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(Updated February 1, 2001)

 

 

 City News.

     "Ben," a well known and much beloved monkey, the property of Mr. Hodges, the proprietor of the National Hotel, expired yesterday after a brief attack of pneumonia.

- January 2, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Burned to Death.

     ...Mr. D. L. Richards, on the corner of Harwood and Commerce streets...died at 3:30 this morning....lamp fire.

- January 2, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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City News.

     Miss Louisa Ella Jenkinson, daughter of Capt. S. N. Jenkinson, died yesterday.
     Robert Atkinson departed this life yesterday at his residence on Cabell street.

- January 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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CITY NEWS.

     Wilhelm Mirus died at his mother's residence in this city yesterday afternoon at 2:30.

- January 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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WANTS A DEATH CERTIFICATE.
______

The Disposal of a Large Estate
Hangs on It.

     Mayor Connor received a letter this morning from the German consulate at ___ston making inquiry concerning the death of a German citizen by the name of Christian Frederick Krunze, whom, it is alleged, died in this city some [torn] ago. The consul asked for a certificate of the subject's death. It is [stated] that a large estate hangs on the desired evidence.

- January 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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CITY NEWS.

    Mrs. C. A. Deringer died of pneumonia yesterday at her residence on Jackson street.
    The funeral of Mr. Meeley will occur to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock under the auspices of the G.A.R. All the old comrades are invited to attend from 45 Alamo street by order of H. C. Long, S.V.C.
    Jesse Meeley, at one time a member of the police force, died this morning from the ravages of consumption.

- January 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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City News.

     Mrs. J. G. Waller died yesterday at the age of 62 years.

- January 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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CITY NEWS.

    Justice Braswell held an inquest yesterday morning on the body of Eliza Johnson, colored, who was discovered about 11 o'clock Tuesday night in her bed in a house in Young's quarter, dead. It is thought she died from apoplexy.
    The remains of Bradley, the young man who was killed yesterday by Tom Angus, were embalmed at the undertaking establishment of P. W. Linskie, where they now lie. Mr. Linskie has telegraphed to the parents of Bradley at Oil City, Penn., for instructions, but has not yet received reply. Mr. Linskie says the bullet which pierced through Bradley first shattered the right arm above the elbow.

- January 17, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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CITY NEWS.

    The remains of John Bradley, who was killed by Tom Angus Tuesday morning were laid away in Trinity cemetery this afternoon, as per instructions received from his former home in Oil City, Pa.

- January 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Died at the Hospital.

     The remains of Willie Dockery, who died of pneumonia at the city hospital, were sent to Mineola, his former home, for interment this morning. A few days ago, Officer Pegues discovered Dockery, who was 24 years old, lying in a tent near the cemetery grappling with the fearful disease. The officer had him removed to the hospital, where he was well cared for, but survived only a short time. Deceased has a sister living in San Marcos, who was notified by telegraph of his brother's sad death.

- January 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
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"THE STONEWALL BACKSTOP."
_______

The Tragic Death of Chas. M. Bradley,
the Famous Ball Player.

[Louisville Courier-Journal]

     In a late dispatch from Dallas, Texas, came the announcement: "Bradley, the noted professional catcher, was shot and killed here by Tom Angus, a hackman. There is said to be a woman at the bottom of the affair."
     Charles M. Bradley, or "Brad," as he was familiarly called, was very well known in Louisville, and was one of the most popular baseball men in the country. Born in June, 1864, in the oil regions of Pennsylvania, of wealthy parents, he was surrounded with every luxury. He acquired a collegiate education and all the ornamental accomplishments of modern times. He was possessed of a charming tenor voice; was a brilliant pianist and an expert linguist. He was passionately fond of the national game, and his great ability as a catcher won for him the sobriquet of "The Stone-wall Backstop." He first sprang into fame as a catcher with the Corning, New York, team of 1885, and was with the Topeka team of the Western League in the early part of 1886. He injured his kneecap while sliding to bases at Denver, and never fully recovered from the consequent stiffness. Being released from Topeka at the same time with Weaver, now of Louisville, he signed with the Abilenes, champion Kansas team, in June, 1886, and finished the season with them. He then went on one of the new railroads of Kansas as a fireman, and in 1887, played with the Emporia team in the Kansas State League. In 1888, he played with the famous "State Fair" team, of Dallas, Texas, champions of the Texas League.
     Bradley is thus spoken of by an old ball player of Louisville, who knows him very intimately: "Just before a hard-fought battle against a Topeka team at Abilene, we were in a ferment on account of our team not having a first-class catcher. When Weaver and Bradley arrived, we placed Weaver on second base, and Bradley behind the bat. "Turk" Burke, afterward reserved by Detroit in 1886, went in to pitch, and our great team sent Topeka to bed to the tune of 11 to 0. It was Brad's first appearance, and his magnificent catching of Burke's heavy drop-curves made him at once a favorite with everybody. He caught nearly every contest played, always putting up a uniformly steady game, and to his excellent work was greatly due our successful season.
     "Bradley was usually reticent as to his past history, and I doubt if there are many besides myself who know much of his past. An early disagreement with his father, the result of his penchant for base ball, led to an estrangement, and, troubles never coming singly, he was rejected by a young lady of Oil City, Pa., to whom he was devoted. He drifted carelessly from place to place, his ambition gone, and his only care being to drown his 'aching void.' I well remember his favorite ballad: 'When other lips and other hearts their tales of love shall tell.' How soulfully poor 'Brad' used to drink in the melody of his own clear tenor voice when its ending, 'Then you'll remember me,' had come, and how sadly he would turn away to hide his tears."

- January 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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CITY NEWS.

     Under the new law regulating burial of the dead, the physician will issue a certificate of death which will be presented to the city secretary, who will issue a burial permit to the undertaker, who in turn, returns that permit on which he endorses the disposition made of the body with all other necessary data. By this means, a perfect and reliable death record will be kept.

- January 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Death of Dr. Lee.

     Dr. William States Lee died at his residence, 1118 Commerce street, this morning at 10:45 o'clock, after a prolonged and painful illness. The funeral will probably take place to-morrow afternoon. A service will be held in St. Matthews' cathedral, after which, the remains will be conveyed to Trinity cemetery.  Dr. Lee was an old and respected citizen of Dallas, and his death will be mourned by a large circle of friends. Mr. Watson, a son-in-law of the deceased, arrived this morning early from his home in Florida.

- January 31, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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CITY NEWS.

     Mr. J. J. Beeman, who with his brother, John, and their families, settled in Dallas in 1842, died recently in Lampasas. These were the first familiesto settle in Dallas county.

- February 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Funeral of Mrs. Seth Shepard.

     The obsequies of the late Mrs. Seth Shepard, who died at the family residence in this city yesterday morning at an early hour, took place this morning at 11 o'clock at St. Matthew's Cathedral, and a large concourse of relatives and friends followed the remains to their last resting place. All the courts in the city were adjourned as a token of respect to the deceased.

- February 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
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Dr. J. M. Ross Dead.

    Dr. J. M. Ross, a former resident of Dallas, and the father of Capt. J. K. Ross, of this city, died at his home in Brenham last night, after a brief struggle with a spell of pneumonia. Capt. Ross left for Brenham this morning to attend his father's funeral.

- February 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Death of Fred Brooks.

     Fred Brooks, a well-known bricklayer of this city, who, about ten days ago, fell a distance of forty-three feet while assisting in the erection of a college at McKinney, mention of which was made at the time by the TIMES-HERALD, died at that place yesterday morning. His body was brought to this city and the funeral takes place this afternoon, being conducted by the Dallas Protective Bricklayers' Union No. 5, of which Mr. Brooks was a worthy and zealous member. The Painters' and Decorators' Union, Stonecutters' Union, Knights of Labor and other organized labor bodies, have been invited to assist in paying this last tribute of respect to the honored dead. The TIMES-HERALD had an article in type yesterday in relation to this sad affair, but just as the edition was going to press, said article was "pied," compelling us to forego its publication.

- February 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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THE DESPERADO WOMAN.
_________

BELLE STAR, THE MOST NOTED CHAR-
ACTER IN THE WEST.

_______
Some Incidences of Her Career in
Dallas Recalled--She Was a re-
markable Woman.

    GAINESVILLE, Tex., Feb. 5.--Capt. Bodine, from Eufaula, I. T., to-day, gives the following particulars of the killing of Belle Starr: On Monday, she had been in town during the day and had started to her home, about six miles distant. When about half that distance had been traveled on horseback, she was shot by some person unknown, the ball entering her heart and presumably killing her instantly. The riderless horse went home and Belle's daughter mounted him and rode back in search of her mother, whom she found lying dead in the middle of the road. A large number of persons visited the premises to view the remains of the dead woman.
    W
ACO, Tex., Feb. 6.--Mordecai Hunnicut, a plasterer, who resides in this city and has resided here for many years, and who is in a position to know whereof he speaks, gives the following recital concerning Belle Star, who was assassinated last Sunday night near Eufaula, I. T.:
    She resided in Bosque county sixteen years ago as the wife of Jim Reed, who owned a farm in that county. Reed was arrested on accusation of participation with the Younger brothers in the Gad's Hill train robbery and died in prison, without coming to trial. Mrs. Reed took the name of Ross, and under that name, resided in Dallas and Sherman in 1875. She returned to Waco, accompanied by a person of the name of McManus, and they took rooms at the Kirkpatrick house, where they were arrested by Sheriff L. S. Ross on a charge of horse theft. Mrs. Reed was released, but McManus was some time in the McLennan county jail. In 1880, McManus returned to Waco, and on Oct. 9 that year, attended a circus, and while at the show, exhibited a handful of twenty dollar gold coins of United States mintage, which he said he had recovered from a plant made by Jim Reed on the Bosque farm, being Reed's share of the Gad's Hill exploit. The person who saw the money in McManus' possession remembered that five years before, while in prison, he had told a story to the effect that he was accompanying Mrs. Reed to Bosque county to dig up the treasure, when they were apprehended. Gov. Ross, who was the sheriff, making the arrest, is referred to by the News correspondent's informant as having knowledge of a portion of the details given above.
     Belle Star, the desperado woman, was well known to every old citizen and officer in Dallas county. They recall her as a handsome woman, a graceful equestrian, and a crack marksman with a faultless nerve. She possessed commendable courage and would face any danger without flinching. The published statement from Waco is pronounced by those here who are well acquainted with this remarkable woman's career, in the main correct: The exceptions being that the party she visited Waco with when arrested by Gov. Ross was Mike McCommas of this county; and her husband, Jim Reed, instead of dying in jail, was killed by a detective, who was also a relative, and was following Reed for the purpose of arresting him. The two were traveling in a stage, the detective, whose name was not readily recalled, having spotted Reed and was awaiting an opportunity to get the "drop" on him. A halt was made for dinner at a stopping place in Grayson county, and while at the table, the detective managed to get the drop on Reed and ordered his hands up. Reed threw up his hands, and as he did so, turned the table up in front of him when the detective fired, the ball penetrating Reed's heart after going through the table.
     Many exploits are re-called here which were enacted while citizens and officers were endeavoring to rid the county of horse thieves. Ed. Shirley, Belle Starr's brother, was leader of a notorious gang, and one night in '67, when the citizens surrounded Shirley's house, which is yet standing on Mesquite creek, Belle, with a yankee blue overcoat drawn over her shoulders, thrust her head through a shutter opening and was endeavoring to get a shot at some of the party. She was ordered several times to take her head back, but refused to obey until a ball from Mr. Joe Huffman's pistol (he is now dead) cause her to retire. Shirley was finally killed at a point on Spring creek in 1867 by Mr. Joe Lynn, now of Collin county. From the date of the killing of her brother, to whom she was greatly attached, marked Belle Starr's--nee Mira Reed--desperate career. Several times, it is said, she buckled a brace of six-shooters around her and went in search of Mr. Lynn. She was confined in the Dallas county jail over a year when Barkley was sheriff, and during this time, it is said one of the deputies became so infatuated with her, that he suicided because his attentions were not reciprocated. When she was released from jail, she went to the Indian Territory, and it is learned here, was killed by a pal because she "squealed" on some of her tribe who were engaged in a late train robbery occurring in or near the Indian Territory. She was familiarly known here as Mira Reed, and was in the city about eight weeks ago on a visit. While here, she sent for several of the old time officers to call on her. Her daring and recklessness found origin, perhaps, in the Indian blood which coursed her veins.

- February 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5-6
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(link to Belle Starr-related articles)

COURT PROCEEDINGS.

    The court took up the motion docket this morning and refused to grant a trial in the cases wherein J. W. Monk and W. C. Jump were convicted of the murder of Charlie Spears.
    The will of Wm. Cumby and W. L. Griggs were probated in county court to-day.

- February 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1
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THE WAGES OF SIN.
_______

Suicide of a Woman Well
Known in Dallas.

     The Fort Worth Gazette of Wednesday's date contained a special from Laredo, giving details of the suicide in the last-named place of Mrs. Mattie Tracy, who had some acquaintance in Dallas, where she formerly lived. She was the wife of J. W. Tracy, a carpenter, formerly of Marshall and Tyler:
     The family, consisting of man and wife, had been but two months in Laredo, and were living in a house occupied by several families as a tenement house. To all outside appearances, they were living happily together, but it was known that there was trouble between the couple, it is supposed on account of the fondness of the husband, for liquor and his abuse of his wife while under the influence of liquor. In fact, the wife, the day before, is said to have committed the rash act told a lady living in the house that she could not live in that manner and intended to kill herself. After the fatal shot was fired, Tracy, who was the only occupant of the room at the time of the shooting, ran out of the house and called his neighbors, crying that his wife had shot herself. The neighbors crowded the room and found Mrs. Tracey seated in an armchair by a table, gasping for breath, with a ghastly wound over her heart. A doctor was sent for, but the victim was dead long before he arrived. Tracey said his wife had been writing at the table, and then, with the parting words, "Good bye, Jack," shot herself before he could do anything to prevent it. He had been lying on a pallet on the floor some ten feet away. He was under the influence of liquor at the time the deed was done. A rigid search was made for the letter which the dead woman was writing, but it could not be found at the time. Afterwards, it is alleged to have been picked up in the room on the floor. Witnesses are willing to testify that it was not there immediately after the killing. The letter found bade her husband good bye. She says she will meet him in heaven or hell; says she had tried to be a good wife to him, but that he had broken her heart and calls on God to have mercy on her soul. Suspicions are expressed that all is not right in connection with the matter, and a grave mystery is hinted at, in which a prominent woman is thought to have had connections.

