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From Ka--Before the Norther.

KA, Tex., Feb. 25, 1890.
To the Times-Herald.
     Mrs. S. Z. Lawson, Mrs. N. Berry's daughter, died on the 22d inst. at 10:30 a. m. of consumption, of many months of lingering and suffering. She cheerfully expressed her willingness to go and be with loved ones gone before. It was well that the poor wearied body was freed from pain. On the afternoon of the 23d, with a large attendance at the funeral, the body of the loved one was consigned to earth in the Rawlins grave yard at Lancaster.
     We condole with the sorrowing mother, brother and sister, and five little orphans--two boys and three girls--of the deceased. Their father died May 13, 1888, who was of the redeemed, as was the sister, Mrs. J. A. Porter, who died January 24, 1888, and who was very courageous and amiable in her many days of suffering, God's grace being sufficient unto the day of trial.

- February 27, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

CAHN'S TRIAL.
_______

SEVERAL WITNESSES EXAMINED THIS
MORNING.

_______

Cahn Killed Benedikt For Money
and That is the Only Cause Re-
vealed So Far.

     After procuring a jury yesterday in the murder case in district court, wherein Leo Cahn is charged with killing M. Benedikt on the 22d day of last March, the state introduced Dr. Parsons, who testified as to the dying declarations of deceased. These were to the effect that Cahn shot him because he refused to sign a paper which Cahn presented to him.
     Proceedings here closed for the day and were resumed at 10 o'clock this morning by presenting Rabbi Chapman of congregation Emanu El on the stand. He was with deceased a good deal of the time after he was shot and was with him when he died. The deceased made a dying statement to him in which he stated that Cahn approached him for money and upon his refusal to give it to him, the defendant shot him.
     Dr. Henry K. Leake, physician and surgeon, testified as to the location and nature of Benedikt's wound. He said he considered it fatal from the first examination. Its first effect must have been to cause the victim to fall; paralysis was almost instantaneous. He and other physicians were called to the wounded man, but did not make an examination until he rallied, about an hour afterwards. Witness did not think the wound caused any trouble with the brain.
     Simon Schiffman testified that defendant Cahn was in his (Schiffman's) place of business about noon on the day of the killing and had been chatting with witness. He did not in manner or conversation betray any unusual sign of emotion. Defendant remained a few minutes when he left, saying he was going to Benedikt's store. This was a little while before the killing. Witness said the reputation of defendant for peace and quiet was good, while the reputation of the deceased for veracity was bad. At this point, a little asperity was interpicted into the proceedings by Jerome Kerby, asking witness if he had heard that defendant Cahn had ever served a term in prison in the mother county for assault with intent to kill. This question brought the attorneys for the defense to their feet, who objected to the question in a brief speech full [of] emphasis. The court sustained the objections, and all was serene again.
     William N. Coe testified to going to the scene of the shooting a short time after it occurred. He went to a room in the front of the building and discovered there some notes and checks which he exhibited to the court and jury.

- February 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

DALLAS CITY COUNCIL
_______

SATURDAY NIGHT'S PROCEEDINGS.

     The city health officer's weekly mortuary report was read, showing six deaths.

- April 30, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

SUICIDED.
_______

A Foreigner Sends a Bullet
Through His Head.

     Max Morganstein suicided Saturday night at 130 Ross avenue by shooting himself through the head. The weapon used was a .32 calibre American double action pistol. A small gold watch was found on his person, and some $75 in currency and two or three dollars in foreign coin. A cheap note book was in his pocket filled with written sentimental sentences showing his derangement to be due probably to some love affair.
     He left the following note:
    "My name is Max Morganstein; am Jew from Vienna, Austria. Please nothing to publish by newspapers. Cheques are there."

- April 30, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Appalling Disaster
Killed in a Railway Wreck
A Fireman Killed at Miller's Switch.

     John Conway....was a worthy young man, well thought of in Corsicana, where he lived.

- May 4, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

A Sad Accident
A Child Killed on the Belt Line.

     Jessie, 3-year old child of Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Gardenhire....inquest this evening.

- May 4, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died.

     The little two-year old son (Walter) of Mr. and Mrs. John Willie, 418 Caroline street, died Wednesday and interred yesterday....

- May 4, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Citation.

    ....summon Mrs. Katherine Strickling, who resides in Greene county, Mo., near Springfield, and the unknown heirs of James M. Jones...a male person over the age of 21 years, died March 3, 1888, at residence of Dr. D. T. Morgan, in Dallas county...

- May 7, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 7, col. 4.
- o o o -

A Sad Death.
Another Unfortunate Crushed to Death Under the Wheels of a Locomotive.

     ...Ben Ryburn...at the T & P coal chute yesterday...was a nephew of Mr. J. W. Ayers, local freight agent for T & P & Missouri Pacific railways. 17 years old...mother in Texarkana and was telegraphed of the accident.

     A bill of $7 due Ed C. Smith, undertaker, for providing a pauper, who had died in the city, with a coffin, and whose relatives, after the contract had been closed, refused to let deceased use the coffin on account of its cheapness, was referred to Mr. Haskell with the request that he confer with Mr. Smith and see if he will agree to hold the coffin over for some future pauper whose relatives will not be so high-toned.

- May 8, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Charged with Lunacy.

     Mary Curtis, tried to hang herself...says she killed her own child and felt guilty.

- May 8, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

[Legal Notice]

     The State of Texas....estate of Casten H. Buchrke, deceased.....Ernest Beilharz, administrator.....

- May 11, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

Another Suicide.

     Adolph Gubler, a well known Dallas butcher, suicided in his room on Austin street Saturday night by cutting his throat from ear to ear with a butcher knife. He was a man of genial spirits, whole-souled and generous and withal prospering in business, and no cause can be assigned for the rash act. He was under the influence of liquor Saturday night and had been drinking previously.
     Judge Braswell viewed the body and held the inquest this morning, returning the verdict that deceased met death at his own hands.

- May 14, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     John Gaffney died suddenly of paralysis at 1637 Main street, yesterday. He was an employe of the Gulf Colorado & Santa Fe Railway, and his relatives live in Pennsylvania.

- May 14, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Mr. Frank Blain with Mr. H. R. Rogers, of this city, has returned from Palo Pinto county, where he was called by telegram to the bed side of his father, Mayor A. C. Blain, who died quite suddenly with paralysis on the 7th instant. Mr. Blain was an old citizen of Texas, having resided in the state some thirty-six years.

- May 15, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Localettes.

    Mrs. Shanks died at the Woman's Home last night. She was buried this morning.

- May 17, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

An Old Man's Sudden Death.

     An old man known as Alexander, who has been cooking for sometime at the Crutchfield House, died suddenly at noon to-day of a hemorage of the lungs...had been in feeble health for a long time...60 years of age...no one knows anything of his antecedents and it is supposed he has no family. Judge Kendall will hold an inquest this afternoon.

- May 18, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

A FATAL SWING.
________

A YOUNG MAN KILLED
_________

While Swinging From the Steps of
a Moving Train.

