Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

To Dallas County Archives main page
To Obituary Index, 1862-1950
To Obituary Table of Contents page

(Updated June 9, 2004)

 1921
Hargreaves Funeral Thursday.

     Funeral Services for Mrs. Elizabeth Hargreaves, 93 years old, who died at her residence, 513 South Zang's Boulevard, Wednesday night, will be held at 5 o'clock Thursday afternoon from the residence of her son, Sam Hargreaves, 204 West Twelfth street. The Rev. G. M. Gibson of the Oak Cliff Methodist Church will officiate.
     Mrs. Hargreaves is survived by her son, Sam Hargreaves, and her daughter, Miss N. J. Hargreaves.

Schneider Funeral Thursday.

     Funeral services for William Schneider, 64 years old, who died Tuesday morning, were held from the home of his daughter, Mrs. O. A. Palmer, Jr., East Arlington Stop, at Arlington, at 2:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon.
     Mr. Schneider is survived by his wife, a son, W. F. Schneider, of Stevens Point, Wis., and a daughter, Mrs. Palmer.

Services for Mrs. Marten

     Funeral services for Mrs. Catherine M. Marten, widow, 65 years old, 2202 Browder street, who died Wednesday morning in a local sanitarium, will be held Friday morning. The funeral procession will proceed from the residence at 8: 30 o'clock, with services at St. Joseph's Church, Swiss avenue and Texas street, at 9 o'clock. The Rev. Father Elkert will officiated. Burial will take place in Calvary Cemetery. The pallbearers will be Claude Amos, Alex Miller, Daniel McNulty, S. Allen, C. M. Shackelford and George Bower.
     Mrs. Marten is survived by two daughters, Mrs. M. Coerver of Dallas and Mrs. E. S. Stephens of Nashville, Tenn., and four sons, Frank, George, Edward and Louis Marten, all of Dallas.

Services for J. B. Hogg.

     Funeral services for J. B. Hogg, 62 years old, who died Wednesday at his home, 2719 Hibernia street, were held at 4: 30 o'clock' Thursday afternoon from the residence. Burial was in Grove Hill Cemetery.
     Mr. Hogg is survived by his wife, two daughters and three sons.

Mays Funeral Thursday.

     Funeral services for Louis H. Mays, 52 years old, who died Wednesday evening at his home, 3600 Marshall avenue, were held from the residence of Mrs. W. W. Cooley, 3701 Trunk avenue, at 4[?] o'clock Thursday afternoon. Burial was in Grove Hill Cemetery.
     Mr. Mays is survived by one son, R. B. Mays, and three daughters, Mrs. W. W. Cooley, Mrs. J. H. Lee and Miss Josie Mays, all of Dallas.

- May 5, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

FUNERAL SERVICES
FOR MRS. TERRY TO
BE HELD THURSDAY

     Funeral services will be held at 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon for Mrs. Callie Hicks Terry, who died Wednesday morning at her home, 215 South Marsalis avenue. Services will be held at the residence with burial in Greenwood cemetery. Dr. L. D. Young, pastor of the City Temple will preside. Mrs. Terry was a member of the Presbyterian church.
     Mrs. Terry, who was the widow of James S. Terry, came to Dallas in 1877 from Marshall County, Mississippi. She is survived by the following sons and daughters, Mrs. W. J. Schaefle, Los Angeles, Cal., Roy, Cleveland, Paul and Robert Terry; Mrs. J. Preston Goodman Jr. and Mrs. Henry M. Kiston. Surviving grandchildren are W. James Schaefle, Roy, James and Callie Terry and Katherine Kiston.
     Active pallbearers will be Dr. G. M. Terry, Olin A. Terry, Jesse D. Moffett, Forest Reed, Terry Gill, W. O. Goodman, Allen Bogan.
     Honorary pallbearers will be Joe E. Lawther, J. E. Bassett, H. W. Burr, Dr. Rufus Whitis, Louis Blaylock, J. P. Goodman Sr., James Storie, E. O. Tenison, J. T. Rush, R. C. Ayres, Dr. J. H. Burma, T. L. Bradford, Rev. F. Hendrix, J. O. Gill, C. H. Edwards, M. L. Sammons, Dr. Homer Donald and Dr. John G. McLaurin.

[Note: the above obituary was accompanied
by a photograph of Mrs. Terry]

Miss Wilma Johnson Dies.

     Miss Wilma Johnson, the 18-year-old daughter of Mrs. Minnie Johnson of Graham, died in a local sanitarium Thursday morning. The body was sent by the Charles F. Weiland Undertaking Company at 11 o'clock Thursday morning to Graham, where funeral services will be held some time Friday. Miss Johnson is survived by her mother.

Scaff Funeral Thursday.

     Funeral services for Monroe Scaff, 50 years old, who died Wednesday in a local sanitarium, were held in the chapel of Lamar & Smith at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. Wallace Bassett officiating. Burial was in Oak Cliff Cemetery.
Mr. Scaff is survived by three sisters, Mrs. J. P. Johnson of Dallas; Mrs. W. J. Kinsey of Nashville, Tenn., and Mrs. W. Trousdale of Houston; one brother, W. R. Scaff.

Busby Funeral Saturday.

     Funeral services for Walter Busby, 48 years old, who died at his home, 2407 Hickory street, at 10 o'clock Thursday morning, will be held at 3 o'clock Saturday afternoon from the Central Christian Church. Burial will be in Grove Hill cemetery.
     Mr. Busby is survived by his wife; one son, Walter Busby Jr.; five sisters, Mrs. Julia Rankin of Rockfield, Mrs. Ella Hardgreaves of Burlington, Texas; Mrs. J. B. Farrlington of Huntsville, Mrs. Price of Rochelle and Mrs. Gamble of California; one brother, Hugh Busby of Clayton, N. M.

Mrs. Donie Cutchin Dies.

     Mrs. Donie Cutchin, 17 years old, wife of J. C. Cutchin, 2503 Hickory street, died at the home of the family at 5:30 o'clock Thursday morning. Announcement of funeral services will be made later.
     Mrs. Cutchin is survived by her husband, an infant son; mother, Mrs. Azile Emerson; four brothers, Larry, Pat, Leslie and Tarry Emerson, all of Dallas. Mrs. Cutchin was a member of the Hickory Street Baptist Church. The Rev. T. O. Sallee will officiate and burial will be in Oakland Cemetery.

- May 5, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 19, col. 3.
- o o o -

PROMINENT DRY
GOODS MAN DIES

     Clarence E. Kellogg, 2929 Forest avenue, died at his home Thursday morning.
     He was 42 years of age and had been a resident of Dallas about thirty-two years.
     Mr. Kellogg was first employed by the Sam Dysterbach Company, Elm and Pearl streets, when he was 16 years of age, as cash boy and stock clerk. He later became vice-president of the company and had served in that capacity since 1909. He was also acting manager and buyer for the firm. He came to Dallas from Lawrence, Texas, near Forney, at the age of ten.
     Surviving are his wife; mother, Mrs. Hattie Kellogg, two sisters, Mrs. Ida Kraft, of Dallas, and Miss Leatrice Kellogg, of Los Angeles, California; one brother, Argo Kellogg, of Dallas.
     Funeral will be held from the residence at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon, the Rev. Wm. M. Anderson, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, officiating. Burial will take place in Oakland Cemetery.
     Mr. Kellogg was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and also a member of the Woodmen of the World.
     The Sam Dysterbach Company will be closed Friday.

- May 5, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 23, col. 6.
- o o o -
[Note: a photo of Mr. Kellogg accompanied the above obituary]


 

Dr. Henry North Graves

Death Claims Last Survivor of Little
Band That Buried "Twin Sisters"