THE TRACY FAMILY IN DALLAS.

     During their residence in Dallas, which was some time last summer, Tracy, the husband of the woman who took her own life, was not unknown to the police. He was a dissipated, improvident fellow, and his home life was none of the most felicitous. It is related of him that during a Sunday debauch at home one day last June, while a clock on the mantle was striking, he seized a pistol or rifle and discharged its contents into the dial plate of the offending time piece, and for this disturbance of the piece and good order of the neighborhood, he was locked up in the calaboose. His wife, at one time, was employed as a saleswoman in a leading dry good house here, but, failing to give satisfaction, was dismissed. They subsequently went to Fort Worth, and thence probably to Laredo, when the tragedy a few days ago recalled the circumstances of their residence in this place.

LIVING IN ADULTERY.

     The woman's maiden name was Eggleton. She married a barber by the name of Goldwire and they separated in Fort Worth. She was the mother of two children, and after taking up with Tracey, made an attempt once in this city to kill him. The Laredo coroner, after spending two days in holding the inquest, returned the following verdict:
    After hearing all the evidence that could be adduced, I find that Mrs. Goldwire, alias Mrs. Tracy, of Sherman, Texas, came to her death by a pistol shot wound in the heart, fired by her own hands, and that J. W. Tracy, her alleged husband, had been living with her in adultery for the past twelve months, and is morally responsible for her death.

- February 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1
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CITY NEWS.

     A private telegram was received in this city announcing the death at Dallas of Mrs. Seth Shepard. She died at 7 o'clock on Tuesday morning. The deceased was well known here and had many warm friends, to whom the intelligence came as a severe shock. Her husband lived here from boyhood, was almost idolized by his friends and acquaintances, and in his severe affliction in losing the dearest companion on earth, he has the warm sympathy of them all.---Brenham Banner.

- February 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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City Council Meeting.

    The city health officer reported 7 deaths during the past week, and measles prevailing. His hospital report showed 14 patients on hand Jan. 1; admitted during the month, 32; discharged, 24; died, 4; remaining, 17.

- February 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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BELLE STARR'S HUSBAND
_______

An Uncle of Cole Younger, Her Le-
gal Helpmate.
[Denver News.]

     In the telegraphic columns of the News within the past few days, there has appeared mention of the death of the notorious Belle Starr at Eufaula, I. T. The first dispatch stated that she was the wife of Cole Younger, one of the more notorious Younger family, whose name has become familiar to the whole country by reason of their many crimes. Cole denied the assertion that Belle was his wife. This statement is confirmed from a local source, and that she was, instead, the wife of Bruce Younger, an uncle of Cole. Bruce lives at Colorado Springs, where he went for his health, and a part of last summer was spent by him in Denver at the Brunswick hotel. Younger was a cousin of the Younger brothers who were mixed up in crime. He died at Colorado Springs last August, leaving one child, who was then being educated at Notre Dame, Ind. While Younger was at Colorado Springs, he lived with a woman supposed to be his wife, but whether is was Belle Star, or whether he had separated from her prior to her appearance in Colorado, does not appear. Through married to the woman in 1874, it is to be presumed that Bruce Younger's appearance in Denver created a slight stir in gambling circles, for he had a little money and alternately won and lost heavily. He went broke frequently, was staked and picked up again. At one time, he went on a prolonged spree, during which, he was ugly, but at other times he was very quiet and gentlemanly. At last, he broke down and had to borrow money to leave town, owing considerable amounts to various parties. He was introduced here by the noted gambler, Jim Kendall.
     A special from Chetopa, Kan., says sometime after the Otterville robbery, Bruce Younger went to the Nation and became acquainted with Belle Starr. She was infatuated with him and they lived together some time, he representing himself as Cole Younger. Becoming tired of the solitude of the Starr ranche, Bruce ran off and got as far as Chetopa, where he was overtaken by Belle at the National hotel, then kept by one Lellinman. Belle pulled her gun and Bruce got on his knees to her and begged for his life. Belle's terms were to "marry, or pass in your checks."     Bruce agreed to marry. They went to Oswego, got a license and were married in Chetopa by J. P. Shields, a justice of the peace. He is, at present, residing at Chetopa where he can be communicated with. Belle leaves two children by this marriage, a boy and a girl, both bright children.

MYRA SHIRLEY BELLE STARR.

     SHERMAN, TEX., Feb. 12.--A great deal has been said and written about Belle Starr since she was killed. L. H. Scruggs, proprietor of the Commercial hotel of this city, was well acquainted with her, and gave the following version of her real identity to the News reporter to-day:
"I was an old schoolmate of the woman of whom so much has been said, and what I state, I know to be positively correct. Belle Starr's maiden name was Myra Shirley. She is, or was, the youngest daughter of John R. Shirley, who died in Dallas county in this state a number of years since. She was born and raised in Carthage, Jasper county, Missouri, in which county I was also raised up. Her father lived in Carthage and was the proprietor of a hotel there until 1861, when he came to Texas. Myra Shirley, or Belle Starr, married a man by the name of Reed about the close of the war. Reed was with Quantrell. That was her first marriage. Reed was killed and she, afterwards, married the celebrated half-breed, Sam Starr. There are several citizens of Sherman who formerly lived in Carthage, Mo., and they will substantiate the history I have given of her to be a true one. Her people were all enthusiasts in the cause of the south during the war. I can positively state that she did not have a drop of Indian blood in her veins."
     This is believed to be the only correct version yet given of the parentage of this noted female character, whose name has been heralded all over the southwest.

- February 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
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Died.

     The four-year-old son of Mr. B. P. Fakes died at their residence on Ervay street this morning at half-past 9 o'clock. The remains will be shipped to Fort Worth for interment.

- February 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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UNDER THE DOME.
_______

THE GILBERT MURDER TRIAL IN PROG-
RESS TO-DAY.

     The case of the state of Texas against J. E. Gilbert was called in Judge Muse's court to-day. Gilbert is a farmer, and the crime with which he stands charged, is murder. On Feb. 17, 1889, at Grapevine Prairie, in the northeast corner of Dallas county, a farmer named A. Ray, lost his life, and it is alleged that Gilbert is his murderer. Dudley G. Wooten appeared for the defense and Colonel D. A. Williams and Barry Miller prosecutes. The greater part of the morning session was devoted to the work of impaneling a jury from the special venire, and at 11:30, it was complete, as follows: W. E. Myers, John H. Mason, J. S. Anderson, F. A. Matlock, E. A. Crompey, J. S. Lanham, T. G. Cherry, W. F. Whitman, W. E. Murphy, W. F. Ollinger and J. N. Elam.
     This afternoon, the trial began in earnest. The defendant was arraigned, the indictment read and a plea of "not guilty" entered. The witnesses were sworn and the state began to present the evidence. There are a large number of witnesses to be heard, and it is said that the case will not reach the jury before to-morrow evening.

- April 18, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4. col. 3.
- o o o -

UNDER THE DOME.

     As stated in these columns yesterday, the Gilbert murder case trial engaged the attention of Judge Muse, beginning yesterday morning. J. E. Gilbert, the prisoner, reparated from his wife and was disposed to consider A. Ray, his brother-in-law, responsible for the lack of harmony in his household. Several witnesses swore that Gilbert made threats against Ray. On the morning of the fatal meeting, Gilbert drove up to Ray's house and was warned to halt. The warning was repeated three times, and finally, Ray fired, killing Gilbert's horse. The latter returned the fire, killing Ray. At 11 o'clock this forenoon, arguments began, Barry Miller opening for the State. Dudley G. Wooten followed for the defense and Colonel D. A. Williams closed for the prosecution. The case is now in the hands of the jury.

- April 19, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5. col. 4.
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CITY COUNCIL MEETING

    The city secretary's weekly mortuary report showed 11 deaths--4 children and 7 adults.

- February 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Capt. Adams Dead.

   Capt. Samuel J. Adams died at 8:30 this morning at his residence, corner of Live Oak and Pearl streets.

- February 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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[No Heading]

     Nellie, the infant daughter of Richard and Julia Flannagan died yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, of pneumonia. The funeral took place this afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family residence on Main street, near Harwood.

- February 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

COURT PROCEEDINGS.
RAY DIES AND GILBERT SURRENDERS.

     Al Ray, who was shot Sunday near Grapevine, by J. L. Gilbert, his brother-in-law, has since died. Gilbert came to town yesterday, and about 5 o'clock p. m., surrendered to the sheriff in his office after receiving a formal introduction to that official. Through his attorney, he, this morning, applied for a writ of habeas corpus, which was set for hearing instanter and then continued by consent until 9 a. m. to-morrow on account of the absence of witnesses, of whom, there is said to be only three and they live eighteen miles from the city.

- February 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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 CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The city secretary's weekly mortuary report showed eight deaths.

- February 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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CITY NEWS.

     The little son of Dr. and Mrs. Leake, Henry, Jr., died yesterday afternoon.

- February 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City News.

      The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Harris died yesterday.

- February 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Court Proceedings.

     Louis Gilbert, charged with the murder of Al. Ray, his brother-in-law, will have a habeas corpus hearing this afternoon.

- February 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     George Wilson, old citizen of Dallas Co., died yesterday at his residence at Cedar Hill.

     Mr. T. P. Marshall's baby, Robert Poindexter Marshall, died last evening at his residence, 911 Jackson St.

- March 1, 1889, Dallas Morning News, p. 8.
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CITY NEWS.

     The baby boy of Mr. T. P. Marshall died yesterday evening.
     Geo. Wilson died at his residence near Cedar Hill yesterday. He was an old settler in this county.

- March 1, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Holding the Inquest.

     Justice John Henry Brown has gone this afternoon to 526 North Harwood street to take evidence in the suicide of Mrs. W. F. Gathwait. It is intimated that some sensational disclosures may be developed.

- March 1, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

City News.

    The funeral of Mrs. Ganseppa Dichiara, who died yesterday, occurred this afternoon.

- March 2, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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A SAD ENDING.
_______

A Once Prominent Man Dies in the
Hospital and Is Buried in Potter's
Field.

     Louis La Salanier died at the city hospital yesterday morning of chronic alcoholism. He came here about eighteen months ago as chief of Hennessey's detective agency, but soon lost his position on account of over indulgence in intoxicating liquors. He was, at one time, a man of genius and ability, as well as prominence, having represented a Louisiana district in the legislature. He was well connected, but friends and relatives were powerless to snatch him from the vortex of degradation into which an ungoverned appetite for strong drink landed him. His friends deserted him in death, and his body was buried in the potter's field. On New Year's day, his mother, who lives in New York, wrote him a letter as only a mother can write, whose love follows a wayward son to the utmost ends of the earth.

- March 2, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

COURT PROCEEDINGS.
THE VERDICT.

     Justice Brown has finished the testimony in the inquest as to the cause of the death of Mrs. Garthwait, and rendered the following verdict:
"After viewing the dead body and hearing the testimony, I find that Mrs. Ellen Garthwait came to her death from morphine or other opiate taken by herself with suicidal intent and that she died about half past five o'clock p. m. on the 27th day of February, 1889."

- March 2, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Mr. Salanier.
_________

He Dies in the Hospital and is Buried in
the Potters Field.

    Louis La Salanier, once a member of the Louisiana legislature, and later connected with Hennessey's detective agency in Dallas, was buried yesterday in the potters field from the city hospital where he died last Friday of alcoholism.

- March 3, 1889, Dallas Morning News, p. 4, col. 2
- o o o -

City News.

    The funeral of Mr. D. F. Phillips, proprietor of the St. James Hotel, who died Saturday of neuralgia of the heart, will occur at 9 o'clock a.m. to-morrow under the auspices of Dallas Lodge No. 44, IOOF.

- March 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     Col. George Wilson, an ex-member of the legislature from Dallas county, was buried at Little Bethel Saturday.
     John Mundy died yesterday morning of consumption at his residence 1006 Commerce street, in the 40th year of his age. The funeral took place at 3 p. m. to-day. The remains were buried in the Catholic cemetery.

- March 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The hospital report submitted by the health officer showed 23 patients admitted during February, 2 died during the month and 20 remained on hand the last day.
     The city secretary's mortuary report showed 13 deaths, 9 children, 8 of whom died with measles; and 4 adults.

- March 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Will Chapman was killed four miles south of Hutchins yesterday evening about sunset. ...Chapman was under bond for killing Dudley Lowrey, the two other parties charged as accomplises, having been acquitted.

- March 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE LATE COL. GEORGE WILSON.
_______

A Summary of the Important
Events in His Honorable Career.

     The death of this old, honorable and useful citizen at his old residence, four miles northwest of Cedar Hill, a few days since, recalls his value as a citizen. He came from Missouri to Lamar county about 1840---was in several expeditions against the Indians---and in 1847 was an officer in Col. Wm. C. Young's regiment for the Mexican war; but they reached Mexico as the war closed. In 1848, he came to Dallas county, where he has ever ranked among the foremost of its most enlightened and successful farmers. He rendered valuable service in the civil war and also represented Dallas county in the legislature. While always a popular man, he shrank from office holding. For a great many years, he was a conscientious member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Having passed beyond four score years, he died lamented by all who knew him, leaving his aged wife, several sons, a daughter and several grand children to cherish his memory. A more upright and estimable man never lived in Dallas county.

- March 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

LIFE FOR LIFE.
_______

Nick Lowry, Kills Will Chapman
and Afterwards Surrenders.

     News reached the city this morning of the killing of William Chapman near Hutchins last evening about sunset. It is reported that Chapman was shot from ambush almost over the identical spot where, it is alleged, he shot and killed Dudly Lowry about three years ago. Chapman was under bond to be tried for the murder of Lowry.
Shortly after noon to-day, Sheriff Lewis was apprised by a telephone message from Lancaster of the fact that Nick Lowry acknowledged that he shot and killed Chapman and had voluntarily surrendered to Deputy Sheriff Jesse Peacock. Lowry will be jailed to-night.

