," was his invariable reply, "I am a Democrat. I like Bud Connor, but he is not on the democratic ticket and no man who runs against a democratic nominee can get my vote." And, he didn't get it.
     He was a man of the world, affable in manners, courteous at all times, a fluent talker, and thoroughly informed; and popular with all with whom he came in contact.
     One of his most intimate friends said to-day: "Ed made a barrel of money in his time. He was the soul of generosity and his possession melted away. He died poor, as men of his stamp usually die. All that could be done to make his last moments easy, all that faithful nurses and intelligent physicians could do, was done, but death claimed its own and the good and bad in the life of Ed. Hennessey will be consigned to mother earth with his mortal remains this afternoon."

- July 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died of His Injuries.

     T. P. Trewitt, the carpenter who was run down by a train at Ennis Tuesday night, died yesterday. Interment will follow in this city. A widow and several children survive him.

- July 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

BYERLY'S BREAK.
_______

He Attempts to Escape from
Deputy Bolick.

     Some weeks ago, William Byerly was arrested, on a complaint of his wife, charged with aggravated assault and battery. He was placed under $250 bond and released. Wednesday, his bondsmen asked to be released, and Deputy Sheriff Bolick gathered Byerly in and started to the county jail. The prisoner made a break for liberty near the elevator and ran. Bolick chased him through a barbed wire fence. Byerly was placed in jail. Deputy Bolick has a swollen nose and a sore hand as a result of a contact with the fence. Byerly's wife died a week or two ago, leaving a little boy for him to care for.

- July 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Upon the request of his sister, the remains of Ed Hennessey were shipped at 1:20 to-day over the Santa Fe for interment at Terra Haute, Ind.

- July 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

HORRIBLY MANGLED.
_______

Lucy Williams, to Escape Dan-
ger, Steps Into the Jaws
of Death.

     Lucy Williams, an aged negro woman, was run over and killed at 8:10 Saturday night by a Rapid Transit motor, just east of No. 2 engine house, Capt. Daniels of the engine company, who saw Lucy just before she was killed, states that an east and a west-bound car met at that point. He thinks that Lucy stepped back to allow the west-bound car to pass, and being hard of hearing, she was not aware of the approach of the other car, so she stepped in front of it--into the jaws of death. The front truck passed over her body, but the motor man stopped the car before the rear truck struck her. She was horribly mangled and died within two minutes after she was taken from under the car.
     Not a member of her race would touch the body until they received orders from the coroner.

- July 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Alex. Burke accompanied the remains of the late Ed Hennessy to Terre Haute, Ind.
     August Berhardt died yesterday at his residence near the corner of Boll and Flora streets.
     The remains of little Fred Lesterjette were laid to rest yesterday afternoon in Trinity cemetery.

- July 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
- o o o -

DEAD IN HIS ROOM.
_______

A Life Insurance Agent Dies
Suddenly.

     About 11:30 this morning, the remains of a man who registered at Randall's cafe as H. C. Thompson were found in his room fronting Main street. Yesterday, Thompson went over to Oak Cliff, and returning, he spend a portion of the afternoon writing letters. In the evening, he was on the porch enjoying the breezes. That was the last any notice was taken of him until found dead in his room to-day. He had been drinking considerably, and to this, combined with the excessive heat, is attributed his sudden death.
     Later in the day, Mr. B. F. Dyer, of the New York Mutual agency, by papers found among the effects of the deceased, recognized him as H. C. Horn, an agent whom he recently employed. Horn came to him a stranger two weeks ago, said he was directly from Paris, Texas, but previously from Kentucky, where he was in the employ of his brother, who has the agency or the Aetna of that State. He asked for work and an advance of $20, which he obtained and he went to Clarksville than and worked up a splendid business. He then severed his connection with the company, but last week, he wrote again, asking for work and an advance of $65. Mr. Dyer wired him to go to work and to draw on him, and to-day, he paid the draft. He did not know that Horn was in the city.
     He says he was a good worker and successful. Letters found with him show that his sister lives at 50 West St. Jo street, Indianapolis. His brother will be wired as soon as his address can be obtained. An inquest will be held, but the physician stated that there was no sign of poison with suicidal intent.

- July 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Will be Shipped Home.

     The remains of H. C. Horn, who was found dead in his room at Randall's cafe yesterday, will be shipped to his home in Bedford Springs, Pa. Undertaker Linskie received instructions from his brother, who lives in Louisville, Ky.

- July 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     It is stated that the eleven year old son of Mrs. Wambold of Oak Cliff died Monday of diphtheria, but the burial certificate does not show it. The health officer states that several supposed cases have been reported to him, but upon investigation, he found no trace of the disease present.

- July 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

DIED AMONG STRANGERS.
______

Harley E. Nichols of Joplin,
Missouri.

     Harley E. Nichols, a promising youth of 19 years, died at the Phoenix Hotel Saturday morning, after a brief illness. He had recently terminated his studies at school and was about to choose a profession and begin the race of life. His father, E. J. Nichols, formerly of Joplin, Mo., arrived in the city last week, and all that a fond parent could do to alleviate the suffering and save from death a beloved son was done. Mr. Nichols said to a TIMES-HERALD reporter this morning: I came here a stranger, but am deeply grateful for the many acts of kindness extended to my son during his illness, and also to myself, by Mr. and Mrs. Boyle and family of the Phoenix, the guests of the hotel, Rev. Dr. Sims of the First Baptist Church and others. I am deeply grateful and I wish the TIMES-HERALD would return thanks for me."

- July 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Alex. Burke, who accompanied the remains of the late Edward Hennessey to Terre Haute, Ind., returned last evening. He attended the funeral of his departed friend and was instructed by the relatives of the dead, who are well-to-do people of Terre Haute, to thank the Dallas friends of the dead man for their kindly offices in the last hours of the noted gambler and man of the world.

- July 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Daniel Fetzer died at his residence in this city yesterday.
     William Brown, of Chicago, a young man of 30, crawled under a coal car in the Missouri, Kansas & Texas yards last night and fell asleep. A switch engine came along and sent the car whizzing over the body of Brown. His left arm and leg were horribly crushed, rendering amputation necessary. He was removed to the city hospital, and will die.

- July 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

The Last Sad Rites.

     A little group of ladies gathered yesterday morning in the Woman's Home to pay the last tribute of respect to the little baby girl who had struggled so bravely to live, to comfort her weeping young mother. Only two weeks ago, the rite of baptism was administered, and now the same clergyman, the Rev. C. W. Turner, stood by the little casket to read the impressive burial service over the little one.
     Flowers, sweet fragrant flowers, were tenderly placed around the little form and in the baby hands, by the ladies who come to sympathize with the bereaved young mother. Most faithfully had the kind physician, Dr. Ashton, striven to prolong the little life, but all in vain, and on Sunday evening at sunset, the gentle spirit of little Lizzie winged its flight to the blissful shores of the Summer Land. The president of the Home, Mrs. Pfouts, several of the officers, Mrs. J. J. Carnes, Mrs. R. C. Baker, Mrs. McMasters, Misses Baldwin and Wright followed the little one to her last resting place. Mrs. Williams, the young mother, most gratefully appreciates the kindness and sympathy of those who have come to her as friends in this, her hour of distress.

- July 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death of an Old Citizen.

     Mr. Daniel Fetzer, an old and highly esteemed citizen of Dallas, died at his home yesterday. Mr. Fetzer was about sixty-five years of age, and has been a resident of this city fifteen years. He was a contractor and builder, and was for many years, engaged in the planing mills businesss now owned and controled by his son. The funeral will take place to-morrow. See announcement.

- July 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     William Brown, injured in the Missouri Kansas & Texas yards Monday night, is dead.

- July 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     W. W. Worden, aged 68, and an old resident of Dallas, died suddenly last evening.

- July 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

KLEBURG NEWS.
________

Queer Place for Nest--Personal
Mention.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     K
LEBURG, Tex., July 24.-- Mrs. Harris, daughter of J. H. Sullivan, whose husband died near Dallas last week, is moving to her father's.

- July 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

FOUND DYING.
_______

P. H. Maroney the Victim
Placed in the Hospital.

     P. H. Mahoney was found in a dying condition at Mrs. Lewis' boarding house, near the union depot last night at a late hour. Officer Sheeler found him in a dying condition and telephoned for Dr. Groves and the ambulance. Maroney was removed to the hospital. Dr. Groves says it was a case of strychnine poisoning or epileptic fit. He could not say which. Maroney is a stranger in the city and was alive at last accounts.

- July 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. O. Martin at 8:30 last evening. Will be buried from their residence on Cottage avenue, at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

- July 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE CITY COUNCIL MEETING

     The city secretary reported 27 deaths in the last two weeks, 20 of them being children.

- July 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Henry Hamilton, Sr.

     Mr. Henry Hamilton, father of Alderman Hamilton, died at 5 o'clock this morning of paralysis and old age, at his residence, 176 Bryan street. Ten years ago, he came to Dallas from Danville, Ky. He died in his 70th year, leaving a wife and children. Funeral services will be held at his residence at 10 o'clock to-morrow morning and then his remains will be interred in Trinity cemetery. Rev. Homer T. Wilson, former pastor of the Christian Church, will conduct the services.

- July 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     Died at 5 a. m. to-day, Henry Hamilton, Sr. Funeral at 10 a. m. to-morrow, 28 inst., from his late residence at 176 Bryan street. Friends and acquaintances invited.

- July 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

SHOOTING AFFAIR AT RYLIE.
________

THREE FARMERS QUARREL
OVER THEIR PREMISES.

_______

Will Holman Shot and Killed
by H. L. W. Gilcrease,
a Landlord.

________

The Latter Receives Fatal
Wounds--The Facts in the
Case Gathered.