     When death sealed the lips of Dr. Henry North Graves of Dallas, Tuesday morning, the last hope of patriotic Texans to recover the "Twin Sisters," two cannon, relics of the Texas Republic and later of the civil war, was abandoned. The last survivor of the group of five men who buried the relics during the civil war, that they might not fall into the hands of Federal troops and be turned against the sons of those who had cherished them for the part they played in gaining Texas' independence, breathed his last Tuesday morning at 8:30 o'clock without designating the place where the cannon were buried. Mr. Graves died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. N. Bigbee, 409 North Haskell avenue.
     The "Twin Sisters" gifts to the Texas Republic by a woman's society of Cincinnati, O., were buried in the vicinity of Harrisburg, Texas, during the latter days of the civil war. They played an important part in the early history of the Texas Republic and were used by General Sam Houston against the Mexican president and General Santa Anna. During the Civil war, the Twin Sisters were in possession of a party of 72 men who garrisoned Galveston Island. Hard-pressed by the Yankees, Dr. Graves, with three other soldiers and a negro, slipped them from the garrison during the dead of night and carried them to the vicinity of Harrisburg, where they were buried in a field. Dr. Graves was the last survivor of the party.
     Born in Plains Hill, Tenn., July 20, 1846, Dr. Graves moved to Texas in 1860, settling near Gonzales. He was the son of Rev. and Mrs. H. A. Graves, his father a Methodist minister in Tennessee. At the outbreak of the civil war, Dr. Graves joined the Confederate forces and served as a dispatch rider in Forest's Cavalry, until detailed with 71 other men to garrison Galveston Island. He was discharged from the Confederate army immediately after the surrender of Lee at Appomattox court house. He served in Col. Man's Regiment, also, in a company organized in Dallas county and commanded by Captain Cunningham.
     Dr. Graves was married to Miss Susan Davidson, December, 2, 1869, and studied medicine and afterward practiced at Gonzales, Seguin and Georgetown. He was considered one of the best authorities in the state of anti-toxins and traveled over Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas, where he taught serum-therapy.
     Three children were born to the union of Dr. Graves and his wife, who was a sister of the late Judge W. I. Davidson, of Austin. The children are Mrs. J. N. Bigbee, of Dallas, Miss Fannie Graves, also of Dallas, and Harry Graves, of Georgetown. All survive him. He is also survived by one brother, J. W. Graves of Houston, and one nephew, Judge Allen Graves, of Austin.
     Dr. Graves came to Dallas five years ago from Georgetown.
     Funeral services will be held at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday evening at the Grace Methodist Church, with Dr. W. D. Bradfield, officiating. The body will remain at the church all night Tuesday night and will be forwarded by the Geo. W. Loudermilk Undertaking Company to Georgetown, Wednesday morning, for burial. He was a member of the Grace Methodist Church, and of the Masonic order at Georgetown. He will be buried with Masonic honors.
     Pallbearers will be J. H. Taylor, T. H. Morrow, W. H. Lamar, J. J. Knause, C. E. Sylvester, V. J. Branon, E. S. Fudge, W. O. Forester, W. C. Temple, R. R. Jackson, R. Hill, C. M. Sandell and Brooks Mays.
     Only recently, Dr. Graves expressed a desire that he would live long enough to make a trip to Harrisburg and aid in recovering the Twin Sisters. Patriotic Texas organizations have endeavored for years to have the cannon dug up and placed at the state capitol at Austin, but on account of his health, Dr. Graves has not been able to make the trip and lead the searchers. During the Confederate Reunion in Houston last year, Dr. Graves escorted a group of veterans to the field where the guns are concealed, but made no effort to determine the exact spot where they were buried.
     Dr. Graves intended to make a search for the cannon if financial aid could be extended him, and plans were being made to introduce a resolution in the Texas legislature at the time of his death asking the necessary appropriation. The late Senator J. C. McNealus was among those who promised to support the movement.

- June 28, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
p. 1, col. 3-5; cont. on p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -


DEATHS

SERVICES SATURDAY
FOR DALLAS SOLDIER

     Funeral services for Corporal Frank D. Webb, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Webb, 1519 Foreman street, who was killed in France, Oct. 10, 1918, were held at the home of his parents at 3 o'clock Saturday afternoon with the Rev. J. B. Blansett officiating.
     Corporal Webb was a member of the original Dallas Grays, which went to France as Company B, 144th Infantry, 36th division. His company was composed almost entirely of Dallas and McKinney men. Many former comrades who served in Company B, attended the funeral services.
     The body of Corporal Webb will be sent to Clinton, Hunt county, former home of the family, Sunday morning, where it will be buried under the auspices of the Otho Morgan Post No. 17, American Legion, of Greenville.

FUNERAL OF MRS. FORREST
HELD SATURDAY MORNING.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Agnes Forrest, who died Wednesday night, were held at 11 o'clock Saturday morning at the home of her son, James E. Forrest, 3509 Lexington avenue, Highland Park. The services were conducted by Bishop Alexander C. Garrett, assisted by Dr. Smith of St. Matthew's Cathedral. Burial was in the Oakland cemetery. Pallbearers were C. W. Davis, C. W. Hobson, R. G. Roper, M. C. Turner, A. H. Johnson and C. S.[?] DeFord.
     Mrs. Forrest was born in St. Marys, Canada, Jan. 13, 1861. She had been a resident of Dallas 17 years. She is survived by James E. Forrest, her only son, and two grandchildren, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Forrest.

BANKER WHO DIED THURSDAY
IS BURIED FRIDAY.

     Funeral services for Leverett H. Squires, well known Dallas banker, who died at his home Thursday night, were held at the residence, 1734 Bennett avenue, at 5 o'clock Friday afternoon. The Rev. W. D. Bradfield, pastor of the Grace Methodist Church, of which Mr. Squires was a member, conducted the services. Burial was in the Grove Hill cemetery, under the auspices of the Masonic Blue Lodge. Floral tributes were received from Hella Temple, Trinity Valley Masonic Lodge, the employes of the Central State Bank, and from a large number of individual friends.
     Preceding the ceremony at the home and the grave, the Masonic ante-burial service was held by Trinity Valley Lodge at the Scottish Rite cathedral. Mr. Squires was a part master of Terfral Lodge of Terrell, Ok, and had attained the 32d degree Scottish Rite, and was a member of the Trinity Valley Lodge, and Hella Shrine Temple.
     Active pallbearers at the funeral, all employes of the Central State Bank. were Ben C. Ball, Benton F. Joyner, C. G. King, A. T. Darr, J. J. Kettle and T. K Cleveland.
     Mr. Squires is survived by his wife and three children, James Hilton, 12 years old; Jessie Jean, 9, and Fred, 5. Mrs. Squires was formerly Miss Jessie Dodson, daughter of Dr. J. B. Dodson of Vernon of Vernon. His father and mother, Mr. and Ms. William Squires, live at Henrietta. Fred Quires, a brother, live at Henrietta. Fred Squires, a brother, lives in Dallas.

- October 22, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

CHILD DIES FROM
INJURIES RECEIVED
WHEN HIT BY AUTO

     Nellie Griggs, 8-year-old girl who was run down by an automobile on Second avenue Saturday afternoon, died Tuesday at Parkland hospital, where she was taken immediately after the accident.
     The child lived with her parents at 1419 Second avenue, and was crossing the street at the time of the accident which caused her death.
O. L. Bosworth was arrested following the accident and charged with careless collision.
     Nellie Griggs is the second child to die from automobile accident in Dallas within the past forty-eight hours.
     Funeral arrangements for the Griggs child have not been completed.

- October 25, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

FUNERAL SERVICES TUESDAY
FOR MRS. PEARL NORTON

     Last rites for Mrs. Pearl Norton, aged 35 years, who died Monday in a local sanitarium, were held at noon Tuesday at the Seventh Day Adventist church, Live Oak and Liberty streets. Following the service, the body was sent to Fort Worth for interment. Mrs. Norton is survived by her mother, three brothers and two sisters.

- October 25, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

Duval Funeral Tuesday.

     Funeral services for W. A. Duval, who died Sunday, were held at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning from the parlors of the Weiland Undertaking company.

- October 25, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

Services for Mrs. Harris.

     The funeral of Mrs. Hennie Harris, who died at the family home, 2903 Gould street Monday afternoon, will be held at the Weiland chapel at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning. Interment will be in the White Rock cemetery. Mrs. Harris, who was forty-five years old, is survived by a son, Harry Harris, and three daughters, Miss Beatrice, Helen and Gertrude.

- October 25, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6.
- o o o -

Injuries Received
When Struck by An
Auto Cause Death

     After lingering for nearly five days, Fred Pogue, aged 8[?] years, died Monday afternoon at the City Hospital as the result of injuries received when struck by an automobile. The accident occurred last Thursday afternoon at Elm and Walton streets. The boy was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Pogue of Mesquite. With his parents, the little fellow was in Dallas to attend the fair and was injured as he went to cross the street. The automobile which struck the boy was being driven by W. W. Gillette. The body is held by the Loudermilk Undertaking Company pending funeral arrangements.

- October 25, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

DEATHS

Services for Miss Barrow.

     Funeral services for Miss Edith Barrow, aged 19, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Barrow, who died Monday, will be held at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the chapel of the George A. Brewer Undertaking company. Interment will be in Oakland Cemetery. Besides the parents, Miss Barrow is survived by one sister and a brother.

Funeral of Miss Lindsley.

     Funeral services for Miss Florence Lindsley, who died Monday, were held at the home of her mother, Mrs. J. H. Daniel, 3132 Ross avenue at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning.

- October 25, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 16, col. 3.
- o o o -


MAN DROPS DEAD
LOADING WAGON

     Lee McKenzie, negro, 35 years old, 1216 McKinney street, dropped dead while loading a wagon with gravel at the gravel pit located at the end of the Forest avenue bridge, Thursday morning.
     No inquest had been held over the body at a late hour Thursday. The body was turned over to the Citizens' Undertaking company for burial.