     A fatal accident occurred on the east bound Texas & Pacific train this morning at East Fork bridge, between Mesquite and Forney. C. C. Bounds, a young man, whose home was at Mesquite, was a passenger on the train, and while it was crossing the bridge at a high rate of speed, he was swinging out from the steps, and was struck and knocked off by one of the bridge timbers. He was thrown from the train and trestle work and struck the ground some distance below, a mangled corpse.

- May 21, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Three children were buried in the city yesterday.
     The body of Chas. Reaussau, who committed suicide Saturday, is in the embalming vault of P. W. Linskie, undertaker.   The young man's uncle is here from Gainesville and his parents have been telegraphed, but no orders have been received concerning the disposition of the remains.  Justice Braswell held the inquest.

- May 21, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Court Transactions
Daily Routine of Litigation...

     J. D. Claunch, step-father, and his wife, Mary Claunch, mother of Joe Conway, who was run over and killed by engine 89 at Miller's switch, on the H & T. C. Ry, have filed suit in the district court for $25,000 damages...

- May 22, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Mrs. Caroline Tabor died yesterday at the residence of her son, John Tabor, on Beaumont street.
     Mr. B. W. Reilly, a member of Dallas Typographical Union, died yesterday at his residence, corner Hord and Griffin streets, the remains will be interred to-day by the Union.

- May 23, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Localettes.
Jimmie, son of Postmaster Cochran, died yesterday of consumption. He was a promising young man, just out from school, and this being the second grown son Mr. Cochran has lost with this dreaded disease the present year, the blow comes very hard.

- May 24, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Mrs. J. W. Barton, who has suffered for months with continued sickness....died this morning...leaves a husband, four children....

- June 1, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Died.

     June 1, 1888, at 6 a.m. at the family residence, corner of Oleander and San Jacinto streets, Mrs. J. W. Barton. Funeral tomorrow....conducted by her pastor, Rev. R. T. Hanks....

- June 1, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     D. M. Spence, deputy assessor of East Dallas, has been notified of the death of his mother in Alabama.

- June 1, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 5.
- o o o -

Head Cut Off.

     Chas. Zeiman, a German 40 years of age, was killed at the rear of Mayer's Garden yesterday morning at 2:30 by a train passing over him and severing his head from the body. The decapitated member rolled several feet down the embankment. Zeiman had just gained possession, it is said, of $15,000, and his mysterious and horrible death created suspicion of foul play. The inquest has not been held yet, and it is not known that the evidence given in will establish more than the fact that he was killed, presumably by the train passing over him.

- June 11, 1888, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     A negro boy was drowned in the Trinity while bathing yesterday afternoon.

- June 21, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Criminal Carelessness

Is the Charge an Indictment Alleges Against a Railroad Engineer.

     ...death of Joe Conway, the fireman who was killed several weeks past in a wreck on the Central railway at Miller's switch.

- June 22, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Court Notes.

     J. W. Monk, charged with the murder of one Pierce, was granted a habeas corpus hearing before Judge Aldredge this morning....

- June 23, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

The City.

     James Smith, the engineer who was arrested for criminal carelessness resulting in the death of Joe Conway, has given $1,000 bond.

- June 23, 1888, Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

A HORRIBLE DEATH.
______

An Old Settler Dies From the Poison-
ous Effects of a Rattlesnake
Bite.

     Mr. John W. Penn, an old resident and respected farmer living on the mountain near Cedar Hill, in Dallas county, was bit by a rattle snake last Friday evening, from the effects of which, he died early Saturday morning.   The fangs of the reptile were buried deep on the back of the hand, and as soon as he was bit, Mr. Penn declared he would never survive.  His prediction was gradually verified as he poison settled deeper in his system and about midnight, he lost consciousness and became a raving maniac, four holding him in bed until death relieved his terrible suffering early Saturday morning.
     The snake struck the unfortunate man while he was in his field stooping over to pick up a rake from a rank growth of weeds.   Mr. Penn had been living on the place twenty-five years, and he stated after he was bit that it was the largest snake he ever saw.   He called to his son who was plowing in another portion of the field, who conveyed his father home.   Stimulants and every remedy available were administered without effect.
     After its deadly work, the snake escaped in the high weeds.

- June 25, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Another Trunk Wreck
Burton, the Porter, Killed.
The Baggage Car and Passenger Coach Jump a Bridge.

     ...at Hickory creek....Burton, the colored porter, who was married last Thursday in Dallas, was....crushed...died and...transported to this city.

- June 25, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Griffin Oliver, the little son of Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Roberts, died of acute bronchitis this afternoon at their residence on Germania street.

- June 25, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

James P. Smith Dead.

     The well known newspaper man, and an old attache of the Times-Herald, before and after the consolidation, died at his sister's residence, 942 S. Harwood street....will be interred to-morrow in Trinity cemetery....little past 30 years old...has been in feeble health a long time...for a number of years was the city editor of the Morning Herald, retaining that position up to the time the Herald ceased to exist. He then accepted the city editorship of the Evening Times, which place he filled until that paper consolidated with the Evening Herald last January, after which he was connected with the Times-Herald until his health failed...

- June 27, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Another case of scarlet fever is reported from Young street, where a child died with it yesterday. The first case was reported two weeks ago from Germania street; others have since developed. yesterday. The first case was reported two weeks ago from Germania street; others have since developed.

- June 27, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

The Last Sad Rite.

     ...James P. Smith laid to rest at Trinity. Funeral services held at residence of his sister, Mrs. Sue Bullard, on S. Harwood street. Rev. A. P. Smith, conducting...

- June 29, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Personals.

     Mr. George Keating, brother of Mr. C. Keating, and a member of the firm of the Keating Implement co., of this city, died yesterday evening at San Diego, Calif.

- June 29, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

An Aged Lady Gone.

     Mrs. Rachel Rosenthal, mother of Mr. A. Z. & Miss Rosa Rosenthal, died this morning at 7 o'clock of paralysis. She was in her 72nd year. Funeral services will be held at the house of her daughter, Mrs. Wetzler, 811 Akard avenue, this evening....remains will be taken to the Union depot to St. Louis to be buried at the side of her husband, pursuant to a request from her to her son, who will accompany the remains to their last resting place.

- July 3, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Justice Braswell held an inquest on the body of C. E. Haywood, who was discovered dead in his room at the St. George Hotel yesterday, returning a verdict in substance that he came to his death from the effects of drinking too much beer, of which he had been consuming twelve bottles a day.

- July 6, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     The little two-year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geiger, residing on Adolph street, died yesterday of membraneous croup.

- July 7, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Mrs. C. P. Maloney died Saturday night at 7:30 o'clock at the residence of her father, Mr. G. Oberly, on Ross avenue between Germania and Hall streets.

- July 9, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Run Over and Killed.

     Little Bertie Waterhouse, aged 15 years, who was from Galveston visiting his aunt, Mrs. F. W. Boyle, 511 S. Harwood street, was run over by a horse ridden by a boy on Elm street, near the intersection of Sycamore, Saturday afternoon..remains, accompanied by his aunt, were carried to Galveston yesterday for interment.

- July 16, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

Localettes.

Mr. R. A. Sharpe's little one-year-old boy, Clifton, died yesterday.