     Rylie is a station on the Trunk railroad, sixteen miles south of Dallas.
     A terrible tragedy was enacted a short distance from the station in the country at about 5 o'clock last evening. The meagre facts in the case at hand were brought to this city by two young farmers, who were in quest of the sheriff to go there and make an arrest. Sheriff Lewis departed for Rylie at 4 o'clock this morning, taking with him Deputy Simpson. As the T
IMES-HERALD representative gleaned them, the facts are about as follows:
     The Holman boys, Will and Coon, with their mother, are renters of H. S. W. Gilcrease, a well known citizen of the neighborhood.
     Trouble ensued between landlord and renters several weeks ago, and Gilcrease ordered the Holmans to vacate the premises.
     They declined to move and an appeal was taken to the courts. Old Lady Holman vanquished her landlord in the justice court.
     Last afternoon, Mr. Gilcrease and wife drove over to the Holmans, and the landlord ordered Mrs. Holman to go instanter. They again refused to obey. Gilcrease called to his wife, who was seated in the wagon.
     "Old woman, bring me that gun and I'll nail up the gates and door."
     The wife obeyed and Will Holman ran out and shot Gilcrease in the left arm and side, inflicting probably fatal wounds. Holman then ran, and Gilcrease turned his gun loose and killed Coon Holman. Gilcrease was placed under arrest. The T
IMES-HERALD's correspondent sends the following report of the killing:

BAD SHOOTING SCRAPE.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     R
YLIE, Tex., July 30.--A shooting scrape occurred on the Wunderlich farm, one mile south of Rylie, about 4 o'clock yesterday, in which Holman was killed and Ell Gilcrease was badly wounded.      The Holmans say that Ell was nailing up the gate so they could not go in and out from their house and that they went out to ask him not to nail it up, when Gilcrease drew his pistol to shoot.
     Pleas Holman shot him in self defence. Gilcrease's wife then handed him a shot gun and Pleas ran. Gilcrease then started after Will Holman, who being without any means of defence, started to run, but was shot in the back and killed almost instantly.
     Gilcrease says that he was nailing up the gate to keep the stock off of his crop, when he saw the Holman boys coming with guns and told his wife to bring him his gun from the wagon, which she proceeded to do.
     Pleas Holman pointed his gun at her and threatened to shoot her if she didn't stop.
     Failing to stop her, he turned on Ell, who said: "I don't want any trouble. Don't shoot me."
     Pleas answered: "God d--m you, I am going to kill you."
     Gilcrease then attempted to draw his pistol, but before he could get ready to fire, Pleas fired, shattering his right arm, and some of the shots entering his right side, and then ran. Mrs. Gilcrease then handed him the gun, and seeing Will Holman behind a tree trying to get a shot at him, he got behind the fence, and went along the fence till he got to a place where he could shoot Will. Holman started to run and Gilcrease shot him.
     Gilcrease and wife then walked to Mr. R. P. Hull's, where they are at present. The inquest will be held by Justice Fly to-day.
     Ell Gilcrease and Pleas Holman are both under arrest. Constable Frank Moore has charge of Holman and S. H. Cumby is watching over Gilcrease. Sheriff Lewis is here.

- July 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

 

Dying.

     We have received news that Maj. Jas. I. Reekes is dying from the wound received on his farm some weeks back. He has been very ill and the doctors say that the end is now coome, that he cannot possibly live till morning.

- August 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Maj. Reeks Dead.

     Maj. J. I. Reekes, who met with an accident at his ranch near Hutchins several weeks ago, an account of which was published in the TIMES-HERALD at the time, died Sunday morning at five o'clock. His remains will be laid to rest this afternoon at five o'clock from his home on Haskell avenue.
     Major Reekes was a native of Kentucky and about fifty years of age. He was an old and popular citizen and served East Dallas as mayor several times. He was public spirited and had acquired considerable property. He leaves a family and many friends, who will miss him.
     He leaves surviving him, a grief-stricken, saddened family and many sorrowing friends. The T
IMES-HERALD extends to the bereaved family in this, its hour of tribulations and bereavement, its most heartfelt condolence, and hopes that providence and the great panacea of all heart-aches will sustain and support them through the irreparable affliction that now hangs like a dark cloud over their heads.

- August 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

LEAPED INTO THE RIVER.
_______

COULDN'T DROWN, AND THEN
CUT HIS THROAT.

_______

A Young Teamster's efforts to
Leave the World--Fine Sur-
gical Operation.

     W. F. Willbrink, a teamster about 30 years of age, was carried to the city hospital with a ghastly wound across his throat, inflicted with a pocket knife held in his own hands. He was discovered by employes of the livery stable near the corner of Commerce and Poydras streets, to which place he had walked from a point on the river below the city hospital. He was weak from the loss of blood and his clothes were dripping wet with water.
     Dr. Rosser, the city health officer, assisted by Dr. Dickerson, dressed the wound in the throat, which penetrated the windpipe and barely missed the jugular. It is pronounced one of the finest surgical operations ever performed in Dallas, and Wilbrink is doing well, able to sit up and eat. Chances for his recovery are very good.
     A T
IMES-HERALD reporter endeavored to get out of him his reason for trying to take his life, but he would not give it up, and his friends who have called to see him, are unable to account for his rash act. He admits that he jumped in the river first, couldn't make a success at drowning, and then tried to cut his throat. The first lick was a bad job and he had not the nerve to thrust in the blade again, so he walked, he knew not where, until he fell faint from loss of blood.
Wilbrink says he came to Dallas about four years ago from Giles county, Tennessee. His parents are living, so far as he knows, and he had two married sisters living here, but they moved to Grayson county. Their names, he kept to himself. He says he had work and plenty of it, and when pressed to give a reason for his deed, he would only utter "trouble." He is unmarried, and he admitted that his trouble was not a love scrape. He is a puzzle.

- August 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The eleven months old baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. James Schoolfield, and grand-son of Chief. Thos. Wilkinson, of the fire department, died yesterday. The body was buried this morning.

- August 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Willie Weakly Drowned.

     Willie Weakly, a fifteen year old lad who lived with his parents near the Missouri, Kansas & Texas depot, was drowned in the Trinity yesterday while bathing. He ventured too far in the water and his strength failed. His companions were unable to rescue him.

- August 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Funeral.

     Major J. L. Reeks died yesterday morning at five o'clock. Funeral this evening at his late residence, 502 Gaston avenue at 5 o'clock. Friends are invited to attend.

- August 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Mrs. Cummins' Death.

     This estimable lady, wife of Mr. J. H. Cummins of Denison, to whom she was united in marriage in this city nearly fifteen months ago, died at her Gate City home Saturday night after a brief illness. The remains were brought to Dallas Sunday afternoon and taken to the residence of Mr. G. O. Hambrick, her father, 113 Adolph street, where the funeral services were held yesterday morning at 9:30 o'clock. Rev. Dr. A. P. Smith, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, officiated, and during his brief, but touching remarks, referred to the short interval which had elapsed since, in the same room, he had joined Mr. and Mrs. Cummins in the holy bonds of wedlock. Followed by a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends, the remains of the beautiful and beloved Lina Hambrick Cummins were conveyed to Trinity Cemetery, and in that silent city of the departed, laid to rest.

- August 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

HIS VALISE FOUND.
_______

Where Wilbrink, Its Owner,
Left It On the River Bank.

     Yesterday, employes of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railway Company discovered a valise on the river bank in the southern portion of the city. It was carried to police headquarters and there opened. In it was found a ten-dollar bill and receipts showing it to be the property of W. F. Wilbrink, the young teamster who attempted suicide by drowning and by cutting his throat last Sunday, as reported exclusively in detail in the TIMES-HERALD yesterday.
     He was not short of employment, he had money, he says it was not a love scrape, but there was some great trouble weighing on his mind which drove him to the very brink of self-destruction.

- August 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death of William Fischer.

     William Fischer, who has been a resident of Dallas three years, died at the residence of his sister, Mrs. A. E. Hernischel [?], on Dawson avenue, at 7:35 this morning. He was 47 years of age, single and a member of the harness-makers' union of this city.

- August 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Meeting of the Womans Home.

...
     Ten persons have been cared for and assisted by the home. The death of the little girl baby, Lizzie Lee Williams, has been duly chronicled, but the death on the following day of the poor little baby known here as Arthur Stanley, needs some slight notice. Little Arthur was brought to the home in a state of starvation from the hands of its own parents. All that care and pure milk could effect, was done. The physician who attended the child did all in his power to save it, and after the little one had fallen asleep, the same kind doctor saw it had [a] respectable burial. Although no mother's gentle hand cared for it, Miss Lizzie Williams gave it a kind mother's care, and in her arms, the little one breathed its last.
...

MRS. P. S. PFOUTS,
President Women's Home.

- August 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

MIXED HIS LAST DRINK
________

The Dallas Club Bar Tender Falls
Dead Behind the Bar.

     F. D. Locke, the new bar-tender at the Dallas Club, fell dead this afternoon at 12:25 o'clock, while mixing a mint julip for a customer. He was, to all appearances, in good health and good spirits, was as jovial as usual, but while mixing a drink, fell backwards against the bar and then to the floor. His assistant, the negro boy, and the customers rushed to him and picked him up. In a few seconds, his life had passed away.
     Dr. Pace, who looked at him, said he should say, without giving any closer examination, that his death was caused by heart disease.
As neither of the justices of the peace could be found, Judge Braswell, having gone to a picnic, and Judge Lauderdale, home to dinner, the body was put in a coffin and moved to Undertaker Linskie's.
     F. D. Locke came to Dallas a short while ago from Corsicana. He is a particular friend, and was formerly partner, of Mr. Lockwood, the proprietor of the Commercial Hotel of Corsicana. He was 48 years old. His people are said to live in Vermont. In his pocket, was found an empty box on which was marked "Morphine." He is said to have been addicted to the habit of morphine eating. Immediately after his death, a telegram was sent to Mr. Lockwood for advice in regard to his remains, also for the address of his people.

- August 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

[No heading]

     Mrs. M. L. McCorkle died yesterday evening at the residence of her son, H. L. McCorkle, at the corner of Benson street and Exposition avenue.

- August 8, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

[No heading]

     The body of F. D. Locke, the bartender who fell dead behind the Dallas Club bar last Friday, is being held for his brother, who is expected to arrive this week from Graiton, Vermont.

- August 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Solemn Requeim high mass for the repose of the soul of Mrs. Frank Sreenan, will be celebrated to-morrow at 8 o'clock at the Pro-Cathedral.

- August 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Birdie, the little two year old daughter of Mr. Thomas Hurley, died yesterday evening of malarial fever.

- August 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     Funeral of Mrs. Lula Salmons, wife of T. B. Salmons, at 10 o'clock to-morrow morning from their residence at 190 Cochran street. Interment in Trinity cemetery. Friends and acquaintances invited.

- August 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Mrs. Lula Salmons.

     Mrs. Lula Salmons, wife of Mr. T. B. Salmons, deputy county clerk, died this morning at 3 o'clock, after a brief illness of four or five days. Her grief stricken husband and the motherless little children have the sympathy of a large circle of friends and acquaintances. The funeral occurs from the family residence on Cochran street to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock.

- August 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 5.
- o o o -

Notice.

     To the friends and customers of the late Mr. A. Fox, that the business of manufacturing candy and syrup, etc. will be continued as heretofore, by S. E. Fox, at 111 Market street.

- August 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Lloyd, the little six-year-old boy, of Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Thayer, died this morning at 3 o'clock at their home on San Jacinto street, corner of Germania. He was sick only a few days.

- August 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     THAYER--Died, August 15th, 1891, at 2 o'clock a. m., Lloyd Edward Thayer, son of Edward S. and Eugenia L. Thayer, aged 5 years, 3 months and 9 days.
     Funeral to-day (Saturday) at 5 o'clock p. m., from residence, corner San Jacinto and Germania streets. Friends invited to attend.