- March 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Thrown By a Horse and Killed.

     A young man whose name could not be learned, but who, it is stated, was a nephew of Mr. J. G. Garvin, proprietor of a feed store on Ross avenue, was killed about four miles north of the city by being thrown from a horse.

- March 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     John Taylor, colored, incarcerated in the county jail on the charge of embezzlement, died yesterday from cramps in the bowels.

- March 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The city secretary's mortuary report accounted for 12 deaths during the week---7 adults and 5 children.

- March 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mrs. Gen. Felix A. Robertson died of pneumonia yesterday at Waco. She was the wife of Gen. Felix A. Robertson, a distinguished citizen.

- March 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

City News.

    Mr. Henry W. Dawson, the jeweler, died yesterday from pneumonia. He will be buried to-day by the Knights Templar from St. Matthew's Cathedral.

- March 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

ANOTHER MURDER CHARGE.
_______

This Time W. B. Arnold Kills
James Lucas Over Family Af-
fairs.

     W. B. Arnold was brought in yesterday from Sachse station and lodged in jail, charged with murdering James Lucas, his neighbor, last Sunday morning. Family affairs, it is stated, caused the trouble, and for some time, the two men have been going about armed. Sunday morning, Arnold was observed standing on the station platform with a gun in his hand. Lucas was approaching the station, and when close by, Arnold raised his gun and fired, the entire load of buckshot entering the face and breast of the unfortunate Lucas. The defense alleges that before Arnold fired, Lucas threw his hand around to his hip pocket, and that after he fell, a 45-calibre bull-dog pistol was discovered in his hip pocket.

- March 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Deaths.

     A. B. Brown, the 10-year-old son of Mrs. O. C. Brown, died yesterday in South Dallas of measles and pneumonia.
     Mr. Chas. S. Stewart died at his residence on McKinney avenue yesterday.
     Marion, son of ex-Sheriff W. H. W. Smith, died this morning at 6:30 at their home on Swiss avenue, corner Washington, of meningitis. Funeral to-morrow morning from the residence.

- March 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

FOUND DEAD IN BED.
_______

The Startling Discovery Made By
Some Workmen This Morning.

     This morning about 8 o'clock, Mr. Joe Lowenstein was found dead in bed at his residence on Akard, corner of Young street. Workmen were engaged in adding a second story to his dwelling, and failing to see him as usual about the premises, their curiosity was aroused and an investigation as to his whereabouts instituted. His room was entered and the corpse found in bed.
Mr. Lowenstein had been affected with brain trouble for some months and his general health for some time had been on the decline. He was about 45 years of age, and had, for some years, been a prominent business man in this city. The deceased was engaged to be married to Miss Yeidell, of Denison, at the time of his death.

- March 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Died.

    Mrs. Julia E. Onstott, aged 52, died Thursday night at 9 o'clock and was buried yesterday from the residence of her son, Monta Beach, in South Dallas. She was the mother of Geo. N. and Monta Beach and Thos. Onstott, of this city.

- March 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Please Take Notice.

     Members of Ahavath Sholom Lodge No. 346, I. O. B. B., are hereby ordered to assemble at our Hall to-morrow, Sunday, March 17th, at 9 a. m., to attend the funeral of Bro. J. Lohenstein, a member in good standing. Funeral takes place at 10 o'clock. Fine according to our By-Laws will be imposed upon those who fail to attend. Members of Dallas Lodge No. 197, as well as visiting brethren are invited to attend.
      By order of the President.
                          S. W. G
OLDBERG, Sect'y.
      March 16, '89.

- March 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     Members of Dallas Lodge No. 197, I. O. B. B., are hereby respectfully requested to meet at their lodge room at 9 o'clock a. m. Sunday, March 17, for the purpose of attending the funeral of Bro. Joe Lohenstein. By order of
                                    S
IGMUND LOEB, Pres.
     J. V
AN RONKLE, Sec'y.

- March 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING

     Under the head of officers' reports, the secretary's weekly mortuary report showed 14 deaths. Six were children and the rest adults.

- March 17, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE SUMMONS WAS SUDDEN.
_______

It Came While Mr. James Proffatt
Was Conversing with Friends.

     Mr. James Proffatt, the well-known contractor, while talking with several friends at the corner of Elm and Pearl streets yesterday, suddenly dropped dead on the sidewalk. He was subject to heart disease and it was that fearful malady that snatched him from the midst of his family and friends without even a moment's warning. He had just started from his home on Live Oak street in the best of health and cheerful spirits to walk down to the city, and meeting several friends, stopped to talk with them when death came. He was about 35 years of age and occupied a prominent position in labor circles, at one time being the workingman's candidate for mayor. He enjoyed the love and esteem of a large circle of friends who received the news of his death with visible sorrow. The remains were interred this afternoon by the Knights of Labor, of which order Mr. Proffatt was a prominent member.

- March 17, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mr. Joe Lowenstein, who died suddenly recently, carried life insurance to the amount of $10,000.

- March 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

    James Henson, aged 32 years, died of pneumonia and measles yesterday at the Kentucky House, on Ross avenue.

- March 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

LAST NIGHT'S STABBING
________

IN WHICH CHARLES PERRY BITES THE
DUST

________

And Probably Receives His Death
Wound--Four Parties Under Arrest.

    A row occurred in the south end of the city near the Alliance Exchange in which Charles Perry, a carriage washer at Clark & Cabell's livery stable, received probably his death wound.
    Four parties have been arrested, charged with implication one way or another, in the bloody deed. They are J. A. Johnson, Joseph Goams, G. W. Smith and a party by the name of McMillan....
    It appears that all hands were drinking when they met, and to this more than anything else, is probably due the general row that came up in which Perry was stabbed. Perry was carried to the stable where he was receiving surgical attention this morning, but there are small hopes of his recovery.

- March 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Nellie, the little daughter of Mr. Jno. Figh, died last night of membraneous croup.

- March 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

STATE ITEMS.

    The funeral of Miss Sallie Bradfield took place at Decatur yesterday. She was brought to that city from Dallas county for her health some months ago.

- March 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

    The fine residence which Mr. Joe Lowenstein was having erected on Akard street when he died very suddenly about a week ago, is nearly completed. A number of offers to rent it have been received by the agents for from $60 to $70 a month.

- March 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Council Meeting.

     The weekly mortuary report submitted by the city secretary showed 9 deaths-7 adults and 2 children.

- March 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     Allen Skelton died at his parents residence on Gaston avenue yesterday of pneumonia.

- March 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

FINNIE - Little Robert, infant son of Thomas J. and Fannie D. Finnie, departed this life Tuesday morning, March 26, 1889. The bereaved parents have the heartfelt sympathy of friends and relatives in the early removal of their little babe to that Kingdom of God's which belongs to little children.

- March 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mrs. John Lang died at her residence in this city on Commerce street, Wednesday evening, at about 9 o'clock, at an advanced age. She had been ill for some time, and death came as a welcome relief from her sufferings. The funeral was delayed until this afternoon in order to allow relatives to reach the city to attend the obsequies. Deceased was a most estimable lady and leaves many friends to mourn her loss.

- March 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

City News.

      News has been received by Mr. Ed. Cornwell of the death of Mrs. Martha Drane, grand-mother of Mrs. Cornwell, which occurred in Baton Rouge, La. Her husband was formerly pastor of the Baptist church in this city, which position he now holds with the Baton Rouge church.

- March 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

 

 [No Heading]

     The funeral of the late Thos. J. Potts will take place from the establishment of P. W. Linskie to-morrow afternoon at 5 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances of the deceased are invited to attend.

- July 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

DALLAS PIONEERS.
_______

Annual Reunion Being Held To-day
at Oak Cliff.

      The Dallas County Pioneer Association is in annual session to-day at Oak Cliff. There are a number of those who settled in Dallas county in the forties and fifties and they are having a very pleasant reunion to-day. The programme includes an address of welcome by Judge J. N. Aldridge and poem by Mrs. Mary Mitchell Brown, both being responded to by W. C. McKamy son of an old pioneer.
      The T
IMES-HERALD is requested to state that to-morrow's session will be held in the city park. The programme for to-morrow is as follows:
    1. Assemble at 10 a.m. Prayer by Chaplain Myers.
    2. Reports of officers and committees.
    3. Memorials of the dead during the past year by Brethren Nat M. Burford, Z. E. Coombes and George C. Cole, native of this county. [The dead during the year, so far as reported to the president, have been Col. George Wilson, Crawford Trees (the first man married in the organized county of Dallas), Col. James G. Stevens, John Merrifield, Melton Merrifield, the venerable Hiram Bennett, Miss Sabrina Sheppard, Harrison C. Marsh and wife, John Dickson, Mrs. Martha Swor, (nee Martha Winn), Henry Lively, Joe Lively, Phillip Winn and Dr. H. J. Moffatt. There are doubtless a number not reported.]
    4. Miscellaneous remarks.
        Dinner.
    1. Re-assembled at 2 p. m.
    2. Election of officers and committees for 1889-90.
    3. To be followed by social intercourse, addresses, or whatever the association may call for.

- July 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes? [page is torn]

     ____ Morgan, Sr. died at the....son, Richard Morgan.

- July 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Items of Interest to Dallasites
What is Going On in and Around the City.

    Arthur K., the infant son of W. A. and Mrs. Lillian Disborough, of 818 Wood street, was buried at 9 a.m. today.

- July 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

BUYING A HUMAN BODY.
_______

A Husband Sells the Remains of
His Wife for Ten Dollars.

     About one year ago, Alexander Maggart, who lives on Farmers Branch, a few miles north of this city, was married to Helen May McGowan in DeWitt, Mo. The marriage was consummated against the wishes of the girl's parents. Last Wednesday, Mrs. Maggart succumbed from the effects of childbirth, and the day following, was buried in the little graveyard at Farmers' [B]ranch. Thursday night, Mrs. McGowan, mother of the deceased, who had arrived from Missouri to be at the bedside of her daughter during the critical period, informed Ed. C. Smith, undertaker, that she desired her daughter's remains exhumed and embalmed for shipment to Missouri, where they were to be laid away in the family burying ground at DeWitt. Accordingly, Mr. Smith and his assistants repaired to Farmers' Branch on Friday following, and proceeded to take up the coffin, when they were ordered to desist by Maggart, husband of the deceased. Mrs. McGowan was apprised of the turn of events, and with tears and entreaties, be-sought Maggart to permit the remains to be removed. He was inexorable at first, but finally agreed to let the work of exhumation proceed on condition that he be given $10, a proposition which, of course, originated with himself. The money was paid Maggart, the body was removed, and on Friday evening, Mrs. McGowan took the north-bound Central for Missouri with her dead child.

- July 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.

     J. H. Holthusen, a young Englishman, died yesterday in the city hospital.

- July 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.

     Peter Giuffre, the well known barber, who has been in the employ of Lee Cohn on Main street, near Lamar, has been critically ill for several days past with an affection of the stomach. Latest reports says he is no better and a fatal result is feared.
     Sterling Phillips, aged 3 years and 7 months, son of S. G. and Lila E. Roberts, died at the family residence, 227 Germania street, this morning. The funeral takes place to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock. This is the third child Death has laid his icy fingers on of this grief-stricken family within the past thirteen months---two boys and a girl.

- July 17?, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8?, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Council Meeting.

    The city secretary's mortuary report, dating from June 22 to July 20, showed 46 deaths.

- July 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

The Hand of Death.

     Mrs. M. E. Bachman died at her residence, 250 North Harwood street Saturday. She was buried in the family cemetery at Cochran's Chapel yesterday.
     S. B. Hartsfield, a well-known young man, the support of a widowed mother and family and a young wife, succumbed to death's cold touch Saturday evening after a lingering illness extending through five months. The funeral was conducted by Rev. R. T. Hanks at the First Baptist church yesterday afternoon, and the remains laid to rest in Trinity cemetery.
     Mrs. Lizzie Crandall, wife of M. F. Crandall, died at 3:30 p. m. yesterday at their residence on the corner of Pearl and Commerce streets. The funeral services will be held at the residence at 7 o'clock this evening and body shipped to Buffalo, N. Y., the home of her parents, at 8:35. An infant is left the bereaved husband.

- July 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE BODY OF AN UNKNOWN MAN.
_______

Found by a Traveler Floating Down
the Trinity River.

     About 4 o'clock this afternoon, a Mr. Wm. Eslon, who lives in the northern portion of the city, telephoned his discovery of the body of a man floating down the river about an hour before. City Messenger Hereford reported the case to the county authorities and a coroner and undertaker have gone to the tank after the body, which is in such an advanced stage of decomposition as to be unrecognizable
     It is not known whether the drowned was a white or black man. Mr. Eslon stated that he was coming to town on the Miller's Ferry road and found the body about the rear of Adams slaughter house. He fastened a wire around one leg and drew it to the shore.

- July 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

ITEMS OF INTEREST TO DALLASITES

     Nothing has developed to throw any light on the identity of the body of the white man whose body was found in the river yesterday. Undertaker Linskie says, from all appearance, it had been in the water three weeks. The party was about 5 feet 6 inches tall.

- July 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mrs. Sarah J. Eason, wife of Judge B. Eason, died at the residence of her son, C. G. Eason, 320 Collin street, at 10:30 a. m. to-day. Funeral services at the residence of her son at 11 o'clock a. m. to-morrow, and concluded at the grave. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

- July 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

A SAD AND LONELY DEATH CHAMBER.
__________

A Husband Expires of Hemorrhage
While Being Held in His Wife's
Arms.

    Jim Cunningham, an aged employe of the city, died very suddenly this morning at his residence on Cottage Lane, near Victor street. Mr. G. E. Rust, who lives near the Cunningham residence, about 1 o'clock, heard Mrs. Cunningham crying out as if in distress. Mr. Rust went to their place and found Mrs. Cunningham sitting on the side of the bed holding her husband, who was in a half reclining position. A pool of blood was on the floor and the life fluid was issuing from his mouth, indicating a hemorrhage from which the unfortunate man expired within five minutes after his wife called for help. A physician was telephoned for, but none could be had on such short notice. The deceased, at the time of his death, was employed to work on the new Catholic church. He leaves a wife and one child in destitute circumstances. It is said that he contracted the troubles leading to his ill health last winter while at work on the city water works plant.