- July 16, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

An Unfortunate Man

Intoxicated, He Sleeps on the Railway Track and is Killed.

     ...Saturday night, P. J. Shetterly was run over and killed by a Texas & Pacific train....just east of the Santa Fe crossing.  He was summoned to the residence of his brother-in-law, Mr. R. A. Sharpe, to attend the death bed of the latter's child, Saturday evening and remains were taken in charge by Mr. Sharpe, who placed them in the hands of Mr. Linskie, undertaker, and will be shipped to the family of the decased who are living in Knoxville, Tenn.  He leaves a wife and 6 children, who left Dallas last January and went to Knoxville to reside with relatives.

- July 16, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Clarence Patterson is reported to have been the rider of the horse that ran over and killed little Bertie Waterhouse...

- July 17, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

North Dallas Killing.

_________

An Outraged Husband Slays the De-
stroyer of His Happiness.

     At 1:20 this morning, in what is known as North Dallas Freedmantown, Jim McMassey shot and killed Massey Flucas, whom he found sleeping with his (McMassey's) wife. It is said that the indignant husband walked in on the guilty couple and sent a Winchester ball through the lower part of Flucas' body, while he was yet in the room. The slayer then retreated, and it was though came to town. He was followed by a crowd of excited colored citizens, some of whom were carrying guns, seeking his arrest, which the officers, up to latest accounts, have not accomplished, although, it is a alleged, McMassey, after coming to the city, returned home, where he slept till morning.
     Since the above was written, Deputy Sheriff F. M. Deputy found McMassey asleep in his boarding house, in the rear of the calaboose, on Market street. He offered no resistance, and stated that he expected to be arrested. In his statement of the shooting, he says he stole the Winchester from a house and returned the gun after the shooting.

- July 18, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Mr. James Smith, an employe of the railroad planing mill, died at his residence on Flora street, yesterday morning at 9:30 o'clock after a brief illness.
     Intelligence received in this city today, by Mr. Henry Daugherty, reports William Epperson dying at Hot Springs, Ark. He is well known in this city, which is his home.

- July 18, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Personals.

     Mr. C. C. Merrill was called by telegram from Mrs. Merrell to Keokuk, Iowa, where she is spending the summer....their infant died....

- July 19, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Inquest.

     Justice Kendall is holding an inquest this afternoon on the body of Moses Fuqua. About 35 colored people are in attendance. Mr. Cole, white, was an eyewitness to some of the preliminaries of the shooting. He saw the slayer, who gives the name of J. M. McMassa...

- July 19, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Gaines died yesterday of dentition.

     Mr. R. A. Staude died yesterday at his residence on the corner of Crossthwaite and McKee streets.

     The little son of David Guest, residing on Jefferson street, died this morning from injuries received in a run-away some two weeks ago.

- July 21, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Latest News
Condensed from Dispatches...

     Mr. W. H. Rowe,one of the first settlers of Mesquite, died last Friday at his residence. He left a wife and 3 grown sons.

- July 23, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL.
______

The Work Done at Saturday Night's
Session.

     Health officer reported eight deaths for the past week, no epidemic and health of city excellent.

- July 24, 1888, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     The infant of Mr. and Mrs. John Funnel, of West Dallas, died Sunday morning.

- July 23, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Mrs. Ellen A. Bowen, after an illness of several days, died at Pecos City yesterday morning. Mrs. Bowen was the mother of Mrs. A. P. Lindsay of this city.

     John B. Dodson, the night foreman of the T & P yards, who was run over by the engine Friday, died from his injuries, and his remains were shipped to Terre Haute, Ind. for interment Saturday.

     Mr. Hiram Bennett died at his home at Mesquite Saturday afternoon. He was the oldest man in Dallas county, being 93 years of age. Children, grandchildren, great grand-children and great-great-grandchildren saw the venerable old man breathe his last. He was an honest, good, old-fashioned man.

- July 23, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

     The store of Messrs. Blakeney, Free & Co., is closed to-day on account of the death of Mr. W. H. Free which occurred at 5 o'clock this morning....had been sick since Monday, and was removed yesterday to the home of Mr. Blakeney, where he died. No announcement of the funeral can be made until a sister of the deceased, who lives in a distant state, has been heard from. She has been notified by wire of his death.

- July 25, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Tired of Life.

     Annie Bailey, who formerly had roomed[?] in a dilapidated old house [near the] court house, recently moved out on McKinney [avenue], took an overdose of morphine, [and] died at 10 o'clock this morning.

- July 26, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Suicide.

     Justice Braswell held an inquest on the remains of Annie Bailey, an account of whose death appeared in yesterday's Times Herald, and found that she came to her death by an overdose of morphine.

- July 27, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     The remains of Mr. W. H. Free have been forwarded to Logansport, Ind., for burial.

- July 27, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     Died - At the residence of Mr. J. W. Loughlin, corner of Williams and Crowdus streets, this morning....his wife, Mrs. Hannah Loughlin. Funeral tomorrow from the Church of the Sacred Heart.

- July 28, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Mr. Free's Death
His Friends in Indiana Suspect Foul Play

     ...intemperate use of liquor cause of death...his tongue had been cut or bitten...paroxysms....a nail had to be held between his teeth to prevent him from biting his tongue off.

- July 31, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personals.

     Rev. Samuel J. Hawkins of Sulphur Springs, died at his home Tuesday night. He was one of the associate editors of the Texas Christian Advocate of this city.

- August 3, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

      The little fourteen-month old child of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Kivlen died yesterday of cholera infantum.

- August 6, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

The City.

     Joe Siederlie, one of the proprietors of Bismarck hall, died suddenly yesterday.

- August 6, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Infant child of Prof. W. T. Weaver, of Oak Lawn, died yesterday afternoon.

- August 6, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE WOUNDED MAN DIES.
______

Lane Charged With His Murder--
The Remains Sent to Houston.

     Mr. J. W. Wilson, who was shot Wednesday by S. E. Lane, died yesterday evening. Justice Braswell went to the unfortunate man's boardinghouse on Patterson avenue and viewed the remains, which were shipped to Houston, his old home, this morning. He will hold an inquest as soon as he can get the witnesses together.
     A new warrant was issued, charging Lane with murder, instead of assault with intent to murder, and the date of his examining trial was set for next Monday. Until this preliminary trial, it is likely no further developments will be made public, since Lane refuses to make a statement for the press.

- August 10, 1888, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

The Coroner's Inquest
Testimony in the Lane-Wilson case.

     ..body of J. W. Wilson, who was shot last Wednesday by S. E. Lane. and died Thursday....eyewitness testimony...

- August 11, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

A WITNESS MISSING.
_______

The Testimony Destroyed in the
Lane-Wilson Tragedy.

     The case of the state against S. E. Lane, the printer, charged with taking the life of S. A. Wilson in 1888, will be called next Monday before Judge Burke of the fourteenth judicial district.
     The testimony gathered at the examining trial was destroyed in the court house fire, and W. A. Rogers, one of the principal witnesses, is missing. Rogers was, at the time of the tragedy, employed by A. D. Aldridge & Co. as pressman. He went with Lane from Aldridge's establishment, on the day of the killing, to the News office, where the shooting occurred, and he was one of the witnesses to the shooting. Advertisements in typographical and other widely-circulated journals, it is said, have failed to elicit a response from Rogers, and an effort will be made to establish his testimony without his present at the trial.