- October 27, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 7.
- o o o -

DEATHS

SERVICES FOR MRS. COOPER
TO BE HELD THURSDAY.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Lou Cooper, widow, 86[?] years old, who died Wednesday at the home of Mrs. W. H. Bettes, 3407 San Jacinto street, will be held Thursday afternoon from the First Methodist Church, Ross and Harwood. Burial will be in Greenwood Cemetery. Mrs. Cooper was born in Illinois, but had been a resident of Texas for many years.

Alexander Funeral.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Rebecca Alexander, 78 years old, who died Wednesday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fannye Eile, 1408 Pocahontas street, were held at Weiland undertaking parlors Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Burial was in White Rock Cemetery.
     Survivors are Mrs. Eile, one granddaughter, Miss Juliette Eile, and one son, Sol Alexander. Mrs. Alexander was formerly a resident of Shreveport.

Wilson Funeral Thursday.

     Funeral services for Charles Franklin Wilson, 71 years old, who died Wednesday at the home of his brother, S. W. Wilson, 2503 Hickory street, will be held at the residence at 4 o'clock Thursday. The Rev. T. O. Sallee and E[?] R. Hussey will officiate. Burial will be in Oakland Cemetery.
     Pallbearers are A. R. Logan, Donald T. Smith, Dr. George W. Kelly, J. L. Long, Dr. J. L. Rogers and Bryan A. ____.
     Mr. Wilson is survived by his brother and one sister, Mrs. W. W. Strippey of Harpers Ferry, W. Va.

- October 27, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 18, col. 4.
- o o o -


DRAFT RESOLUTIONS
ON DEATH OF LEADER

     The Oreades Club met Wednesday at their club rooms in postponed session, and a committee was appointed to draft resolutions on the death of their leader, Miss Clara Allison Bixby. The following is a copy of the resolutions adopted:
     "Whereas, with seemly humility and reverence, we acknowledge the wisdom and benevolence of our God in all things, and since, in the exercise of His tender love His children, He has seen fit to call from us, our dearly beloved and gifted leader and friends, Clara Allison Bixby, to perfect her destiny among His chosen in the Realm of Light, therefore, be it,
     "Resolved, That while acknowledging the wisdom of our Heavenly Father, we cannot but bow our heads in sorrow that so great a soul, so grand a mind, so benevolent a heart, and so dear a friend should be taken from us. Her keen mentality and unfailing generosity of purpose, together with a great love for humanity, endeared her to the hearts of all who knew her and especially to the members of this club. Be it further
     "Resolved, That we shall always carry in our hearts, the great memory of her wise Christian counsel, which will ever be a source of the highest spiritual inspiration. And, be it further
     "Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be spread on the minutes of the Oreades Club; a copy sent to the bereaved family, and a copy given to the press for publication.
     "M
RS. R. H. JOHNSON, Chm.
     "M
RS. W. H. BALDWIN,
     "M
RS. O. H. BETTIS,
     "M
RS. R. F. TAYLOR."

- October 27, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 18, col. 4.
- o o o -

SAYS MAN DIED
FROM WOUND
SELF-INFLICTED

     J. E. Watkins, found dead in his bed at 3013 South Boulevard early Thursday morning, came to his death from a gun shot wound, self-inflicted, according to a verdict rendered by Justice Sam Barnett, who viewed the body at the Weiland Undertaking Parlors.
     Detective Captain Will R. Moffitt, who investigated the case, said that, in his opinion, the case was a suicide, but an investigation is being conducted. All efforts on the part of Detective John Blanton to discover the place where the pistol, a .38 calibre was purchased, had failed at noon Thursday.
     The footprints about the window near where Watkins' head rested on the blood stained pillow, have been measured and the officers have not entirely abandoned the theory that the man was murdered.

Tried to Borrow Gun.
     Mrs. Houston Watkins, daughter-in-law of the dead man, informed the officers Thursday morning, that her father-in-law had recently tried to borrow a shotgun owned by her husband. It was also learned that Watkins had been found in his room a few weeks ago with the gas stove turned on and the windows and doors closed.
     It was reported to the police that financial reverses had caused despondency recently, and that Watkins had talked rather freely to friends about his troubles.
     He is survived by three sons, Henry Watkins of Nevada, Houston Watkins of Dallas, and H. L. Watkins of Mexia. Watkins came to Dallas from Royce City about a year ago. Funeral arrangements are being held up pending the arrival of relatives.
     Early indications pointed to murder in the case, but after the investigation by the police, and the verdict of Judge Sam Barnett, this theory was partly abandoned.
     The body was discovered by Mrs. Lydia Christelles, who entered the room to light the gas stove. The pistol was lying on the bed beside the body.
     The screen window at the head of the bed was open and underneath the window, there were footprints leading from the front walk.

- October 27, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 18, col. 6.
- o o o -

Youth Dies in Houston.

     Daniel Horace Kirby, 8-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. M. F. Kirby of Dallas, died Thursday in Houston at the home of his uncle, E. P. DeGuire. The boy is survived by his mother; two brothers, Horatio and Roland Kirby and two sisters, Mrs. Lillian K. Stephens, and Miss Cassie Kirby. The body was brought to Dallas for burial in Oak Cliff cemetery. Funeral services were held in Smith & Lamar undertaking chapel at 10 o'clock Friday morning.

- October 28, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 13, col. 2.
- o o o -

PASS RESOLUTION ON DEATH
OF NEUMAN GOLDSTEIN

     Resolutions expressing sorrow at the death of Neuman Goldstein were unanimously passed at a meeting of B'nai B'rith memorial service held Thursday night in Temple Emanu-El Annex. The resolutions were presented by Victor H. Hexter. Copies of the resolutions will be sent to members of the faculty.
     Speakers on the program were H. P. Scheline, Louis Kleinman and Emil Corenbleth. Max R. Rosenfield, president of the lodge, was in charge of the services.

- October 28, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

DALLAS MAN IS
KILLED BY FAST
TRAIN NEAR FORNEY

     According to advices received in Dallas Friday night, Charles Tatum, well known in Dallas, was struck by a Texas & Pacific train near Forney Friday afternoon and instantly killed. The body is being held by an undertaker at Forney pending the location of relatives and the completion of funeral arrangements. Tatum was recently employed by the Texas & Pacific railway in anticipation of strike trouble and was assigned to guard a bridge not far from Forney.
     Advices received here were to the effect that the man was caught in the middle of the trestle by the Sunshine Flyer, and instead of jumping from the trestle when the train approached, he tried to run to the other end of the bridge ahead of the train and was run down. The body was horribly mangled.
     Tatum, up to a short time ago, was employed as house officer at the Southland hotel, and had lived in Dallas for many years. It is believed he has a daughter in El Paso.

- October 29, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

CARD OF THANKS

     WE wish to thank our many friends for their kindness shown in the loss of our beloved brother, D. H. Kirby. Mr. and Mrs. Freddie Stephenson.

- October 29, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

RESTRAIN JESS
HASSELL FROM
OPERATING CAR

     A temporary injunction, ordering Jess Hassell, part owner of the Dallas Baseball club of the Texas League, "to desist and refrain from operating an automobile in the city and county of Dallas," was issued late Monday afternoon by District Judge E. b. Muse of the Forty-fourth court.
     At noon Tuesday, the injunction had not been served on Hassell, although Chief Deputy R. L. Petty, personally, was attempting to locate Hassell.
     The penalty for violation of the injunction, after it is served, consists only of contempt of court, and can not exceed three days' confinement in jail, in addition to a substantial fine.
     The action of the court followed the filing by Assistant District Attorney D. E. Coffman of a petition seeking to permanently restrain Hassell from operating a motor vehicle.
     The court's order will stand until a hearing is held on the issues raised, while the case will not be set for trial until attorneys for Hassell file a motion to terminate the order.
     The district attorney's petition charged that Hassell was in the habit of becoming intoxicated, and while in such condition, drove an automobile in a reckless and dangerous manner.
     The application lists a number of accidents in which Hassell is alleged to have figured. The petition alleges that on Nov. 20, 1920, he ran over and killed Mrs. S. E. Hamm; that on Feb. 23, 1921, he ran down and injured Mrs. Watt Hartmann; that on Feb. 23, Mrs. E. T. Rudolph was injured as a result of Hassell's reckless driving; that on Nov. 8, 1921, he was arrested while driving a car while intoxicated, and that he gave the name of John Smith; that on Dec. 9, he injured H. E. Bower while driving an auto, and that on the same date, he also ran into a car in which Mrs. Ruth Ballard was riding, seriously injuring her.
     Jess Hassell faces trial Friday morning in Judge T. A. Work's county court at law on two charges of aggravated assault with a motor vehicle, filed against him in connection with the automobile accident, Dec. 9, in which H. E. Bower and Mrs. Ruth Bullard were injured.
The case will be personally prosecuted by District Attorney Maury Hughes, aided by Assistant District Attorney C. D. Bell.
     These are the most recent charges to be filed against Hassell, who is president of the Dallas Athletic Association and part owner of the Dallas baseball club of the Texas League.