- July 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

    W. P. Anderson died very suddenly last evening at 7 o'clock of typhoid-malaria at his home, 1353 San Jacinto street. He was a prominent member of the East Dallas Baptist Church, and also a member of the Knights of Pythias. Deceased leaves a wife with seven little children, the two youngest being twins about one week old.

- July 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

About the City.

Items of Interest to Dallasites.

    Died at 1015 Wood street on the 26th inst., of typhoid malaria, the infant daughter of G. W. E. Merewether. The funeral took place at St. Patrick's church and the remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery.

- July 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

A NEGRO KILLED.
________

RESISTS ARREST BY TRYING TO
SHOOT THE OFFICER.

________

Who Fires One Fatal Shot, From
Which the Negro Died Yesterday.
Detailed Statement of an Eye-
Witness.

    John Randall, a negro laborer, about 45 years of age, was fatally shot Saturday night between 11 and 12 o'clock, by Police Officer Grizzle. The ball entered near the left kidney and found its place of exit to the right and a little below the umbilical region. The man died from the wound yesterday about 11 o'clock at the city hospital, where he was conveyed.
    Officer Franklin, who was paired with Grizzle Saturday night, and who was an eye-witness to the shooting, made this statement to a T
IMES-HERALD reporter: "We were at the union depot, standing on the west end of the platform, when we saw this colored man who was shot, pass us in company with a woman whom we afterwards learned was his wife."

- July 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

BIG DAMAGE SUIT
______

Mrs. F. F. Aden Begins a Suit
For Damages Against the
Central.

     On July 31, 1889, Captain F. F. Aden of this city, purchased a ticket for Ennis via the Houston & Teas Central railroad. At Garrett, he stepped from the train to attend to some business, and when the train pulled out, he attempted to board it, missed his hold and fell, or was thrown beneath the wheels of the cars, sustaining terrible injuries to his lower limbs. Aden was picked up and taken to the depot, where one of his limbs was amputated by the surgeon in the employ of the railroad company. He died that evening, shortly after the operation.
     To-day, the widow began suits for damage in the district court of Dallas county for herself and her daughter, Nellie, claiming $25,000 in each case. The petitions of the plaintiffs allege that F. F. Aden was injured by falling from the train by reason of gross negligence on the part of the employes of the railroad company; that he was forcibly prevented from boarding the train by the conductor, and that by reason of the conductor's arbitrary action, Aden sustained severe injuries; that the amputation which caused the death of Aden was performed by a surgeon grossly incompetent and incapacitated by reason of his love for intoxicating liquors.
     The suits are docketed for the September term of the fourteenth judicial district court. Mrs. Aden was at one time a society reporter on a Dallas newspaper and resided, during the lifetime of her husband, for many years, in St. Louis.

- July 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.

    Geo. Walter makes application for a writ of habeas corpus to reclaim his three children who fell into the hands of their grand father, John Berger, directly after the death of Mrs. Walter.

- July 31, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.
_______

ITEMS OF INTEREST TO DALLASITES.
________

What is Going On In and Around
the City.

    Mrs. Susan U. Floyd, an old citizen of Dallas county, died at Belle Plain at 9 p.m. yesterday. Her remains will arrive at her grand-daughter's, Mrs. John Allen, to-night, and she will be buried at Cox's grave yard to-morrow.

- August 2, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

MESQUITE MATTERS.
_______

Death of an Estimable Lady.

    MESQUITE, Aug. 1.-- Died, at Talbots, Tenn., to-day at 8 a.m., Mrs. Bettie Chapman, formerly Miss Bettie Rugel, of typhoid fever. She was married to G. F. Chapman of this place, June 17, last, and she and husband had gone to Tennessee to spend a short time with her mother, where she was taken sick and died. She was in the bloom of womanhood and her death has cast a gloom over the community, where she was known and loved.

- August 2, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death of Mrs. Susan L. Greer.

    Last evening at 6 o'clock, after a lingering illness, Mrs. Susan L. Greer departed this life at her residence on Hawkins street. This estimable lady, who was in her 67th year, came with her husband (long since deceased) to this city from Tennessee eighteen years ago. They purchased a tract of land which adjoins the union depot on the north and extending beyond where the Queen City Electric Light Works are located, but disposed of all save the family residence and some other property adjacent on Swiss avenue and Hawkins street. The deceased was a consistent member of the First Presbyterian Church, and Rev. Dr. Smith will conduct the funeral services this afternoon. To the four sons and one daughter as well as other relatives, the TIMES-HERALD extends its heartfelt sympathy.

- August 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.
Monthly Report of Officers and
Proceedings of Interest.

    Under the head of officer's reports, the report from the health officer relating to the city hospital, was read. It showed: Patients admitted, 22; remaining from June, 29; discharged, 11; died, 22; remaining, 22.
    The city secretary reported the death of thirteen children and eleven adults during the month.

- August 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Richardson Notes.

     The infant of A. R. White was buried at Mt. Calvary last Sunday.

- August 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

GRIEVED OVER HIS WIFE'S DEATH.
_________

And Attempt to Throw Off the Bur-
den By Taking Morphine.

    Yesterday, Geo. Martin, a horse trader, who held out on the Courthouse square, took fifteen grains of morphine with suicidal intent. He had been drinking and was under the influence of liquor when he went to a neighboring drug store and purchased the drug. A colored man saw him swallow the dose and he informed the crowd, one of whom summoned a physician and the best-known efforts were brought into play to save Martin's life.
    The cause of the act is said to be traced to the fact that he lost his wife, to whom he was devotedly attached, a few weeks ago, and grief threw him into despondency, and amid the shadows of despair and hopelessness, he resorted to the poison.

- August 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING

     The city secretary's weekly mortuary report accounted for 5 deaths--3 adults and 2 children. It is said the physicians, in some instances, are not complying with the death register ordinance.

- August 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

D. GOSLIN IS DEAD.
__________

Unfortunate Termination to the
Existence of a Well Known Busi-
ness Man.

    Last night at 9 o'clock, Mr. D. Goslin, a prominent Hebrew merchant doing business on Elm street, and a well known and like citizen, was found in his store in a dying condition from the effects of an overdose of morphine, the use of which, his acquaintances say, he was addicted to. He was removed to his home on Ervay street, where every known remedy and every effort to revive him was brought into play, but to no purpose, and this morning at 2 o'clock, he died.
    His friends deny the theory of suicide that was being circulated the early part of the day. It was a well known custom with Mr. Goslin to go down to his store Sunday night, and lighting his lamps, return home. Las evening, he remained longer than usual downtown, and his absence from the supper table created uneasiness, as he was a man generally to be found at home when not detained by business. Investigation resulted in the discovery as above stated.
    Mr. Goslin's well-known happy, jovial disposition and his pleasant surroundings, preclude the idea of suicide, especially when it is known that he used the drug as some people use other stimulants.
    It was an unfortunate termination to the life of a citizen who will be sadly missed from the community, from his family, and from the social circles where he contributed liberally to charity and to works of rendering the existence of others happy.

- August 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

    Capt. A. F. Hunt, of the firm of Hunt & McDaniel, died on yesterday at Tyler. Mr. McDaniel went down last night.

- August 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

IN AND ABOUT DALLAS.
_______

NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

     Prof. E. B. Lawrence, an educator of wide-known ability, and who has identified his interests with those of this city the past score of years or more, died suddenly Saturday. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon in the First Baptist Church, after which the remains were interred in Trinity cemetery.

- August 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

IN AND ABOUT DALLAS.

     Tom Jordan, a laborer, died suddenly last night on the sidewalk in front of his boarding house near the corner of Bryan street and Pacific avenue. The cause of his sudden demise is supposed to be traceable to over heat.
     Justice Brown yesterday held an inquest over the remains of a farm laborers whose name was Jackson. He came to the city Saturday and filled up on whisky. He started home and when about seven miles down the Trunk road, he laid down across the track and went to sleep. An engine, in backing to the city, ran over and killed him.

- August 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     Wallace, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Murphy, of Leadville, Col. Funeral from the residence of Mr. Wm. Kelley, 629 Browder street. Notice of time in the morning paper.

- August 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

IN AND ABOUT DALLAS.
_________

NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

     Mr. D. Goslin's funeral occurred last evening at 5 o'clock.

- August 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Locals From Richardson.

     Mrs. Maj. O. P. Sims died at her home on last Tuesday.

- August 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death of Mrs. Taber.

    Mrs. S. H. Taber, wife of Mr. S. H. Taber, of the firm of Taber Bros., of this city, died this morning about 10 o'clock at the family residence on Griffin street. The deceased leaves one child five or six months old. Mr. Taber has a large circle of friends who will sympathize with him in his bereavement.

- August 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

    The city secretary reported ten deaths during the week--six adults and four children.
    The city health officer recommended that the ordinance relating to the burial of the dead be amended to require every practicing physician and every midwife in the city to register their names. Referred.

- August 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

AN OVERDOSE OF MORPHINE.
________

Louis Arons, an Old Citizen, Suc-
cumbs to the Effects of the Drug.

    This morning about 6 o'clock, Mr. Louis Arons was discovered to be in an unconscious condition at his residence on Caroline street, in this city, from the effects of an overdose of morphine, taken, as his friends allege, by mistake. Medical attendance in the persons of Drs. Carter and McCarty, was summoned, but their efforts were unavailing, and, at about 9 o'clock, Mr. Arons breathed his last. His remains will be buried this afternoon at 4 o'clock in the Jewish cemetery.
    Mr. Arons, the deceased, was born in Lubch, Mechlenberg-Schwerin, on February 20, 1823. He emigrated to America about 40 years ago. He found his way to Dallas about 18 years ago, and has resided in this city ever since. He conducted a grocery store during several years on the corner of McKinney avenue and Caroline streets.
    He leaves a wife and five children to mourn their bereavement.

- August 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

    Departed this life at 7 a.m. to-day, N. M. Harper, a prominent and an honored citizen and a faithful and beloved member of the first Baptist Church.
    Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday) at 2 p.m. from the family residence on the corner of McKinney avenue and Phelps street.

- August 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

    Mr. N. M. Harper, a well known and highly esteemed citizen and a member of the First Baptist Church, died this morning at his residence on the corner of Phelps street and McKinney avenue after a spell of sickness lasting about one week. He leaves a large family and a large circle of friends who keenly feel the loss of a faithful friend and benefactor. The funeral occurs at 2 p.m. to-morrow.

- August 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

COURT PROCEEDINGS.
_______

Suits were filed as follows:

    Sallie L. Chowning against Union Central Life Insurance Company of Cincinnati, Ohio. This suit is brought to recover under a policy for $5,000, which defendants issued and delivered to John N. Chowning, now deceased. The petition recites that all the conditions required upon the part of Chowning and upon plaintiff, the beneficiary on the policy, have been complied with.

- August 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Council Meeting.

     The city secretary reported the deaths of 6 children and 6 adults.

- August 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

WHO WAS JOHN J. MURPHY?
______

He Was Killed Yesterday in the In-
dian Territory.

    Messrs. Murphy & Bolanz this morning received the following by wire:
P
URCELL, I.T., Aug. 31.
    Murphy & Bolanz:
   John J. Murphy killed yesterday. What is his parents' address?

W. H. P. TRUDGEON.

- August 31, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

 

ABOUT THE CITY.

     R. M. Allen died in North Dallas Sunday night of congestion.

- September 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

     The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Blain will regret to learn of the death of their little daughter, Laura Bertie, which sad event took place Monday at 12 o'clock at the residence of Mr. Blains' mother in Palo Pinto county, where the bereaved parents are visiting.

- September 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

     Mrs. H. W. Basye died at her residence on corner of Ervay and Beaumont at 7 o'clock this morning, in her 76th year. Funeral will take place to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock from the residence. Friends are invited to be present.

- September 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4
- o o o -

A Police Officer Dead.

     Ed. Desmond, a member of the police force, died this morning after a week's illness, resulting from a complication of malaria troubles. He leaves a widow and three children.
     The funeral occurs to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock. Upon the motion of Col. C. P. Whitehead, prosecuting attorney, the city court adjourned until to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock to afford the officers an opportunity to attend the funeral.

- September 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

    At 4 o'clock a.m. Friday, Sept. 6, 1889, E. N. Desmond, member of the police force. His funeral will be held at the Second Presbyterian church, Wood street, corner Veal, to-morrow, Saturday, at 10 a.m. The friend of the family are invited to attend.

- September 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

Mr. Desmond's Funeral

     The remains of Ed Desmond, the dead police officer, were laid to rest at 10 a. m. to-day. They were taken in charge by the Police Benevolent Association, and after short funeral services at the Second Presbyterian Church, were carried to the cemetery and turned over to the Masonic fraternity, of which Mr. Desmond was a member. The pall bearers were, E. F. Gates, H. C. Waller, John Keehan, J. A. Beard, T. B. Hogan and A. B. Rawlins, members of the force and members of the association.

- September 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. __. E. Maynor died yesterday.

- September 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

BURIED AS AN UNKNOWN.
______

A Santa Fe Passenger Meets His
Death on the Train.

     The south-bound Santa Fe train yesterday brought to the city the body of an unknown man who died on the train. The man, who as a Swede with rather handsome features, boarded the train at Reinhardt. His appearance showed him to be a man of weak constitution and he had not been in his seat long before he died, apparently without much pain.
     There was not a scrap of paper nor an article of any description about the body that would lead to ready identification, and the dead man let fall no word by which his fellow passengers could trace his friends and his past. He was dressed in ordinary working clothes; appeared 52 or 53 years of age, was 5 feet 7 inches tall and would weigh about 140 pounds. The mud on his shoes was evidence of a tramp through the country.
     The body was placed with Undertaker Linskie who interred it this morning. It was not identified and there was no clew promising to reveal friends or acquaintances of the dead man.

- September 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.