- October 14, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

The Wounded Woman Dead.

     Mrs. Fromlett, who was shot by Mrs. Salisbury at the Crutchfield House, died to-day at noon.....preliminary trial probably Tuesday next....

- August 11, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

Died in Well.

     Richard Bell, colored, died in a well on St. Louis street, at Mr. La Moreaux's place....dangerous gasses...

- August 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     At the residence of her son, William J. Keller, east Ross avenue, this 9 a.m., Mrs. Susan A. Keller, in her 85th year, mother of William J., C. E. and H. W. Keller....Funeral tomorrow at 10 a.m. from residence to Trinity cemetery.

- August 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Suicide.

    Jacob Engleman committed suicide at Waxahachie at 2 o'clock this morning. Notice came to this city by telephone and friends went down to convey the remains for interment. The burial will take place to-morrow morning at 10:30 at the Jewish cemetery.

- August 25, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The funeral of Mr. John H. Jones will take place from the First Baptist Church to-morrow afternoon at 4 o'clock...

- August 26, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

A Useful Citizen Dead.

    Mr. John H. Jones, the cotton buyer, died of congestion at his home on Harwood street at 10 o'clock this morning.  Mr. Jones was a native of Alabama, serving Howard College in that state as professor of mathematics for several years.   He removed from that state to Bryan, Texas, thence to Dallas...he was an efficient member of the city board of trustees, and a consistent member of the Baptist church.

- August 26, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

A Fatal Accident
A Dallas Boy Killed in the Indian Territory While Trying to Board a Train.

John Lang [Long]....died on the way to Gainesville....

- August 28, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Buried This Morning.

      Young Long, son of Mr. William Long, who was killed in the railroad wreck in the Indian Territory, was buried at Trinity cemetery this morning....

- August 29, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Localettes.

     Mrs. E. E. Lewis, a most estimable and well known lady, died at the family residence on San Jacinto street, yesterday. The funeral occurred to-day from the First Baptist church, of which Mrs. Lewis was a member.

- August 29, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

A Tribute

To the Memory of John H. Jones.

- September 4, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suicide.
 John Dalton, of North Dallas, Goes the Morphine Route.

 ...Justice Braswell holds inquest on body of John Dalton, living in North Dallas, on the Cedar Springs road, who suicided last night by taking morphine...a young man...disappointed in love, rejected by sweetheart...23 years old, a native of Tarrant county...engaged as a teamster for C. P. Newton....remains in charge of P. W. Linskie...interred in Trinity cemetery to-morrow.

- September 4, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

City News.

     George Davis, colored, and Morris Reardon, white, died this week at the hospital.
     Bell Coleman, colored, died very suddenly at the hospital yesterday of hemorrhage. She died sitting in a chair.

- September 8, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death of a Prominent Citizen.

     Wm. Little, of Hutchins, died this morning at sun-up, aged 62 years. He was a prosperous farmer, growing fine stock most successfully, and is known as the introducer of Johnson grass in this county; was also the first to bring Polled Argus cattle and the Jersey red hogs to this section.
     Mr. Little leaves a son each in Kentucky and Tennessee, the latter was with him at his death. His wife and two sons survive him and mourn the loss of a faithful husband and kind father. Deceased was a worthy citizen and esteemed by all his neighbors.

- September 10, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

      Henry Lathrop, esq., a prominent young lawyer of this city, died at 2 o'clock this morning of consumption. Burial at Trinity cemetery to-morrow.
     Mr. Charles Winthrop died at his home in this city at 7 o'clock last night of congestion.
His wife is in New York and has been notified by wire. The body has been embalmed and the funeral will occur on her return home.

- September 11, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     LATHROP -- Sept. 11 at 2:30 a.m., Henry Lathrop, aged 26 years. Funeral will take place at his father's residence Wednesday.

- September 11, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Personal.

    Mr. M. Seidenbeitel died at his home, corner of Harwood and Cadiz streets, last night. He was a member in good standing of the I. O. B. B., and his funeral will take place from the lodge room at 8:30 a.m., Sept. 13th.

- September 12, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Buried Alive

Sad Death of a Laborer Who Was Buried in An Excavation.

     Marshall, white laborer,...Justice Braswell will hold an inquest...Marshall was buried to-day in the city cemetery.  No one seems to know his former residence or his Christian name.

- September 13, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The remains of Mr. C. B. Winthrop, lately in the employ of the Tompkins Implement & Machinery co., will be buried to-morrow. Services at cemetery by Rev. John R. Wolf, of Tabernacle M. E. Church...

- September 14, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

 

A Grief-Stricken Wife
She Reads of the Untimely Death of Her Husband in a Newspaper.

     Mrs. Annie Marshall, of Fort Worth, wife of C. L. Marshall, who was killed in the excavation...would like to have body moved to Fort Worth....

- September 15, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

Obituary.

     The bright and loving little son of Mrs. Clara C. Douglas, died Thursday morning at 1 o'clock with typhoid fever and congestion of the brain....5 years, 5 months and 12 days old....

- September 15, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

City News.

     Mrs. C. W. McCarty, wife of the proprietor of the Southern Hotel, near the corner of Ross avenue and Sycamore street, died yesterday from the effects of an overdose of morphine. She had been suffering from feeble health, and to gain temporary relief, took five grains of the drug in three separate doses. About noon, the deadly effects of the morphine were discovered, but too late to revive her.

- September 15, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

City News.

     Capt. John W. Lane, an old citizen, and one of the early settlers, died at his residence in the city yesterday evening.
     Mr. H. Douglas, a member of the firm of Douglas Bros., who left this city about two weeks ago to attend his father's funeral in Minneapolis, Minn, died in that state Saturday afternoon...was in feeble health....when he left here....

     The body of C. L. Marshall, who was killed in an Ervay street excavation and buried in the city cemetery, was moved to Fort Worth at his wife's request.

- September 17, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice-A. F. & A. M.

Tannehill Lodge No. 52, A. F. & A. M.....meet to attend the funeral of John W. Lane.

- September 17, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City News.

     Mr. and Mrs. Jack Duncan lost their baby girl yesterday by dentition.
     The remains of Holine Douglas will arrive to-night from Minneapolis.

- September 18, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice-A. F. & A. M.

[regarding] Brother John W. Lane, deceased...

- September 18, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City News.

     Mrs. J. H. Stewart, wife of Mr. Stewart, deputy district court clerk, died at her home at Cedar Hill, night before last and was buried at the Cedar Hill cemetery at 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon. Husband and other relatives survive....

- September 20, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

City News.

     Mr. Y. J. Craddock, brother of Messrs T. H. and L. Craddock, died at 10:30 this morning at Corsicana. His brothers and relatives of this city have gone down to attend his funeral.

- September 22, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

City News.

     John Elevanger, driver of a butcher wagon, was accidentally drowned Saturday evening in Mr. Harris' tank in East Dallas.

- September 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

UNDER THE DOME.
MONK O. K.