- August 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     Leta Gray, the baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Culbreath, died last night.

- August 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

A FARMER'S SAD DEATH
__________

WHILE DRUNK HE WALKS ON
THE TRACK.

_______

And is Run Over and Horribly
Mangled-An Unfortunate
Family.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     G
ARLAND, Tex., Aug. 21-Last night about 12 o'clock, a freight train on the Santa Fe ran over and killed Wash Maynard, a farmer, living about two miles northeast of Garland.
     He left town on foot about 10 o'clock, being at the time very much under the influence of liquor.
     It is supposed that he lay on the track and went to sleep. His body was terribly mangled, one side of his head being crushed and one of his ears being entirely torn away. One of his hips was badly crushed and his side punctured.
     He lived about twenty-five minutes. He was 40 years of age and leaves a wife and eight children to battle their way through this uncertain life.
     Hundreds of people have been at the Santa Fe depot to view his mangled remains this morning, and great sorrow and sympathy are felt for his stricken family.

- August 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     All members ot the Bricklayers & Masons' International Union are requested to attend the funeral of brother James Smith, Sunday at 2 o'clock from Shwaub Hall.

- August 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

A CASE OF SUNSTROKE.
_______

James Smith Dies Among
Strangers.

     Jim Smith, a stone cutter on the county court house building, while engaged at work yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock, received a sunstroke. He was immediately taken in charge by his brother workmen and taken home, when a physician was summoned, but to no avail, for he died last night at 10 o'clock and his burial took place this afternoon at 3. He has only been in the city a short while and was a member of lodge number seven of the stone masons' union, under whose directions his remains were interred. All members of the lodge stopped work to attend the funeral.

- August 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The unfortunate woman, Flossy, who shot herself Thursday night, as detailed exclusively in the TIMES-HERALD's report yesterday, died last evening.

- August 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

DUST TO DUST.
______

The Remains of James Smith
Entombed.

     Fourteen short months ago James Smith, a brawny young Scot of 24, with light heart and fancy free, kissed his dear old mother on the banks of the Clyde and sailed for America to make his fortune and cheer up the declining years of the loved one, in a far-distant land.
     A few weeks ago, he came to Dallas, deposited his card with his union and secured work on the court house job when work started up.
     Last Friday was the hottest day of the year, the melting rays of the sun beat down piteously, and young Smith at work on the court house, was prostrated at 4 o'clock. A stranger in a strange land, he was borne to the home of a fellow craftsman, medical aid summoned, and all that science and nursing could do was put forth to save him. He was past human aid and died at 11 o'clock Friday night.
     Undertaker Linskie took charge of the remains, an elegant casket was ordered, and the union bricklayers, masons and stone-cutters of the city determined that their Scottish craftsman, who came to them bearing the card of fellowship, and died far from home and friends, should be given a funeral and be placed to rest in accordance with their principles--the brotherhood of man and the fatherhood of God.
     The funeral took place from Linskie's yesterday. More than 300 members of the brick-layers, mason's, and stone-cutters' unions were in attendance. Rev. Warren G. Riggs, the eloquent pastor of the Presbyterian church, of which deceased was a member in boyhood and manhood, officiated. He preached a powerful sermon to a body of men of all nationalities and creeds, and there was scarcely a dry eye in that large crowd of bread-winners when he had concluded.
     After mournful dirges by Prof. Schroeder's band, the cortege wended its way to Trinity church-yard. In the brick-layers' lot, one of the most beautiful in the city of silent sleepers, all that was mortal of James Smith, the Scottish lad, was consigned to the tomb.
     The pall-bearers were Jams Pool and John Tellison, of the brick-layers; Alexander Ross and Joseph Coker (of Fort Worth) of the masons; Andrew Lawson and Thomas Turner of the stone-cutters. The marshals were John Willkerson and William Gilligan.
It was one of the most imposing funerals ever witnessed in this city under the auspices of the trades organizations.

- August 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mrs. Catherine Myers died at her residence in Dallas, corner Williams and Preston streets, at 11:45 last night, aged 64 years. She was the wife of John F. Myer and mother of the well-known E. G. and F. J. Myer of this city. Funeral will be announced later to accommodate relatives from out of the city. Houston and San Antonio papers please copy.

- August 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 5.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The friends and acquaintances of Mrs. Catherine Myers are invited to attend funeral services at St. Patrick's Church at 3 o'clock to-morrow afternoon. Burial at the Catholic cemetery.

- August 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

 

Card of Thanks.

     I hereby extend my heartfelt thanks to my relatives and friends, and especially the members of the Gruetli Verein, Odd Fellows of Frohsien for the kindness shown me in my late bereavement. Mr. B. Surbank.

- September 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

DEATH AT THE DYNAMO.
______

Hal Smith Instantly Killed By
the Deadly Current.

     Yesterday evening, Mr. Hal Smith, the day man at the Dallas Electric Light Company's power house, was instantly killed by an electric current. He was explaining to the night man, Mr. E. Beeler, some change in the circuit which had been made during the day, and while talking, he absentmindedly took hold of a positive and negative wire, which sent a current though his body, killing him instantly.
     Mr. Smith was an unmarried man, about 25 years of age, and he came to Dallas from Wichita, Kan., and accepted a position with the company about six months ago. His remains were placed in charge of Undertaker Linskie last night and his relatives at Wichita were notified and asked for instructions.
Mr. J. P. Smith, manager of the electric light works, states that this is the first accident to human life that has occurred at the power house during eight years.

- September 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p.6, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mr. George B. Leachman, aged 77 years, and one of the old settlers of Dallas, died yesterday at the residence of his son on Grand avenue.

- September 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

A SAD ACCIDENT.
______

A Little Two Year Old Boy Killed
By an Electric Car.

     Yesterday afternoon, the little two year-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. James S. Dunlap, of 547 Corinth street, was killed by a Commerce and Latimer street electric motor, near the switch on Latimer street. It was at a point where two motors were passing and the child ran on to the track just behind the car, which passed him and just in front of the one approaching. The car struck him on the left hip and the little one was killed by the shock. He lived a short while after the accident.

- September 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Hugh McLean, a stone-cutter, died yesterday.

- September 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Death of Mrs. Hendricks.

     Capt. Walter Caruth received a telegram from Los Angelos, Cal., to-day, stating that Mrs. Bettie Hendricks died there at an early hour this morning.
     Her sisters, Mesdames Mattie and Walter Caruth, are with her. They left here a few days ago to be with her in her last moments, as she was expected to die.
     Her remains will be brought to Dallas for interment.

- September 8, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 5.
- o o o -

HUGH M'LEAN BURIED.
______

One of the Skilled Stone Cutters
of the South.

     Hugh McLean, one of the best known stone cutters in the south, a prominent member of the stone cutters' union ,and one of the strongest advocates of trades unionism in the country, died at Mineral Wells Saturday, at the early age of thirty-two years. He had been ill since last November and had been tenderly looked after and all his wants provided for by his craftsmen, with whom he was a universal favorite. McLean was a skilled workman, well educated and has bossed more fine jobs than any man of his years in Texas.
     The remains were shipped to Dallas from Mineral Wells and the funeral took place yesterday from the Second Presbyterian Church. Rev. Warren G. Riggs, the pastor, preached an eloquent sermon. The remains were encased in a handsome casket and several handsome floral offerings were noticed.
     The turnout of stone-cutters was the largest ever witnessed in Dallas, more than 100 being in line in the regalia of their order. Prof. Day's band headed the funeral cortege and furnished the music. Interment followed in the stone cutter's lot in Trinity cemetery, a beautiful spot, where all that is mortal of the labor leader will rest till resurrection morn.
     The pallbearers were John C. Patterson, David Patterson, Joseph Bargetti, Andrew Lawson, Thomas Turner and Edward Coleman. Frank Gunter and John C. Patterson were the directors. A large number of the member of the Caledonian Club were present, paying the last tribute of affection to their countryman and friend.
     Hugh McLean came from Inverness, Scotland, fourteen years ago, and had been a resident of Texas more than eight years. His parents are still living in the quaint Scottish town in which he was born, and there will be tears and sad hearts in the old home when the announcement comes that their boy died in far-off America, far from those whom he loved, and that he will sleep the last sleep in his adopted country.

- September 8, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS.

     The city secretary reported five deaths during the week ending September 5, thirteen during the preceding week.

- September 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-3.
- o o o -

Funeral To-Morrow.

     The funeral of Mrs. Bettie Hendricks will take place to-morrow morning at 8:30 from Mrs. Mattie Caruths' residence, corner Ross avenue and Masten street.

- September 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

SANITATION AND HEALTH.
_______

In the Best Condition--Small
Number of Deaths.

     Dr. Rosser, city health officer, states that very few complaints involving the sanitary condition of the city reach his office now. He accepts this as an indication that everybody is pleased. And, speaking as the head of the health department, he says the city is remarkably healthy, and that it is in a good sanitary condition. While the sanitary force is not as large as it has been in times past, the work is well and systematically done.
     Dr. Wilson, late health officer of the city, says that Dallas is one of the healthiest cities in the southwest and its sanitary condition is the best.
     The last weekly mortuary report of the city secretary showed only five deaths.

- September 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

DEATH ENDS HIS TROUBLES.
______

J. M. MASTERS OF ARDMORE
COMMITS SUICIDE.

________

Financial and Domestic Trou-
bles a Greater Load Than
He Could Bear.

______

He Was a Student of Dallas
Business College For Two
Months Past.

     J. M. Masters lies cold in death at the residence of his uncle, D. C. Savage, 117 Benton street.
     Two months ago, he came from Ardmore, I. T., and entered the Dallas Business College. He was a handsome fellow of 30, with coal black hair and mustache, a good dresser and of affable manners.
     He completed the one year's course in the theory and three weeks in the practical departments of the college and was a brilliant student.
     At 5 o'clock last evening, he penned a letter and departed from the college. It was noticed that he was in low spirits. He went to his residence, swallowed a dose of strychnine and after enduring horrible agony for an hour or more, he died at 7 o'clock, despite the efforts of a physician to save his life.
     The letter was found on his person. It was directed to his only sister at Howe, Tex. In substance, he stated that the act was impelled by no crime of his; that he was unable to meet his obligations and had resolved to end his existence and find solace in the arms of death.
     The remains will be shipped to Howe for burial. Masters' parents are dead, his father having been killed fighting the battles of the Confederacy early in the war.
     There is a romance concealed somewhere in the life of the unfortunate suicide. A few years ago, he failed in business; afterwards, he married a beautiful girl. Their marriage life was unhappy and they drifted asunder, he to die by his own hand and she to meet the fate that Providence has in store for her.