- December 13, 1921, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p.2, col. 1.
- o o o -



1922
H. O. SAMUELL DIES
OF HEART DISEASE

______

FORMER POLICE COMMISSIONER
AND CATTLEMAN LIVED
IN DALLAS 44 YEARS.

     H. O. Samuell, 78 years old, a resident of Dallas since 1878, died Sunday afternoon at 2:10 o'clock at the residence of his son, Dr. W. W. Samuell, 3409 Worth street. He had been seriously ill with heart trouble for several weeks. He was, for a number of years, prominent in the public life of Dallas and was Police Commissioner during the administration of Mayor Curtis P. Smith.
     Mr. Samuell was born June 20, 1844, in Scott County, Ky. He married Miss Sallie Worthington of Greenville, Ky., on Oct. 29, 1876.
     He was engaged in live stock raising during practically all his active life, embarking in that business first in Kentucky when a youth. His land holdings are chiefly in Dallas County, where, for a number of years, he specialized in blooded Shorthorns. He was a lifelong member of the Baptist Church.
     He is survived by two sons, E. W. Samuell of Phoenix, Ariz., and Dr. W. W. Samuell of Dallas, and one daughter, Mrs. Harry Williams of Dallas, who was with her father when death came. The sons are expected to arrive Monday. Dr. Samuell was in the North on business. Funeral arrangements will be announced Monday. His home was at 3607 Gaston avenue.

- February 20, 1922, Dallas Morning News, p. 2, col. 6-7.
- o o o -

Business Man Who
Came To America
From Dublin Dies.

     William J. Kinsella, 46 years old, a native of Dublin, Ireland, who came to Dallas with his mother and two sisters when he was but 12 years old, and who founded the Kinsella Hat Company, which was dissolved several months ago, died Tuesday night before the charter had been granted for a new and bigger hat company.
     Though in broken health, with the failing of the company, at the helm of which, he had stood for fifteen years, he did not lose faith and went about re-organizing the new company, which he was to lead. Over-exertion brought on heart trouble, and during the day, Mr. Kinsella remained in bed, but kept hoping that he would live to see the return of the charter, which is in Austin.
     Becoming suddenly worse, he died late Tuesday afternoon at the family residence, 5318 Rowena street.
     The story of his struggle upward in business is well known in Dallas. Two older brothers preceded the little family to Dallas. In 1888, accompanied by his other and two sisters, he arrived in Dallas from Dublin, and immediately began work in Sanger Bros. store, where he rose to the head of the hat department and later bought this branch from the Sanger Company and organized his own company.
     The father died before the birth of William J. Kinsella, and as soon as the family could amass enough funds, they left Ireland and headed straight for Dallas, then only a promising little town in the Southwest.
     Mr. Kinsella's wife, who was Miss Ida Hollaway, three sons, William J. Jr., Charles and Robert Kinsella, and two daughters, Miss Julia and Sarah Elizabeth; one brother, T. J., and two sisters, Mrs. C. H. Wilson and Mrs. A. D. Fraser, all of Dallas, survive him.

- May 17, 1922, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 2
[a photo of William J. Kinsella accompanied the above obituary]
- o o o -

DEATHS.

Taylor Funeral Saturday.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Winnie Thomas Taylor, 3502 Lindenwood avenue, who died Thursday, were held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the chapel of the Weiland Undertaking company, with burial in Oak Cliff cemetery. Pallbearers were Harry T. Peebles, Ed Reynolds, Wirth Wimberly, John Meredith, Harry Harlan and Roy Holden.

Bryan R. Mayo Dies.

     Bryan R. Mayo, 41 years of age, died Friday morning at a local sanitarium. His wife, Mrs. Lillian Mayo; a daughter, Miss Zoe; a sister, Miss Anne Mayo, and one brother survive him. Funeral services were held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the residence, 5514 Columbia avenue, with burial in Oakland cemetery.

Bono Funeral Saturday.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Rosa Lee Bono, 25 years of age, who died Friday at a local sanitarium, were held at the Sacred Heart cathedral at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon, with burial in Oakland cemetery. She is survived by her husband, Sam Bono, and four children. The family residence is at 6200 Aqueduct street.

Miss Carrie Ley Dies.

     Word has been received in Dallas of the death of Miss Carrie Ley in Worland, Wyo. She is survived by two sisters in Dallas, Mrs. Fred Hemple and Miss Bertha Ley, 1811 Pocahontas street. The body will be received by the Loudermilk-Sparkman company and funeral services will be held at the home of Mrs. Hemple Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Burial will be in Oakland cemetery.

- June 11, 1922, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -


Deaths.

Williams Funeral Thursday.

     Funeral services for Howard Earl Williams, 1-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Williams, who died Wednesday at the family residence at 2826 Rosewood street, will be held at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon with burial in Grove Hill cemetery.

Little Girl Dies Wednesday.

     Jessie Armour, 11 years of age, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Armour, 410 South Beacon street, died Wednesday at a local sanitarium. She is survived by her parents, two brothers and one sister. The body will be sent Friday morning by the Ed C. Smith & Bros. company to Hawkins, Texas, for burial.

Boyle Funeral Thursday.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Fields Boyle, 62 years of age, who died Wednesday at her home, 813 Eighth street, will be held at 5 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the chapel of Lamar & Smith Undertaking company. She is survived by one daughter, Allys Fields Boyle.

Mrs. Julia Emgard Dies.

     Mrs. Julia Emgard, 79 years of age, died Wednesday at a local sanitarium. She is survived by three sons, Henry, George and William Emgard, all of Dallas. Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon at the chapel of the Ed C. Smith & Bros. company, with burial in Greenwood cemetery. Mrs. Emgard lived at 1104 McKinney avenue. She was a native of Germany.

Mrs. Margaret L. Kelly Dies.

     Mrs. Margaret L. Kelly, 84 years of age, died Wednesday night at the home of her son, E. H. Kelly, 5558 Richard avenue. She is also survived by twelve grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. The body will be sent Friday morning by the Weiland Undertaking company to Wortham, Texas, for burial. Mrs. Kelly was a member of the Wortham Presbyterian church.

Jackson Funeral Thursday.

     Funeral services for Thomas W. Jackson, who died Tuesday morning at this home, 2418 Hickory street, will be held Thursday afternoon at the chapel of the Ed C. Smith & Bros. company. The body will then be sent to Shamrock, Texas, for burial. Mr. Jackson was 58 years of age, and had been a resident of Dallas for the last twenty-five years. He is survived by two brothers, J. H. Jackson, oldest employe in the postoffice, and C. S. Jackson, of Shamrock, and one sister, Mrs. F. M. Stafford, of Shamrock.

- June 15, 1922, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 13, col. 4.
- o o o -

Deaths.

WIDOW OF SERGEANT GALLEGER
DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS

     Mrs. Bertha Galleger, 34 years of age, widow of the late Sergeant John D. Galleger, last soldier to be returned from France, died Friday at a local sanitarium, following a long illness. She lived at 2619 Hibernia street. She is survived by two brothers, D. L. and M. L. Rivers of Dallas and four sister, Mrs. W. F. Brintwell and Mrs. H. S. Turner of Shreveport, La.; Mrs. George McDaniel of Daingerfield and Mrs. S. H. Cole of Tulsa, Ok. The body was sent early Saturday morning by the Loudermilk-Sparkman company to Cason, Texas, where burial will be held Sunday afternoon.

Leroy Borden Dies.

     Leroy Borden, 36 years of age, died at a local sanitarium early Saturday morning. He is survived by his wife. The family residence is at 6336 Aqueduct street. Funeral services, with burial in Grove Hill cemetery, will be announced later.

Sister of Dallas Woman Dies.

     Mrs. J. H. Wigham, 1218 Browder street, has received word of the death of her sister, Mrs. Maude Shepard, in a hospital in Rochester, Minn. The funeral was held last Wednesday at the home of Mrs. Shepard in Kansas City, Mo. She is survived by her husband and daughter, her father, four sisters and three brothers.

Gleaves Funeral to Be Saturday.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Martha E. Gleaves, 53 years of age, who died Friday at her home three miles northwest of Dallas, will be held Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock, with burial in Greenwood cemetery. She is survived by her husband, J. K. Gleaves; a son, Clyde, and two daughters, Miss Winnie Gleaves and Mrs. H. C. Summers, all of Dallas.

- June 17, 1922, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. I, p. 3, col. 4.
- o o o -



1923
MOTHER'S DEATH
FOLLOWS SON'S

_____

Dark Angel Has Visited Conine Family
Twice in Past Few
Months.

     Death has struck the Conine family twice in the past few months. This morning, Mrs. M. C. Conine passed away. A few months ago, a little son died. The mother leaves a husband and five children. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock with interment in Pleasant Ridge cemetery. The family resides at the corner of Bank street [and] Forney avenue.

- February 28, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 5.
- o o o -

SPECIAL CAR TO GO
TO JAMES FUNERAL

______

DALLAS MASONIC LEADERS TO
ATTEND FINAL RITES AT
CLEBURNE.