     The case of the State of Texas vs. J. W. Monk was dismissed yesterday. On the 25th day of September, 1888, Calvin Spears was killed and Monk was charged with the crime. He was convicted and given five years in the penitentiary. The court of appeals reversed the verdict, and now Monk goes free.

- March 21, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Helpless Men Shot Down

Another Bloody Chapter to the Convict System....

     A squad of five State convicts made a break for liberty near the gas works, on the Missouri Pacific road. John Davis was killed outright by the guard and Chris Wells mortally wounded and expired last evening at 8 o'clock...the gang at present in the city numbers 45...they are all young men.

- September 26, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Died.

     At 6 o'clock a.m., September 26th, 1888, George J. Bartram.
     Funeral services from Tabernacle M. E. Church, corner of Main and St. Paul streets, September 27...

- September 26, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     The little three weeks old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max Gottinger of Fellman, Grumbach & Harris died last night after a day's illness.

- September 29, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

About the Metropolis...

     The two-year-old babe of Mr. and Mrs. F. Gonzales died at 11 o'clock today. Funeral at Catholic cemetery to-morrow.

     The infant of Mr. and Mrs. Max Gettinger [Gottinger] died at 12 o'clock last night, and will be buried in the Hebrew cemetery at 6 this evening.

- September 29, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading?]

     C. H. Scott, of Dallas, a young railroad brakeman, fell off a caboose on the Frisco road in the Indian Territory Saturday night and was run over and killed. He leaves a wife in Dallas.

      Mr. J. S. Burton, an old telegrapher many years in the employ of the Western Union here, and at St. Louis, and more recently, manager of the B. & O. officer here, died Saturday evening and will be buried this evening from the First Methodist Church.

- October 1, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. ?
- o o o -

Two Fires...

     At 3:22 a.m. to-day, a second alarm was sent in from Box 124. This time it was the burning of two houses, 1667 and 1669 Main street, East Dallas, the property of the lamented J. S. Burton, who was lying deceased in the house adjoining on the east...

- October 1, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

About the Metropolis....

     The clerk of the police court at Denver writes the health officer of this city enquiring of the particulars of the death of P. J. Flanady, a laundryman, said to have suicided in this city six or eight months ago. It is desired to know if he left any property.

- October 2, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

About the Metropolis...

     Mr. Charles Green of the Sycamore grocery, died last night at the Bogle hotel. He was recently from Brooklyn, N.Y., and had made a number of warm friends since he located in Dallas.  The funeral occurred from the Congregational church.

- October 4, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

About the Metropolis...

     Mrs. J. C. Barnes died yesterday of congestion and was buried to-day in Trinity cemetery.

- October 5, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Frank Bergen

Killed by an Elevator Accident at the Windsor.

     ....was a nephew of Frank Bergen and his mother lives in St. Louis...was for quite a while a newsboy and carrier of the Times-Herald.

- October 8, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

City News.

     The mortuary report for last week shows only four deaths. This is good in a population of 49,000.

     A Spaniard named Oride died of consumption at the hospital this morning. He was from San Antonio.

- October 8, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

City News.

     Justice Braswell concluded the inquest testimony this morning on the elevator tragedy in which Frank Bergen lost his life...

- October 9, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mr. R. Wise, a resident of Caroline street, died very suddenly Sunday. His wife went to church Sunday morning...when she returned, he was lying on the floor..and the last spark of life had left. He was subject to fits and to this cause is attributed this sudden death.

- October 9, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 5.
- o o o -

Roller Coaster Crash
Two Cars Rush Together with Horrible Results.
Two Passengers Believed to be Fatally Injured.

     Miss Loula Mackay, a visitor to Mr. Bailey's family....Pfeifer Bailey, a collector, whose home is 529 Griffin street.

- October 12, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

[News of Interest]

     Fonvey Hobbs has been arrested in St. Louis on a charge of murder committed in Dallas. He is wanted here for assault with intent to murder.

- October 13, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Death From the Roller Coaster Wreck.

     Mr. W. H. Ryan, one of the injured parties in the roller coaster collision Friday, died at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Scruggs, on Akard and Wood streets, at 2 a.m. yesterday, from the effects of his injuries. Mr. Ryan was a clerk in the T & P general freight office, and was very popular among his associates and acquaintances.

- October 15, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

UNFORTUNATE "MIKE"
________

FISHED FROM THE BOTTOM OF A
CAMP STREET WELL.

_______

The Last Scene of His Life Shrouded
in Mystery--the Bar Keeper
and Proprietor Talk.

     The sensation of the hour on Camp street is the discovery early this morning of the bloated body of an Irishman familiarly known among his acquaintances as "Mike," in the bottom of a well at the rear of J. Brunk's saloon, 129 Camp street. Mike's stature is about 5 feet 7 inches. The bar is in the front of the building and the well is reached from it through a dark narrow passage, a flight of rickety steps on the left, leading to the upper apartments and a dining room on the right. The passage empties into a back yard surrounded by a high fence, and near the rear of the building is the well. It is about twenty feet deep, walled up with stone, contains a fraction over three feet of water, and is enclosed with ordinary box, which is about 30 inches high.
     This morning, about 7 o'clock, Fritz Hurst, Brunk's bar keeper, discovered the subject of this narrative, in the well. According to his statement, Mike's feet were on the bottom of the well, his body doubled up, throwing his head against the wall of the well and under the water and his back up, which was the first part of the body visible when drawn up. He knows nothing about how or when Mike got in the well. Fritz had been absent in the country two days and returned yesterday. Thursday morning, the cook found Mike's straw hat lying near the well; Fritz thought the hat belonged to a friend of his working at the Pacific house, whom he went to hunt yesterday evening. He found the friend, but the hat was not his. Yesterday morning, he saw something in the well, but made no investigation until last night. He discovered the object in the well "must be a man," but, acting on the advice of the proprietor of the place, no effort was made to rescue the man until this morning, when, with the assistance of a negro man, Mike, who was found in the position mentioned, was hauled out.
     Brunk, the proprietor, said he had been using the water, but the past few days, it began to smell so bad, that he gave instructions to use only hydrant water. He couldn't account for the offensive odor of the water, but thought there was a sack of something in the well. This theory of his was strengthened by the fact that the negroes in the neighborhood often play pranks on him and he suspected this was another "job" of theirs. The last he saw of Mike was Wednesday evening before candle light. He came in the saloon singing, and a party who was playing dominoes at the table, told Mike he would give him a nickle if he would quit singing. Mike quit and the party gave him the nickle, which Mike at once spent for a glass of beer, and then he went out, and that was the last he saw or heard of him until this morning, when his body was taken from the well. He had missed Mike's daily visits to his place, and at one time, sent up stairs to search the rooms and see if he was occupying any of them. He said Mike sometimes crawled over the fence and slept in the wood shed.
     Mike's reputation is that of a harmless, inoffensive person. The greater portion of his time, it seems, he was engaged in sweeping out and doing little odd jobs around saloons. In this capacity, he was a frequenter of John Schluneger's saloon, on Commerce street. Mr. Schluneforr [sic] states that he has missed him about three days.
     Although considered a worthless character, it is said he would sometimes engage at hard labor and earn a little money, but managed to spend it soon.
     The remains were viewed by Justice Brasswell, who says he found the skull crushed on top of the head, which he attributes to the fall in the well and striking his head against the stone wall. He will hear testimony as soon as practicable. The remains were turned over to Undertaker Linskie.