- September 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The funeral services of the late J. W. Webb will take place at the residence of T. J. Oliver, corner Swiss and Haskell, at 10 a. m. to-morrow, the 22d instant, and from that place, at Trinity cemetery, this city.

- September 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Dust to Dust.

     The funeral of Francis Welchsel, late proprietor of the Market drug store in Oak Cliff, took place to-day under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias.

- September 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
COUNTY COURT.

     PROBATE MATTERS--Report of sale of the property in the estate of E. D. Chapin, deceased, rejected and disapproved. Petition of sale of real estate filed September 26, granted and order to sell the property described at public or private sale for cash and report to this court of its action.
     In re estate of Dr. Hugh Harbison, deceased: Claims of Curfman & Clark, J. V. Ryan, W. N. Sellers, S. Brandenburg, J. Brandenburg, Mrs. E. J. Anderson, R. W. Gillespie, William McDonald, Mrs. R. M. Edwards, all of fourth class allowed and approved and ordered paid in due course of administration.

- September 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Thomos [Thomas?] Dunn, four or five months an inmate of the city hospital, died there yesterday at the age of 67 years. He was a resident of Dallas several years past.

- September 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     Ford Ware, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Ware, who live on Sixth street in Oak Cliff, died yesterday of scarlet fever.

- October 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Porter Hay, aged 3 years, youngest child of the late J. T. Hay, died of diphtheria this morning, and will be buried at 5:30 to-day from the residence of his mother, Mrs. F. A. Hay. Funeral private.

- October 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death.

     James Ford, the bright little son of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Ware of Oak Cliff, died yesterday of scarlet fever, after an illness of nineteen days. Funeral from the family residence on Sixth street at 4:30 this afternoon.

- October 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Garland Items.
[From the Garland News.]

     Died on Wednesday morning at 4 o'clock, Raymond, the babe of Dr. and Mrs. T. S. Walker, of flux.

- October 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     Frank Bridenback, swindling; defendant having died, this case is dismissed.

- October 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

A BRAKEMAN KILLED.
_______

He Lost His Footing and Fell
Under the Cars.

     Last night, while coupling cars in the Houston & Texas Central yards at Miller, Henry Daniels, a brakeman, lost his footing and fell under a moving car. The unfortunate man was mangled and ground to pieces under the trucks. Death came to his relief almost instantly.
     He was a widower and he leaves a sister, brother and two children, who live at Temple. His remains were sent to Smith's undertaking establishment, and from there, they will be forwarded to Temple for interment.

- October 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     [Docket No..] 9065--T. J. Noel vs. Daniel Fitzer; plaintiff suggests the death of D. Fitzer and has leave to make his personal representatives parties to the suit.

- October 8, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

On a Sad Mission.

     Last evening, Walter G. Wilkins' city passenger and ticket agent of the Santa Fe road at Dallas, passed through the city en route north with the body of his aunt, Mrs. Martha Schoen, who died at his residence in Oak Cliff, Thursday. He was en route to his old home in St. Joseph, Mo., to place the body of his deceased relative in her last home in the beautiful Mt. Mora cemetery,. where others of her kindred are waiting the last reveille. Mrs. Schoen was a lady universally popular wherever known, and many friends in the beautiful city on the Missouri will mourn her untimely death. The Gazette but voices the sentiment of scores of friends in Texas in extending its sincere sympathies to Mr. and Mrs. Wilkins in their bereavement.--Fort Worth Gazette.

- October 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mrs. Etta Moore, the estimable wife of Mr. C. E. Moore, died at 12:30 last night at her home at 479 Jackson street. She leaves a loving husband and three little boys to mourn her demise. The funeral will take place from the family residence at 10:30 o'clock to-morrow morning. A sister at Galveston and a brother at Fort Worth have been wired the sad news.

- October 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mrs. Ella W. Morton, this morning, at the residence of her father, Capt. W. White, 261 Bryan street. Funeral services at the house at 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

- October 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

STRAUSS--Died, on Monday October 19th, Rosie, beloved wife of Edward Strauss. Funeral from residence 336 Elm street at 10 o'clock, Tuesday morning, Oct. 20th.

- October 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Death of Mrs. Minor.

     Mrs. P. N. Minor, wife of Police Office Minor, died last evening at the family residence, corner of North Harwood and Wichita streets. Deceased was 38 years old and had been an invalid for two years. The funeral took place at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the late residence of the deceased, the remains being interred in the East Dallas cemetery. Mrs. Minor was a lady highly esteemed by all who knew her. She leaves three children, the eldest 18, and the youngest, 10 years.

- October 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

PROCEEDINGS OF THE COURTS.
______

JUDGE TUCKER REACHES HIS
VENIRE CASES

______

And the Mealer Murder Case is
Called for Trial.

JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     The case against Will Mealer, charged with murder, was called this morning. Mealer is charged with killing a young man named Webb at Garland last spring. Mealer was a bar-tender in a Garland saloon at the time of the killing. Webb was a farmer and was born and raised just east of Garland, near Pleasant Valley. It is said that Mealer and young Webb had a falling out several months previous to the killing and that Mealer shot at Webb several times, missing him each time. Last spring, young Webb was in Garland and went into the saloon where Mealer worked, but whether he went in simply to get a drink, or to have settlement with Mealer amicably, or otherwise, has not yet fully developed. Nevertheless, a shooting took place, and Mealer was the man that got in his work with deadly effect. A shot gun was used to wipe the young farmer out, it is said. Mealer's case was called once before, but did not get to trial. When his case was called this morning, his lawyers asked for a continuance.

COUNTY COURT.

     Dallas Brick Company vs. T. L. Calloway. Death of J. I. Reekes suggested. Continued to make parties.

- October 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 5.
- o o o -

A FATAL FALL
_______

Resulting in the Death of Little
Robert Cole.

     A sad accident befell little Robert Cole, son of Col. J. R. Cole, from which he lost his life. Late in the afternoon yesterday, he fell from a tree on Crocket street and struck his head, causing concussion of the brain, from which the little boy died before midnight. He fell a distance of nearly thirty feet, striking on a section of sewer pipe. Funeral will take place from family residence, 210 Cochran street, at 4:30 this evening. Our sympathies go out to the father and mother in their affliction.

- October 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

A Bright Flower Plucked.

     Franklin Clark Fairbanks, the little two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Fairbanks, died last Saturday, the 17th instant. A large concourse of relatives and friends of the family followed the remains to the place of interment in Trinity cemetery last Sunday. The funeral services were conducted by Elder M. M. Davis, pastor of the Central Christian church.
     Atlanta, Ga. papers are requested to take notice.

- October 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Fred Pates, recently of Denison, well known in this city, died this morning at his father's house near Dallas, after an illness of several weeks. Mr. Pates was one of Dallas county's rising young men, well and favorably known in this state, and was soon to have led to the altar, a most estimably young lady of Dallas.
     Hosts of friends in this state and Kentucky will sincerely mourn his loss.
     The remains will be shipped to Kentucky for interment.

- October 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     Louise D. Pegues, the 13-year-old and eldest daughter of Officer Pegues and wife, died Saturday afternoon of typhoid fever. Her remains were interred yesterday afternoon in Trinity cemetery in the presence of a large number of friends.

- October 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

PROCEEDINGS OF COURTS.
______

THE MOONEY WEATHERFORD
MURDER CASE CALLED.

______

A History of the Case...
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     The case against Mooney Weatherford, charged with murder, was called this morning. Mooney, who is called Bud by his intimate friends,, was born and raised a few miles southeast of Mesquite, and is about 20 years old. The story of the killing is as follows:
     In the neighborhood where Mooney lives, there is an educational institution known as Edward's Schoolhouse. At the time of the killing, the young folks were conducting a literary and debating society. The deceased and defendant were both active members of this literary and social coterie.
     On the 19th of last March, this society was holding a meeting and the boys were slinging eloquence, and the girls were smiling encouragingly, little dreaming that the meeting would be terminated by a tragedy.
     During the meeting, Ike Allen called Jim Weatherford, Mooney's brother, out and asked: "Did you tell a certain fellow that I stole your hat?"
     "I did not."
     "You're a damned liar."
     "You're another."
     Allen's next response was a blow on the neck with a knife, inflicting a dangerous wound, from which, the blood fairly gushed. Weatherford ran about calling his brother Bud, saying that Allen had killed him. Bud rushed out and saw as he thought his brother bleeding to death, advanced upon Allen and asked what he meant. Allen replied with an oath and, it is said, flourished his knife, whereupon, Bud drew his revolver and shot him through the heart.

- October 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Dropped Dead.

     Lawrence Winter, a bar-tender, dropped dead at 124 Sumpter street, last night. Justice Braswell will hold an inquest.

- October 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

The Courts.

     The case against Herman Kuhlman, charged with arson and murder was continued until November 14, by the state. Kuhlman is chargd with burning the Big Jumbo chop house in which James McAllister lost his life.

- October 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

NOTICE.
_______

THE STATE OF TEXAS.

     To all persons interested in the Administration of the estate of Francis Derue, deceased:
     Joseph Martiniere, administrator, has filed in the county court of Dallas county, final account showing the condition of said estate, which will be heard at the next term of said court, commencing on the fourth Monday in November, 1891, at the courthouse in the city of Dallas, at which time all persons interested in said estate may appear and contest said account if they see proper.
     Witness, S. B. Scott, county clerk of Dallas county, Texas.

 ~
 {   L.S.  }
  ~

    Given under my hand and the seal of said court, at office in the city of Dallas, this 13 day of October, A. D., 1891. S. B. SCOTT
County clerk, Dallas Co., Texas.
By T. F. L
EWIS, Deputy.

- November 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

A Sad Mission.

     A telegram has been received from Judge W. B. Gano, saying he would reach Dallas to-morrow (Saturday) evening at 8 o'clock with the body of the late John T. Gano. A number of friends will leave this city to-morrow at 3 o;o'clock and meet the body at Fort Worth, accompanying it back to Dallas.

- November 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mrs. Jeo [sic] Baumgartner, wife of the manager of the Miesterhan's pavillion, died at 8:30 o'clock last evening. The funeral took place from the late residence of deceased at 3 o'clock this afternoon. Editor A. W. May, of the German Post, officiated and paid a high tribute to the worth of the departed.

- November 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The city mortuary report shows that Robert Harvey, living near the crossing of the Rapid Transit and the H. & T. C. railway, died of meningitis last week. Other cases of pronounced brain fever have excited suspicion.

- November 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

CONSIGNED TO THE TOMB.
________

FUNERAL OF THE LATE JOHN
T. GANO YESTERDAY.

________

Services at The Church--The
Pall Bearers and Resolu-
tions of Board of Trade.