     The Elks meet to-night to adopt resolutions in memory of James Meryfield, a popular member now deceased.

- September 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

The Last Sad Rites.

To the Editor of the Times-Herald:
     On Saturday last, a group of ladies gathered in the Woman's Home to pay the last tribute of respect to the baby whose sweet blue eyes first opened on the light within its walls. All that medical skill could effect had been tried by her generous young physician, Dr. Rufus Whitis, but at 6 o'clock a. m., the gentle spirit of little Seville winged its flight to the beautiful shores of the Summer Land. Snowy blossoms were clasped in the waxen little hands and rested on the tiny form, placed there by the tender hands of the president of the Home and the other ladies who composed the audience, so feelingly addressed by the Rev. Dr. Allen.
     A portion of the impressive burial service of the Episcopal church was read, some sympathetic remarks offered to the weeping young mother and the little casket being removed, a procession led by the president started on its way to Trinity cemetery. On arriving at the grave, the concluding service was rendered by Dr. Allen, and all present realized the little babe was safe in the care of Him who said: "Let the little ones come unto me."                      HOMA.

- September 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Council Meeting.

    The health officer reported 22 patitents in the hospital August 1, 77 admitted during August, 94 discharged and 1 died.
    The city secretary's weekly mortuary report showed 13 deaths - adults 8, children 5.

- September 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.

     The youngest child of Mr. R. F. Foote, an attache of the district clerk's office, died last night.

- September 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

KILLED LAST NIGHT.
________

F. W. Habel Sends a Deadly Bullet
Through Ed McDonald's Brain.

     F. W. Habel, a painter claiming Abilene, Kan., as his home, but arriving in Dallas yesterday from Fort Worth, shot and killed a waiter in the Mascot saloon on Main street last night about half past one o'clock. Habel and the waiter engaged in a dispute over the price of a bottle of beer and continued with a war of words until someone suggested that they go out of the saloon upon the sidewalk where they could settle matters, which was, at once acted upon McDonald when gaining the sidewalk, ran or walked rapidly up the street, followed by Habel and accompanied by F. S. Moody, who overtook him (McDonald) near the alley running northwest of Sycamore street. At this point, Habel opened fire, one shot taking effect in the side and one penetrating the brain of his victim, McDonald. A crowd collected on the spot at once and the wounded man was found to be breathing, but within five minutes, he was dead. Habel claims that he acted in self-defense and only shot McDonald to save his own life. Special Wells and Policeman Holly promptly arrested Habel and Moody on the spot immediately after the shooting. The weapon used was a 38-calibre Smith & Wesson revolver.

- September 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

     Dr. Carter says that this is the time of the year when the death roll is the largest. This year, however, is an exception to the rule, and while, of course, in a city like Dallas, people are dying, the doctor says it can be stated as a fact, that this city is exceptionally healthy.

- September 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Real Estate Transfers.

     J. O. Rickets, administrator of estate of T. J. Pollard, deceased, to John Tomson and M. A. Tomson, 70x100 feet on Cora street in city of Dallas, $1100.

- September 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     At the residence of her father in West Dallas, Miss Emma Warnetta, daughter of Mr. G. W. Cupinall, on Thursday, Sept. 26, at the age of 18 years, after an illness of three days. She leaves a father, mother and three sisters to mourn her loss.

- September 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 2.
- o o o -

NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

     Justice Brown, yesterday, held an inquest over the dead body of Mollie Brown, a mulatto woman found dead in a shanty near the electric light tower. The coroner's jury returned a verdict that she came to her death from a combination of diseases and the excessive use of drink.

- September 30, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

The Body Mangled Out of All Hu-
man Semblance.

     Last Saturday evening, a train on the Dallas and Waco branch of the Missouri Pacific road ran over and killed D. S. Hart, a white man, at a point about four miles south of the city. The body of the unfortunate man was mangled in a most horrible manner. The head, legs and arms were severed from the trunk, presenting a ghastly sight. The remains were gathered up and conveyed to Lancaster, and buried. The coroner's inquest found in accordance with the apparent facts.
     The engineer of the locomotive states that when Hart was first discovered, he was lying down between the tracks about fifty feet ahead, and that it was then too late to prevent the accident. Whether the man was asleep or drunk, is not known.
     In the pockets of the dead man was found a small memorandum book in which was written the name, D. S. Hart, and also a railroad pass from St. Louis to Texarkana bearing the same name. On his person were also found letters addressed to him from Wisconsin, one from T. L. Dempsy of Marshall, and one from John Ross of Fort Gibson, Indian Territory. Hart was about 30 years old and had dark hair and a brown moustache.

- September 30, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE WOMAN'S HOME.
_______

Work Accomplished During the
Month of September.

     The ladies of the Woman's Home held their third quarterly meeting this morning, Mrs. P. S. Pfouts presiding.
     The matron's report was read and approved.
     During the month, fourteen persons have been cared for by the home. Some of these persons were ill and were treated by the physicians attending during the month. Others were in destitute circumstances and were sheltered and provided necessaries by the home.
     The sweet blue eyes of a little baby girl closed to open again on the "other side of the river," one hundred and twenty-eight visits having been made to little Sevill by her kind young physician, Dr. Rufus Whitis, but "she closed on her bosom her dimpled hands and fearlessly entered the phantom barque," and her young mother, bereft of husband and child, had to take up the broken threads of life again, feeling thankful her child had received every care the Home could give.
     The ladies return their thanks to all who aid them in their work of love and to the kind physicians of Dallas who never fail to respond to a call from the home. Physicians attending during September: Drs. D. L. Hall, L. Coover and Rufus Whitis.

- October 1, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Her Sufferings Ended.

     On Saturday, September 21, little Maggie, aged 8 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Brooks, passed away at the family residence on McCoy street after a lingering illness. Her bereaved parents have the sympathy of all their friends in this sad hour of affliction.
     'I think when He laid His dear hands on
          their heads,
     In blessings so rich, sweetly given,
     He spoke some for Maggie, in the words
          softly said:
     'Of such are the kingdom of Heaven.'

- October 1, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

IN AND ABOUT DALLAS.

     J. G. Leigh died yesterday at his residence on Houston street. He was a member of the K. of P. lodge.

- October 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3
- o o o -

City Council Meeting.

    The city secretary's weekly death roll contained the names of four adults and five children.

- October 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

     The funeral of Timothy Bresenham occurs to-morrow at 9:30 a. m.
     John Williams, aged 21, and a nephew of R. D. Strother, died yesterday at his uncle's residence.
     Barney Ray, an old man, who was picked up recently by the river side, where he was lying in a dying condition, gave up the ghost yesterday at the city hospital. Dr. Carter pronounced his malady congestive apoplexy, a disease, the root of which, is intoxicants. Nothing is known of his relatives. He was without money.

- October 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Real Estate Transfers.

     The heirs of H. Douglas, deceased, to Samuel W. Worley, lot 4, block A, Central avenue addition, $650.

- October 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

ITEMS OF INTEREST FROM THE VARI-
OUS COURTS OF DALLAS.

     Kenneth Foree was appointed temporary administrator of the estate of Geo. D. Clark, deceased.

- October 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

IN AND ABOUT DALLAS.

     Died, at the residence of her father, Judge Geo. R. Fearn, Pocahontas street, at 8:10 this morning, Fannie Fearn. Funeral services at St. Mathew's Cathedral to-morrow evening at 3:30 o'clock.

- October 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     Died, at her home in Oak Cliff, to-day, Mrs. D. P. Mahoney. Funeral Sunday from St. Patrick's church at 3 o'clock. Friends invited to attend.

- October 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2
- o o o -

COUNCIL PROCEEDINGS

     The city secretary's death roll contained 20 names--fifteen adults and five children.

- October 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     John F. Berry, unknown about Dallas, but who said he had relatives living in Collinsville, Ala., was run over by a Missouri Pacific railway car near the grain elevator about noon yesterday, and received injuries from which he died at 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

- October 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

City News.

     Mrs. Marietta Peck died yesterday at the residence of her son, M. K. Peck, corner of Ross avenue and Hull street.

- October 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mr. Maxime Guillot died to-day at noon at his residence, corner Harwood and Live Oak streets. The funeral occurs to-morrow at 3 o'clock in the afternoon from the Church of the Sacred Heart.

- October 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     Maxime Guillot died at noon to-day, at his residence corner Harwood and Live Oak strets. Deceased was born Dec. 10, 1829.      Funeral will take place from the Church of the Sacred Heart, to-morrow morning at 10:30. Friends and acquaintances invited.

- October 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Obituary.

     At 12 o'clock to-day at his residence, corner of Live Oak and Harwood streets, Mr. Maxime Guillott departed this life after a lingering illness and after an honorable residence in Dallas of thirty-five years. Funeral to-morrow at 10:30 a. m. Friends are invited to attend.

- October 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Attention, Pioneers of Dallas Co.

     All members of our association who can, are requested to assemble at 9:30 a. m. to-morrow (October 25) at the Live Oak Grocery, 949 Elm street, to attend in a body, the funeral of our lamented brother, Maxime Guillot.
J
OHN HENRY BROWN, President.
Wm.C. McK
AMY, Secretary.

- October 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Dallas City Council.

    The mortuary report of the city secretary showed six deaths for last week, three children and three adults.

- October 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

    Only thirty-one deaths from all causes have occurred in Dallas since October, up to and including the 20th day of the month. Dr. Carter, city health officer, says it is remarkable for a city the size of ours.

- October 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

MURDERED HIS SWEETHEART
_______

Because She Refused to Marry Him
--Behind the Bars.

     A case of disappointed love with tragic termination is reported from the northern portion of the county nine miles from the city. On Mr. O. P. Scott's place, there lived a bright mulatto girl whose dusky charms kindled a blaze of love in the heart of Walter Sims, a negro man about grown. Sims pressed his claims with all the devotion of an ardent lover, but at the last moment, he was refused. He was persistent in his efforts to gain the fondest admiration from the girl, but that she would not bestow upon him. Last Tuesday morning, he called at the cabin on the place where Kate Arbuckle, the object of his affection, lived. The other negroes were picking cotton in a field nearby. Just what transpired in the house is not known, but Mr. Scott, who was going to the horse lot, saw the smoke from the pistol and heard its report as the unfortunate girl left the cabin and, screaming for help, fell to the ground. Sims fled at once and Mr. Scott gathered his gun and, overtaking him, placed him under arrest, and landed him in jail the day the shooting occurred.
     The ball passed through the abdomen of the victim and she lingered between life and death until she died yesterday morning.

- October 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     E. A. Michel, a pressman, died yesterday at 751 Ross avenue of black jaundice.

- October 30, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Arthur Louis Evarts, infant and only child of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Evarts, who reside at the corner of Live Oak and Field streets, died Thursday morning. It was buried in Trinity cemetery.

- November 1, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mrs. S. A. Savage died yesterday at the family residence on Henning avenue in South Dallas. She was buried this afternoon.

- November 1, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING

     The city secretary reported the death of nine children and six adults during the week.

- November 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

COURT PROCEEDINGS
FORTY-FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT.

     On the jury trial docket in this court, the following were the most important entries:...S. J. Adams against N. M. Harper and others, Mrs. Bama Adams executrix of S. J. Adams, suggests the death of the plaintiff and she has leave to prosecute the suit in her name as executrix; she suggests the death of the defendant, N. M. Harper, and an order for scire facias against his legal representatives to make them parties to the suit is granted.

- November 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

COURT PROCEEDINGS

FORTY-FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT.

     In Judge Tucker's court the following proceedings were had: W. J. Young against T. P. Worthington, cause abated on account of plaintiff's death.

COUNTY COURT.

     Application to probate the will of the late Max Guillot was filed to-day. The estate is valued at something over one hundred thousand dollars and it all goes to Mrs. Mary Guillot, wife of deceased.

- November 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

About the Metropolis.

     Willie Burnes, the little boy whose leg was cut off by a railway train during the Fair, died yesterday of lockjaw.

- November 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

[Advertisement]

     Murphy & Bolanz...facts about the metropolis...the city health officer's last annual mortality report showed the death rate to be 12 1/2 to the 1000 inhabitants.

- November 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. __.
- o o o -

Death of Mrs. Terry.

     The announcement of the death of Mrs. Winfred Terry will be received with profound regret by the friends of that lady and of the family. Mrs. Terry died at the residence of her son-in-law, J. T. Duncan, in West Dallas, at 2 o'clock this morning in the 84th year of her age. The funeral will take place from the First Methodist Church in this city to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock. The deceased was an old resident of Dallas county and leaves a large number of friends and acquaintances to mourn her loss. She was the mother of J. S., C. M. and T. G. Terry, well-known citizens.

- November 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mrs. Winfred Terry, at o'clock 2 A. M. Nov 6, 1889, at the residence of her son-in-law, J. T. Duncan, West Dallas. Funeral from First M. E. Church at 10 o'clock Nov. 7. The deceased was the mother of J. S., C. M. and T. G. Terry, and was in her 84th year.

- November 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Trustee's Sale [notice]

     H. C. DeGrummond, of Johnson Co., Tx....died May 22, 1889...Sanger's employees Loan & Saving Assoc.

- November 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 5.
- o o o -

Notice.
ESTATE OF W. S. LEE, DECEASED.

     Whereas, letters of administration upon the estate of W. S. Lee, deceased, were granted to the undersigned by the Dallas county court on the 31st day of October, A. D., 1889, all persons holding claims against said estate are required to present the same within the time prescirbed by law. My residence and postoffice address is Dallas, Texas.
MRS. C
ORA I. LEE.

- November 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

A WRESTLING MATCH
_______

Terminates Fatally for Frank Glos-
sett.

     Frank Glossett, who was injured while wrestling with a party in a Lamar street saloon last Wednesday, died yesterday at his residence on Sumpter street. It was his dying request that no criminal proceeding be had against the man with whom he wrestled when he received the fatal fall. He exonerated him from any blame. However, it may serve as a lesson to others. Death was the result of paralysis caused by Glossett's head being forced down upon his chest, which fractured his spine.

- November 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

The city secretary reported twelve deaths for the week passed.