- October 19, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Henry Fisher, a native of Switzerland, suicided last evening by taking laudanum.

- October 23, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Mr. Durham Dead

From His Injuries Sustained in the Street Car Accident.

     Mr. Joel Durham, run over by a street car last Sunday and removed to his home in Terrell, died there yesterday.

- October 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     The grand jury returned an indictment against Mrs. Salisbury for the murder of Mrs. Fromleth, and she was re-arrested yesterday.

- October 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

City News.

     At 8:30 yesterday morning, death's icy fingers laid to rest the spirit of little Lucille, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Kahn, aged 4 months, and 17 days. The funeral took place yesterday evening from their residence, corner Ervay and Young streets.

- October 26, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

An Officer Dead.

     Charlie Haskell, deputy constable in this precinct as an appointee of Constable Jacoby, died at his residence in this city after a long siege of sickness...he was a member of the Masonic order in this city..funeral this afternoon at 4 o'clock.

- November 1, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Council Meeting.

     Health officer report...8 deaths during the week.

- November 5, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Court Transactions.

     Frank Shaw, colored, incarcerated on the charge of murdering Jones, also colored, at Oppenheim's slaughter pens the other evening, to-day filed application for a writ of habeas corpus hearing.

- November 10, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The health officer reported five deaths during the week--two adults and three children.

- November 12, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Funeral Notice.

     The funeral of Mrs. W. H. Thomas, wife of Capt. W. H. Thomas, president of the American National Bank, will occur to-morrow morning at 11 o'clock from the family residence, on McKinney avenue near Harwood street.

- November 14, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     Health officer Carter showed by his report eight deaths in the city for the week.

- November 19, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

UNTIMELY DEATH.
_______

E. J. RODDIS, THE WELL KNOWN BRO-
KER, EXPIRES IN HIS OFFICE.

________

Congestion the Probable Cause of
Death.

     The citizens of Dallas were startled this morning by the news which became current upon the streets about 9 o'clock to the effect that E. J. Roddis, the senior member of the well-known brokerage firm of Roddis & Ogden, had just been found dead in his office in the opera house building. The news caused the usual crowd of friends and curiously-inclined citizens to congregate about the office at once, and it was toward noon before any facts surrounding the sad affair could be elicited.
     It seems that at the usual hour this morning, viz., about 8 o'clock, the office boy, Henry Bouchelle, arrived at the office and proceeded to his accustomed morning duties, the first of which was to make a fire in the stove. He noticed Mr. Roddis lying upon some newspapers carefully spread upon the floor near the stove when he entered, and though thinking strange of the fact, he, supposing him to be sleeping, went about making the fire very cautiously in order that he might not disturb him. Finally, when he had finished this task, he noticed that Mr. Roddis was still lying as he had at first discovered him and perfectly motionless, so he proceeded to where he was and tried to arouse him, but to no avail. He then rushed out and procured assistance, but they together, could not arouse him and he ran quickly to Main street for a physician. Williams' drug store was the first place he made the situation of affairs known and Dr. D. R. P. McDermett being there, hastened with him back to the office, only to find that Mr. Roddis had

BEEN DEAD FOR SOMETIME.

     Other physicians were eventually called in as, also, Justice Braswell, who impaneling a jury, proceeded to view the body, after which it was removed to Undertaker Linskie's establishment, and subsequently, or about noon, removed to his late home on Chestnut Hill in South Dallas, from whence the body will be taken to his old home in Milwaukee to-morrow morning.
     Dr. McDermett being seen in his office by a reporter, said that he had arrived at the office where the body was shortly before 9 o'clock and found the deceased stretched upon the floor. Made an examination of the body and found no evidence whatever of violence, or other causes for death than natural, though he did not know deceased, nor of his habits or conditions, and could not speak intelligently as to the possibilities--he had been dead some little time when I saw him.
     Justice Braswell said in reply to questions, that he had viewed the body and would, some time to-morrow, hear the evidence in the case--that he did not know anything about it yet.
     Robert Ogden, the company part of the late firm, said that he last saw deceased alive about 1 o'clock yesterday. His theory is that he having missed the train on the Rapid Transit Railway, went into his office to await the last train, that goes immediately upon the close of the performance at the theatre and, probably not feeling well, he having been the subject to chills, laid down by the fire and, becoming worse, was unable to call assistance and died of congestion. He, continued Mr. Ogden, has had two congestive chills lately and I think he died from the effect, of one last night or sometime this morning.
     Mr. Ed. Alston, who was known to be a particular personal friend of the deceased, was next seen, and talked very freely of the virtues of his late friend--said that deceased had been in the city for the past 10 years, during all of which time, he had been in the brokerage business and had been very successful. He came from Milwaukee here and was probably, without exception, the finest grocery man in the city. I have known him intimately, added Mr. Alston, and there were few more lighthearted or congenial men anywhere than he. He was one of the most talented young men I have ever known and enjoyed the confidence and esteem of all who knew him.

AT THE RESIDENCE.

     A TIMES-HERALD reporter called at the late residence of the deceased shortly after noon; numbers of friends from the city and the immediate neighborhood were there to pay respects, but it was only the most intimate personal friends that were permitted to see the distracted wife and mother, who was in her room upstairs entirely removed from the busy scene that was enacting below. The deceased leaves a wife and one child, a girl of five. Mr. Alston said it was the most difficult task of his life to break the sad news to the wife of the deceased.
     Preparations are making for the shipment of the remains to the old home in Milwaukee to-morrow morning.
     The deceased, with his little family, had but a few days ago occupied their beautiful new residence on Chestnut Hill, in South Dallas, which had been newly and handsomely furnished throughout.
     A singular coincidence connected with the death is the fact that Mr. Roddis leaves no blood relation on this earth, and the wife who survives him has only one relative in the world--a brother--in Milwaukee.
     The bereaved family have the sympathy of a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

- November 20, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

THE MYSTERY UNRAVELED.
_________

Mr. Roddis Purchased Morphine
Twice on the Night of His Death.

     The evidence in the case of the mysterious death of Mr. E. J. Roddis, is drawn out by degares. To-day Henry Edmondson, employed at Williams' drug store, was sworn and testified: "On the 20th inst., about 9 o'clock p.m., I sold deceased four grains of morphine and two of quinine in solution. He said he wanted it for indigestion. He seemed to be rational. After that, and about half-past 10 o'clock p.m., I sold him four grains of morphine in powder and two of quinine, he saying he had broken the bottle of that which he bought before."
     It is said that further evidence has been discovered going to show that on the night of his death, he entered a Main street saloon and called for a glass of beer. The beverage was drawn, and, before he drank it, he emptied into the glass, a powder, which he said was quinine, and remarked after he drank it that it was very bitter.
     The witnesses who have testified before the coroner, so far, are H. W. Vauchelet, H. Robeson and Henry Edmondson, and still the testimony is not concluded.