     The special Scottish Rite interurban car, which will take Dallas Masons to Cleburne today to attend the funeral services of the late William James of Dallas, formerly of Fort Worth, will leave the Dallas Interurban Station at 10:30 o'clock this morning. It will reach Cleburne in time for lunch before the convening of the grand commandery at 1 o'clock, after which, the Grand Lodge of Texas will be convened in special communication to conduct the Masonic burial service of Mr. James, he being a past grand master of Texas.
     Mr. James held his Masonic membership and his commandery membership at Cleburne. While a resident of that city, he was chosen grand master. He served the grand chapter as secretary-treasurer of the Home of Aged Masons since it was established. He was a 33°, inspector general, honorary, and held membership in all the Masonic bodies.
     Among those who have made reservations on the special car are the following: W. D. Bates, Louis Blaylock, H. B. Criswell, George B. Dealey, Dr. A. L. Frew, H. M. Greene, J. W. Howerth, S. D. Hanley, George Lang, H. F. Lively, E. A. Sanger, J. C. Smith, John M. Spellman, J. L. Stephens, W. C. Temple, Edward Titche, M. N. Baker, W. A. Browning, J. H. Cassidy, H. W. Crutcher, J. H. Dunn, S. L. Dysterbach, A. D. Fraser, J. A. Gulick, Sam Hargreaves, Wilbur Keith, W. C. Lemmon, E. H. McClure, H. P. May, W. H. Miller, T. H. Morrow, Lee Richardson, R. E. L. Saner, H. H. Williams, C. H. Behrens, H. P. Eller, J. A. Gartland, T. W. Harrison, S. C. Relyea, J. L. Zumwalt, John Turner, J. E. Douthitt, D. C. McCord, Elwood Padgitt, Frederick Schenkenberg, Sam Young, P. W. Wimberly and Chester A. Hammil.

- March 4, 1923, Dallas Morning News, Part IV, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

Deaths

Funeral Held Saturday

     Miss Lucy M. Burnett, 19 years old, died Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock at her home, 514 South Brighton street.
     She is survived by her mother, two sisters, Mildred and Fern; two brothers, Robert and Joe Burnett, and a grandfather, S. F. Wooding, all of Dallas.
     Funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the residence. Rev. Wallace Bassett, past of the Central Baptist church, was in charge of the services. Burial was in Oak Cliff cemetery.

- March 11, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 12, col. 3.
- o o o -

Deaths

     Curtis L. Fry, a resident of Denton, Texas, died Monday morning at a local sanitarium.
     The body will be sent Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock by the Brewer Undertaking company to Denton, Texas, for burial. Mr. Fry is survived by his father, L. L. Fry of Denton.

Mrs. Lydia Greaves.

     Mrs. Lydia Greaves, 38, a resident of Dallas for fourteen years, died Sunday night at her home, 913 Belleview avenue.
     She is survived by her mother, Mrs. Lou Fletcher, and two sons, W. F. and S. P. Greaves, all of Dallas; two sisters, Mrs.. Mamie Clark of Dallas and Mrs.. J. B. Palmer of Graham, Texas, and three brothers, Henry, Charles and Alfred Harrison, all of Dallas.
     Following short funeral services Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock at the residence, the body will be sent by the Weiland Undertaking company to Waco for burial.

- August 6, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Member of French
Colony is Buried

 MRS. CESARINE REMOND

     Mrs. Cesarine Santerre Remond, 84 years old, one of the surviving members of La Reunion, the little French colony which flourished in prospect years ago along the Trinity River, was laid to rest in the old French cemetery, two miles west of Dallas, on the Fishtrap road, Monday afternoon. Her body was borne to the grave by six of her nephews, John, Leo, Bert, Charles and the two Georges Santerre, cousins, of Dallas.
     Mrs. Remond died Sunday night at her home, 713 West Tenth street, in Oak Cliff. She was born at Blois, France. With her parents, she embarked at La Havre in 1856, a girl of 17, and began the long journey to the Utopia established two years before by Victor Considerant, the French engineer exile, who sought to establish a new State as a sort of social democracy.
     She and her brothers and a sister -- Emanuel, Germain and Gustav Santerre of Dallas, and Mrs. Lucy Voirin of Irving -- lived through the hardships of the little settlement, which was founded upon the unproductive soil from which rock is now quarried for the making of Portland cement in the Cement City neighborhood.
     With them, she saw the passing of the dream that was to have solved human problems as Considerant saw them in the early half of the nineteenth century, and upon which, he had based his political, economic and social philosophies.

- August 7, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Deaths

HOLD FUNERAL SERVICES
FOR J0HN W. ROACH MONDAY.

     Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the residence, 514 Cumberland street, for John W. Roach, well known Dallas resident, who died Saturday morning at his home suddenly of heart failure.
     Mr. Roach was born in Staunton, Va. He married Miss Mary E. Riley of Louisville, Ky., in 1894. He came to Dallas twenty-three years ago, where he has resided continuously. He was a member of Tannehill lodge, A. F. & A. M., the Maccabees and Order of the Eastern Star. The deceased is survived by his wife.

Edna Earl Bell.

     Edna Earl Bell, 3-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Bell, died Saturday morning at a local hospital, after a short illness.
     The body will be taken overland Sunday morning at 7 o'clock by the Loudermilk Sparkman Undertaking company to Aubrey, Texas, for burial in the family lot in Aubrey cemetery.
     Surviving are her parents and one brother, Elwood Bell, all of Dallas.

- August 12, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. I, p. 9, col. 5.
- o o o -


FUNERAL IS HELD FOR
JAPANESE COTTON MAN.

     Funeral services for Kiyokazu Hara, 35 years old, prominent in Dallas cotton trade circles, and a leader of the Japanese colony here, were held Sunday afternoon from the residence, 1717 Moser street. The body was sent Sunday night to San Antonio for cremation, after which, the ashes are to be sent to Japan to be given burial.
     Dr. William Anderson Jr., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, conducted the services. Pallbearers were T. Okamato, J. Arakawa, T. Nakashima, T. J. Handy, V. J. Wood and B. W. Thomas.
     Mr. Hara, who was secretary of the Southern Products Company, was born near Tokio, Japan, but had lived in the United States since 1913, except for a short period. He had made his home in Dallas for more than six years and enjoyed a wide friendship in this city. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Eiko Hara, and a sister, who lives in Japan.

- August 13, 1923, The Dallas Morning News, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -


RECORD OF DEATHS.

Jordan. -- Mrs. Eudora Jordan, 52 years old, wife of John S. J. Jordan of Grand Saline, Texas, died at a local hospital Sunday morning. Besides her husband, she is survived by four sons, Baxter Jordan of Dallas, Floyd G. Jordan of Denton and Gordon and Zella Jordan of Grand Saline, and four daughters, Miss Exa Jordan of Fort Worth, Mrs. Catherine Thorn and Misses Anna Mae and Marie Jordan of Grand Saline.
     The body was sent to Grand Saline Sunday night by the Brewer Undertaking Company. Funeral and burial will occur at that place Monday.

Shell. -- Charles M. Shell, a disabled veteran of the World War, died Sunday afternoon at St. Paul Sanitarium. The body is being held by the Brewer Undertaking Company, pending directions from his parents, who reside at Mildred, Texas.

Abney. -- Mrs. Beatrice Balfour Abney, 43 years old, died early Sunday morning at a local sanitarium. She is survived by her husband, J. D. Abney, 4831 Swiss avenue, and one sister, Mrs. B. J. Hatfield, of Torreon, Mex. Funeral services will be held at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon at the Weiland Undertaking Parlors and burial will be in the Grove Hill Cemetery. The Rev. C. C. McNeill, pastor of the East Dallas Presbyterian Church, will conduct the services.
     Pallbearers will be R. E. Alstead, V. D. Hoffmaster, A. G. MacMahon, A. J. Knight, J. P. Miller and J. L. Cummings. Honorary pallbearers are: R. E. Doyle, J. K. Lesch, R. W. Grisham, T. S. Lotta, C. M. Hunt, D. D. McLarry, B. A. Mansfield, Charles Rohner, M. L. Coefield, Bell Fielder and T. C. Abney.

- August 13, 1923, The Dallas Morning News, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -


SCHOOLS HONOR
MISS LIDA HOOE

_______

FLAGS AT HALF-MAST AS BODY
OF ART SUPERVISOR IS
LAID TO REST.