- November 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     August Evanajamame, a German, while in conversation with friends on the corner of Young and Austin streets yesterday, dropped dead. Heart disease was the cause of death.

- November 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Information has been received in Dallas announcing the death at McGregor of J. H. Meade, a Dallasite. He was a member of the abstract firm of Meade & Hunt. He was sick with pneumonia only a few days.

- November 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     M. B. Looney, foreman of the street works, has collected a considerable [bit] of money to defray the burial expenses of "Bill" Leary, an old and highly-respected, though unfortunate citizen of Dallas, who was buried by the laboring fraternity.

- November 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Died, last evening, on Crowdus street, the infant son of Mr. John Dillon. The funeral took place at 2:30, this afternoon.

- November 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The body of Joe Hargrave passed through here from the Indian Territory en route to Duncanville yesterday evening. His brother-in-law, John Penn, received a telegram stating that Hargrave was killed, but which gave no further information on the subject. Deceased, who is a son of Dr. Hargrave, who recently moved to Denton, is well known in this city, and has been always looked upon as a good natured, though reckless young man. It is generally believed that he met with foul play in the Indian country.

- November 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     The report of the death of Joe Hargrave in the Indian Territory has not been substantiated. The wire message received by his brother-in-law, Mr. John Penn, to meet the body at the depot here, was followed by preparations for his burial at Wesley, and brought together at the railroad station a large number of family friends and relatives. Some of Hargrave's acquaintances believe that the dispatch was perpetrated by the young man himself.

- November 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS

     Died on the 13th at his residence, corner of Peak and San Jacinto streets, P. E. Baker, recently from southern Texas, and a staunch adherent to the Presbyterian Church. He was buried yesterday evening at 3:30 in Trinity Cemetery, and his remains were attended to the grave by many of his brethren.

- November 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

 

About the Metropolis

    R. N. Hubbard, who was knocked down and run over by a frightened horse attached to a buggy last Wednesday afternoon, as noted in the Times-Herald yesterday, died last evening [from] the injuries he received. He died [of] a concussion of the brain caused [by a] fracture in the skull. He was a ____ husband, and a wife and four little children depended upon him for the comforts of life.

- November 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Death of Mr. Geo. M. Figh.

     Mr. Geo. M. Figh, a prominent contractor of this city, died about 2 p. m. to-day. He has been of a delicate constitution for many years, and had been sick for several weeks so that his decease was not unexpected by his family. His brother, Mr. James Figh, of Montgomery, Ala., is here, and according to the request of deceased, he will carry the remains to Montgomery for interment. The funeral notice appears elsewhere.

- November 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

     Mr. Geo. M. Figh, at his residence, 731 North Harwood street, about 1 p. m. Nov. 15, 1889. His funeral will take place from the First Baptist Church to-morrow, 4:30 p. m. He was a prominent and much beloved member of this church. His friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

- November 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS

     Mrs. Judge Reuben A. Reeves died yesterday afternoon at the residence of Jeff Word on Ross avenue. Mrs. Reeves was the wife of Judge Reuben Reeves, late a member of the supreme court of New Mexico. The funeral occurs to-morrow at 2 p. m.

- November 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Council Proceedings.

    City Secretary reported 11 deaths during the week -- 7 adults and 4 children.

- November 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Jennie, the little daughter of T. W. Scollard died yesterday, aged a little past five years. The funeral occurs at 3 p. m. to-morrow from St. Matthews Cathedral.
     A very difficult operation in surgery was performed last evening on a Mrs. Cloud at the Woman's home, under the superintendence of Drs. Boyce and Ray, assisted by four or five other physicians. The patient was suffering from cancer, and her recovery is very doubtful.

- November 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
______

COUNTY COURT.

     T. G. T. Kendall filed suit against Kenneth Foree as the administrator of the estate of Geo. Clark, deceased, asking for partition in the estate of Clark and Kendall, who at the time of Clark's death, were in partnership in the livery business. The estate is valued at $2754.57 at the time of Clark's death. A statement of the case shows that during the partnership, Clark, who was manager, recieved partnership funs to the amount of $3835.85. During the time, there was paid out $3110.45, leaving a balance on hand of $725.40. Plaintiff received $203 partnership funds, and since Clark's death he has continued the business and receieved $4217.70 and paid out $3611.05, leaving a balance on hand of $505.54. That plaintiff now has partnership profits in his hands of the value of $3241.62 and there is due the sum of $500.

- November 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     The little 3-year-old daughter, Jonnie, of Mr. and Mrs. John B. McCraw of South Park, was buried yesterday at Trinity cemetery.

- November 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

A TRAIN'S AWFUL WORK.
_______

A YOUNG LADY RUN DOWN AND
KILLED

______

By a Freight Train on the Central---
She was a Deaf Mute Going to a
Wedding--Rapid Speed.

     After the TIMES-HERALD went to press yesterday afternoon, it received information of a horrible accident which occurred shortly after 4 o'clock, according to the statement of witnesses, on the Central railway near the intersection of Ross avenue, in which a young lady deaf mute lost her life. The unfortunate victim was Miss Nannie West, a beautiful and highly-educated young woman 19 years of age. She had just left the residence of Mrs. Moss on Hugo street, between Thomas avenue and Cochran street, and was walking down the railroad to attend the wedding of Miss Julia Burton and M. W. Mason on Main street. When near the yard limits between Ross avenue and Flora street, she was run down and killed by a Central locomotive drawing a south-bound freight.
     The instrument of death threw her backwards against the pilot, frightfully mangling her lower limbs and crushing her skull and then hurled her to the right and her lifeless body was left lying on the embankment near the rails. Several colored people, being the vicinity, saw the accident.. One witness, who left the track just in front of the young woman, says when she looked back, the pilot was doing its dreadful work and the victim, in falling backwards, was holding her hand to her head. On her way down the road, she was observed to look back twice, but the swift messenger came thundering along in a moment, when doubtless, she felt that she had perfect assurance of safety. The engineer gave the usual signals of danger, but his blood almost chilled in his veins when he saw his locomotive bearing down on the form that gave no heed to his warning.
     The body was left where it fell until viewed by Justice John Henry Brown and a jury. It was then removed to the undertaker's.
     The wedding was celebrated without the presence of Miss West, but the house of merriment was turned to mourning when the cause of her unexplained absence was made known.
     Miss West had nearly completed her education, having left school only last June, where she was the companion of Miss Fannie Moss, daughter of the lady whom she left a few minutes before meeting the terrible fate. She had a large circle of acquaintances who were terribly shocked to hear of her tragic death. Her father, who is now dead, was once a prosperous merchant of Terrell.
     More accidents have been reported on this section of the Central road than any other road leading into the city. It has not been a great while since a negro preacher was killed there and several parties have made exceedingly narrow escapes by being knocked down by locomotives. It is a fact that trains run down that grade and across the street intersections toward the Union depot at a rate of speed which greatly endangers human life, and public complaint has often been heard on this account. It is time the proper remedies were administered.

- November 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Mr. Hart, living on the corner of Carter and Hoard streets, is pronounced by his physicians as past all hope. He has had rapid consumption for some time.

- November 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Obituary.

     Died, at 1015 Commerce street this morning at 7:30, Mrs. Aaron Cohn. The remains will be interred to-morrow.
     Died, at 10 o'clock his morning at his residence on Elm street, John T. Hay, a druggist of this city. His remains will be interred at Trinity cemetery at 2 o'clock this evening.
     Died, at northwest corner of Houston and Elm streets, yesterday evening, Clinton Google, brother to Wm. Google, manager of the Clarendon Cattle Company. The funeral will take place this afternoon.
     Died, at the residence of her son, 409 Ervay street, at 10:30 last night, Mariam, the widow of the late Colby T. Smith, in the 63d year of her age. The funeral will take place at 10 o'clock to-morrow from Commerce Street Christian Church. Mrs. Smith, who has been a resident of Dallas since 1860, is the mother of Ed C., H. H., G. D., Ellen and Willis R. Smith and Mrs. Oliver Thomas, whose families are well and favorably known throughout the city and Dallas county.

- November 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Council Meeting.

    The (city) secretary reported 11 deaths during the week, 8 children and 3 adults....

- November 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1-3.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The friend and acquaintances of the late John C. Hay are requested to attend his funeral from the First Methodist Church to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock.

- November 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE VERDICT.
_______

Justice John Henry Brown's Verdict On
the Death of Annie West.

     Judge John Henry Brown, who viewed the body of Miss Annie West, the beautiful young lady who met with a shocking death on the railroad Tuesday, finished taking evidence yesterday and returned the following verdict:
     "After viewing the body and hearing the testimony of A. Sims, Maggie A. West, and Joseph Teague, I find that Annie West was killed by the Houston and Texas Central railroad about 3:30 p. m., Nov. 21, 1889, near the Junction or crossing of Flora street; that she was a deaf and dumb girl about nineteen years of age; that the train was running at the rate of about sixteen miles per hour and that the whistle was not blown until the train was within sixty or eighty yards of Miss West."
     A legal representative of the road was present this morning and obtained a copy of the verdict. A suit for damages, it is said, will be instituted against the road by the relatives of the ill-fated young lady.

- November 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

A Servant Girl Suicides.

     Lizzie Odeamer, a servant girl in the family of W. E. Hughes, of the Windsor hotel, suicided Saturday by taking morphine. She was twenty-nine years old, and had been in the family four years. The following note, which she left, threw no light on the cause for her rash act:
     "Dear loved ones--Do not mourn for me, I am so happy to die. I must have been born for this, for there always was a depression on me that I could not cast off, even when a child. Best for you to know how happy I am to die."

- November 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

HIS LAST ACT.
_______

SUICIDED IN A CHEAP LODGING
HOUSE ON CAMP STREET.

_______

After Drinking Beer and Writing a Letter
Giving the Cause and Disposing
of Earthly Effects.

     Last night, an unknown man entered the Farmers Hotel, a cheap German lodging house on Camp street, paid the proprietor for a bed, called for beer three or four times for the crowd and then asked for a piece of paper and a desk where he might write. The paper was given him and he was assigned a seat at the table in the dining room. When he had finished writing, he gave the document and $00 in cash to the proprietor, and he was then shown a dark, dingy room containing two cots spread with blankets. The stranger occupied one of the cots and another lodger, the other. During the night, the lodgers were disturbed by an incessant and deathly rattle coming from the throat of the unknown man. Later on, someone became alarmed and attempted to arouse him. He was already in the throes of death, and an empty laudanum bottle lying on the table told of the instrument that was doing the work. Physicians were called, but their efforts were unavailing, and the man died about 8 o'clock this morning. He was a middle-aged man and has not been identified. His appearance and dress showed him to be a day laborer. His countenance was of a German east. He had a full growth of beard and dark hair, inclined to curl. He was about five feet six inches and would weigh between 150 and 160 pounds. Here is the contents of the letter he left with the proprietors. It was written in a steady hand and the characters are quite legible, but nothing definite is revealed as to the man's identity:
     As I am about to stand before the presence of my Maker, I have no earthly motives to disguise the truth. I have been, for these last fifteen years, or so, the victim of a base slander and have borne the blunt of vile lies that maliciously, or heedlessly has nevertheless ruined my life and made it a burden. Those who wreck their revenge on me do so justly, but are mistaken in the man. They have done me infinite injury, but I forgive them as I hope to be forgiven. This is a solemn moment for me, and my own life that I am going to take is the only human life that I have taken. Those who have so thirsted for my ruin may not, when, the inevitable moment comes, meet it with as much composure as I do. My name may suffer, but the carrion feeds on the dead. I have many aliases, but I had to change my name often, being a deserted of the U. S. army. I leave one hundred dollars behind me. Let fifty defray the expenses of my burial; the rest to the lady who lost 25 dollars in the fall of 85. I was hard up to kept up the money that I found. Good bye."
     Justice Braswell viewed the remains and will take testimony to-morrow.

- November 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Died, at his residence on Pacific avenue, James Auburn, in the 25th year of his age. His remains will be interred at his family burial ground between here and Mesquite.
     Died, at the city hospital yesterday morning, J. Campbell, a stranger to this country, but well connected in the state of Mississippi, where his mother resides. The deceased's brother is a member of the Finley Store Company of St. Louis. His remains will be held in the Linskie vault until sent for by his family.

- November 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Died, at the residence of her father, Eighth street, Oak Cliff, Miss Katie Henderson, aged 16 years. The deceased had been ill only a few days when she fell a victim to typhoid malaria. Her remains will be interred this evening at 3 o'clock.

- November 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

COURT PROCEEDINGS.
JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     S. H. Paree vs. B. F. Cloud; death of the defendant suggested and leave given plaintiff to make his legal representatives parties defendant; continued.

- November 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     The wife of Rufus Davis (colored), died this morning of consumption. Her remains were interred at 3:30.

- November 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Christophus Peterson, a stranger in this city, died this morning and will be buried at 3 o'clock.
     The remains of J. W. Kimble, who died four days ago, will be forwarded to Davenport, Iowa, this evening.

- November 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Mrs. Rossie Hanks Dead.

     Mrs. Rossie E. Hanks died this morning at 10 o'clock at her residence on Wall street three doors south of Corinth. The funeral occurs at 10:30 to-morrow morning from her late residence. Mrs. Hanks was a devoted member of the First Baptist Church. She was the widow of B. M. Hanks who died two years ago, leaving his wife and brother, R. T. Hanks, care of the six little children, who are now left without earthly parents. The grief stricken relatives have a large circle of friends who tender them sympathy and condolence in their dark hour of sorrow, which falls to the lot of every human being.

- November 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Chris Peterson, a brick mason, died at the city hospital yesterday from the effects of pneumonia.
     Died, at Marshall, this morning, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Leachman. The funeral service will be read at the family residence at 10 o'clock on Friday. The friends of the family are invited to attend.
     E. W. Tillton, who was last night reported to be dying at the National Hotel from an overdose of opium taken with suicidal intent, is in a fair way to recover. When Mr. Hodges and his son discovered Tillton, he was apparently lifeless, and it was only through their strenuous efforts to excite circulation that his life was preserved. The physician in attendance appears confident that the opium was taken without any intention of self-destruction, as Tillton had been using it together with other medicines for several days. There was also a quantity of grapes and refreshments in the room, which would tend to prove that the man was not contemplating suicide. It is reasonable to suppose that the drug was taken to alleviate pain caused from dysentery.