- November 22, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

W. L. Griggs Dies.

     Mr. W. L. Griggs, president of the Fourth National Bank, died at his residence, on the northeast corner of Swiss and Haskell avenues, in East Dallas, this morning at 3:30 o'clock, after a brief confinement from pneumonia. The remains will be sent to Mexia, his former home, for interment. He leaves an aged mother, a wife, children and innumerable friends to mourn his departure. His bereaved family are well provided for. Among other effects, Mr. Griggs held a policy in the New York Mutual Life for $5000.

- November 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The health officer for the week reported eight deaths.

- November 26, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     The report of the health officer for the week ending Nov. 24th showed that E. J. Roddis was 36 years of age and died of congestion.

- November 27, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Sudden Death.

     Miss Fannie Woolen of Redoak, who has been on a visit to the family of Mr. Anthony Douglas, on Caruth street, died very suddenly this morning.   Miss Woolen, during her short stay here, made many warm friends who will regret to hear of her sudden demise. Her remains will be taken home to-morrow.

- November 30, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2
- o o o -

DIED FROM MORPHINE.
________

A Worthy Young Man Suicides--The
Cause Shrouded in Mystery.

     Henry Soblowich died from the effects of a dose morphine, supposed to have been administered with suicidal intent, yesterday morning at Mr. W. E. Best's residence on McKinney avenue. Deceased was a clerk in the grocery store of Mr. Best, by whom he has been employed the past five years. He was seventeen years old, and bore an exceptionally good reputation, and the rash deed cannot be accounted for He was in good health, and this fact gives more coloring to the theory of suicide.
     Mr. Best states that early after supper Wednesday night, deceased left his residence apparently in the best spirits. He did not know when he returned to his room that night, as he did not hear him. About 7 o'clock, when breakfast was ready, deceased was called, and not till then was the discovery made that he was dying. A physician was summoned, who pronounced his ailment to be from the results of an overdose of morphine, a partly-filled vial of which was discovered in the room of deceased. It was unlabeled and about twenty grains were missing. Sablowich expired about 8 o'clock. His remains were removed to the residence of his parents on Carter street. They were greatly shocked and are prostrated with grief over the sad termination of the young man's promising life.

- November 30, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Court Items.

     The habeas Corpus trial of E. J. Humphries, charged with the murder of J. S. Staggs at Mesquite, has been continued until December 10.

- December 1, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     The little son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Conkling died yesterday.

- December 1, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.
______

PROCEEDINGS IN REGULAR SESSION.

     The health officer's weekly mortuary report showed ten deaths, of which three were infants and seven adults. He recommended that the death register be placed in the hands of the secretary and that no person be allowed to construct or interfere with a vault without a permit from the city engineer and health officer. The recommendations were referred.

- December 3, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-2.
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CITY NEWS.

     Felica Davis, a colored woman living at the corner of Young and Houston streets, suicided yesterday morning by taking morphine. Ill health was the cause.

- December 3, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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A HORRIBLE MISHAP.
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BOTH LEGS CUT OFF BY A TRAIN.
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The Fatal Accident that Befell a
Little Newsboy.

     At 3:30 yesterday afternoon, just after the forms of the TIMES-HERALD went to press, a horrible accident occurred at the intersection of Austin street and the Texas & Pacific road. Little Edgar Hall, aged 13 years, a newsboy on his way to the TIMES-HERALD office to get his daily supply of papers to sell, and in making the crossing at the point named, was run over by a backing T. & P. train. Several parties saw the boy as truck after truck passed over his mangled body, but they were so horrified that they could not tell whether he was knocked down by the train or fell in an effort to climb upon it while in motion. C. H. Leatherman, a colored employe working at the compress, was the first to reach the mangled boy who held up his little pouch of change and told them who he was and begged piteously to be carried home. "Some of you please take me home; here is my money. I was going for my papers. Please, some of you, take me home. For God's sake, take me home; oh, give me some water, I am so thirsty," were the agonizing pleadings that pierced the ears of the horrified spectators. A gunny sack was taken from the platform and an ill provized stretcher made of it, upon which the little fellow was tenderly placed, and himself indicating the way, he was borne, between John Jones and William Davis, two colored men, to his home on the corner of Jefferson and Hord streets. His mother, who is a poor widow woman, was struck down with grief at the sight of her mangled boy. Another boy, an older brother, was at home and his mirthful laugh was turned into deep sobs over the fate of his little brother. The little fellow showed true heroism in his fearful suffering. He remained perfectly conscious and talked of the accident in which he said he was knocked down and run over by the train which was backing unobserved by him. When asked if he was climbing on the train, he said "no." Physicians were summoned and immediately responded. The little boy's mind seemed clear for the space of an hour or more after the accident, but soon the pallor of death settled on his brow and relieved his sufferings about 6 o'clock.
     He was thrown across the side track at the southwest corner of the compress platform. Several lengths of cars passed over him, cutting one leg off just below. His thigh bones were frightfully shattered. After he was carried home, the compress workmen gathered the fragments of mangled and scattered lower limbs and conveyed them to his home.
     Little Edgar was a part of the support of his widowed mother, whose life is enveloped in another dark cloud of sorrow.

- December 6, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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CITY NEWS.

     Little Edgar Hall, who was run over and killed by a train Wednesday afternoon, was buried to-day.

- December 7, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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[No Heading]

     The late Col. Elam Sharp, who died in this city a few days since, deserves more than the mere announcement of his death.   He was a South Carolinian--an educated, modest, Christian gentleman, and was a lieutenant colonel in Hampton's famous legion in Virginia. His deceased wife was a daughter of the distinguished Senator Robert Y. Hayne, whose name is associated with that of Webster in the celebrated debate in 1830.   Bereft of fortune by the war, Col. Sharp, after its close, visited Mexico.  In April, 1866, with John Henry Brown and two other Americans and 158 Mexicans, he was on the steamboat Coy, on the Pameco river, 125 miles above Tampico, when the boiler exploded and left them all afoot in the wilderness. Returning to the United States, he came to Dallas county in 1871, and has ever been an honored citizen, esteemed in the highest sense by all who personally knew him.  The wife of ex-Sheriff Smith is one of his daughters.

- December 8, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
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CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The health officer's hospital report for the month furnished the following statistics: Patients admitted 47; remaining over from October, 28; discharged in November, 32; died, 5; remaining in the hospital, Dec. 1, 32. Total deaths in the city during November, 41, of whom 23 were adults and 18 children. His weekly mortuary report accounted for eight deaths.

- December 10, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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[No Heading]

     Annie L. Moore, writes from El Paso, enquiring for evidence concerning the death of her father, M. F. Moore, which she states occurred at a hotel in this city in 1872, and he was interred under the auspices of the Masonic fraternity.

- December 12, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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CITY NEWS.

     The remains of Walter Wall, a compositor, who died aboard a boat on the lower Trinity, arrived in the city yesterday and will be interred to-morrow.

     Mr. Chas. D. Fox, recently with the First National Bank of Fort Worth, died at the residence of his sister, Mrs. F. C. Callier, in this city last night of consumption.