     The remains of the late John T. Gano, one of Dallas' most honored and progressive citizens, arrived in this city Saturday evening from Wyoming, where Augel Azrael struck him down without a moment's warning, in charge of his brother, W. B. Gano. A delegation of citizens of Dallas accompanied the remains from Fort Worth to the home made desolate by the grim reaper and to the relatives plunged into the deepest mourning by the untimely demise of a loved one who had barely passed the threshold of manhood's youthful prime.
     A largely-attended meeting of the Board of Trade was held Saturday afternoon and sorrow was depleted upon every countenance, for John T. Gano was held in high esteem and universally admired for his manly ways, progressive spirit, Christian character and unalterable devotion to what he considered was right and just. His former friends and associates adopted the following tribute to the worth of the departed, after which the meeting adjourned, each and every one feeling in his heart that Dallas mourned the loss of one of her most valued citizens:
     Whereas, the officers and members of the Board of Trade have learned with profound sorrow of the sudden demise of their esteemed member and honored director, Mr. J. T. Gano, and
     Whereas, it is well known to the citizens of Dallas and the officers and members of this Board of Trade, that the deceased was a true friend to all and every interest concerning the prosperity of the city of Dallas and the state of Texas; therefore be it
     Resolved, that as officers and members of the board of Trade and citizens of Dallas, we deplore the summons from on high to our honored member, which has removed him from among us and thus deprived us of one of our most useful and valued members, and the city of Dallas of a true friend, one whose counsel was ever ready and whose purse was ever open when demanded for the public good. Be it further
     Resolved, that we extend to the family of our deceased member, our sincere and heartfelt sympathy and assure them that we fully appreciate his loss, both in its sadness and its effect. Be it
     Resolved, that the Board of Trade rooms be draped for ten days in memory of our deceased director and that a coy of these resolutions be spread on the minutes of our association and be furnished to his family and to the press.
     The funeral took place yesterday from the late residence of the dead, the religious services being held at the Christian Church on Bryan street at 10 o'clock in the morning, The temple of God was crowded with mourners and the friends of the family. In fact, it was one of the largest demonstrations ever witnessed in the city and was indicative of the warm place John T. Gano held in the hearts of his townsmen. Eld. W. H. Wright, assisted by Eld. M. M. Davis of the Central Christian Church, and Eld. R. C. Brummitt of Sherman, conducted the simple, but impressive service of the Christian denomination. Elder Wright delivered the funeral sermon, in which he paid a most eloquent tribute to the worth of his dead friend, his standing as a citizen, his pure Christian character and his zeal in the cause of the Master. To the bereaved ones, the loving young wife weighed down with the greatest sorrow which can cast its pall over a happy home circle, to the little children deprived of a fond father's care and a father's love, to the bereaved parents, who mourned the loss of a noble and affectionate son, to the weeping brothers and sisters who bowed in humble submission to the fiat of Him, who doeth all things well--to these were given that consolation which only those who place their trust in the hands of God can receive.
     The floral offerings were magnificent. They came fro those whose hearts had been pierced by the dart of the dread messenger, from those who had loved and lost. They were typical of the transitory stages of man's brief career---from the cradle to the grave.
     Among the beautiful emblems were, "The Gates Ajar," composed of cape jasmine, white carnations, tube roses and Le Puritan buds surmounted by a star, over which fluttered a pair of white doves guiding the way to that heaven of rest, with "Our Boy" in immortelles. A large pillow of rare white blossoms with a cluster of Marechel Neil roses with "Our Brother" in purple immortelles. A smaller pillow with the pathetic words, "Our Papa," a monument, embedded among its dainty flowers three feet high of peerless white blossoms with the words, "Brother John." A lyre surmounted by a star and crescent with anchor resting on the pedestal with "Brother" in immortelles, while numerous wreaths, anchors, crosses and other lovely designs emblematical of the faith, hope and charity of the dear departed and the love and esteem of sorrowing friends, rested in their exquisite bloom and fragrance on the elegant casket and about the altar.
     Among the mourners were the servants of the family, man of them bowed with years and gray with age, showed grief stricken faces bore evidence that they, too, had lost a kind and indulgent master, nay more, a faithful friend.
     After the services were over, the funeral cortege slowly wended its way toward the silent city where sleep the dead in the "windless palaces of rest." It was one of the most imposing funeral corteges ever witnessed in the metropolis, more than 300 carriages having been counted. The pallbearers were, Messrs. O. P. Bowser, Dr. R. W. Allen, Judge Z. E. Coombes, W. H. Lemon, Ripley Harwood, J. J. Collins, J. V. Spears and Frank, W. Crutcher.
     In the most beautiful portion of the Trinity cemetery was consigned to tomb, the mortal remains of John T. Gano, there to sleep until that morn when resurrection comes and the re-union f long parted ones shall take place. The grave was covered with flowers, those pure and fragrant offerings of loving hearts. the last sad rites had been paid to the dead.
     This is the first death that has broken the home circle of Gen. and Mrs. R. M. Gano's family. All the members of the family were present with exception of a brother of deceased, Dr. Sidney Gano, who is in Philadelphia.
     John T. Gano was one of the foremost young men of Dallas. A Kentuckian by birth, he loved the state and city of his adoption and ever lead [led?] in the van of progress. He was a devoted husband and father, a dutiful son, a kind brother, a good citizen, a true friend, an upright, chivalrous, Christian gentleman and God's noblest work--an honest man. The T
IMES-HERALD, voicing the deep grief of the people of Dallas, extends to the grieved ones in their hour of sorrow, the sympathy of all.

- November 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

DEATH OF MISS ELIZA McCOY.
_______

A Noble Woman and a Devoted
Christian Worker.

     Miss Eliza McCoy died of pneumonia yesterday afternoon at her residence, 460 Main street, surrounded by her immediate relatives and friend.
     Her life was a shining example of Christian devotion, as shown by her personal work and her liberal donations. Rev. Wm. McCoy, her grandfather was a Baptist minister in Kentucky. Her father, a farmer, was an early pioneer in Southern Indiana. Miss Eliza McCoy was born in Clark county, Ind., in 1813. Her public life began in 1844, when she went with Miss Sarah Osgood, under the direction of the American Baptist Board of Missions from Louisville, Kentucky, to what is now the town of Paoli, Kan., where, for ten years, she worked as a missionary among the Pottawatamie Indians. She came to Dallas in 1874, where she had made her home continuously since. Her brother, John C. McCoy, was then living on the site now occupied by the four-story brick at the corner of Commerce and Lamar streets.
     Among her donations to the cause of Christianity were $8000 to the Franklin College (Baptist) of Indiana; $100-[?] to the Home Mission Board of New York city; $500 to the Baptist Seminary of Louisville, Ky.; $6000 in land to Baylor University of Waco; $1,000 in cash to Baylor Female College of Belton; $10,000 in donations to the First Baptist Church of Dallas, of which she was a member; 320 acres of land to Buckner Orphans' Home. She was supporting Rev. Trevine, a Mexican missionary and her contributions to missionary work generally were large and liberal.
     She was the last of a family of twelve children. Among her surviving relatives in this city are Capt. John M. McCoy, Dr. McCoy and Prof. Calvin McCormick, nephews.
     Funeral services will be conducted by Pastor Simms, of the Fist Baptist Church, at the church to-morrow afternoon at 3 o'clock. From there, the body will be conveyed to the old Masonic cemetery on Akard street, where her remains will be laid to rest by the site of her illustrious brother, the late John C. McCoy.

- November 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

DIED VERY SUDDENLY.
________

Miss Mary Lewis Succumbed to
An Attack of Heart
Disease.

     About 10 o'clock last night, Miss Mary C. Lewis, a seamstress who boarded with a family by the name of Hamilton on Cora street, died very suddenly. She was in a room by herself sewing, or supposed to be, when the family heard a strange noise and rushed in. They found her unconscious and summoned a physician at once, but she died before he arrived.
     She did not complain of being unwell yesterday and appeared to be in good spirits.
     The physician who was called in thinks she died from a sudden attack of heart disease. Justice Lauderdale held an inquest this evening and gave a verdict to that effect.

- November 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
GRIGSBY CASE.

     Judge Frost took up the Grigsby case this morning and will finish it. The death of Miss Eliza McCoy was suggested and the court continued in regard to her interest. To-day, the court is hearing testimony in regard to the partition of the property, which was divided into nine lots. Lots 5, 6, 3 and 4 are partly in the city and well improved, and consequently, possess a greater value than the remaining lots, which are situated further out.

- November 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     Died, Mrs. A. Moulard at 6:15 this morning at 272 Young street, aged 69 years. Funeral from family residence at 10 o'clock to-morrow morning. Friends of the family invited to attend.

- November 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

A Good Man Gone.

     Mr. N. K. Wright, a well known carpenter, died of dropsy last night at his residence at 265 South Harwood street. His funeral occurred this afternoon.
     The funeral services were conducted under the auspices of the Masonic fraternity and the Grand Army of the Republic, deceased holding prominent connection with each order. He was a worthy and esteemed citizen, enterprising and industrious and he stood at the head of his occupation. He leaves a wife and several grown children, together with a large number of friends and acquaintances who mourn his death.

- November 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

HENSON'S FATAL MISTAKE.
______

AN OVER DOSE OF MORPHINE
TO RELIEVE PAIN.

_______

Robs a Wife and Child of Their
Earthly Protector-John Hen-
son, the Barber no More.

     Hanging from the door knob of the little frame barber shop on the north side of Elm street, just east of the Union depot platform, this morning, was a dark emblem of death. It was an humble, dingly little place and through the broken glass door could be seen inside two vacant chairs. The crape on the door denoted that the sould of John Henson, the proprietor, had crossed the great divide and his body was cold in death. The next door bar-keeper directed the TIMES-HERALD reporter to the residence of the later proprietor of the barber shop. It, too, was an humble box tenant of two or three rooms wedged in on a twenty-five foot lot, 642 Pacific avenue. A group of men were standing outside and several neighbor women had gathered to console with the heartbroken wife, who was left a widow with one little child. There the story of the untimely death of John Henson was heard.
     "Don't you say he suicided," said his wife, between sobs, "for he didn't."
     "No," said his aunt, an old lady with a kind, but sorrowful face. "I know he didn't kill himself. He was too good a boy for that. It was an accident."
     According to their statements, John Henson was nearly sick all day yesterday, so unwell that he did not go to his shop. He was suffering with a severe pain in his head an he took a light dose of morphine. That did not relieve him, and a few hours afterwards, he took another dose. This had the desired effect and he rested easy. His wife had no thought that he had swallowed an overdose of the drug until about 8 o'clock in the evening, she discovered that he was breathing hard. She tried to arouse him without avail, and she became alarmed and called her neighbors. Then, a runner was sent for medical aid and Drs. A. I. Allen and Ewing responded and did all in their power to stem the tide of approaching death, but in vain. The spirit of John Henson took its flight about daylight this morning.
     Deceased was raised in Dallas and he has worked at his trade here from boyhood to manhood. From the rought, thankless life of a bootblack and newsboy, who sold papers from the old Evening Times and Herald offices, Johnnie Henson developed into a barber, and he was one of the best in the city. He was true to his mother, who was an invalid, and he was her mainstay and support until she died, several years ago. He was about 25 years old. His remains willl be laid to rest to-morrow morning. A sister living in Louisiana has been telegraphed to come and attend the last sad rites.