     Flags of the Dallas public schools were at half mast Friday in honor of Miss Lida Hooe, a teacher in the Dallas public schools for more than thirty years and one who served for the last twenty years as art supervisor. She brought to the Dallas public schools, national recognition for the standard of excellence maintained by the art department, and in doing so, became nationally known as one of the most efficient and alert art directors of the public schools of the country.
     Miss Hooe died Thursday morning at 1 o'clock at her home, 4322 Junius street. Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the home of her sister, Mrs. Felix S. Hereford, 3918 Bowser avenue, North Dallas. Burial was in Oakland Cemetery. Dr. S. W. Williams of Grace Methodist Church and Dr. W. D. Bradfield of S. M. U., officiated.
     The white schools of the city were dismissed Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock to enable the teachers and pupils to attend the funeral services.
     Active pallbearers were W. E. Greiner, president of the Board of Education; W. C. Lemmon, a member of the Board of Education; J. L. Long, former Superintendent of City Schools; Dr. J. F. Kimball, Superintendent of the City Schools; Norman E. Crozier, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, and J. F. Peeler, supervisor of elementary grades. Honorary pallbearers were Royal B. Farnum, Boston, Mass.; C. Valentine Kirby, Harrisburg, Pa.; George H. Dutch, Nashville, Tenn., and Dr. Daniel A. Penick, Austin.
     Miss Hooe is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Hereford, Miss Dodie Hooe, supervisor of the primary grades, both of Dallas, and Mrs. D. G. Boone of Fort Worth.
     Miss Hooe came to Dallas while a small girl and was educated in the Dallas public schools, being graduated from the Bryan Street High School. She served as supernumerary teacher under J. L. Long when he was Superintendent of Schools and later went into the grade schools, where she taught for ten years. She was made art supervisor of the city schools nearly twenty years ago.

- September 29, 1923, Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

EX-COUNTY POOR
FARM HEAD DIES

     D. C. Burgess, 75 years of age, pioneer citizen of Dallas county, and for seventeen years, superintendent of the county poor farm, died Thursday afternoon at his home, 5919 Lindell street. He had been ill for sometime.
     Surviving are his wife, and seven children, Mrs. Olive Moore, Mrs. T. J. Adair, Mrs. H. B. Tuer, Mrs. T. B. Hill, Mrs. Lewis T. Proctor and B. B. Burgess and A. G. Burgess.
     Funeral arrangement will be announced later.

- October 4, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12.
- o o o -

Capt. Dee C. Burgess.

     Funeral services were held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence, 5919 Lindell street, for Capt. Dee C. Burgess, a native of Alabama and one of the early residents of Dallas county, who died Thursday at his home. Burial was in Grove Hill cemetery.
     Mr. Burgess is survived by his wife; five daughters, Mrs. Olive Moore, Mrs. T. J. Adair, Mrs. H. B. Tuer, Mrs. T. B. Hill and Mrs. Lewis T. Proctor, and two sons, B. B. Burgess of Dallas and A. G. Burgess, of Kemp.
     Active pallbearers were his four son-in-laws and two grandsons, Ross Adair and Karl Moore. Honorary pallbearers were J. L. Burgess, Dr. A. W. Carnes, Hutchins; S. B. Scott, Ben E. Cabell, J. W. Bowen, Henry Davis?, Bud Bentley, W. A. Tolan, J. W. Vance?, Frank Williamson, Ed Cronwell, Ben Brandenburg, E. C. Hill, Capt. William Preston, J. L. Lowery, John DeLee, Will Horton [?], Judge Kenneth Foree, Murray Fisher, Judge R. B. Seay, Judge William H. Atwell, Congressman Hatton W. Sumners and James Williamson.

- October 5, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6.
- o o o -

Milton O. North.

     Milton O. North, 63 years of age, who has resided in Dallas for the last six years, died Saturday night at a local sanitarium, following a brief illness. His residence was at 714 Casey street. He had no relatives in this city, but a niece residing in Illinois has been notified of his death. The body is at the Loudermilk-Spark & Co., pending funeral arrangements.

- November 4, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

Mrs. J. C. Yancy.

     Funeral services for Mrs. J. C. Yancy, 82 years of age, who died Friday at the home of her granddaughter, Mrs. L. C. Barton, 316 ______ street, will be held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock at Grapevine, Texas. The body was taken overland Saturday evening by Lamar & Smith Undertaking company.
     Mrs. Yancy is survived by one sister, Mrs. H. E. Barton, of Grapevine, and five grandchildren, C. B. Phillips, Mrs. L. C. Barton, Mrs. F. J. Farrell Jr. and Miss Ruth Phillips of Dallas and Dr. W. D. Phillips of Fort Worth, and five great grandchildren.

- November 4, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 7, col. 7-8.
- o o o -

Deaths

Mrs. Eva May Haygood.

     Mrs. Eva May Haygood, 40 years of age, a native of Oregon, died Saturday afternoon at a local sanitarium.
     The body is at the chapel of Ed C. Smith & Brothers Undertaking company, pending funeral arrangements. Mrs. Haygood resided at 1811 Orleans street.

Mrs. Leona Robertson.

     Mrs. Leona Robertson, 45 years of age, a native of Mississippi, died Saturday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. B. Pike, 2828 Corinth street.
     Mrs. Robertson is survived by six sons, J. H. Robertson of San Antonio; J. S. Robertson of Lampasas, J. W. Robertson of Georgetown, C. P. Robertson of Texas City, H. O. Robertson of New Orleans, and Theodore Robertson of Texas, and three daughters, Mrs. W. L. Goddale and Mrs. Allen Skiles of Port Arthur and Mrs. Pike of Dallas.
     The body will be sent Sunday by the Ed C. Smith & Brothers Undertaking company to Georgetown, Texas, for burial.

Mrs. Marian S. Westbrook.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Marian S. Westbrook, 56 years of age, who died Friday night at the home of her son, B. C. Westbrook, 603 South Tyler street, will be held Sunday afternoon at Belton cemetery. The body will be sent Sunday by Loudermilk-Sparkman Undertaking company to Belton.
     Mrs. Westbrook is survived by five sons, B. C., H. G. and N. W. Westbrook of Dallas; J. M. Westbrook of Beaumont, and one daughter, Miss Ruth Westbrook of Beaumont. She is also survived by one brother, R. W. Wright of Dallas, and three sisters, Mrs. C. B. Kirkland of Belton; Miss Kate Wright of Waco and Mrs. R. R. Rankin of Brownwood, Texas.

- November 4, 1923, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. IV, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

1924
RETIRED RAILROAD
MAN DIES AT HOME
HERE WEDNESDAY

_____

     Thomas Clarence Burns, 77 years of age, a resident of Dallas for thirty-nine years, retired railroad man, died Wednesday morning at 6 o'clock at his home, 2106 Park avenue, following a lingering illness.
     Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence. Burial will be in Grove Hill cemetery under the auspices of the Tannehill lodge of which he was a member.
     Honorary pallbearers will be members of the Richard J. Oglesby post of G. A. R., of which he was a member since its organization. Active pallbearers will be announced later.
     Mr. Burns was a native of Ireland and is survived by his wife, one son, Thomas W. Burns of Little Rock, Ark., and one daughter, Mrs. H. S. Dean of Dallas. He is also survived by two grand-daughters, Mrs. R. E. York of Dallas, and Miss Rhoda Ann Burns, and one great-granddaughter, Rhoda Ann York of Dallas.

- circa February 21, 1924, Dallas Dispatch?
- o o o -

FACES HOMICIDE
CHARGE IN FATAL
SUNDAY ACCIDENT

_______

Accused Denies He Drove Car Which Struck
Children, Claiming He Was Only Specta-
tor; Says He Picked Up Boy Victim.

     Arrested early Tuesday morning by deputy sheriffs as the driver of the death car which crushed the life out of George Judy, aged 8, and injured two other children on the Orphans' Home road Sunday at noon, O. D. Bohannon, 31 years old, farmer living near Buckner Orphans Home, was formally charged with negligent homicide and failure to stop, in Justice of the Peace F. H. Alexander's court.
     The failure to stop complaint charged Bohannon with refusing aid to Woodrow Wilson Smith, 10-year-old companion of young Judy. The Smith child was seriously injured, suffering internal injuries and a possible fracture of the spine. The negligent homicide charge accuses the farmer of responsibility for the death of Judy.
     The accused, who was taken into custody by Deputy Sheriff Hilliard Brite, protested his innocence at the sheriff's office.

Says He Was Witness.
     "I saw the accident, but had no part in it," he declared. "A man driving toward Dallas in a car similar to mine, struck the children while I was about 200 yards away from them. He passed me on his way to Dallas. I was going in the other direction toward my home."
     Bohannon was arrested after Deputy Sheriffs Hal Hood, Dave Bradshaw and Brite had worked on the case for about 24 hours. Deputy Hood signed the complaints lodged against him.
     The accused was lodged in the Dallas county jail, the district attorney's office announcing that bail of $2,500 would be asked in each case.

Were Picking Flowers.
     The Judy child was killed and young Smith and Johnnie F. Brann, aged 11, were injured when a car struck them on Orphans Home road at Beeman avenue. The parents of the Judy child are Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Judy, 5619 Beeman street, and those of Smith and Brann are Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Smith, 2628 Kinmore and Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brann, 1625 Kinmore street, respectively.
     The children, with several others, had been picking flowers and craw fishing. They were hit as they were returning home.
     Bohannon declared Tuesday, that after the accident, he put the Judy child in his car and started to the hospital with him, at the request of several people, who witnessed the accident. "After I had driven a few yards, my car went dead and the boy was transferred to another," Bohannon declared. "After that, I drove on home."