     Mrs. Emma Kivlen, wife of Patrolman Kivlen, died at their residence on Bogel street at 7:10 this morning of consumption.   She was 28 years old and leaves her husband and four little children, the eldest of whom is ten years, to mourn her death.   She will be interred at 10 o'clock to-morrow morning in the Catholic cemetery.

- December 12, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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PERSONAL.

     Dr. G. Holland, father of Mr. F. P. Holland of the Farm and Ranch, died this morning at his home in El Paso after an illness of several weeks.

- December 14, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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DOMESTIC INFELICITY
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ENDING IN THE SUICIDE OF MRS. FRANK
J. SMITH.

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Substance of the Testimony As
Given at the Inquest.

     The Morning News contained under the head of funeral notice this morning, the announcement of the death of Mrs. Sarah S. Smith, wife of Mr. Frank J. Smith, at their residence on Beaumont street, last night. At an early hour, rumors developed that Mrs. Smith had suicided, and a visit to Justice Brown's office confirmed the street talk and revealed the fact that he was called last night to hold an inquest on the body of the deceased, but it was stated that the family desired, if possible, to keep the statement out of the papers.
     The mother of deceased testified at the inquest that about 9:45 last night, she heard a noise in Mrs. Smith's room, and upon entering found her suffering greatly. She dispatched a runner for Dr. Mitchell, who responded about 10 o'clock.
     Dr. Mitchell testified that he was called and deceased, although suffering terrible pain, but apparently perfectly rational, stated to him that she had taken morphine and strychnine with suicidal intent. He did all he could to save her life, but she expired soon after his arrival.
     The husband testified that his wife had before attempted suicide while laboring apparently under temporary insanity.
     Last evening at 5:30, deceased was out riding with Mrs. Brewer on Cabell street, apparently in her usual health, and gave out no evidences of contemplating the terrible rash deed she committed only a few hours afterwards.
     An investigation of the rumors growing out of the sad case disclosed the fact that deceased and her husband have been separated since the filing of divorce proceedings some three weeks ago by the latter. The papers were not in the clerk's office when called for this morning, but were in the hands of the attorney in charge of the case. However, it is learned that the application was based on the allegations of general disinterestedness and neglect on the part of the wife. It was further developed that the proceedings had their origin, direct, out of a sensational scene which transpired at the office of the husband between deceased and a female destroyer of her happiness, in which she threatened to shoot both her husband and the woman in question. The "woman in the case" on this occasion, it is stated, bid defiance to deceased, whom she abused shamefully.

- December 19, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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[No Heading]

     Alfred A. Loeb, a promising young man of 22 years, and son of Henry and Matilda Loeb, died yesterday afternoon. The funeral occurrred this afternoon.

- December 19, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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City Council.

     Health officer reported nine deaths for the current week--seven adults and two children.

- December 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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DEATH BY THE CARS.
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CLAUDE L. MILLER MEETS DEATH ON
THE TEXAS & PACIFIC TRACK.

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With a Crushed Leg and Hand, Be-
sides Numerous Bruises, He Sur-
vives But a Few Hours.

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     Shortly before 11 o'clock last night, the report spread through the city that a man had been killed by a T. & P. train at the Sycamore street crossing. Investigation, however, showed the accident to have happened at the Hawkins street crossing of the road.
     When the reporters arrived upon the scene, the injured man had been removed to union depot baggage room and the usual crowd of curious, were crowded about; he was unconscious and died without any evidence of the circumstances attending the accident. It was at that time impossible to identify the man, and it was not until morning that he was positively known.
     He died about 2 a.m., never recovering from the severe shock, and was conveyed to the undertaking establishment of P. W. Linskie. Justice Brown was summoned immediately after death and viewed the body and took what evidence was obtainable at once.
     J. S. Humphries, night yard clerk for the Texas & Pacific road, testified that he was in his office near the Good street crossing when No. 17 came in from the east and stopped to take four cars from the siding, which she was doing when he was attracted by screams, and going out, saw Conductor Chas. Dunbar signaling and calling loudly to the engineer to stop, saying that there was a man under the train.
     ---- Jackson testified to seeing him last about 9:30 on the corner of Elm and Hawkins in conversation with a Mrs. Turner and a man.
     The deceased proved to the Claude L. Miller, a brother of A. L. Miller, the manager of the Illingsworth establishment on Elm street east of Harwood, which was closed this morning out of respect to the deceased. Some months ago, the two brothers conducted a dry goods store at the corner of Elm and Harwood under the style of Belt Line Store.
     Since the failure of the firm, however, the deceased has been engaged in school teaching at Farmer's Branch, and had only reached the city on Friday last to spend the holidays with his brother's family. Soon after his arrival, however, he began drinking, and has been on a protracted spree since. It is learned that he spent [the] night before last at the Star Hotel, on East Elm street (corner of Hawkins), and on going there last evening, was refused admittance. Later, however, the landlady, Mrs. Turner, it is said, found him under a bed and ejected him from the premises, as he was then drinking.
     A boy who works in the store, claims to have tried to get deceased to accompany him to his brother's home, on Good street, before bed-time, but that he stopped in a saloon and he could not get him out. It, therefore, appears that after coming from Mrs. Turner's hotel, he started out to his brother's, which was across the railroad, on Good street, and that while walking from Hawkins to Good street, the freight train backed down upon him.
     He is a man of splendid physique, probably 35 years of age and without family. He is from Barboursville, W. Va., where he was raised, and was a graduate of Marshall college at Huntington, W. Va., and later of the university of Virginia. A man of fine attainments, indeed, whose only failing seems, from all accounts, to have been drink.
     The right hand was badly crushed, as also the right leg below the knee, while the head and other parts exhibited slight bruises.
     The body will probably be shipped tonight to the old home in West Virginia.
     Justice Brown was at the union depot at 2:30 this afternoon to get the testimony of the train men, of the train that caused the accident. They went west to Fort Worth last night, and it is on their return trip to-day, that their evidence will be taken.
     The decision of the coroner was therefore not obtainable at the hour of going to press.

- December 28, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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The Verdict.

     Squire John Henry Brown, as coroner in the Claudeus S. Miller case, rendered his verdict to-day at noon, which was as follows: "That Claudius S. Miller, the deceased, had been dissipating to excess for several days; that from 5 to 10 p.m. on December 28th, he was drunk enough to be partially beyond self-control; that he was last seen in that condition at about 10:20 o'clock that night at the corner of Elm and Hawkins street, the night being very dark away from the street lights; that at about 10:30, he was injured by a flat car loaded with lumber and belonging to freight train No. 17, hauled by engine No. 170, on a switch track of the Texas & Pacific Railroad about 100 feet east of Good street, while the car was being slowly moved east; that in the dark, no one saw the accident, and the conductor, engineer and brakeman were only made aware of it by the screams of the injured man, when the car was instantly stopped, the injured man placed on a flat car, and at once conveyed to the baggage room at the union depot, where he died about 1 o'clock on the same night. On personal examination, I find his left ankle was broken, his right leg, from the thigh to the foot, mashed into a jelly-like mass and injuries on his breast." [Signed]
J
OHN HENRY BROWN, J. P.

- December 29, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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