- November 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mrs. F. Moulard, aged 69, died last evening at her residence at 272 Young street. She was a native of France.

- November 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald; p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     At 10 o'clock this morning, death kissed down the eyelids of little Connor Wilson, infant son of S. W. and Ada Morrow. Funeral will take place at 3 o'clock p. m. Sunday at Trinity cemetery.

- November 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald; p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

LANCASTER AND LOCALITY
_______

Gossip Gleanings From the
Lively Herald.

     Mrs. Jane Whisand[?] died suddenly early in the week, leaving a husband and several children and large circle of friends to mourn her loss.

- November 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

AN OLD PIONEER.
_______

Death of Mrs. Pleasant Taylor.

     Yesterday, Mrs. Pleasant Taylor, whose husband, Pleasant Taylor, was one of the pioneer citizens of Dallas county, passed away. Mrs. Taylor leaves many friends to mourn her loss. She came with her husband from Illinois to Dallas county in 1846, and settled where Lancaster now is. Twenty years ago, they moved to Dallas. Mr. Taylor died here last February.
     Mrs. Taylor was 71 years old and had been paralyzed for several years. She will be buried to-morrow in Lancaster.
     She has three children living. The oldest, J. P. Taylor, lives at Breckenridge. P. K. Taylor, the next oldest, lives at Seymour and Mrs. R. P. Aunspaugh, in Dallas, on Annex avenue, where Mrs. Taylor died.
     She was an aunt of R. D. Rawlins.

- November 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

A COUNTRY TRAGEDY.
_______

CHARLIE NASH HELD FOR IN-
VESTIGATION.

______

In Connection With the Vio-
lent Death of Barny
Rainey.

     Last Monday night, a difficulty occurred between two young men on the Widow Smith's place about five miles south of Garland, as the result of which, Messrs. W. J. Tipps and Sam Bolin, two farmers of that section, were in the city to-day after a coffin for Barny Rainey, a young man 25 years of age.
     The particulars of the difficulty vary. Mr. Tipps, a near neighbor to the Rainey family, states that a grudge existed between Barney Rainey and Charlie Nash and that upon their meeting last Monday night at a party given at the Wilson house, their old difficulty was renewed, but afterwards settled. After it was thought to be settled, however, Nash, who was drinking, struck Rainey on the head with a spring back dirk knife, inflicting a wound which penetrated his brain, and from which, he died this morning at 7 o'clock, after the doctors, yesterday, removed two pieces of skull from his brain.

THE DEFENDANT'S SIDE.

     Charlie Nash, who is accused of the murder of Rainey, is but a youth, 19 years of age. He is the son of Mr. Lafe Nash, an old and highly respected citizen. When Rainey's condition was discovered to be serious last Saturday evening, Constable Ryan of that precinct, took Nash in charge and held him until yesterday, when he brought him to jail at the request of his relatives. According to their statement, the two boys had been good friends and no grudge existed between them. They met Monday night at a frolic given at Mrs. Smith's, and before their friends were aware of it, they became involved in a drunken dispute, which grew into a rough and tumble fight. In the fight, it was then through that young Nash was considerably worsted. He was bruised from blows and his hands were badly cut on a wire fence, against which, they both fell in the scuffle. He shows the marks of his injuries to-day. It was not even known that Rainey was hurt badly. He returned to his labor the next day and worked until Thursday, when he was attacked with a chill. A physician was called and began treating him for chills and fever. While treating him, he discovered the wound on his head and discovered that his skull was broken. This was the first the physician knew of any serious injury to Rainey, and it is likely that he received the wound in falling against the wire fence.
     Young Nash was very affected when he heard of Rainey's death this morning.
     The affair is sincerely regretted. Both young men were single and well connected. Deceased was a brother-in-law to Mr. Bob Lyles, the ginner who lives near Garland.

- November 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Little Winnie Davis Donahue died on Saturday evening at 2:50 p. m. She was the only child of Mr. Thomas H. Donahue, 157 Benton avenue.

- November 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

GONE TO HIS LONG HOME.
______

J. M. Sweeney, An Old Printer,
Sailor and Soldier.

     J. M. Sweeney, an old printer, died this morning at the city hospital of pneumonia. He was a native of Ireland and learned his trade in Edinburgh, Scotland. He had served as a seaman and he went though the late civil war under the confederate flag. While in service, he received a wound in the leg, which gave him trouble and pain the rest of his life. He was a man with a history, and at one time, was well to do. He lived at Jefferson a number of years, where he worked on the Jimplicute, and while there, his wife died, leaving him a little girl. Then reverses came, the old man drank, his little savings were swept away and he went from pillar to post. Thoughts of his little girl always filled his mind, and tears would fill the old man's eyes when he talked of his past happy days. In going from town to town, he would sometimes hold a "sit" long enough to save money enough to send the little one, who was with a friend in Jefferson, a present and these little occasions of good fortune seemed to be the delight of his weary life. He cared not to live, he used to say, but the thread of life carried him into old age. His last work was done in the government print office of the Choctaw Nation where he assisted in getting in type, the code of laws of the nation.
     He was a good workman, a true friend and generous to a fault. He died last night at the hospital and this morning, a ticket was sent to him from Camp Sterling Price for h is transportation to the Confederate Home at Austin, but the old man's soul had departed for its eternal home.
     His remains will be buried under the auspices of the Dallas Typographical Union in their lot in Trinity Cemetery.

- November 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

WILL PROBATED.
_______

The Bulk of Miss McCoy's Estate
Bequeathed to Religious
Institutions.

     The will of the late Miss Eliza McCoy was filed for record yesterday. It is dated December 11, 1890, and Mr. J. M. McCoy is named as the administrator of the estate, which is valued at $40,000.
     After bequeathing certain personal property, the following bequests are made:
     To the Baptist College of Franklin, Ind., $2000, or its equivalent in real estate or personal property.
     To Alfred Bennett McCoy, a nephew, of Illinois, $500, in view of his physical affliction.
     To J. M. McCoy, a nephew of Dallas, in consideration of kindnesses and services rendered in settling the estate of J. C. McCoy, deceased, a lot north side of Elm street, East Dallas.
     The remainder of the property, both real and personal is bequeathed to the cause of religion, as follows:
     American Baptist Home Mission Society of New York, one undivided one-third part.
     To Foreign Mission Board Southern Baptist Convention, one undivided one-third part to be applied to the support of the mission work in the Republic of Mexico.
     To the Baptist General Convention of the state of Texas, one undivided one-third part to be applied to support of the mission work of the said convention in the state of Texas.

- November 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

RESULTED FROM AN ACCIDENT.
_______

Death of William Andresen
To-Day.

     William Andresen, the young man who was wounded last Friday by the premature discharge of his gun, caused by carelessly handling the same by the muzzle while loaded out of a wagon, died this morning about 5 o'clock at his boarding house, No. 467 Wood street. He was a native of Sleswig, Holstein; born January 25, 1867, and educated for the mercantile business. He will be buried by the Sons of Hermann, being a member of Uhland lodge No. 22 of this city. The funeral will start from the lodge room, at the corner of Main and Austin streets, at 9 o'clock to-morrow (Thursday) morning, from whence the lodge will proceed to the late residence of deceased.
     Deceased was also an active member of the Frohsinn Singing Society, and possessing a tenor voice, highly cultivated, his presence will be sadly missed. Both societies will participate in the obsequies.

- November 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

The Day in the Courts.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     F. Wichsel vs. City of Dallas; death of plaintiff.

- November 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5.
- o o o -

An Old Landmark.

     Mr. Calvin Tilly, aged 77 years, died suddenly at the Windsor Hotel last evening at 8 o'clock. He leaves a wife and grown children. Mr. Tilly's home was in Bryan, where he was on of the early settlers and one of the leaders in the development of the country. His remains will be sent to Bryan for interment on the morning train.

- November 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     The little 3-year-old child of Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Wilson of Chestnut Hill died yesterday and was buried this afternoon.

- November 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE SICK EDITOR.
_______

A K. of P. and in the Hands of
Friends.

     Mr. William Reily, editor of the Winchester, Va., Times, who, with his wife and daughter, were members of the Virginia editorial excursion party in Dallas the last few days, is now sick at the Windsor hotel. Mr. Reily is quite sick from general prostration brought on by overwork, and has been unconscious the past two days. He is a Knight of Pythias, having held several high positions in that order, and is, of course, being cared for by his brethren here. Col. S. B. Hopkins, C. C. of Dallas Lodge No. 7, this afternoon, received a telegraph message from the C. C. of Winchester lodge asking the lodges here to "give brother proper attention," which was already being done. The TIMES-HERALD hopes the gentleman will soon be up.

- November 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

DIED IN THE HARNESS.
______

Editor William Reily Passed
Away To-Day.

     There is sadness in the family circle of William Reily, the Virginia editor, to-day. That gentleman, who had been ill for several days at the Windsor, sank rapidly last night, and at 7 o'clock this morning, his soul took flight and his life's work was done.
     Mrs. Reily and her daughter, Miss Lillian, were at the bedside of the loved one, and were crushed beneath the blow which came so unexpectedly upon them. Although he died among strangers, far from his home in the Shenandoah Valley, kind hands soothed down the dying pillow and gentle and sympathetic voices whispered words of comfort to those bereaved.
     The dead man was editor and publisher of the Times, Winchester, Virginia, and was a well-known and popular member of the Virginia Press association. He had been in the harness many years and overwork broke him down. His visit to Texas with the association was his first vacation for five years.
     The Virginia excursionists were notified by wire of this death. and on their return to-morrow, the remains of their departed craftsman will be taken back to Virginia for interment. The Knights of Pythias, of which deceased was a prominent member, did all in their power for the afflicted. Undertaker Linskie provided a handsome casket, and all that is mortal of William Reily will ere many days have passed, rest in the bosom of his native state.

- November 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mr. Charles G. Garner died at his residence this morning at 4 o'clock. Funeral will take [place] Friday morning at 10 o'clock from residence, 110 Flora street. Friends and acquaintances of the family are invited to attend.

- November 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     Henry Harris, a colored man, was instantly killed by the accidental discharge of his gun about four miles north of the city on the Preston road.

- November 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The funeral of Marie Mione, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Arbuckle, will take place to-morrow morning from the residence of the parents on Live Oak street.

- November 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

"LODGE OF SORROW."
_______

Dallas Lodge of Elks Observe
the Day To-Morrow.