- November 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The funeral of Mrs. Rossie E. Hanks will occur from her late residence on Wall street, three doors south of Corinth street, to-morrow morning at 10:30. Friends and acquaintances invited.

- November 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE DRUG'S FATAL WORK.
_________

E. W. Tilton Dies at the National
Hotel from the Effects of Opium.

     The TIMES-HERALD, on Wednesday evening, chronicled the attempt at self-destruction of E. W. Tilton, at the National Hotel, via the opium route. Yesterday morning, it was stated that the sick man was in a fair way to recover, and that the effects of the drug were rapidly disappearing. This was a mistake, however, for at 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, shortly after the forms of the TIMES-HERALD were sent to press, the attendants noticed a change come over their charge, and a few minutes later, the death rattle in his throat announced that the end was near at hand. An examination showed that life was extinct and the coroner was immediately notified.

- November 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o-

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     The remains of the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Leachman were interred to-day.
     Died, at 6 o'clock yesterday morning of rapid consumption, at his residence in North Dallas, W. N. Hart. His remains were interred last evening.
     Died.--On Wednesday night, Mrs. Conkright, wife of J. Conkright of the Equitable Mortgage Company, Main street. Her remains will be interred to-morrow evening.
     The case of Mr. E. L. Collins against the Texas & Pacific Railway Company, for $20,000 damages on the life of her husband, who was killed while in the company's employ, is on trial to-day before Judge Burke.

- November 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The funeral of Mrs. Bertha Putz will take place at 10 o'clock Saturday morning from the Sacred Heart Church, Bryan street.

- November 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mrs. Fannie Simon died last night at 12 o'clock. Mrs. Simon was seventy-eight years old, the mother of Mrs. I. Reinhardt, Mrs. Sam Klein and Mrs. Henry Loch. She leaves twenty living grandchildren and two great grandchildren. The remains were shipped to New York this morning for interment.

- December 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Mrs. Chester died yesterday evening at her residence, corner of Main and Pearl, and was interred this forenoon.

- December 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
_________

OTHER PROCEEDINGS.

     Suit was filed by Matilda Elam against W. C. Slagle and the minor heirs of J. J. Pratt, deceased, to remove a cloud of title.

- December 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

CRUSHED TO DEATH.
_______

The Driver of a Brick Wagon Killed
by a Runaway Team.

     About 11:30 this morning, a drayman hauling a load of brick from Butler's yard to Oak Cliff, met with a most violent death while crossing the Dallas bridge. It appears that the wagon, which was not supplied with a brake, and heavily laden, rattled down the steep descent so as to precipitate the load to the front and hurl the unfortunate man between the horses' feet. One of the wheels passed over his neck, which was broken, and death ensued instantaneously. The body, which was not recognized by anybody close to the scene of the accident, was placed on a load of dirt and taken to the establishment of Fife & Gaston, where a police officer had it placed temporarily. A TIMES-HERALD reporter visited the Dallas brick yard and other places, but no light could be thrown on the dead man's antecedents. He was not in their employ, and nothing was known concerning him. The body was afterwards taken in charge by Undertaker P. W. Linskie, and the body is now at his establishment, corner Main and Harwood streets, awaiting identification. The dead man is about 25 years of age, of medium height, a blonde with reddish hair and slight mustache. He wore a blue shirt, overalls, heavy shoes and a tattered black hat.
     Fifty cents in silver coin, a jack-knife and a comb were found in his pockets. Two men called and viewed the remains before they were removed to Linskie's. One of the parties claimed to identify the dead man, saying this his name was Lom White, and that he had an uncle at Bear creek named Price Bless. This was afterwards denied. Justice John Henry Brown will inquest the body.

- December 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

A Sad Affair.

     A young man named Lee Grebar, residing on Live Oak street, and in the employ of Benedikt & Co., was found dead yesterday morning from the effects of an overdose of "Sapanal," administered the previous night. Grebar (on Tuesday evening) was out buggy riding with a young lady and was apparently in good health. Before going to bed, it was stated that he took the medicine as a soporific with the effects above stated. The deceased is a son of H. M. Grabar, who is well connected in this city.
     "Sapanal" is one of the "anodines" recently introduced in lieu of opium (and its preparations), and, like "anti pyrine," is extremely dangerous to any body suffering from heart trouble. A druggist on Elm street informed a T
IMES-HERALD reporter that he had frequently filled orders for 30 grains at a dose, but such reckless usage of a drug like "sapanal," whose merits and demerits have not yet been thoroughly tested, is, to say the least, a dangerous experiment.

- December 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died From Her Injuries.

     The TIMES-HERALD, yesterday, chronicled the horrible accident which befell little Effie Hodges, the four-year old adopted daughter of the National Hotel, who missed her footing and fell into a kettle of boiling water. At first, it was thought the child would survive her injuries, but after eight hours of the most excruciating suffering, she died last evening. No blame is attached to anyone for the accident.

- December 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     The will of Persis M. Newton was probated to-day.
     The body of Mrs. Simons was last night shipped to New York for interment.
     A pair of hearses with rich silver mountings and far more extravagant in price than any yet shipped to Dallas have just been received by P. W. Linskie.
     Justice John Henry Brown yesterday inquested the remains of Henry C. Davis, an aged planter living seven miles south of the city, who was knocked from a bridge by a Central train last Tuesday.

- December 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2-5.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Mrs. E. L. Parrott, the wife of J. Parrott of the Singer Machine Company, died at the corner of Ross avenue and Masten street Wednesday, and was buried yesterday evening at Trinity cemetery.
     Willis Cook, the unfortunate young man who met with horrible death yesterday at the foot of Commerce street, his neck being broken by a runaway team, was raised at Lancaster, and the remains were taken to that place for burial to-day. At first, it was supposed that Tom White was the name of the unfortunate, but late last evening, an uncle of the deceased called at Undertaker Linskie's and identified the body as that of his nephew, Willis Cook.

- December 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Mr. DeLally Toomey died this morning at his home on Highland street. Mr. Toomey was a native of White Sulphur Springs, Va., came from Louisiana to Texas, and had been a resident of Dallas about one year. He was engaged in the real estate business, and was fifty-eight years old at his death. The funeral notice appears elsewhere.

- December 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     De Lally Toomey died this morning at 3 o'clock, at his home on Highland street. Funeral at 10 o'clock to-morrow from the Church of the Sacred Heart. All friends invited to attend.
     North Louisiana and Virginia papers please copy.

- December 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     F. E. Peyton vs. M. Pointer et al.; death of plaintiff suggested and cause continued to make new parties plaintiff.

- December 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Mitchel is lying dangerously ill at the residence of its grandfather, Justice John Henry Brown, and no hopes are entertained of its recovery.

- December 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

Thomas H. Batton Shot and Killed
by E. P. Hyatt--M. Wasserman
Shot and Mortally Wounded by J.
Fischel, Who, in Turn, Attempts to
Commit Suicide--The Facts in the
Case.

     The second edition of the TIMES-HERALD, last evening, noted the encounter which took place between L. H. Batton and E. T. Hyatt, which terminated in the death of the former and the incarceration of the slayer in the city prison. Through the courtesy of Maj. Arnold, a reporter of the TIMES-HERALD was enabled to secure an interview with the prisoner last evening. Hyatt was found in his cell by the scribe and readily gave his version of the tragedy.
     At this point, a description of the alleged murderer is not out of place. He is tall, well proportioned, as dark as an Indian, with black hair, and mustache and a piercing eye. He is not a bad looking fellow, is intelligent and a fluent talker. He is as cool as an ice-berg and impresses one with the idea that he is master of himself, and a bad man to tackle. He is thirty-seven years of age and has evidently seen the ups and downs of life that always follow a rolling disposition.
     "Hyatt," said the reporter, "will you favor the T
IMES-HERALD with your version of the killing of Batton?"
     "Certainly. I have nothing to conceal, and the facts in the case, from my standpoint, are at your disposal. Thos. H. Batton, the man who lies cold in death, has been a friend of mine for years. At Eureka Springs, Arkansas, we first met, and all parties to the tragedy came from that place. For several years past, I have made my headquarters at Denison, although I have lived in this city at intervals, working at my trade, that of plastering. That is the trade I have followed of late, although I served my time as locomotive fireman and became an engineer. I ran an engine on the St. Louis & San Francisco, with headquarters at Springfield, Mo., for two years, and afterward ran the engine on the construction train while the company was building the road to Eureka Springs. I quit railroading in that section, however, and came south. Not finding an opening, I turned my attention to plastering, and have since followed that trade."
     "Are you a married man?" queried the reporter.
     "Yes, sir."
     "Where did your wife reside? at Denison?"
     "No. She is living at LaGrange."
     "When did you arrive in Dallas on this trip?"
     "About six weeks ago, just about the time the fair opened. I came over from Denison and decided to remain here."
     "Please state exactly what transpired, or in other words, the causes which led to the fatal meeting between Yourself and Batton this afternoon."
     "Willingly, although I must ask one request, that the name of the lady in no wise to blame for the killing, shall not figure in the case. When I came to Dallas, Eugene White, a plasterer, came with me. Batton was here in advance of us. Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Duke, originally from Eureka Springs, roomed over Kirk's store on Elm street. The lady who rents the rooms had a vacant one and White and I rented it. Batton heard of it and seemed greatly vexed. He told me that I had no business to rent a room in that building, that my presence there was objectionable to him, and that I would rue it if I did not change my quarters. We had ever been good friends, and his remarks greatly puzzled me. We were both members of the Knights of Pythias, and I could not account for his singular conduct. I remonstrated with him, but he appeared to grow more sullen as time passed by, until a climax was reached to-day."
     "Well, go on with your story. What took place to-day before the shooting?"
     "At 9:30 this morning, Mrs. Duke was engaged in putting up lace curtains to the windows in her room, and at her request, I stepped in and drove the nails, her husband being out in the city in quest of employment. Batton came up stairs and clubbed me [out]. He appeared to be very angry and excited. Looking me squarely in the eyes, he blurted out: 'If I ever find you in that room again, I'll kill you.' I saw that he was laboring under a false impression and endeavored to pacify him. At first, I picked up a bed stave, fearing an assault, but it did not follow. We took a walk on Elm street, sat down and talked the matter over. I plainly and pointedly told him that I had never spoken a dozen words to Mrs. Duke in my life, and that mention of her name would not be permitted. We separated, Batton angry and revengeful, and myself regretting that anything had arisen to mar our former good fellowship."
     "What did you do after you parted with Batton?"
     "Returned to the house and laid the whole matter before Mrs. Duke. I implored him to go to Batton and quiet him, knowing that they were warm friends."
     "And then?"
     "Spent the greater part of the afternoon in my room. At 4 o'clock, I was reading, and my partner, White, was thumbing the guitar, when I heard footsteps on the stairway and, an instant later, Batton was peering into the room. He opened the conversation with these words, 'I'm full of hell, G--d d----n you, and I intend to kill you, I'll have you know.' With these words, he thrust his hand behind him, as if reaching for a weapon. My revolver was handy, and in self-defense, I shot him dead. Mrs. Duke, and the lady who rents the rooms, attempted to keep him from coming to my room, but their efforts were futile. The rest has been told. The officers placed me under arrest and I am now ready for a preliminary trial."
     "What turned Batton's friendship into hatred, Hyatt?"
     "Jealousy, I opine, although what ground he had is a mystery to me."
     "Have you retained a lawyer to defend you?"
     "Not much. I shall attend to my own case. I was a justice of the peace for several years in Arkansas, and Tom Batton has sat on many a jury in my court. These are the facts in the case, and I am not at all fearful of the consequences. It was his life or mine. Good night."

THE VERDICT.

     Justice John Henry Brown inquested the remains at the building where the shooting occurred, 1211 Elm street, last evening. Eugene White, Mrs. M. E. Duke and Mrs. Delia Ellison, the landlady, all three being cognizant of the facts, gave their evidence. The witnesses strongly corroborate the version of the killing, as given by the man whose deadly pistol ushered the soul of Batton into the presence of its Maker. All three testified that Batton forced his way to Hyatt's room, with his hand on his hip pocket, and that he was in that attitude when a bullet from the pistol in Hyatt's hand terminated his earthly career. Justice Brown rendered a verdict in accordance with the facts in the case.
     Batton's remains, neatly coffined, are at Linskie's undertaking establishment awaiting directions from his relatives, who reside at Eureka Springs, Ark. Hyatt is in a cage at police headquarters clamoring for a preliminary hearing.

- December 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-4.
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Died.

    This morning at 8:15, Thomas Braswell, infant son of Thomas B. and Clara Brown Mitchel, and grandson of Justice John Henry Brown, aged eight months and nine days. Funeral from the family residence, 414 Live Oak street at 3 p.m. to-morow, December 13.

- December 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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[No Heading]

     Officer J. P. Keenan reported the death this afternoon of the two-year-old child of Mrs. Dan Cronin, who resides at the foot of Griffin street, near the railroad crossing. Mrs. Cronin is a widow in most distressing circumstances. Her husband died six months ago, leaving her penniless. Another child, born two months since, is very ill. The remains will be buried by the county authorities. At 1605 Commerce street, there is another family in deplorable circumstances, and two young children are lying at the point of death.

- December 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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ANOTHER MURDER.
________

A PREACHER KILLED BY A POLITICIAN,
BOTH COLORED.

_______

In a Row Over Their Troubles Rev.
Arthur Jackson Slain by W. C.
Roberts--Both Parties Colored--
Killer's Statement.