- April 1, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. I, p. 1, col. 1-2; continued on p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -


ASK $50,000 FOR
FATAL ACCIDENT AT
RAILWAY CROSSING

     Two suits asking an aggregate of $50,000 damages from the H. & T. C. railway as the result of a crossing accident, in which Mr. and Mrs. Atlas Thompson and Mrs. Alice Thompson, Dallas people, were killed February 22, were filed in Dallas district court Tuesday morning.
     The accident occurred seven miles south of town on the Hutchins road, while the Thompsons were returning from the Trinity Rod and Gun club at night.
     Miss Lois Thompson, for herself and as next friend to Atlas Thompson, her brother, asked $25,000 damages for the death of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Atlas Thompson. Charles B. Thompson, husband of Mrs. Alice Thompson, filed suit for a similar sum.
     They charge the train was running at a highly dangerous rate of speed and did not blow its whistle for the crossing.

- April 1, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

NEGRO ARRESTED
FOR MURDER OF
TAXI CHAUFFEUR

_______

CONFESSES HE AND WOMAN
ACCOMPLICE SLEW DRIVER
HERE JANUARY 25

     Accused of the brutal murder of Ed Reed, negro taxi driver, on the night of January 25, a negro who gave the name of Levenie Twitty, was lodged in jail here Tuesday morning after his arrest on a farm about thirty miles south of Strawn, Texas, Monday afternoon. The black, according to officers, made a full confession of the crime.
     "I wanted to get hold of a car and some money," he is said to have told the police in his statement, which named a negress as an accomplice in the killing. He said, however, that he has not seen the woman since a few days after the killing.
     Reed was lured to his death with a mysterious phone call for a rent car. His body, badly mutilated, was found in a gravel pit southeast of Oak Cliff the morning after the call was received. The car, stained with blood, was found abandoned in Fort Worth.

Plotted With Woman.
     The murder was planned by Twitty and the woman two days before the fatal call was telephoned to the rent car concern that employed Reed, the black is said to have told officers.
     "We planned to call up the rent car company and have a man sent to an Oak Cliff address, and then knock him in the head and steal his car," Twitty declared.
     Twitty, according to the officers, told how Reed was sent to the address in Oak Cliff. Twitty and the woman got into the car and gave directions to drive. Reed was in the front seat, Twitty and the woman were in the back.
     A hand ax obtained at the house of a negro family in Oak Cliff was hidden under the skirt of the negress. A short distance from where the couple boarded the car, Twitty, according to the officers, struck Reed over the head with the hand ax. Taking the body of the slain negro to the gravel pit, the couple threw it out of the car. They then drove to Forth Worth, where it was decided to abandon the car because it was blood stained.

Left for Strawn.
     Remaining in Fort Worth during the night of January 25 and part of January 26, the negroes then made their way to Strawn. The woman left and Twitty told the police that he had no idea where she was.
     Handcuffed to the officers, Twitty was brought to Dallas, where he was placed in the city jail Tuesday, shortly before noon.
     City Detectives Phillips and Simmons, who have worked constantly on the case since Reed's body was discovered, made the arrest.
Twitty is 24 years old.

- April 1, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

MRS. H. B. CAVE DIES
TUESDAY MORNING;
FUNERAL WEDNESDAY

     Mrs. Jean Reis Cave, 34 years of age, wife of Dr. Harrison B. Cave, died Tuesday morning at 4:30 o'clock at the family residence, 4920 Abbott street.
     Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence. Rev. M. C. Cuthbertson, past of the Garrett Avenue Church of Christ, will officiate. Burial will be in Grove Hill cemetery.
     Pallbearers will be J. E. Forrest, W. R. Ellis, Lloyd Skiles, Dr. G. A. Schaub, E. G. Bower, Dr. J. Nichols, Asher Mintz and J. E. Lockhart.
     Mrs. Cave, who was before her marriage, Miss Jean Reis, married Dr. Cave in Dallas February 20, 1916. She was born December 9, 1890, in Pocahontas, Ark., and had been a resident of Dallas for ten years.
     She is survived by her husband; one son, H. B. Cave, Jr.; a daughter, Mary Frances Cave; her father, I. E. Reis of Denver, Colo., and one sister, Mrs. Josephine Cooley of New York.

- April 1, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Deaths

Mrs. Jennie Sexton.

     Mrs. Jennie Sexton, 44 years of age, a resident of Dallas for seventeen years, died Friday morning at a local sanitarium. Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the chapel at the Weiland Undertaking copmany, Rev. A. O. Collie, will officiate. Burial will be in Grove Hill cemetery. She is survived by her husband, John Sexton, a daughter, Miss Lora Sexton, and three sisters.

Roy C. Mauldin.

     The body of Roy C. Mauldin, who died Wednesday in Calexico, Cal., will be received in Dallas Saturday morning by the Ed C. Smith & Brother Undertaking company. Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Mauldin, 2613 Merlin street, Dr. L. N. D. Wells, will officiate. Burial will be in Grove Hill cemetery.

Sister Catherine.

     Sister Catherine, 48 years of age, of Sherman, Texas, died Friday morning at 3:10 o'clock at St. Paul sanitarium, following an illness of eight months.
Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock at the St. Paul chapel. The Rev. J. J. Cronin of St. Louis, assisted by the Rev. Thomas Powers, president of the University of Dallas, will officiate. Burial will be in Cavalry cemetery.
     Sister Catherine was a native of Kentucky. She obtained her education in that state and later attended the seminary in Emmitsberg, Md.
     Following the completion of her work in Emmitsberg, she went to Los Angeles, Cal., where she was in charge of the operating room in the St. Vincent hospital. She later was transferred to the St. Vincent hospital in Sherman, Texas, three years ago, where she was in charge of the hospital.

C. L. McGuire.

     C. L. McGuire, 25 years of age, 3306 Oak Lane street, died Thursday at a local sanitarium. The body is at the chapel of the Loudermilk-Sparkman Undertaking company, pending funeral arrangements. He is survived by his wife and three children, his parents and a brother.

Russie Smith.

     Russie Smith, 25 years of age, 3201 Dawson street, died Thursday afternoon at a local sanitarium. The body is at the Brewer Funeral home pending funeral arrangements.

Isadore Frenkel.

     Funeral service for Isadore Frenkel, 77 years of age, who died Wednesday night at his home, suddenly, were held Friday morning at 10 o'clock at the chapel of the Weiland Undertaking company. Dr. David Lefkowitz officiated. He is survived by his wife and three sons.

Mrs. Nathan Benedict

     Mrs. Nathan Benedict, 69 years of age, died Thursday at her home, 506 Sunset avenue. The body is at the chapel of the Loudermilk-Sparkman Undertaking company pending funeral arrangements. Mrs. Benedict is survived by her husband and one son, H. H. Benedict of Dallas; two brothers, Allen Hall of Dallas and Phil Hall of Shidler, Ok., and three sisters, Mrs. S. A. Fishburn and Mrs. M. J. Hamilton of Dallas and Mrs. J. G. Street of Oklahoma City.

- April 4, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. II, p. 11, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Deaths

Mrs. Sophronia Brown.

     The body of Mrs. Sophronia Brown, 80 years of age, who died Friday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. W. Neal, 4810 Bryan street, was sent Saturday by the Ed C. Smith & Brother Undertaking company in Sulphur Springs, Tex., for burial. Mrs. Brown is survived by three sons, Robert and W. W. Brown, of Kempner, Texas, and J. H. Brown of Haskell, Okla., and two daughters, Mrs. W. B. Cox of Artesia, N. M., and Mrs. Neal of Dallas.

Mrs. Harriett Elizabeth Benedict.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Harriett Elizabeth Benedict, who died Thursday at her home, 506 Sunset street, will be held Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock, at the residence. Dr. Glenn L. Sneed, will officiate. Pallbearers will be George M. Gross, J. H. Gillespie, J. A. McLean, W. A. Logan, Sam J. Hall and F. M. Wilson.

Mrs. John Sexton.

     Funeral services of Mrs. John Sexton, 44 years of age, 603 Cameron street, who died Fraiday at a local hospital, were held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the chapel of the Weiland Undertaking company. Burial was in Grove Hill cemetery. She is survived by her husband, one daughter and four sons.

Roy C. Mauldin.

     Funeral services for Roy C. Mauldin, 20 years of age, who died Wednesday in Calexico, Cal., will be held Saurday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the family residence in Dallas, 2613 Merlin street. Burial will be in Grove Hill cemetery. The body was received in Dallas Saturday morning. Pallbearers will be E. H. Edwards, E. C. Freeman, V. H. Glasgow, H. W. Carter, L. R. Halsell and C. C. Perkins. Surviving Mr. Mauldin are his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Mauldin, 2613 Merlin street; two brothers, Howard of Calexico and Jack of Dallas; three sisters, Misses Ruth, Iva and Jane Mauldin of Dallas.