     Dallas Lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks No. 71 will hold its "Lodge of Sorrow" at 3:30 Sunday afternoon, in their hall over Bodecker's old stand. A cordial invitation to the ladies of the city and the public, generally, is extended to attend. Rev. Dr. Smith, the Presbyterian divine , will deliver the sermon and Joseph J. Eckford, the well-known attorney, will deliver the annual address. Louis Dabney is also down on the programme for an address. Last Sunday, the various lodges of Elks in the country held "Lodges of Sorrow," but owing to absence from the city of several officers and the illness of others, it was necessary to postpone the "Lodge of Sorrow" till to-morrow. Four members have died during the past year, James Merrifield, ex City Attorney, J. W. Johnston, Pate and one whose name could not be ascertained.

- November 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

A BRAVE SOLDIER
________

Was R. H. Tonge Who Suicided
in Dallas.

     The Atlanta (Ga.) Journal has the following:
     R. H. Tonge, who lived in Atlanta for several years, was a member of the Futon county Confederate Veterans' Association, and who was widely known here, committed suicide in Dallas, Texas, yesterday.
     This will be read with a genuine feeling of sadness in Atlanta by those who knew Tonge.
     His was a life of sorrow and disconsolation. When he first came to Atlanta, he obtained employment in the American Press Association work rooms. Mr. Cooke, the manager at the time, soon discovered that Tonge was a well educated gentleman, struggling against adversity, and gave him a place as book-keeper. For a long time, he held this place, but finally disappeared and was not heard from again.
     While in Atlanta, he made many friends, and was well known. Handicapped by an unconquerable thirst for drink, he rapidly became more despondent than ever, until finally, he left the city without giving notice to anyone.
     He was not heard from again until the news of his suicide was received.
     Tonge was a gallant confederate soldier in the Virginia artillery with the same command in which Pelham so distinguished himself. He was a member of the Confederate Veterans' Association of Fulton county.

- November 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     August Mallard, an old woodchopper who lived at 176 Swiss avenue, fell dead in his yard yesterday evening. He has lived in the city a number of years.

- November 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mario Mione, the sweet baby daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Arbuckle, died yesterday at 10 a. m. of congestion of the brain after an illness of only a few days. The bereaved parents have the heartfelt sympathy of their many friends in their hour of distress, which has thoroughly prostrated the mother. The funeral will take place to-morrow from the residence of Mr. and Mrs. James Arbuckle, Sr., on Live Oak street.

- November 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

FOUND DEAD IN OAK CLIFF.
_______

A MYSTERY DEVELOPS ITSELF
IN THE SUBURB.

_______

A. J. Williams' Lifeless Remains
Discovered--The Facts in
the Case.

     Between 6 and 7 o'clock this morning, the remains of Mr. A. J. Williams were found cold in death at the rear of the store of Roberts & Means, near the Tenth Street station, Oak Cliff. Jerry Price, the colored porter of the store, went out the back door to get some wood with which to make a fire, when he saw the form of a man stretched on the ground. Jerry, at once, called E. C. Miller, a clerk in the store, and together, they went to the prostrate form and found it cold. The dead man was recognized as Mr. A. J. Williams, father of Drs. O. L. and R. G. Williams, of Oak Cliff. The deceased was found resting on his back, with one foot resting on the door sill and the other leg drawn up. Both legs were badly bruised. A large bruise was seen over the man's left eye, while two holes were cut through the under lip. Other bruises were found on various parts of the body. The remains were taken to the residence of Dr. O. L. Williams and Justice Whitaker called to hold an inquest. How Mr. Williams came to his death, is a mystery and the work of the inquest has, so far, failed to reveal much concerning the matter. The deceased was an old man, 76 years of age. Part of his time, he spent at the homes of his sons in Oak Cliff, and part of the time, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. P. Rodgers, near Whitney, Hill county.
     Recently, he has been at his daughter's, and was supposed by his sons to have been there, yet, until he was found dead in Oak Cliff this morning.
     The first theory of the death is that he arrived from Whitney on last night's train, and, at once, started for his son's home in Oak Cliff, via the Oak Cliff elevated railway; that, on his arrival at the Tenth street station, and while the train was yet in motion, he attempted to leave the train and was thrown to the ground, receiving the injuries mentioned. After this, it was supposed that he started for his home, but fell unconscious and died from his wounds, where found this morning. Again, it is thought that he might have gone over on this morning's six o'clock train and then fell from the train, as stated. But, the trainmen of the Oak Cliff road were both taken before Judge Whittaker and all testified that deceased was not on the train, either last night, or this morning.
     Dr. Williams has an office on the second floor of the building, in the rear of which, his father was found dead.
     Some believe that the dead man arrived at Oak Cliff, made his way to his son's office, but not finding anyone in it, attempted to leave the building, and, in some unaccountable way, fell out of a second story window, sustaining the injuries, from which he died. This theory is backed up with the fats that the body was found on the ground, directly under an open window. The glass in the transom over the door and under the open window was broken, and witnesses testify that the glass was whole last night; also, that the open window was also left closed on yesterday evening. The whole method of the man's death is a mystery that will probably never be revealed.
     Deceased was born in 1815. He came to Texas from New Orleans about 20 years ago, and settled in Hill county. About two years ago, his sons came to Oak Cliff to practice medicine, one from Whitney, Hill county, the other from Chapel Hill, Washington county. During the residence of the sons in Oak Cliff, the father has made repeated trips between their homes and his daughter's, Mrs. J. P. Rodgers, at Whitney. The sad occurrence casts a sadness over the homes of his children, made doubly sad on account of the mystery that surrounds his death.

- November 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

W. B. CHAPMAN SHOT
______

BY GEORGE BATCHELOR AT
THE ORLEANS SALOON.

_______

The Wounded Man in a Dy-
ing Condition at Hotel
Windsor.

______

Chapman Alleged to Have De-
stroyed Batchelor's Home
and Made Threats

_______

Against His Life--The Facts in
The Case for Times-Herald
Readers.

     At 12 o'clock to-day, W. B. Chapman of Waxahachie was shot through the body by George W. Batchelor in the Orleans saloon, at the corner of Main and Austin streets.
     Bill Baker and Dick Nelms were just changing watch when the shooting occurred, and there was a large crowd in the saloon.
     Chapman was standing on the outside of the bar. The ball passed entirely through the body of the man and fell on the floor. Chapman straightened himself up when shot and with a bound, cleared the bar, striking on his head on the other side.
     The shooting created great excitement. The wounded man was taken to a room in the Windsor Hotel just across the street.
     George Batchelor, accompanied by several friends, proceeded to the sheriff's office, where he surrendered and was taken to the jail.

WHO THEY ARE.

     W. B. Chapman is about 28 years of age and is crippled, one leg being shorter than the other, caused by paralysis. He is a blonde, weighs about 160 pounds and sports a heavy blonde moustache. He is a gambler and saloon man and makes his home in Waxahachie, where he is in the saloon business. He has relatives in this county and was formerly in business with the man who shot him, they having dissolved partnership three years ago. Chapman came in from Waxahachie this morning on the 7:30 train.
     George Batchelor is well known in Dallas and has many friends in the city. He, too, is a sporting man and was, at one time, Chapman's partner. He is 39 years old and a native of Ellis county, where his parents reside. He has several brothers in this city.

THE CAUSES.

     A TIMES-HERALD reporter called at the jail and found Mr. Batchelor, who had just sent for his attorney, Col. Kearby. He stated that Chapman had threatened his life a thousand times after breaking up his home. Last week, he was informed that Chapman had threatened to kill him on sight. The latter came into the Orleans saloon at noon as he supposed to put his threats into execution. Batchelor drew his revolver, a 45-calibre Smith & Wesson, and sent one ball crashing through the body of his enemy.
     It is charged by parties familiar with the facts in the case that Batchelor had a happy home and Chairman induced the wife of his friend to forget her marriage vows and fly with him. This was several years ago. The husband condoned the wrong and took her to his home again, and again, she departed. There are two bright children, the fruits of the union. One, a boy, is with the father of the prisoner in Elise county. The other, a beautiful little girl, is in a convent in a neighboring city, where she was placed by her father. She was kept in hiding for a long time by the woman who was once his wife, he says, but, he finally secured possession of the child and placed her in a good school.

OTHER GOSSIP.

     Men about town say that the shooting has been anticipated for several months, or years, for that matter, as the threats made by Chairman and the fact that Bachelor looked upon Chairman as the destroyer of his happiness, made it certain that the score would be wiped out in blood. They came together to-day and Chairman did not, according to the statements made by eye-witnesses, get a chance to pull his gun. The present abiding place of the woman in the case is not known to Bachelor. It is understood, however, that she secured a divorce from her husband.
     Bachelor's friends say he will have no trouble in making bond.

- November 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

NO HOPE FOR CHAPMAN.
________

THE PHYSICIANS SAY THAT
HE WILL DIE.

________

Alleged to Have Broken Up
Batchelor's Home a Second
Time Last Month.

     Chapman is in an unconscious condition and Drs. Moseley and Dickason say there is no hope. He is vomiting blood and cannot live many hours.

WHERE SHE IS.

     It is said that not more than a month ago, Bachelor and his wife became reconciled and began housekeeping. Again, she was induced to desert him. To-day's tragedy followed. "The wages of sin is death."

- November 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The funeral of Charles Lane took place yesterday under auspices of the Odd Fellow and Knights of Pythias.

- November 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

MEETING OF CITY FATHERS.

     The city secretary reported eighteen deaths last week--twelve adults and six children.

- November 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2-4.
- o o o -

THE WOUND WAS FATAL.
_______

DEATH OF W. V. CHAPMAN
LAST EVENING.

______

The Remains Shipped to Fer-
ris, Ellis County--The
Prisoner.

     W. V. Chapman, who was shot by George Batcheler yesterday, died at 10:30 last evening at the Windsor Hotel.
     His mother, Mrs. Lang, and stepfather, Mr. Lang, of Ferris, were at his bedside. M. Briggs of Waxahachie and other friends were also present, having been summoned by wire.
     Justice Braswell viewed the remains after the vital spark had fled and Undertaker Linskie then took charge. A handsome casket was ordered. This morning, the body was shipped to Ferris, Ellis county, for interment. Chapman was a single man and was born and raised at Ferris.

THE SLAYER.

     George Batchelor, who killed Chapman, is also a native of Ferris, where his relatives, who are well-to-do and highly respected people, reside. His brother, Harry, is in the general merchandise business at Ferris and also the owner of several stables of fine horses, came in from Ellis county last evening. The prisoner is in jail, taking the situation coolly, and confident of acquittal.

THE WOMAN.

     The woman in the case who led to yesterday's tragedy is said to be of prepossessing appearance and very intelligent. It has been given out that she is in Denver, Col., but a mutual friend of both parties to the trouble informed a TIMES-HERALD reporter to-day that she is in Fort Worth, at least she was in that city no later than Saturday night.