     At 10 o'clock last night, Rev. Arthur Jackson, colored, pastor of St. Paul's African Methodist Church, was shot and mortally wounded by W. Carter Roberts, the negro politician who came within six votes of being elected alderman at the election last spring. The shooting took place at 208 Flora street. After the smoke of battle had cleared away, Jackson was removed to [his] residence, just across from Roberts' residence. Physicians were summoned, but the case was hopeless. The bullet from Roberts' pistol had entered Jackson's forehead just above the left [ey]e, and at 1 o'clock this morning, the vital spark deserted the earthly tenement and the soul of Jackson took its flight.
     Jackson came here from San Antonio about a year ago. He was about thirty-five years of age, prominent in colored Masonic circles, and very popular among his people. When the news of the shooting spread among the people of his race, excitement ran [wild] and threats were made to lynch Roberts. The latter proceeded at once to the county jail and surrendered to the sheriff. He refused to make a statement last night to anyone and snubbed the newspaper hustlers when they called at the jail.

ROBERTS' STATEMENT.

     A TIMES-HERALD reporter was detailed this morning to interview Roberts, and if possible, obtain his version of the tragedy. Armed with a permit from the sheriff, the scribe was ushered into the presence of the prisoner by Jailer Rhodes. Roberts is a square-looking mulatto, above the average of his race in intelligence. He is a good dresser and sports long side-whiskers and moustachios, a la English. The TIMES-HERALD emissary at once made known the object of his mission, but was waved off at the start, in a most dramatic manner, by the alleged killer, who stated that he had been instructed to keep a closed mouth by his attorney. The reporter was there to obtain a statement that would throw light on the killing, however, and after a short conversation with Roberts, he was availed upon to make the subjoined statement, which is given for its worth:
     "My name is W. Carter Roberts, I am 28 years of age, married, and live at 208 Flora street. I am employed by ___ford, Porter & Co., as a porter, storekeeper and shipping clerk. I came to Dallas from Shreveport seven years ago and never was arrested before in my life.
     "Last evening, Rev. Arthur Jackson, the man shot by me, was at the residence of my next door neighbor, William Britton. I called to him to come over to my house and suggested that we would settle our differences in a gentle business-like manner. Jackson and myself have been at outs for several months. I was seated on the porch and he came over. He assumed a bull-dozing, threatening attitude and, refusing to discuss our differences, turned on his heel, walked directly across the street to his residence, entered his house, came out directly and made his way to my home. He carried a pistol in his left hand, and just as he reached the gate, he transferred the gun to his right hand and pushed open the gate with his left.
     "I saw that he meant business and stepped forward, just as he raised his gun and fired. We were so close that the powder from his pistol burned my face. I pulled my gun and fired four or five shots in rapid succession. He keeled over at the first flash of my gun. He attempted to regain his feet as I fired the last shot over the fence. He was removed to his residence, and I came down and gave myself up to the officers. I killed him in self-defense and have witnesses that will corroborate my story. Jackson was a bad man, he was looked upon as a dangerous man and I could not avoid killing him."
     "Who are the witnesses?" was asked.
     "I decline to give you their names. I refuse to make a statement, at this time," said the prisoner in an excited manner.
     "You spoke of having trouble with Jackson. What was the nature of the trouble? Political, religious or domestic?"
     "I won't speak of it now. He abused my family, my wife, shamefully, to her face, in my presence, and even then, I only asked him to apologize for his gross insults."
     Did Jackson oppose you when you made the race for alderman?"
     "No, sir; he supported me warmly."
     "Did he have any cause to mistreat your family?"
     "Not the slightest. I'm a gentleman and always treated the preacher with respect. My wife and myself frequently worshipped at his church, although we are not members."
     "Was this the first hostile meeting between you?"
     "No, we had several rows. One Sunday, a few weeks ago, he came to my residence and picked a quarrel. His wife walked across the street with a gun wrapped up in a cloth, and handed it to him. I ran into my house, and when I went outside again, Jackson had been induced to return to his home by friends. I shall say no more. I have been advised to say nothing about the shooting."
     The T
IMES-HERALD man, having accomplished the object of his mission, withdrew.

SAID HE WAS A DONKEY.

     Mores Whiteman, colored, a friend of Roberts, informed a TIMES-HERALD reporter that the row between the parties had its origin on the 19th day of last June. On that day, a large meeting of colored men took place to arrange for the observance of Emancipation day. Roberts was chairman of the committee. Jackson made himself promiscuous, and was ordered to "take his seat and keep it." The preacher became indignant and grew very hot under the collar. Said he, addressing the chair, "I think yet you are one of these long-eared animals we read about," and retired. Whiteman said that the two men have been bitter enemies since that time, and the shooting grew out of the complements exchanged at that meeting.
     A morning publication, in its version of the affair, says that Jackson was called over to Roberts' residence shortly after he returned from a drive, and crossed over in response to the invitation with his wife hanging on his arm. Officer Williams, who made the rounds of the neighborhood where the shooting took place, talked with a number of colored people, neighbors to both the actors in the bloody drama, and they all agree that Jackson was the aggressor and fired two shots at Roberts before the latter opened fire.

MRS. JACKSON'S STORY.

     A TIMES-HERALD reporter called at the residence of the murdered preacher at noon. Hundreds of colored people surrounded the premises and discussed the killing. The house was crowded also. In a front room, neatly confined, lay the remains. In her room on the second floor, Mrs. Jackson was found, surrounded by her female friends. She made the following statement for publication, very damaging to the prisoner, to say the least:
     "Last evening, my husband and myself took a drive and returned at five minutes to 8 o'clock. The elder was in splendid humor and started into the house to get his overcoat, intending to proceed to church at once, having an engagement there at 8 o'clock. He was unable to get in the house, as the children had taken the key, and just as he came out, Roberts, who was standing in his own yard, called out, 'That you, Elder Jackson?' My husband replied, 'Yes, sir.' 'Come over here; I want to talk with you,' was the next remark made by Roberts. Elder Jackson said, 'If you want to see me, come to my house.' Roberts replied that my husband owed him an apology for abusing his family, and he intended to have an apology at once. Elder Jackson closed the conversation by telling Roberts that he had never abused his family, owed him no apology and would certainly not make one. I advised my husband to pay no attention to the man, but to go to the church. Henry Stark came up at this time and gave my husband the same advice. I took my husband's arm and we started for the church, when Roberts raised his pistol and fired two shots. The first struck my husband in the head, and the second tore through the fingers of the right hand, as he threw it up to ward off the bullet. I screamed and begged of Roberts, for God's sake, to stop shooting. He fired two shots after the elder was lying on [the] ground. My husband was unarmed. He was shot down like a dog without provocation, and the wonder is that I was not killed, too. Roberts did not like my husband, but he had no cause to dislike him. Elder Jackson never spoke ill of his family; in fact, did not know them."

ANOTHER VERSION.

     A colored man residing in Stringtown is authority for the statement that Jackson and Roberts engaged in a wordy argument over the correct interpretation of a certain passage of scripture some weeks ago, in which Roberts came out second best, and since that incident in their lives, the two men had but little use for each other.
     The funeral of Jackson will take place at 3 o'clock to-morrow from St. James Church. Rev. W. B. Cole, Jackson's successor at the Bethel Church, will officiate. The remains will be taken to Houston for interment. The dead man was about 36 years of age, was educated at Washington, D. C., and five years ago, was sent to San Antonio to work among his people. He remained there four years and was then stationed in Dallas.
     The negroes are greatly excited over the killing and threats, long, loud and deep, are uttered against Roberts in the colored quarters. In fact, his life would not be worth two straws if the parishioners and friends of deceased laid hold of him.

- December 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-4.
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CUMMINGS DYING.
________

THE WOULD-BE MURDERER ATTEMPTS
SELF-DESTRUCTION.

________

He is Found Near a Church at Gar-
land in a Dying Condition--Says
He Killed His Sweetheart and Is
Ready to Die.

     At 3 o'clock this afternoon, Sheriff Lewis received a message from Garland, this county, stating that an unknown man had shot and mortally wounded himself, with suicidal intent, at that place to-day. A letter was found on his person in which he stated that he had killed his sweetheart at Dallas last night, and that he did not care to survive her, as she was the only woman that he had ever loved. Cummings' attempt at self-destruction created a great sensation at Garland, and no time lost in communicating with Sheriff Lewis at this point.
     The would-be murderer shot himself with the same weapon he used with deadly effect on his sweetheart last evening.
     Sheriff Lewis' informant stated that the man would certainly die, but that official preferred to take no chances, and lost no time in taking his departure in the direction of the village where the villain lies at death's door.
     He was found, wounded, lying by the side of a church at a point one and a half miles this side of Garland, in a dying condition, and removed to Garland by the parties who discovered him.

CUMMINGS DEAD.

An hour after Sheriff Lewis' departure, the following telegram came to his address:
     G
ARLAND, Dec. 16.---To Sheriff Lewis, Dallas: Jim Cummings, or W. B. Cummings, who appears to have been from Dallas, has killed himself on the Santa Fe railroad. He calls Mrs. Sue Adams, of Dallas, his mother. He also claimed that he killed a girl in Dallas last night named Mary.
          T. J. S
WIM, J. P.

- December 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
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DEATH ON THE RAIL.
________

William Aldridge, of Texas, Killed
at Talapoosa, Georgia.

     One day in the early part of last week, William Aldridge, called at the Texas & Pacific ticket office on Main street and Mr. E. P. Turner, the union ticket agent, sold him a through ticket to Washington, D. C. Last night, at Talapoosa, Georgia, a station on the line of the Georgia Central railroad, Mr. Aldridge stepped from the train to get a view of the surroundings. When the train pulled out again, Aldridge, in attempting to get on board, missed his footing and was thrown under the wheels. The life was crushed out of him before the train could be brought to a standstill. A telegram was received in this city announcing the above facts, and also making inquiry as to his place of residence and relatives, if any he has. Aldridge was a stranger to Turner, and a TIMES-HERALD reporter was unable to located any person in the city who knew the dead man, or could throw any light on his history.
     Any information will be gladly received by Mr. Turner or the T
IMES-HERALD. The remains are at Talapoosa awaiting the disposition of relatives or friends. If not claimed, they will be interred at that place.

- December 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
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HENRY SIXTY RUN OVER AND KILLED
BY A TRAIN
.

________

The Horrible Fate Which Befell a
Tinner Last Evening--The Facts
in the Case and Disposition of the
Remains
.

     Henry Sixty, a German tinsmith in the service of Hinckley & Son, on Elm street, near the corner of Austin, was run over and killed by a Santa Fe train, near the water tank in the vicinity of Harwood street, last evening.
     The remains were discovered by several workingmen on their way to their places of business at an early hour this morning. The coroner was summoned and the body was inquested. The left leg was severed from the trunk, and it is supposed that Sixty bled to death after having been knocked from the track by the north bound train. It is supposed that he was on his way from a saloon to his boarding house when run down by the engine.
     Sixty came to this country twenty-two years ago and has been a resident of Dallas for the past eight years. His employers say that he was a splendid workman, but addicted to drink. He would work a week or ten days and then dissipate while his money lasted.
     He had no relatives in this country and his real name is not known. "Sixty" being an alias conferred upon him by Castle Garden officials, who were unable to pronounce the jaw-breaking cognomen bestowed upon him by his parents. "Sixty" as near as they could come to pronouncing it and the tinsmith adopted their translation.
     The funeral of the unfortunate man took place this afternoon from the Second Presbyterian Church, Rev. Warner G. Briggs officiating.
"Sixty" spent his money freely and died penniless. His shopmates defrayed the expenses of the funeral and gave him a Christian burial.

- December 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Mrs. Thomas J. Petit, wife of the teller of the National Exchange Bank, died last evening in this city at the residence of Captain George Mellersh, corner of Cedar Springs street and Oak Lawn avenue.
     Mrs. Rebecca Randon, after a prolonged illness, died at the home of her son-in-law, Mr. S. A. Drake, corner of Harwood and Jackson streets, last night. Deceased was 67 years of age and held in high esteem by a large circle of friends in different parts of the state.

- December 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Funeral Notice.

     J. L. Godley died at 1:10 p. m. to-day at the residence of his son, R. B. Godley on Gaston avenue in East Dallas. Mr. Godley was 76 years old and he died of typhoid fever. Funeral services will be held at 6 a. m. to-morrow and the remains will then be shipped to Bremond for interment. Friends and acquaintances of the family are invited to attend the services.

- December 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
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J. L. Godley Dead.

     J. L. Godley, father of R. B. Godley, died at the latter's residence at 1:10 p. m. to-day of typhoid fever. Mr. Godley was in his 76th year. He was an honored and respected citizen and though he died ripe in years, his absence will be mourned by a large family circle of friends. Funeral services will be held at 6 a. m. to-morrow at R. B. Godley's residence, and the remains will then be shipped to Bremond for interment.

- December 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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City Council Meeting.

    ...the city secretary reported 11 deaths during the week, of which ten were adults and one child...

- December 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Clifford died last night and was buried at 3 o'clock to-day in the Catholic Cemetery.
     Willie Kennedy, who was run over by a train on the Rapid Transit Railroad Saturday afternoon, died at the hospital at 7 o'clock that evening, after enduring excruciating pain for several hours. He was a bright little fellow, not more than fourteen years of age, and was a T
IMES-HERALD carrier at one time.

- December 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Uncle Clayton Miller, a colored man, aged 76 years, dropped dead on the Houston & Texas Central track at 5 p. m. Dec. 24. His funeral was fixed for 2 p. m. Dec. 26th, and the arrangement was made for his old masters, Col. W. B. Miller, N. M. Burford, Z. E. Cornelius, W. M. Moore, J. Pink Thomas, John Henry Brown, R. B. Harwood and J. A. Brown and others to attend his funeral, as a testimonial to his worth by the old citizens. But, circumstances demanded a change in the time, and he was unexpectedly buried the 25th. Uncle Clayton left a good home and large family and died respected by every old citizen of Dallas county.

     Christmas, with its festivities, is now over and we are on the verge of a New Year. Farewell, old 1889. You have been kind to many of us, and grateful hearts will throb warmly for your peaceful repose in the grave of your ancestors. Only a few more days for the old year to wind up its own affairs and lie down in the tomb of the buried centuries. Millions of words and buried angels are gathering around its death bed to sing the requiem of its departure, and arch-angels are grouping at the reporter's golden desk to catch and chronicle its "last words" and write its epitaph.

- December 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2-3.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS

     Eugene Plager, a German who died at the city hospital on the 31 inst., was buried yesterday at 7:30 p. m.

- January 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
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