P. B. King.

     P. B. King, 47 years of age, 4302 1/2 Colonial avenue, died Saturday morning at a local sanitarium. Funeral services will be held Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the chapel of the Ed C. Smith & Bro. Undertaking company. Burial will be in Arlington cemetery. He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Bell King; one son, John C. King, and a daughter, Miss Vivian King, all of Dallas.

Charles S. Wynns

     Charles S. Wynns, 74 years of age, pioneer railroad man, died Saturday morning at the family residence, 5847 Richmond street, following an illness of several months. Mr. Wynns was born in Houston, Texas, and spent many years in railroad services, retiring from active business two years ago on account of ill health.
     Mr. Wynns is survived by his wife and two sons, P. R. Wynns of Dallas and C. M. Wynns of New Orleans, La. Funeral services will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock at the residence. Further arrangements will be announced later.

- April 5, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 6.
- o o o -
 

Deaths

William C. Forde.

     William C. Forde, 43 years of age, died Monday at his home, 2214 Wall street. The body is at the chapel of the Weiland Undertaking company pending funeral arrangements. Mr. Forde is survived by his wife; three daughters, Mrs. Ida May Zack, Miss Lahyna Forde and Miss Gennell Forde, and a son, Charles Forde, all of Dallas.

Mrs. Nell P. Geer.

     Mrs. Nell P. Geer, 34 years of age, died Monday at her home, 6614 Gaston avenue. She is survived by her husband, two children, one brother and a sister. The body is at the chapel of the Ed C. Smith & Brother Undertaking company. [last line is illegible, due to scratched film]

Mrs. Josephine Frances Ludwig.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Josephine Frances Ludwig, 79 years of age, who died Monday night at the home of her son, B. F. Ludwig, 2210 Kirby street, will be held Wednesday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the Brewer Funeral Home. The services will be private. Burial will be in Grove Hill cemetery. Mrs. Ludwig is survived by one son and a brother who resides in Ohio.

Mrs. Emilie Blohme.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Emilie Blohme, 77 years of age, who died Monday afternoon at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. M. Ernest, 5901 Reiger avenue, will be held Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the residence. Burial will be in Greenwood cemetery. Mrs. Blohme is survived by two daughters and two brothers.

- April 1, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. I, p. 6, col. 5.
- o o o -

CARD OF THANKS

     WE wish to extend our sincere thanks to the many friends and relatives for their kind thoughts and beautiful floral offerings in the death of our husband and brother and uncle. Mrs. Jack Phillips, Mrs. Cornelia Brookfield, Mrs. Clyde Bealnear[?].

- April 1, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 10, col. 1.
- o o o -

ROBERT C. WHITE
DIES AT HOME OF
DAUGHTER HERE

______

Was One of Founders of Foundry
Company of Birmingham,
Alabama

     Robert C. White, 65 years of age, of Birmingham, Ala., died following a brief illness at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. C. Phelps, 3608[?] Armstrong avenue, Friday morning at 2:30 o'clock. Mr. White arrived in Dallas five days ago from Birmingham, his home.
     Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence. Burial will be in direction of the Brewer Undertaking company.
     Active pallbearers will be W. M. Holland, Hamilton Lee, George T. Lee, Giles H. Edwards, Roger Rutherford and D. C. Talichet.
     Mr. White was born in Grafton, W. Va. When a young man, he moved to Birmingham, Ala., with a brother, John White, where he became associated in the railroad business for several years. He later was president of the Beggs Foundry & Machine company. He was associated with this company at the time of his death. Mr. White was the inventor of the White granite bar and of the White road pipes.
     In 1891, Mr. White was married to Miss Virginia Beggs of Birmingham, who survives him. He also is survived by one daughter and a granddaughter, Virginia White Phelps of Dallas. Mr. White was a member of the Masonic fraternity and held life membership in the King Solomon lodge of Birmingham.

- April 4, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. II, p. 10, col. 1.
- o o o -

Death Cheats Dallasite of Long-
Cherished Desire to Revisit Old
Country on Eve of His Departure

     Emil Gruner, 45 years of age, who, as a youth, emigrated to America, will not realize his long-cherished ambition to re-visit his native land. He died Saturday at his home on the eve of his departure on the trip to see the "home folks."
     Gruner was employed by the City Planing mills as a cabinet worker and had been saving for twelve years to buy the ticket to the "old country." Often, he would talk with fellow workmen about the trip.
     Several days ago, Mr. Gruner asked the foreman at the mills for a two months' leave of absence. He said that he had made all arrangements for passports to Germany and had purchased his ticket. He had planned to meet friends in New York, who were to join him on the trip.
     The body of Gruner is at the chapel of the Loudermilk-Sparkman Undertaking company, pending advice from relatives in Germany.

- April 6, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 1, col. 1-2.
- o o o -


WOMAN FATALLY
HURT IN FALL TO
BE BURIED HERE

_______

     Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Kramer, 74 years of age, 3101 Live Oak street, who died Tuesday while visiting in San Antonio, Texas, will be held Friday morning at 9:30 o'clock at the St. Joseph's church. Burial will be in Grove Hill cemetery.
     Mrs. Kramer was visiting in San Antonio with a daughter, Mrs. T. J. Bibby. She died from injuries received when she fell from a porch nearly two weeks ago. Her leg was broken.
     Active pallbearers will be Laurin Kramer, Frank Bourquin, Lee Vilbig, Jack Horn, Edwin Vilbig and Johnnie Eury. Mrs. Kramer is survived by three sons, J. P., Frank and William Kramer, and four daughters, Mrs. John Bourquin, Mrs. F. B. Stowe, Mrs. Bibby and Mrs. August Vilbig.

- September 25, 1924, Dallas Daily Tmes Herald, Sec. I, p. 12.
- o o o -

SIMPLE FUNERAL IS
END FOR STRANGER

______

SALVATION ARMY CONDUCTS
SERVICE FOR BARBER, WHO
DIES SUDDENLY

BY MARSHALL SMITH

     With the failure of relatives to claim the body of John Speahl, or Spahl, 50 years old, a barer who died here Dec. 7, members of the Salvation Army gathered in the chapel of the Ed C. Smith & Bro. Undertaking Company at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon and conducted a simple funeral service for him. Thirteen Salvationists, most of them women, were present.
     All that is definitely known about John Speahl is that he was a god barber and a stranger in the city.
     He had worked for George Hawthorne, 1330 Peak street, near Bryan, in East Dallas. It was near there he fell dead after a hearty meal. Before coming to Dallas, he lived in Los Angeles, where at one time, he was the owner of property valued at $50,000.

Can't Locate Relatives.
     All efforts of Ed C. Smith & Bro. Undertaking Company, the Salvation Army and George Hawthorne to locate relative have failed. His widow has not been found. His parents, who are believed to be in 'Germany, have not been located. His luggage, found at his rooming place, 4506 Bryan street, failed to reveal detailed information about him.
     Taking his text from the twenty-first and twenty-second chapters of the Book of Revelation, Col. Edwy[n] White, commanding officer of the Salvation Army in Dallas, spoke of the all-encompassing power of God, the Great Comforter. He read:
     "And God shall wipe away all fears from their eyes, and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain, for the former things are passed away. * * * And he said, unto me, it is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is thirst of the fountain of the water of life freely. He that overcometh shall inherit all things, and I will be his God and he shall be my son."
     Somberly garbed, the women of the army stood, dressed in black, except for the ribbon of red on their bonnets, and sang. Twanging music of vibrant guitar strings was the accompaniment. Commandant Rosa Goblenz and her sister, Ethel Goblenz, sang a duet, the chorus of which, was joined in by the audience.

Simple Service at Grave.
     Abruptly, the service at the chapel closed. Employes of the undertaking company were emergency pallbearers. The procession to Grove Hill Cemetery was made up of three automobiles.
     Simplicity marked the ceremony at the grave in Potters' Field. The Salvationists sang, Col. White read the Salvation Army ritual, in which he committed the body to the ground, "Earth to earth, ashes to ashes; dust to dust, in sure and certain hope the resurrection to eternal life through our Lord Jesus Christ, who shall change our vile body that it may be like unto His glorious body, according to the mighty working, whereby He is able to subdue all things to Himself."
     Col. White's wife played and the service was over.
     Two sprays of pink and red carnations, sent by the Salvation Army, were the only flowers.
     A small, white, wooden marker bearing the man's name and the date of his death was placed as the cemetery workmen filled the grave.
     Costs of the funeral were borne equally by the undertaking company and the Salvation Army.
     This is the second "unknown" person buried in Dallas this year. On Feb. 10, 1924, Mrs. R. H. Waiders or Waiters was buried in Oak Cliff Cemetery by Lamar & Smith Undertaking Company.

- December 31, 1924, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 1, col. 7.
- o o o -