BATCHELER'S ATTORNEY TALKS.

     Batcheler has retained Col. Jerome Kearby, the well known criminal lawyer, to defend him. The colonel was asked by a TIMES-HERALD [reporter] what steps he proposed to take to secure freedom for his client.
     "At noon to-day," said the affable lawyer, "I will take the prisoner before the trial justice and waive a preliminary examination. Then sue out a writ of habeas corpus and endeavor to have him admitted to bail. If the judge decides it to be a bailable offense there will be no trouble about making a bond."

BATCHELOR FREE.

     At 2 o'clock, Batchlor was taken before Justice Braswell. He waived preliminary trial and was remanded to jail. At 2:30, he was taken before Judge Burke. Bail was placed at $3000. The prisoner's father and brothers singed the bond and he is, again, a free man pending his trial for the killing of W. V. Chapman

- December 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

BURIED IN A WELL.
_______

JNO. J. FORD, A WELL-DIGGER,
THE VICTIM.

_______

After Several Hours Under the
Sod He is Rescued, But
Dead.

     At Dr. A. S. Lewis' residence on Browder street this afternoon, an accident occurred which cost Jno. J. Ford his life.
     Mr. Ford is a well digger and is well known as a co-worker with Mr. Lewis under the firm name of Ford & Lewis. Ford lives on Pacific avenue.
     At noon to-day, while Ford was in the well at Dr. Lewis', the well caved and covered him up for several feet. An alarm was sounded, and help called. For some time, men could not be found to descend to the rescue, for fear of further caving.
     Finally, brave men went down to the rescue, and after two hours hard work, the dirt which covered poor Ford was removed and the body of the victim reached, but too late.
     The spark of life had fled. John J. Ford had dug his last well. He was dead.
     Mr. Ford was about 35 years of age, and leaves a wife and two or three small children to mourn his sad death.

- December 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

     In the estate of Elizabeth Pollard, deceased, her last will and testament was proved and sent to record. J. O. Rickets was appointed administrator and his bond was fixed at $7000. E. A. Gracey, Ham Taylor and Jim Sims were appointed appraisers.
     In the estate of August Haerzer, deceased, the report of the administrator, filed July 31, 1891, was approved, and the administrator was instructed to pay court costs and devote the balance to the payment of claims so far as may be due, and file receipt, when he will be discharged.
     In the estate of Dr. Hugh Harbison, deceased, the annual account was examined and approved, except as to the administrator taking the interest of said estate in the lumber business of Halsell, Allen & Co. The administrator was instructed to sell said interest in lumber business for cash and report to the court.

- December 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

The Dead Well Digger.

     Justice Braswell held an inquest on John J. Ford last night and returned a verdict in accordance with the facts. The widow and children of the dead man reside in Sherman.

- December 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

DIED ALONE.
_______

John Van Wie Found Dead This
Morning.

     The sheriff was notified this morning that "there was a dead man up stairs at 203 Elm street."
     Sheriff Lewis sent an officer to the place designated and there, lying stark and stiff on a bed, cold in the chilly embrace of death, was John Van Wie.
     Van Wie was formerly in the grocery business and is an old resident of Dallas. He was a hard drinker and, of late, had imbibed large quantities of his favorite beverage, which resulted in bringing on a serious spell of sickness.
     During the absence of his nurse last night, or at an early hour this morning, death claimed the patient.
     Justice Braswell viewed the remains, after which, they were taken in charge by Undertaker Linskie.
     Van Wie was about 49 years old, a single man, and is said to have been the owner of a saloon in this city.

- December 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

GOD HAVE MERCY ON MY SOUL
_______

THE PRAYER THAT ASCENDED
TO HIS MAKER.

_______

By R. H. Tonge Before Sending
a Bullet Through His Brain
To-Day.

     At 9:00 this morning, when Mr. C. H. Huffman visited the offices of Simpson & Huffman on Elm street, a terrible sight presented itself.
     Lying on the floor, full length, just inside of the railing of the main office, was the body of R. H. Tonge, Colonel Simpson's book-keeper. His head was lying in a pool of blood.
     At first, Mr. Huffman though the man was sick or intoxicated, but on close inspection, convinced him that it was a suicide, for the blood had soaked into the carpet and a 45-calibre Smith and Wesson pistol was lying by his side.
     The horrified gentleman at once called to Tom Ennis, at Fakes & Col__, to come in and inspect the condition of affairs. Col. Simpson was notified, as was Justice Braswell. By order of Col. Simpson, the remains were sent to Linskie's undertaking establishment, where they await interment.
     R. H. Tonge was a man of 60 years. He was about 5 feet 10 inches in height, wore full whiskers liberally sprinkled with gray, and was a quiet reticent sort of an individual.
     He had been in the service of Col. Simpson for a year or more. On his person was found 30 cents in cash, keys and a pocket knife. A grip, already packed and locked, was lying near by. On a desk in an outer office, a note was found with the keys of the building. The note was written with a pencil, in a legible firm hand, as follows:
     "This pistol belongs to Hanna. God have mercy on my soul."
     It was not signed. Mr. Huffman states that the books of the suicide were in excellent condition as far as known, and that his finances were a t a low ebb. He had been low-spirited and despondent for a month for more and evidently some secret trouble was preying on his mind. He never spoke of his wife, but frequently talked of his son and daughter, who reside in one of the interior towns of Georgia.
     The remains of the unfortunate suicide will be buried in this city, unless his relatives otherwise order.

- December 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

DOINGS OF CITY FATHERS.

     The city secretary reported thirteen deaths for the week.

- December 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1-3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
JUDGE BOWER'S COURT.

     In the estate of Henry Burbeck, deceased, the inventory and appraisement were examined and approved.

- December 8, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2-3.
- o o o -
 

City Notes.

     Mrs. M. F. Axton died at her home on Canton street yesterday, after an illness of several months.
     The will of John Van Wie has been probated. Cornelius H. Van Wie and L. B. Upham of Clay county are the executors. The estate, valued at $2000, will go to Cornelius Van Wie, father of deceased.

- December 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Mesquite Locals.

To the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., Dec. 17.-- J. T. Lawrence, one of the oldest residents of this county, died Wednesday evening at his home. He died surrounded by a great many of his relatives and friends. He is an old landmark in this country, having come here about 1840. He was about 80 years old. His death is deeply felt by everyone.

- December 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

LOCAL AND GENERAL ITEMS

     W. S. Tison of Atlanta, Ga., superintendent of penitentiaries, is in the city to attend the funeral of his brother, Columbus Tison.
     Columbus Tison, a well-known bartender, died yesterday. He was a Georgian by birth, well known to the men about town and lived in Dallas for several years. His remains will be interred in the city cemetery.

- December 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

FATALLY BURNED.
________

The Little Daughter of Sam
Freshman.

     The little three-year-old daughter of Sam Freshman, the Lamar street saloon-keeper, was fatally burned to-day at the family residence, corner Patterson avenue and Akard street. The child was playing in the yard and ventured too near a bonfire. Its clothing ignited and before the flames could be extinguished, the little girl sustained fatal burns.
     L
ATER.-- Death relieved the sufferings of the little girl at 3 p. m.

- December 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

BATES WILL DIE.
______

The Victim of Manning's Ready
Revolver.

     George Bates, who was shot by Ed Manning, will die, the physicians say. He cannot speak and is slowly sinking.

- December 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

ITEMS OF GENERAL INTEREST

     Little Bertha Ray Fleshman [Freshman], who was burned to death Saturday, was buried yesterday.

- December 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mrs. Thomas R. Easterling died yesterday of pneumonia at her residence, corner San Jacinto and Harwood. Three small children are left motherless.

- December 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mr. J. W. Knight, a well-known young man, who has been employed at Worley's for several years, died last night at the home of his uncle, Alderman Knight, on Cedar Springs road. Mr. Knight was 31 years old and single, well-known and esteemed by all who knew him. The funeral will take place at the residence at 4 o'clock this evening. The K. of P.'s will take charge of the remains after the funeral at the house.

- December 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

DEATH OF MRS. COLE.
_______

One of the Pioneer Mothers
Passes Away.

     Mrs. Elizabeth Cole, wife of "Uncle Jack" Cole and mother of George C. Cole, died this morning at her home on McKinney avenue. She was taken ill last evening with congestion of the bowels and, despite all medical efforts to save her, sank into eternal rest this morning. Deceased was a native of Cass county, Mo., and was about 60 years of age. She was one of the pioneer mothers of Dallas county and lived more than forty years in this community. She was a warm-hearted upright Christian woman and her relatives and large circle of acquaintances sincerely mourn her demise. The funeral will take place at 3 o'clock to-morrow afternoon from the family residence, Gen. R. M. Gano officiating. Interment will follow in the city cemetery.

- December 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE LOCAL ROUND UP

     Mrs. Clara F. Miller died Saturday at 478 Commerce street.

- December 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death Notice.

     Leslie, son of A. Crabtree, died to-day at 1 o'clock at the family residence, No. 648 South Harwood, of diphtheria.

- December 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Woman's Home.

     Christmas day found the Woman's Home well supplied with good things for those dependent on its generous hospitality....
     The festivities were scarcely ended when they were visited by the "Angel of Sleep, who closed the eyelids of little George Morley Hutchinson to reopen on the beautiful shore of the "summer land." Very brief was the mortal life of the little one, who was baptized on the 23d of November, at the age of nine days.
     Very desolate was the heart of the bereaved young mother, who, deserted by her worthless husband in a foreign land, saw the little one taken and no means for her to provide it a respectful funeral, but her countrymen responded generously to the appeal made, and the funds were provided by Messrs. C. E. Wellesley, Evans & Cole, A. E. Hall, R. C. Baker, James Kirkland, William Hurst, Back & Harris, Holloway & Co., Wm. McCutcheon, Mesdames Cole and Maynard.
     The last sad rites were held in the Woman's home, and, in the absence of the Rev. Mr. Wickens, the appeal for a minister was kindly responded to by the Rev. M. M. Davis of the Central Christian church. Very appropriate and full of sympathy were his remarks and condolence to the bereaved young mother and assembled friends, and the little one was laid to rest in the quiet shades of Trinity.
     An appeal has been made to the British Consul in Galveston to furnish transportation to send the weeping young mother home to her relatives in old England. Her warmest thanks are tendered to those who came to her aid in her sorrow, and to Mesdames Pfouts, Robert Gibson, Leo Wolfson, and Messrs. M. M. Davis and E. C. Smith for kind offices shown her. The mistletoe and the cypress vines were thus mingled in the Christmas festival at the Woman's Home.

- December 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mr. Ellen Perry, of Lancaster, an old pioneer, is dead; aged 68 years.

- December 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -