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(Updated June 11, 2004)

1914
RECEPTION GIVEN
HONORING FRASER

______

SOVEREIGN COMMANDER OF WOOD-
MEN GUEST AT MEETING
THURSDAY NIGHT.

     In honor of W. A. Fraser, who recently succeeded J. C. Root, deceased, as sovereign commander of the Woodmen of the World, the members of that order from all parts of northern Texas gathered in Dallas Thursday night for a reception. The affair was successful, one of the largest informal meetings the fraternity has held in years being registered.
     Many speakers were heard during the evening, among them being the honor guest, Commander Fraser. He spoke at some length, giving a brief outline of his hopes for the good of the order. He also declared there would be an encampment of Texas degree companies at some point on the Gulf coast next summer, with all expense paid for the teams attending.
     Mr. Fraser will leave for Omaha, Nebraska, Saturday night, taking his family with him to make his home there.

- January 16, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

ECHOLS CHARGED WITH MURDER.
_______

Death of Sam Hunter Results in Filing
of Affidavit in Justice
Court.

     Following the death Wednesday night of Sam Hunter, an affidavit was filed in Justice Stewart's court yesterday, charging Bob Echols, a young white man, with murder in connection with the wounding of Hunter on Aug. 5 last by pistol shot. The shooting occurred on San Jacinto street and Hunter had been in bad health ever since, his death occurring Wednesday night. Echols had formerly been charged with assault to murder and was released under $1,000 bond, being later exonerated by the Grand Jury.

- January 16, 1914, Dallas Morning News, p. 16, col. 6.
- o o o -

VALENTINE KRUSZ
FUNERAL SUNDAY

______

SERVICES HELD FOR WELL KNOWN MEAT
DEALER OF DALLAS WILL BE
HELD AT 4 O'CLOCK.

     Funeral services for Valentine Krusz, well known Dallas man, who was found dead in his room, back of his butcher shop, 1415 McKinney avenue, early Thursday morning, will be held at 4 o'clock Sunday afternoon. The services will be conducted by Rev. A. Romanowski of the German Evangelical church and interment will be in the Oakland cemetery. Active pallbearers will be selected from among the Sons of Herman, of which organization Mr. Krusz was a member. Members of this organization will also take part in the funeral services. The services will be held at 1503 Illing street.
     A call was also issued Friday morning for all members of the recently organized Meat Cutters' Local No. 523, to meet at the corner of McKinney avenue and Orange street at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon for the purpose of attending the funeral in a body.
     The death of Mr. Krusz was caused from a bullet wound through the head. Justice of the Peace Stewart, acting as coroner, returned a verdict to the effect that death was caused from a gunshot wound self-inflicted. Ill health is the reason assigned for the act. Mr. Krusz was one of the oldest meat dealers in Dallas, and was well known, especially among the German residents.

Funeral of Charles Schultz.

     Funeral services for Charles Schultz, who died at 11:50 o'clock Wednesday night at the family home, 2817 Thomas avenue, were held at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the Sacred Heart Cathedral. Services were conducted by Rev. John H. Heuel, assistant rector of the church, and burial was made in Calvary cemetery.

Remains Sent to Wylie

     The body of Charles Housewright, who died Thursday at St. Paul's sanitarium, was sent to Wylie for burial by the Ed C. Smith & Bros.' Undertaking company, leaving Dallas at 9 o'clock Friday morning. The deceased was thirty-one years of age, and had been in Dallas only three weeks. He is survived by his widow and three children.

Funeral of Mrs. J. Smith.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Jennie Smith, wife of Joseph Smith, who died Thursday at the family residence, 2415 Ferris street, were held Friday afternoon from the residence, with burial in Oakland cemetery.

- January 16, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

BUSINESS MAN OF DALLAS
FOUND DEAD IN SHOP.


V
ALENTINE KRUSZ

VALENTINE KRUSZ FOUND DEAD.
_______

Bullet Hole Is in Head -- Business Man
of Dallas Many Years -- Funeral
Sunday.

     Valentine Krusz, for many years, a resident and business man in Dallas, was found dead yesterday morning in his room in the back part of his market at 1415 McKinney avenue. About 5:30 o'clock William Emgard, an employe, opened the place, and entering the back room, found his employer dead.
     Mr. Krusz was seated in his big chair. There was a bullet hole through the head and a pistol with one empty chamber upon a table close by his right hand. The condition of the body made it plain that death had come several hours before.
     Mounted Policemen Hanie and Murray, summoned by Mr. Emgard, made investigations and members of the family were summoned. The body was removed to the George W. Loudermilk undertaking establishment. S. Leslie Stewart, Justice of the Peace, acting Coroner, gave as his verdict, after ________ death resulted from a gunshot wound, self-inflicted."
     Mr. Krusz, about the old ______ in point of business life in Dallas, was a native of Germany, born in 1849, as a small boy, he came with his parents to America and lived for some years in St. Louis. It was there that he married in 1867, Miss Lottie Haupt. The family moved to Waco in 1876, where Mr. Krusz was a butcher. In 1879, they removed to Galveston, where his savings were invested in a business of buying and selling cattle and live stock. He came with his family to Dallas in 1889, and had resided continuously here until his death. His life had always been active, and until the last year or more, his health had been excellent, rarely a day finding him ill or even complaining.
     Surviving are his wife and their five children. The children are Mrs. Lizzie Greenough of Galveston, wife of G. H. Greenough; Mrs. John E. Boyd, Mrs. Oscar Weber, Andrew O. Krusz and William J. Krusz of Dallas. There are other relatives in St. Louis.
     The funeral service will be at the residence, at 1503 Illing street, at 4 o'clock Sunday afternoon. Burial will be in Oakland Cemetery. Active pallbearers will be from among the members of the Sons of Hermann, who will be in charge of the funeral. Rev. A. Romanowski, pastor of the German Evangelical Church, will officiate.

- January 16, 1914, Dallas Morning News, p. 16, col. 6.
- o o o -

FUNERAL SUNDAY OF
VALENTINE KRUSZ

_______

Man Found Dead Thursday to Be
Buried From Daughter's Home
at 4 O'clock.

     Funeral services for Valentine Krusz, who was found dead Thursday morning in the rear of his meat market at 1409 McKinney avenue, will be held at four o'clock Sunday afternoon from the residence of J. E. Boyd, 1503 Illing street, with burial in Oakland cemetery. The services will be conducted by Rev. A. Romanowski, pastor of the German Evangelical church, under the auspices of the Sons of Hermann and the local union of meat cutters.
     Active pallbearers will be William Largenhausen, Fritz Schupbach, J. H. Prante, C. P. Weaver, Julius Bauman and A. Schmid. Honorary pallbearers will be Emil Fretz, John Schablinski, Frank Hann, Herman Peters, William J. Jones, Joseph Baker, A. H. Nolan and J. Malcomesius.

Funeral Rosa Flood.

     Funeral services for Minnie Rosa Flood, 11 years , who died Friday morning at the Baptist Sanitarium, were held at 4:30 o'clock Friday afternoon at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Flood, 1709 Merlin street, with burial in Oakland cemetery, Rev. Frederick F. Bosworth, pastor of the Apostolic Church of Christ, conducted the services.

- January 17, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

OBITUARY.

     At Asheville, N. C., on the morning of Dec. 18, 1913, the soul of Mrs. Nettie Pearl MacLauchlin, wife of Rev. A. M. MacLauchlin and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Simmons, took its homeward flight to spend its first day in the realm of eternal bliss. She was born near Mexia, Tex., on the 9th day of January, 1879. When she was 3 years of age, her parents moved to the town of Mexia, Limestone County, Texas, and, at 16, they went to live in the city of Dallas, Tex. On the 8th day of November, 1905, she and the Rev. A. M. MacLauchlin were united in the holy bonds of matrimony, after which, she heartily and earnestly entered into the work of the Master with her husband at Asheville. At the age of 6 years, she expressed a desire to unite with the Presbyterian Church, but a thoughtful, loving mother persuaded her to wait until she was older; at 8 years of age, she became a member of that church. During her entire life, she was an active, consecrated Christian. She was a devoted daughter, a true, affectionate wife and mother and a loving sister. In addition to her sorrowing husband, she left a little boy, Andrew M. MacLauchlin Jr.; her mother, Mrs. H. F. Simmons; two brothers, Messrs. J. E. Simmons and T. L. Simmons, and a number of other relatives and friends whose hearts are filled with grief, but who know that their loss is her gain. The summons was sudden and unexpected, but at the call of the death angel, she was ready. She died in her mother's arms. As God placed her, a blue-eyed, smiling baby, in those loving arms, so her dear Redeemer, in his own good time, took her from that same embrace in "making up his jewels." Her body was interred in the Oak Cliff Cemetery at Dallas, Tex., to rest with her father, who preceded her, until the resurrection morn. A. B. R.

- January 16, 1914, Dallas Morning News, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

Victim of the Explosion and His Wife
B. R. Bourland Meets With Tragic Death
Well Known Cement Contractor in City
B. R. BOURLAND

MAN BLOWN TO BITS
IN DYNAMITE EXPLOSION

_____

YOUNG CEMENT
WORKER MEETS
TRAGIC DEATH

______

B. R. BOURLAND TERRIBLY MAN-
GLED WHEN DYNAMITE IS
EXPLODED.

______

BODY BADLY TORN

_______

FEATURES WERE DESTROYED AND
THE HANDS WERE BLOWN
ENTIRELY OFF.

______

WIDOW IS PROSTRATED
______

Young Man Had Only Resided in Dal
las For About One Year -- Widow
Was Visiting Friends When
Notified of Tragedy.

     B. R. Bourland, thirty-six years old, a cement contractor living at 612 North Harwood street, was instantly killed about 8:30 or 9 o'clock Tuesday morning, when some dynamite he had been using for blasting stumps, exploded as he leaned over the box in which it was stored. The upper part of the man's body was torn to pieces, some portions of it being picked up over a hundred feet from the scene of the explosion. The features were entirely destroyed and the hands were blown off.

Was Married Man.
     Bourland was married and, at the time of the explosion, his wife was visiting with Mrs. Palmer, wife of the senior member of the undertaking firm of Palmer, O'Connor & Whisenant, 603 South Ervay street, and was at the undertaking establishment when she was notified of the accident, which cost her husband's life.
     The place where the explosion occurred is about three miles northeast of the city on the Greenville road, and is in what is known as the Lakewood addition, just being platted. Bourland had the contract for the cement work and was to have started the actual construction work last week, but was prevented by the heavy rains.

Had Finished Blasting.
     According to Mrs. Bourland, her husband told her Monday night as she wrote out a report for him showing the progress of the work, that he had completed the blasting necessary to clear the addition of stumps, and would not use dynamite again during the work. He intended to start the work of laying the concrete forms for the sidewalks and curbs today, the wife said.
     Details of the accident are meager, as Bourland was practically alone when the explosion occurred. The generally accepted belief is that he was replacing some sticks of dynamite in a box where he kept the explosive, and in some manner, dropped a weight on some dynamite caps. The explosion of the caps furnished sufficient concussion to explode two sticks of dynamite in the box, killing Bourland.
     Workmen heard the explosion and ran to the Lakewood Country Club, near the scene of the accident, where they summoned the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking Company's ambulance, and the body was brought into the city. The body is held at the morgue of the Palmer O'Connor & Whisenant Company on South Ervay street, pending funeral arrangements.

Wife Almost Prostrated.
     The young wife of Bourland, so tragically widowed, was almost completely prostrated Tuesday. Until she recovers, the funeral arrangements will not be made, but it is believe that Bourland will be buried in Dallas.
     Bourland and his wife came to Dallas just a year ago from Little Rock, where he was engaged in the cement contracting business. He entered the cement business here and worked on several contracts. The one he was staring when he was killed was the biggest he had handled in Dallas, Mrs. Bourland said, the contract calling for $25,000 worth of cement work for Dan Sonnenthiel Realty Company, which is platting the Lakewood addition.
     Bourland was born in Effingham, Ill. and had he lived, he and his wife had planned to celebrate the tenth anniversary of their wedding May 1.

- January 7, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4-5, 7
- o o o -

UNUSUAL CASE OF
EXTREME GRIEF IS
BROUGHT TO LIGHT

_______

MOTHER OF DALLAS MAN WHO
DIED RECENTLY WAS UNABLE
TO SHED TEARS.

     One of the most unusual cases of extreme grief that has come under the observation of Dallas physicians in some time is that of Mrs. Rosie Loupot. About two weeks ago, a son of Mrs. Loupot died at the West Dallas home from injuries received when a horse stepped on his foot. A short time before the accident occurred, Mrs. Loupot had started on a trip to the old country. She was stopped in Chicago and hurried back to Dallas, reaching her about an hour before her son's death. He was unconscious, however, and never recognized his mother.
     The mother was so grief stricken that she was unable to shed a tear and because of her inability to cry, her condition became so serious that she was placed under the care of doctors. She complained constantly of a choking sensation in her throat and physicians became alarmed at her condition, and she was taken to St. Paul's Sanitarium. Here she was given the best attention by several physicians, but for seven days she remained in this condition.
     Finally, she shed a few tears and thus gained relief. She immediately began to improve and was taken to her home where she is now slowly recovering from the strain under which she was suffering. During the time that Mrs. Loupot was unable to shed tears, she fell off greatly in weight and became so weak that she could hardly stand alone. It was one of the most pronounced cases of extreme grief that local physicians have had under observation for some time.

- June 25, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

WILL BURY MRS. SAMUELL TODAY.
_____

Mother of Prominent Local Physician
and Old-Time Resident Dies
at Family Home.

     Mrs. Sallie Worthington Samuell, wife of H. O. Samuell, 3507 Gaston avenue, died last night at the family residence.
     Mrs. Samuell was born Dec. 20, 1845, in Washington County, Mississippi, and in October, 1876, was married to H. O. Samuell, who survives her with their children, Dr. W. W. Samuell, E. W. Samuell and Mrs. Harry Williams. Mr. and Mrs. Samuell came to Texas in March, 1878.
     Funeral services will beheld from the family residence this afternoon at 5 o'clock, Dr. R. C. Buckner and Rev. L. M. Waterman officiating. Burial will be made in Oakland Cemetery.
     Honorary pallbearers will be A. A. Green, Sherwood Sabin, C. L. Wakefield, P. B. Hunt, J. W. Everman, J. J. Willingham. The active pallbearers will be Dr. W. E. Crow, W. W. Caruth, Will W. Caruth, Ray Caruth, B. R. Parks, J. G. Collins.

- July 9, 1914, The Dallas Morning News, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

Mrs. H. O. Samuell
Dies at Family Home

     Mrs. Sallie Worthington Samuell, wife of H. O. Samuell, died at her home, 3507 Gaston avenue, Wednesday evening. Mrs. Samuell was born in Washington county, Miss., December 20, 1845. She had been a resident of Dallas since 1878, and had a wide circle of friends. Funeral services will be held at the family residence, Thursday afternoon at 5 o'clock, Dr. R. C. Buckner and Rev. L. M. Waterman officiating. Interment will be in Oakland Cemetery.
     Mrs. Samuell devoted much of her life to charity and religious work. She is survived by her husband, two sons, Dr. W. W. Samuell and E. W. Samuell, and one daughter, Mrs. Harry Williams.
     Honorary pallbearers will be A. A. Green, Sherwood Sabin, C. L. Wakefield, P. B. Hunt, J. W. Everman and J. J. Willingham. Active pallbearers will be Dr. W. E. Crow, W. M. Caruth, Will W. Caruth, Ray Caruth, B. R. Parks and J. G. Collins.

- July 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -


[USES] VICTIM'S REVOLVER TO KILL HIM
________

CROWD SEES
HOTEL MAN
SHOT DOWN

________

C. C. LONG IS HOT TO DEATH
AFTER DESPERATE STRUGGLE
WITH W. A. BURGESS

WIFE GRANTED DIVORCE ON CRUELTY GROUNDS.
________

     The records of the Fourteenth district court show that on May 26, Lula Long was granted a divorce from C. C. Long. An injunction preventing the defendant in the case from interfering with Mrs. Long was also granted. The divorce petition was filed with the district clerk on April 14, 1914, and gave cruelty as grounds for the divorce.
     A charge of aggravated assault on W. A. Burgess was also pending against Long in the County Court at Law. This case was to have been tried next Friday, but was dismissed Friday by Judge W. F. Whitehurst. The order was: "Dismissed by court (defendant dead.)"

     C. C. Long, proprietor of the City Hotel, 2530 Elm street, was shot to death by W. A. Burgess, in the doorway of the Illinois rooming house, 2420 Elm street, Thursday evening. The killing was the third to take place in Dallas during the past four days.
     The shooting took place after a desperate hand to hand struggle between the two men for the possession of a six shooter. The cause of the shooting is said to be an old grudge. The fight was witnessed by many people, none of whom were able to prevent the killing.
     Although the police arrested Burgess immediately after the shooting, they are having difficulty in securing any definite line of evidence from eyewitnesses and people who claim to know the reason for the tragedy. Burgess, himself, will make no statement.
     Long was walking west on Elm street at the time of the trouble. He came face to face with Burgess at the foot of the Illinois stairway, and it is alleged the two quarreled and Burgess is said to have drawn a pistol. The gun was said to have been the property of C. C. Long, and was left by him at the hotel when he moved his quarters.
     Long and Burgess grappled and fought hand to hand. In the struggle, Burgess turned the pistol against Long's breast and pulled the trigger three times. Every bullet took effect, piercing his body through and through. In spite of three mortal wounds, Long continued to struggle with his assailant. He was still on his feet, streaming with blood, when Officers Lovell, Bates and Seals ran up. The police disarmed Burgess and helped Long into the Bullington drug store, where he fell unconscious. Drs. Marshall and Sullivan attended him, finding that two bullets had penetrated his stomach at the waist line and the other pierced the center of his chest. Any one of the wounds would have caused death.

"My Own Gun."
     "He shot me with my own gun," was the only statement that Long managed to make. He was placed in an ambulance and rushed to St. Paul's Sanitarium, but died before he could be placed on the operating table.
     Burgess was taken to the city jail in the patrol wagon. He refused to make any statement in regard to the shooting. "I had it to do. I have nothing more to say," was all that could be got out of him.
     Friday morning, Burgess was removed from the city to the county jail and a formal charge of murder was filed against him. His plea will probably be one of self defense.

Grand Jury Busy.
     The Dallas county grand jury, immediately on convening Friday, took up the details of the killing. Numerous witnesses will be summoned before them in the course of the day.
     The body of C. C. Long is held at the Ed C. Smith undertaking establishment pending funeral arrangements. The man was fifty-five years old and had lived in Dallas for some years. He came her from Illinois. He was a member of the local organizations of Moose and Red Men and also belonged to the K. P. lodge at Mound City, Ill. This lodge has been notified of his death by the undertakers.

Case Dismissed.
     That Long and Burgess had been involved in previous difficulties is evidenced by the fact that a case charging aggravated assault was standing against Long in the county court at law. The case was dismissed this morning, owing to Long's death. It was claimed that Long beat Burgess up and injured him severely.

- July 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 7.
- o o o -

G. D. Pantaze Dies.

     J. D. Pantaze of this city received a telegram from Hot Springs, Ark., Saturday morning advising him of the sudden death of his brother, George D. Pantaze, at that place Saturday morning. Mr. Pantaze was thirty-two years of age and is survived by another brother who resides in Alabama.

- July 25, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -

Remains Will Arrive Monday.

     The body of George D. Pantaze, aged thirty-two years, who died at Hot Springs, Ark., Saturday morning, will be received in Dallas by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk Monday evening. Mr. Pantaze is survived by two brothers, J. D. Pantaze of this city, and a brother in Alabama. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

- July 26, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 4, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

ILL HEALTH
BLAMED FOR
SUDDEN END

______

Mr. Platshek Was Prominent
in Business and a Leading Elk.

     Nathan Platshek, aged fifty-three, a prominent business man, and leader among Texas Elks, killed himself some time during Monday night. Mr. Platshek stood before the mirror in his room at 1625 Peabody avenue, and fired a bullet from a thirty-eight calibre revolver into his left temple. The bullet pierced his brain and physicians who examined the body declared that death was instant.

Body is Discovered.
     The body was not found until noon Tuesday. Mose Novich, with whom Mr. Platshek lived, and a negro, Andre Brown, were busy in the lower part of the house. Novich sent the negro to Mr. Platshek's room on some errand, and when he could not get in the door, he called his employer, who entered a window. Mr. Platshek was lying dead in front of the bureau.
     No reason can be assigned by Mr. Novich for the tragedy, except the ill health of Mr. Platshek. He had been unable to attend to his business for some time and was very despondent. On the evening of Mr. Platshek's death, he had gone to visit friends and had returned home before Mr. Novich returned. It was then that he fired the shot, as Mr. Novich came in at 11 o'clock and declared that he did not hear a pistol fired after that hour.
     Mr. Platshek had lived in Dallas for more than a score of years, and was very prominently known. he leaves a brother in South Carolina, whom his friends are now trying to reach. It is believed this brother is a real estate broker in Charleston. Mr. Platshek had no immediate relatives in Dallas. His wife died about two years ago.

Prominent in Elk Circles.
     Mr. Platshek was secretary of the Dallas lodge of Elks for a number of years and was the first manager of the Majestic vaudeville theater of Dallas. He was active in the upbuilding of the Dallas lodge of Elks and had a wide circle of friends throughout the state.
     Mr. Platshek's body was taken in charge by George W. Loudermilk, undertaker, pending advices from relatives regarding the funeral arrangements.

- July 28, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3-4;
continued on p. 5, col. 7.
- o o o -

MAN KILLS
WIFE THEN
ENDS LIFE

______

Edward C. Wade, Painter and
Paperhanger, Dies After
Slaying Wife.

     Standing in the bedroom of their home at 2207 Cabell street, Edward C. Wade, painter, Friday morning fired two bullets into the body of his wife, Ethel Wade, and then turned the gun upon himself, blowing out his brains. He ended domestic troubles with the double tragedy, according to all accounts, his wife having been separated from him during the week, and refusing at the moment before her death to go back to him.
     Every bullet from the .38 calibre revolver took effect. The first one crashed through the face of the woman and the second struck her in the left side, piercing her hearth. Holding the gun in his mouth, Wade sent himself into eternity with a single shot.

Had Been Separated.
     There were only one actual witness to the deed, Miss Katie Yates, who had accompanied Mrs. Wade home this morning. She declared that Mrs. Wade returned only to get her clothes, and was packing them when Wade entered the room. He asked Miss Yates to leave, and she stepped into the hall. The man then closed the door and fired the fatal shots. Miss Yates declared that as nearly as she could tell, before he closed the door, he had urged Mrs. Wade to return to him and she had refused.

Kissed Her Good-Bye.
     Miss Yates described the last scene of the two lives in a dramatic manner.
     "We had just come in from my home. I think it was about 8:30 o'clock, and Mrs. Wade intended to pack her things and leave the house for good. While we were in the room, her husband came in. He was very calm and said:
     "Ethel, I have something I wish to say to you, and it must be in private. Miss Yates, will you excuse us?"
     "I turned to her, and saw that she was frightened.
     "No, I won't go unless Ethel wants me to leave her," I replied.
     "She did not say anything, but motioned for me to stay. Then, she said: 'Step out in the hall a moment, Katie.'
     "I went and heard them talking. He was urging her to come back to him, but she refused. Then, I saw him take her in his arms and kiss her, as if telling her good-bye. He then closed the door, and before I could open it, the shots rang out. I ran in to see them lying upon the bed and floor. Both of them were dead."
     Police calls were made, and Day Sergeant Harrison with a detail of officers rushed to the scene. They were preceded by Motorcycle Officer Hugh Phillips, who found the bodies lying just as they had fallen.
     The woman was across the bed, in a pool of blood, which spurted from her heart. Grasped in hands were the pictures of her little six-year-old son, John, and that of herself and Wade. They were blood-stained.
     The man, clad only in his shirt and trousers, lay upon the floor at her feet. His brains were oozing out of an ugly wound in the top of his head.

Feared Sudden Death.
     Mrs. Wade, during the past week, Miss Yates says, had feared death at the hands of her husband.
     Thursday night, accompanied by Miss Yates, she went to police headquarters and conferred with Assistant Chief of Police Louis Brown. She told him that Wade had threatened to kill her, and was then carrying a gun for her. Chief Brown told her that she could have him arrested for carrying deadly weapons, and instructed her to call at the county attorney's office and file a complaint.
     Mrs. Wade did not do this, Miss Yates said, for fear that if she did, he would make bond and that her fears would be realized at once.

Saw Her Thursday Night.
     Miss Yates stated that Mrs. Wade was with her at 8 o'clock and saw Wade on Main street. He tried to get Mrs. Wade to come with him then to talk over their difficulties, but she refused. "I thought that he would do something desperate them," said Miss Yates. "But, a police officer approached and he walked away."
     Miss Yates declared that Mrs. Wade spent the night with her at her home in Mount Auburn, and that they came down to the scene of the tragedy Friday morning.

Wade Was Union Officer.
     Edward C. Wade was well known locally and was vice president of local No. 63, Painter and Decorators. He had been in Dallas for three years, and had formerly lived in Oklahoma City. From best accounts, this is his native town.
     Mrs. Wade had been married before, to Drew Autrey, but had been divorced. She had one child, John Autrey, and he was in her care at the time of her death. He was sent to the juvenile court, and will likely be placed in the detention home.
     Officer Philips found a letter in Mrs. Wade's trunk from her mother, Mrs. Bettie Collins, who lives in Akins, Okla. The letter told Mrs. Wade that the mother "was praying for her in her time of trouble," and was signed "your mother."
     Both bodies were taken in charge by Henninger-Brewer company, undertakers, and are being held pending funeral arrangements. The painters and decorators are caring for the Wade funeral, while the police are communicating with the woman's people at Akins Okla., in an effort to arrange for her burial.

Little Boy Talks.
     After the shooting, Johnnie, the six-year-old son of Mrs. Wade, was taken in charge by juvenile court authorities. He will be turned over to an aunt who has asked that she have the child.
     Speaking of the killing, the little boy said: "I was standing in the door when I heard the shooting. I thought it was somewhere else and I didn't know my mama was shot. I loved my mama and I feel awful bad that she is gone."

- July 31, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3-5;
continued on p. 12, col. 1-3.
- o o o -

[Note: a photo of the Wade family accompanied the article]


Fire Victim Sent
To Mississippi

     The body of Mrs. Vesta Boatner, aged seventeen years, was sent to Meridian, Miss., for burial Saturday morning by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company. Her husband, G. L. Boatner, accompanied the body to Mississippi.
     Mrs. Boatner is survived by her husband, one daughter, one year of age, her mother, Mrs. Amanda Gipson, who resides near Battlefield, Miss., a sister, Mrs. M. P. Patterson, and two cousins, R. W. and J. V. Gipson, of Dallas.
     Mrs. Boatner received burns Thursday afternoon when a can of coal oil exploded and set fire to her clothing, in the back of her home, 4018 Main street, from which she died Thursday night at the city hospital. She came to Dallas with her husband about a month ago.

- August 1, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

Victim of Bullet
Is Laid at Rest

     Funeral services for James E. Gidcum, were held at the residence of his niece, Mrs. J. A. Johnson, 3401 Gunter street, Friday afternoon, Rev. George S. Fulcher officiating. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery. The pallbearers were John Landemeyer, John Franks, J. Workman, George Head, John Gardner and Walter Sawyer.
     Many friends attended the services, among whom were the members of Refugee Camp No. 2793, Woodmen of the world, who turned out in a body. The floral offerings were both numerous and beautiful.
     James Gidcum lost his life when he and his brother were examining a pistol Wednesday afternoon. The weapon exploded and the bullet passed through the young man's body. He died before medical aid could be summoned.

- August 1, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

Services for E. B. Simpson.

     Funeral services for E. B. Simpson, aged fifty-eight years, who died at Parkland Hospital Monday, were held from the residence of his son, R. E. Simpson, on Second avenue, Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment was in Grove Hill Cemetery.

- August 1, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

Pioneer Dallasite
Died Yesterday

     W. J. Durrett, one of the pioneer settlers of Dallas, died at his home, 1635 Forney avenue, Friday afternoon. Mr. Durrett was born in Kentucky, September 2, 1851, and had been a resident of Dallas county for sixty years. Surviving him are his widow, one son, Jack Durrett, and three daughters -- Mrs. John Rogerman of Kansas City, Mrs. Stanley Smith of Chicago and Miss Mittie Durrett of Dallas. A brother, Wood Durrett, also survives him. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

- August 1, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 6.
- o o o -

Young Dallas Man
Claimed by Death

     Vivian D. Moore, aged twenty-three, son of Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Moore, died at the family residence, 4804 Worth street, Friday afternoon. Funeral services were held at the residence Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment was in Oak Cliff cemetery. Mr. Moore is survived by his parents, one sister, Mrs. John R. West, and four brothers, A. F., Fred and Render Moore of Dallas and Rex Moore of San Francisco, Cal.

- August 1, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 3.
- o o o -

WOMAN DRINKS
CARBOLIC ACID;
DEATH FOLLOWS

     Mrs. Susan Christie, wife of O. C. Christie, died Saturday morning at the emergency hospital as the result of carbolic acid poison. The acid was taken by Mrs. Christie at her home, 2904 Taylor street, and when found by relatives, Mrs. Christie was in a dying condition. She was hurriedly taken to the emergency hospital, but she was beyond all medical aid. Ill health is assigned as the cause of the rash deed by her son-in-law, Frank J. Ferrell. According to Mrs. Farrell, Mrs. Christie has been in ill health for nearly two years.
     Besides her husband, she is survived by two sons and two daughters. The daughters are Mrs. Frank J. Farrell and Mrs. L. I. Putnam, and the sons are Louis and Charles, all of Dallas. Mrs. Christie was born in Green county, Kentucky, fifty-one years ago and had resided in Dallas the past seventeen years.
     The remains were taken in charge by Undertaker Loudermilk and are being held pending funeral arrangements. Mr. Christie, the husband, is engaged in the grocery business with a place of business adjoining the family home.

- August 1, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -

Funeral Services
For Mrs. Christie

     Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Christie, age fifty years, who died Saturday morning, will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. F. J. Farrell, 2604 South Harwood, Rev. L. M. Waterman officiating. Interment will be in Oakland Cemetery. Surviving are her husband, O. C. Christie; two sons, Louis and Charles Christie, and two daughters, Mrs. Clara Farrell and Mrs. Bertha Putman.
     Mrs. Christie died at the emergency hospital Saturday morning from the effects of carbolic acid. She was found by members of her family in an unconscious condition, and was rushed to the hospital, but she was beyond the reach of medical aid. Her husband, son and two daughters accompanied her to the hospital. She had been in ill health for about two years, according to members of the family. The family residence is 2904 Taylor street.

- August 2, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Elizabeth Sprague Dies.

     Elizabeth Sprague, age seven years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Sprague, died at the family residence, 219 East Twelfth street, Saturday afternoon. Funeral services will be held at the home, Sunday afternoon at 5 o'clock. Rev. W. H. Lawrence will officiate, and interment will take place in Oak Cliff Cemetery.

- August 2, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

EX-PUBLISHER IS
CLAIMED BY DEATH
AT SON'S HOME

     C. I. Wilmans, an old-time resident of Dallas, died at the home of his son, Robert Wilmans, 515 North Marsalis avenue, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. He is survived by five sons -- W. B. and C. F. Wilmans of Fort Smith, Ark., and Robert, Hall and L. I. Wilmans of Dallas.
     Mr. Wilmans began his business career in a country newspaper office in Illinois, sixty-four years ago, and had been more or less active in the printing business until a few months ago.
     Mr. Wilmans moved to Dallas in 1880 from Fairfield, Ill., and was one of the contractors on the old Chicago, Texas and Mexican Central Railroad. When this work was completed, he was employed on the staff of the Morning Herald. He was the founder of the Dallas Monitor, now the Southern Mercury. Besides his activities in newspaper work, he invented the first self-inking printing press, the first automatic dough mixer for bakers and the chain mailing system used by the Addressograph machine.
     Funeral services will be held at the home of his son, Robert Wilmans, Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock, Rev. Robert Hill officiating. Interment will be in Oak Cliff Cemetery.

- August 2, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Double Funeral
Will Be Held Here

     Double funeral services will be held at the chapel of the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking Establishment Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock for Edward C. Wade and his wife, Ethel Wade. Interment will be in Grove Hill Cemetery.
     Ed Wade shot and killed his wife, Ethel, and then turned the pistol on himself Friday morning at 8:30 o'clock at the home of Mrs. Fannie Brown, 3207 Cabell street, where the couple had rooms. Domestic troubles were said to have been the cause of the affair. Mr. Wade was, at one time, vice president of the local Painters' Union.

- August 2, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Harry Cruger Dies.

     Harry Cruger, age nineteen years, died at St. Paul's Sanitarium Saturday night at 11:15 o'clock. The remains are being held at the George W. Loudermilk undertaking parlors pending funeral arrangements.

- August 2, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Services for W. J. Durrett.

     Funeral services for W. J. Durrett, Dallas pioneer, who died at his home, 1635 Forney avenue, will probably beheld Tuesday morning. Mr. Durrett was born in Kentucky in 1851, and had been a resident of Dallas county for sixty years. He is survived by his widow, one son and three daughters and brother. Mr. Durrett was a charter member of Dallas Tent No. 23, Knights of the Maccabees.

- August 2, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Services for Vivian D. Moore.

     Funeral services for Vivian D. Moore, age twenty-three years, who died at his home, 4304 Worth street, Friday afternoon, were held at the family residence Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment was in Oak Cliff Cemetery. Mr. Moore is survived by his parents, one sister and four brothers.

- August 2, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

MRS. VESTA BOATNER
IS FATALLY BURNED

______

CAN OF KEROSENE EXPLODES AND
WOMAN'S CLOTHING IS IGNITED.

______

Neighbor Goes to Victim's Assistance
with Bucket of Water--Lingers
Some Hours in Great Suffering.

     Mrs. Vesta Boatner, 17-year-old wife of George Boatner, 4018 Main street, died at the City Hospital last night as the result of burns. She was injured when a can of kerosene, with which she was trying to build a fire under a washing kettle in her back yard, exploded and set fire to her dress at 3:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon. But for the presence of mind displayed by Mrs. Annie Wandt, her next door neighbor, who ran to her aid with a bucket of water, Mrs. Boatner would undoubtedly have perished in her burning clothing, Mrs. Wandt said.
     "From my sitting room, I saw Mrs. Boatner go into her back yard to prepare to wash some clothes. A few moments later, I heard an explosion that sounded like a pistol shot. then, I saw Mrs. Boatner running toward my house, screaming for help. I ran to her with a bucket of water, with which I succeeded in checked the flames. Then, I threw a quilt over her. But, she was horribly burned. Someone pulled the fire alarm box on the corner and the firemen came and ordered Henninger-Brewer's ambulance, in which Mrs. Boatner was taken to the City Hospital.
     Mrs. Boatner's flesh was burned almost to a crisp, from her knees upward, and after examining her, the interne at the hospital said that her death was but a question of a short time, a few hours at the best, and that all medical science could do would be to alleviate her suffering as much as possible.
     There was no reason for calling out the fire department. Although Mrs. Boatner, with her clothing in a blaze, entered the house of Mrs. Wandt, the fire did not extend to the building. The firemen, however, did render a real service in seeing to it that Mrs. Boatner was hurried to the hospital with all possible dispatch.
     Mr. Boatner was away from home at the time of the accident and was not apprised of it until his wife had been conveyed to the hospital. Mrs. Boatner leaves one child, a daughter, about 1 year old.
     The body was taken in charge by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking Company. It will probably be sent to Battlefield, Miss., the old home of the family.

- August 2, 1914, Dallas Morning News, p. 16, col. 3.
- o o o -


MAN KILLED
BY THUNDER
BOLT MONDAY

______

James Hill, Gravel Hauler, Is
Struck by Lightning on
Fishtrap Road.

     James Hill, a gravel hauler, employed at Cement City, but whose home is in Dallas, was struck by lightning and instantly killed near the Lane residence on the Fishtrap road early Monday afternoon.
     On his way, he passed between two big oak trees which support a wire clothes line. It is thought that the man touched the wire rope with his shoulder at the same moment one of the trees was struck by lightning. The powerful electric shock killed him instantly. His right shoulder was slightly burned, otherwise his body was not in the least disfigured.
     Dr. Ormby was summoned from Cement City, but was able to do no good. The man was dead. The body of Hill was taken to Dallas by the Henninger-Brewer company and is held, pending funeral arrangements.

- August 3, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

ELEVEN DEATHS IN DALLAS FROM
VIOLENCE IN JULY BREAKS RECORD

     Breaking monthly records for 1914, eleven deaths from violence occurred in Dallas county during July. Two of the killings have thus far been recorded as unsolved. In four of the killings, no arrests were made. With two exceptions, the pleas of the slayers are believed to be self-defense.
     During the month, several affrays and shootings occurred that may result seriously.
     The July record of killings follows:
     July 6: T. C. Colson, a piano finisher, was stabbed to death in front of the Dallas Transfer barns on Camp street. F. M. Maddox, Jr., young white man, was arrested and charged with murder. His plea was self-defense.
     July 8: Body of Pedro Vasquez, Mexican, was found in his bed at Union Depot hotel. His throat had been slashed and the slayer escaped through hotel window. No arrest made in case.
     July 9: C. C. Long, aged hotel proprietor, shot at 2420 1/2 Elm street and died within few hours at local sanitarium. W. A. Burgess, white man, arrested and charged with the murder. Self-defense his plea.
     July 15: Emma Hawkins, negress, shot to death at her home on Young street, by Chilton Walker, negro. Walker claims self-defense. He was arrested.
     July 18: Alfred Jackson, negro, died at city hospital from gunshot wound received several days before at Main and Lamar streets. White man was arrested, but no action taken by grand jury.
     July 20: Rufus Johnson, negro, stabbed to death by Douglass Traylor at Elm and Hawkins streets. Stabbing followed a quarrel between the two negroes.
     July 22: E. C. Pemberton, farmer-merchant, shot at his store on Kaufman road and died two hours later at a Dallas sanitarium. Robbery believed to have been motive for the killing. No arrests made.
     July 27: Will Williams, shot by John Johnson, negro, at Griffith Lumber company. Killing followed quarrel over money. Johnson escaped.
     July 28: Tom Cook, negro, stabbed to death by Callie Johnson, negress. Stabbing occurred on Canal street. Negress claims self-defense.
     July 30: Burnett Hart, negro, died at city hospital from wounds on the head, inflicted several days before by a white man at an East Dallas coal yard. Grand jury has taken no action.
     July 31: Ed Wade, painter and paperhanger, fires two bullets into head of his wife, Ethel Wade, killing her instantly, then turns gun on himself. He, too, died instantly. Killing occurred in room at 2207 Cabell street. Domestic troubles are alleged to have been cause of double tragedy.

- August 3, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 4, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

Double Funeral
Was Held Sunday

     A double funeral was held from the chapel of the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking establishment Sunday afternoon to Grove Hill cemetery, where the bodies of Edward C. Wade and his wife, Ethel, were buried side by side. Rev. G. M. Gibson, pastor of the First Methodist church, officiating at the services. The funeral of Mr. Wade was conducted under the auspices of the Painters' and Paperhangers' union, of which he was a member.
     Following were the pallbearers: J. R. Welch, C. W. Peon, F. Kildre, John Whattey, W. S. Dunkfield and N. A. Shafer.

- August 3, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Services For Harry P. Crosler.

     Funeral services for Harry P. Crosler, age nineteen years, who died at St. Paul's Sanitarium Saturday night, were held from the residence of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Crosler, 3921 Watt street, Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock, Rev. C. C. Brannon officiating. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. The Mallelieu M. E. church Quartette rendered appropriate music. Pallbearers were: John Tarpley, Jr., Gus Schwander, Harry Arons, Johnnie Taylor, Vol Caruth and Rex Brooks.

- August 3, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

John B. Lewis Dies.

     John B. Lewis, age fifty-three years, died at his home, 3611 Wall street, Sunday afternoon. Funeral services will be held at the residence Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. L. M. Waterman conducting the services.
     Surviving are his widow and several children. Mr. Lewis was a member of the Painters' Union, Eureka Camp No. 2211, W. O. W., Independent Order of Puritans, and the Samaritans.

- August 3, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

FATHER USES
GUN ON MAN
WHO SHOT SON

_______

Daniel Boggus Killed and Jim
Boggus Wounded in
Shotgun Duel

     Following the shooting on Sunday morning, when Daniel Boggus, negro, was shot by Shelby Ford, another negro, Ford himself was shot Monday morning by Jim Boggus, father of Daniel Boggus, according to information received at the sheriff's office. A charge of assault to murder was filed against Daniel Boggus, charging him with shooting Shelby Ford.
     Efforts to locate Ford at the sanitariums of the city or the city hospital failed. It was said he was shot in the head, one eye being shot out and several small shot taking effect in the throat. Ford is charged in Justice Work's court with killing Daniel Boggus.
     Armed with double-barreled shot guns, Shelby Ford and Dan Boggus, negroes, fought a battle to the death at Elm Thicket early Sunday morning. Dan Boggus was shot in the stomach and in the hip. He died at Parkland hospital early Monday morning. Jim Boggus, brother of the dead man, was badly wounded. A charge of shot struck him in the face, tearing out his eyes. If he recovers, the man will be blind for life. Shelby Ford surrendered to the police and is in jail facing a charge of murder. He was unhurt.
     The shooting took place in the grounds of a negro chicken garden owned by Shelby Ford at Elm Thicket, about five miles from Dallas.      Although the affray took place at 3 o'clock in the morning, hundreds of negroes were present in the picnic grounds. They stampeded when the shots began to fly.
     Motorcycle Officers Parsons and Johnson made a call to Elm Thicket when police headquarters were notified. They found both Dan and Jim Boggus lying unconscious. Ford surrendered to the officers. He stated that the Boggus brothers had threatened him, and that the matter had previously been brought into court. He said that early Sunday morning, the two brothers had appeared at his chicken garden. Dan Boggus, so he declared, was armed with a shot gun and fired at him. The bullets flew wild.
     Ford says that he ran into his house and got his own gun. He came out shooting. The first two charges struck Dan Boggus. In order to clear the field, he reloaded and shot down Jim Boggus, who was coming to aid his brother.
     According to witnesses, the names of whom were secured by the motorcycle officers, that Boggus and Ford had been enemies for some time.

- August 3, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 4, col. 6.
- o o o -


 

NECROLOGICAL.

Walter Jones Dies.

     Walter Jones, age thirty-one years, for many years an invalid, died at the city hospital Sunday. One sister survives him. He was a native of Liverpool, Eng., and had been a resident of Dallas for eight years. Funeral services were held from Loudermilk's chapel Monday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. L. M. Waterman officiated. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. The funeral party went in automobiles from the chapel to the cemetery.

Services for W. J. Durrett.

     Funeral services for W. J. Durrett will be held at the family residence, 1535 Forney avenue, Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.

Services Held For Mrs. Mary Christie.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Christie, age fifty years, who died Saturday morning, were held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Clara Farrell. Rev. L. M. Waterman conducted the services. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. P. O. Kneisel, C. Labruzzo, L. A. Oliver, Lee Putnam, A. L. Christie and G. W. Kemper acted as pallbearers.

Services For C. W. Thrash.

     Funeral services for C. W. Thrash were held at the chapel of the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery. The pallbearers were W. L. Dayton, D. S. Stallings, W. T. Montgomery, J. J. Coleman, A. T. Bishop and G. L. Merkle.

Services For Elizabeth Sprague.

     Funeral services for Elizabeth, seven-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Sprague, were held at the family residence, 319 East Twelfth street, Sunday afternoon at 5 o'clock. Rev. W. H. Lowrance officiated at the services. The funeral was automobile from the home to Oak Cliff cemetery, where interment was made. Kenneth W. Capers, N. A. Middleton, T. A. Hord, Jr., Harry McConnell, George Perkins and Eugene Ellison were the pallbearers.

- August 3, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 2.
- o o o -



YOUNG MAN
DIES UNDER
CAR WHEELS

______

William A. Bemount Crushed
to Death in Oak Cliff
Monday Night.

     William A. Bemount, aged twenty-one years, was struck by an incoming Oak Cliff car, at the intersection of Tyler street and Jefferson avenue, Monday evening at 7 o'clock and killed. The young man's legs were badly crushed and his body almost severed at the waist.
     Mr. Bemount resided with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bemount, 900 Center street, Oak Cliff. His parents were out of the city, having left only a few days ago to attend a family reunion at Le Compte, La. He was order clerk for the United States Tire Company, 2109 Commerce street.
     Mr. Bemount worked for the company in Kansas, and came to Dallas in November, when he was transferred to the Dallas branch. He left the office Monday, stating that he intended to return Monday night and complete some work. He is reported as a steady, trustworthy young man and stood well with the company.
     From information received, it seems that young Bemount attempted to board an incoming car, which was pulling a trailer. He missed his step and fell beneath the trailer, both wheels passing over his body.
     The body is being held by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking Company, pending funeral services.

- August 4, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

S. L. Conquest Is
White Plague Victim

     S. L. Conquest, age forty-eight years, died at Woodlawn hospital Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock. He was, for many years, active in Dallas labor circles, and was a member of the old Knights of Labor of the Federal Labor Union, and of the Socialist Party. The Dallas Socialists will have charge of the funeral services.
     Mr. Conquest was born in Iowa in 1866. He served in the United States army in the West, and came to Dallas in 1895. He is survived by his widow. Funeral services will be held at the family residence, 2619 Santa Fe street, Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakland cemetery. Pallbearers will be B. M. Hughes, B. H. Williams, J. N. Crowley, John Grigsby, W. B. Smith and George Clifton Edwards.

- August 4, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Mrs. G. M. Best
Claimed by Death

     Mrs. G. M. Best died at the family home, 3822 Holland avenue, Monday. Mrs. Best was the wife of G. M. Best of this city, and is survived by her three daughters, Mary E., Lois and Gladys Best. Her mother, Mrs. Mary McCarty, also survives her.
     Funeral services will be held at Holy Trinity church, Oak Lawn and Gilbert avenues, Tuesday afternoon at 5 o'clock, Bishop Joseph P. Lynch, officiating. Interment will be in Calvary cemetery.

- August 4, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

WIRE CLOTHES
LINE CAUSES
MAN'S DEATH

______

Considerable Damage in Dal-
las Monday by Wind and
Lightning.

     The one death caused by the storm that swept over Dallas Monday afternoon occurred in a peculiar manner. Bob Hill, teamster, had taken refuge from the rain in a tent near the Trinity gravel pit, near Cement City. When the downpour slackened, Hill started through the fields to the home of a Mr. Lane for a drink of water. As he neared the house, a wire clothes line, strung low between two large trees, barred his path.
     While in the act of lifting the wire line that he might pass under, a bolt of lightning struck one of the trees, passed along the wire line, and entering Hill's body, caused instant death.
     Mr. Hill is survived by a brother, J. C. Hill, living at 3411 Osborne street. The body was taken to the Henninger-Brewer undertaking parlors, and sent to Palmer, Texas, Tuesday morning for interment.
...

- August 4, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 2.
- o o o -

Aged Woman Dies
At Daughter's Home

     Mrs. Sarah Ann Collins, for thirty-eight years a resident of Dallas, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. D. Thomas, Tuesday morning.
     Mrs. Collins was eighty-seven years of age, and was a member of one of the prominent families of early Dallas history. She came to this section from South Carolina.
     The funeral will be held at the family residence, 2304 McKinney avenue, at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning. Interment will be made in Greenwood cemetery.

- August 4, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 2.
- o o o -

William B. Porter,
Old Resident, Dies

     William Benton Porter, age forty-six years, died at the residence of his mother, Mrs. R. P. Trester[?], 612 North Harwood street, Tuesday morning at 12:30 o'clock. Mr. Porter had been a resident of Dallas for many years and is survived by his mother and five sisters, Mrs. James Briggs of Childress, Mrs. R. M. Ingersall of Dallas, Mrs. E. S. McLaughlin and Miss Pattie Porter of this city, and Mrs. Mary Belle Sterrett of Snyder.
     Funeral services will be held at the residence of his mother Tuesday afternoon at 5 o'clock, Rev. New Harris officiating. The remains will be sent to San Antonio for burial by the Charles F. Weiland Undertaking company.

- August 4, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 7.
- o o o -


Services for Mrs. Mary Kenna Miller.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Kenna Miller, who died at Trenton, Tenn., were held from the chapel of Ed C. Smith & Bro.' undertaking establishment Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Interment was in Masonic cemetery. The remains arrived in Dallas Tuesday morning over the Cotton Belt railway.
     Mrs. Miller was the widow of Lawrence Miller, and had, at one time, been a resident of Dallas for many years. Relatives in Dallas are T. L. Bradford, W. H. Lyne and J. B. Shelmire.

- August 4, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 7.
- o o o -

Infant Daughter Dies.

     Alada Graham, infant daughter of J. K. and Lillian Graham, died at the family residence, 1208 First avenue, Monday evening. Funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment was in Glover cemetery.

- August 4, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 7.
- o o o -

SECOND VICTIM
OF FIRE DIES
AT HOSPITAL

     Clara Scott, aged thirteen, burned in the early morning fire which destroyed her father's home, died at St. Paul's Sanitarium shortly after 4 o'clock.
     The fire was caused by an explosion in the kitchen of the Scott home. Clara Scott and her younger sister, Margaret, were in the room, and their bodies were literally charred. The death of the younger girl preceded the other by about four hours.

- August 5, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -


NECROLOGICAL.

Services For John B. Lewis.

     Funeral services for John B. Lewis, who died Sunday, were held at the residence, 3011 Wall street, Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. L. M. Waterman officiating. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. The active pallbearers were: L. C. Reed, Frank Kelly, W. Siler, A. E. Crofts, W. S. Burchfield and J. L. Whatley. The honorary pallbearers were: W. A. Goode, G. H. Hill, Scott Mitchell, A. G. Burnham, J. B. Louis and S. H. Broadnax.

Services for Mrs. Sarah Ann Collins.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah Ann Collins were held at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. J. D. Thomas, 2304 McKinney avenue, Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery.
     Mrs. Collins, aged eighty-seven years, was a native of Sumter county, S. C., and had been a resident of Dallas for thirty-eight years.

Services For Mrs. G. M. Best.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Guy M. Best, who died at her home, Monday, were held at the Holy Trinity church Tuesday afternoon at 5 o'clock, Rt. Rev. Joseph P. Lynch officiating. Interment was in Calvary cemetery. Mrs. Best is survived by her husband and three daughters. Pallbearers were: J. J. Madigan, J. F. Giles, A. L. Bird, George Williams, P. A. Richardson and H. L. Tenison.

Daniel B. Garland Dies.

     Daniel B. Garland, aged thirty-four years, died at the Baptist sanitarium Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services will be held at the family residence, 1219 Pennsylvania avenue, Wednesday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock.
     Mr. Garland was born in Tennessee and had been a resident of Dallas for the past two years.

- August 5, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2-4.
- o o o -



BURNS FATAL
TO SMALL
GIRL TODAY

_______

Margaret Scott Dead and Sis-
ter Clara May Die of
Burns.

     Margaret, the five-year-old daughter of Emmett Scott, who was burned Wednesday morning in a fire when the Scott home was burned, died about 12:30 o'clock at the St. Paul's sanitarium. The body was taken in charge by the Ed C. Smith & Bros.' Undertaking company and prepared for burial, but no funeral arrangements have, as yet, been completed.
     Three members of the family of Emmett Scott, mail carrier, were burned, two of them probably fatally, when fire destroyed the Scott home on Cedar Springs road, just beyond the city limits, Wednesday morning.
     Margaret Scott, five years old, the baby of the family, is the most seriously burned. Doctors at St. Paul's Sanitarium say she will die. Clara Scott, thirteen years old, her sister, was also terribly injured. She has a chance of recovery. Mrs. Emmett Scott, thirty-five, was burned about her face and arms in an attempt to rescue her little ones from the flames. All are at the hospital.
     The Scott home, a one-story bungalow, valued at $3000, went up in flames in a few minutes. Neither Mrs. Scott, nor Laura Scott, a fourteen-year-old girl who escaped without injury, could tell just how the fire started.
     Mrs. Scott was talking over the telephone to a neighbor and Laura Scott was in the parlor of the house when the fire started.      Thirteen-year-old Clara, with her baby sister, was in the kitchen. Clara was trying to make some candy, and the little one was helping her. There was an explosion in the cook stove, and in a moment, both children were sheets of flame.
     Mrs. Scott rushed into the kitchen and carried Clara out. She did not know the other child was burned. A. Livingston, who was passing the house, jumped over the back fence and covered up the child with his coat, extinguishing the flames.
     Margaret Scott was burned from head to foot. Her body was literally scorched to a crisp. Clara Scott was badly burned about the body, legs and arms.
     Neighbors telephoned to the fire department and to the emergency hospital. The Oak Lawn fire department responded and stretched over 1000 feet of hose along the Cedar Springs road, from the nearest fire plug in the city limits. Their efforts were unavailing, however, as the house was soon burned to the ground. The automobile engine also responded from Central station, making a record-breaking run.
     Drs. Charles Card and Howard went to the scene from the emergency hospital and gave first aid to the injured children. They sent them in the Henninger-Brewer ambulance to St. Paul's Sanitarium. __ Stephenson, who lives near the Scott house, also was called.
     A call was sent to the postoffice for Emmett Scott. The mail carrier was on his beat, however, and it was some time before he could be taken to the scene in an automobile. He went to St. Paul's Sanitarium immediately.

- August 5, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 5.
- o o o -

Newspaper Man Who
Was Called by Death

Tom H. Napier

"THIRTY" COMES
TO T. H. NAPIER
IN SOUTH TEXAS

     Tom H. Napier, former telegraph editor of The Times Herald, and one of the best known newspapermen in Texas, died at Texas City Tuesday afternoon, after a long illness. Mr. Napier's home was at 1426 Bennett avenue, but he left Dallas about two months ago for the Gulf coast, in an attempt to regain his health.
     Tom H. Napier was born in Morris county, Texas, forty-three years ago. He was elected to the legislature from Wood county in 1900 and served two terms. He was appointed state printer by Governor H. B. Colquitt, but resigned after eighteen months' service and returned to active newspaper work with The Times Herald.
     Before coming to Dallas, Mr. Napier was editor and publisher of the Winnsboro Wide-Awake. He is survived by his widow, one son and two sisters, Mrs. E. J. Rust of Dallas and Mrs. C. S. Vickers of Cartwright, Texas. He has one brother, W. A. Napier of Texarkana.
     Mr. Napier was a member of the Francis J. Bell Lodge No. 108, Knights of Pythias. This organization will have charge of the funeral. He was also an active member of the Dallas Press club and the Texas State Press association, taking a leading part in the activities of both organizations.
     At a meeting of the Dallas Press club at noon today, suitable resolutions on the death of Mr. Napier were adopted and Tom W. Perkins of McKinney, John H. Cullom and Emmett R. Hambrick were named as pallbearers from the Press club. The other three will be named from among the members of Knights of Pythias.
     The body will arrive in Dallas Thursday morning at 7:30 o'clock over the Houston and Texas Central and will be received by the Charles F. Weiland Undertaking company. The body will be taken to the late home, 1426 Bennett avenue. The funeral service will be carried out in part at the home, beginning at 3 o'clock, and the body will be taken to the First Methodist church, Commerce and Prather streets, where the service proper will be conducted. Rev. W. D. Bradfield of Austin and Rev. G. M. Gibson, pastor of the church, will conduct the services. Interment will be made in Oakland cemetery.

- August 5, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 14, col. 5-6.
- o o o -

Sister of Chief Ryan
Claimed by Death

     Mrs. Hattie Griffin, wife of L. C. Griffin, died at St. Paul's Sanitarium, Thursday morning at 6:40 o'clock.
     Mrs. Griffin was thirty-seven years of age, and is survived by her husband and nine children. Four brothers, chief John Ryan of the Dallas police force, James S. Ryan, Pat Ryan, all of Dallas, and Will Ryan of Athens, and three sisters, Mesdames W. W. Browder, J. C. Beford and T. Merrick, also survive her.
     The body was moved from George Loudermilk's establishment to the family home, six miles south of Garland, Texas, Thursday. Funeral services will be held at the home Friday. Interment will be in Calhoun cemetery.

- August 6, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

Last Services For
Accident Victim

     Funeral services for William A. Bemount were held at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bemount, 900 Center street, Wednesday afternoon at 5 o'clock. Rev. C. O. Shugart officiating. Interment was in Oak Cliff cemetery. The pallbearers were: P. C. Bush, H. B. Bush, Jr., W. G. Farr, Frank Congdon, W. D. Lamb and W. Curtis Weaver.
     Mr. Bemount was killed Monday evening when he fell under a moving Oak Cliff street car.

- August 6, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

Body is Sent to Ratcliff.

     The body of Mrs. Delia Orchard, who died at the Baptist sanitarium Wednesday morning, was sent to Ratcliff, Tex., her home, for burial, Thursday morning, by Undertaker Charles F. Weiland.

- August 6, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

Services for Mrs. Gussie Gottleb.

     The remains of Mrs. Gussie Gottleb, aged ninety years, who died at Hugo, Ok., were received in Dallas by George W. Loudermilk, Undertaker. Funeral services were held at Loudermilk 's chapel, Thursday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Interment was in the Orthodox Hebrew cemetery at White Rock. The body was accompanied to Dallas by her son, V. Gottleb, and son-in-law, H. Goldfeder.

- August 6, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

Fred Wright Dies.

     Fred Wright, aged twenty-six years, died at the Parkland hospital, Thursday morning at 3:15 o'clock. The body is being held by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking establishment, pending funeral arrangements.

- August 6, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 6.
- o o o -

FUNERAL THIS
AFTERNOON FOR
VICTIMS OF FIRE

     Funeral services for Clara Gertrude Scott, aged twelve years, and Margaret Ann Scott, aged five years, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Scott, will be held at the Oak Lawn Methodist Church, Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Grove Hill Cemetery. The funeral procession will leave Henninger-Brewer chapel at 3:30 o'clock, going to the church.
     Clara and Margaret Scott were fatally burned in the fire which destroyed their home on Cedar Springs road, just beyond the city limits, and seriously burned their mother, Mrs. Emma Scott, on Wednesday morning.
     No one seems to know just how the fire started. Clara and her baby sister were in the kitchen making candy. The mother was in the front of the house, using the telephone, and the older sister was in the front of the house, also. They heard an explosion and the mother ran to her daughter's rescue, receiving frightful burns while trying to extinguish the flames which enveloped her children.
     The elder daughter, Laura, called the fire department. Although the firemen from the Oak Lawn station did all in their power to subdue the flames, the little new bungalow which the family had occupied for only a month, was burned to the ground.
     The father, Emmett W. Scott, is a local mail carrier and was on his route when the news of the tragedy reached him. He hurried to St. Paul's Sanitarium, where the injured were taken.
     It was stated at the sanitarium Thursday afternoon that Mrs. Scott spent a restless night Wednesday night, but had a good chance to recover.
     Rev. E. R. Barcus and F. S. Sensibaugh will officiate at the services.

- August 6, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 7.
- o o o -

MANY ATTEND
FUNERAL RITES
OF T. H. NAPIER

     Last rites for Tom H. Napier, well known newspaper man, were held Thursday afternoon at the First Methodist church, corner of Commerce and Prather streets. The services at the church were conducted by Rev. C. M. Gibson, the pastor, and by Rev. W. D. Bradfield, of Austin, a boyhood friend of Mr. Napier. At the Oakland cemetery, where interment was made, the Knights of Pythias conducted the services. Tom W. Perkins of McKinney, who was another childhood friend of the deceased, paid a tribute to Mr. Napier as a friend and man, declaring that he measured up to all requirements. The remarks of Dr. Bradfield were very touching and he told of how he watched Mr. Napier's career from the time he was a barefoot lad in East Texas, until the Grim Reaper had claimed him. He said, that in all walks of life, Mr. Napier had proved his worth and declared that the world had been made better because of the fact that he had lived therein.
     The many floral offerings and the large number that attended the services attested the esteem in which Mr. Napier was held by all who knew him. City Commissioners W. T. Henderson sang two solos at the church, the numbers being favorite hymns of Mr. Napier. The pallbearers were from the Knights of Pythias and Dallas Press Club. Tom Finty, Jr., C. A. Hart and A. G. Schuler represented the fraternal organization and Tom W. Perkins, John H. Cullom and E. R. Hambrick, represented the Press Club.
     Mrs. Napier has received telegrams of condolence from various state officials and newspaper men from different parts of the state. Mr. Napier had been a newspaper man in Texas for a number of years and was well known. He died Tuesday afternoon at Texas City, following an illness of several months.

- August 7, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

John C. McCutcheon Dies.

     John C. McCutcheon, age seventy-six years, died at the home of B. W. Sheegog, 3119 Hood street, Thursday night. He is survived by his widow and three sons, Eugene McCutcheon of Arlington, and Cecil W., and Lyndon McCutcheon of Dallas. The body will be sent to Whitesboro for burial by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk.

- August 7, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

Services For Mrs. Hattie Griffin.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Hattie Griffin, age thirty-seven years, wife of L. C. Griffin, who died at St. Paul's Sanitarium Thursday morning, will be held at the family residence fourteen miles northeast of Dallas, Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Rev. G. C. Lewis officiating. Interment will take place in Cox cemetery.
     Mrs. Griffin is survived by her husband, nine children, three sisters and four brothers.

- August 7, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.

Mrs. Mary E. Eddins Dies.

     Mrs. Mary E. Eddins, aged thirty-five years, died at her home, 837 Oak Cliff boulevard, Friday morning at 7:15 o'clock. Mrs. Eddins was born in Boone county, Arkansas, and had resided in Dallas for one year. She is survived by her husband and six children.
     Funeral services will be held from the residence Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakland cemetery. The funeral will be by automobile.

Mrs. Mattie Martin Elliott Dies.

     Mrs. Mattie Martin Elliott, aged thirty-seven years, died at her home, 2715 Hibernia street, Friday morning. She was the wife of G. L. Elliott and was born in Georgia, April 25, 1877. The body is being held at Ed C. Smith and Bros.' undertaking parlors pending funeral arrangements.

Infant Son Dies.

     Samuel Comby, twenty-two-months'-old son of Joe and Vincent Comby, died at the family home, 904 McKinney avenue, Friday morning. Funeral services will be held from the Sacred Heart cathedral Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakland cemetery.

Mrs. Nita Chandler Dies.

     Mrs. Nita Chandler, wife of R. E. Chandler, died at her home, 4303 Travis avenue, Friday morning. Mrs. Chandler was the daughter of W. M. McCommas and was born in Dallas county, September 29, 1880. Funeral services will be held at the family residence Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Interment will take place in Cox cemetery.

- August 7, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -


Pemberton Case
Now Being Probed

     The county grand jury, Friday morning, it is said, began a vigorous investigation into the killing of E. C. Pemberton, farmer-merchant, several weeks ago. Mr. Pemberton was shot in the head while in his store on the Kaufman road. The shooting occurred about midnight and robbery is believed to have been the motive for the crime. Mr. Pemberton was sleeping in his store.

- August 7, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 2.
- o o o -

Mrs. Addie Gaumel Dies.

     Mrs. Addie Gaumel, aged sixty-seven years, died at the family residence, 3907 Willow street, at an early hour Friday morning. Mrs. Gaumel, wife of F. M. Gaumel, was born in Alabama, March 4, 1847, and had been a resident of Dallas for the past thirty-seven years. The remains were sent to Terrell, Tex., for burial Friday by Undertakers Ed C. Smith & Brother.

- August 7, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 19, col. 2.
- o o o -

DOUBLE FUNERAL
FOR VICTIMS OF
WEDNESDAY FIRE

     A double funeral procession carried the bodies of Margaret and Clara Scott, who were fatally burned in the fire which destroyed their home and seriously burned their mother, Mrs. Emmett Scott, Wednesday morning, from the chapel of Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company to the Oak Lawn Methodist Church, where the funeral services were conducted by Rev. E. R. Barcus and Rev. O. F. Sensabaugh at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon. Interment was in Oak Grove Cemetery.
     The following members of the Sunday school classes, to which Margaret and Clara Scott belonged, were honorary pallbearers: Lucille Smith, Ruth Work, Ruth Lune[?], Myrtle Bennett, Marie Flanary, Katherine Orr, Julia Powell, Aurelia Bullock, Ernestine Brewer, Elsie Stark, Alice and Ethel Signaigo, Irene Richardson, May Elizabeth Abernathy, May Belle Gaddis and Blossom Bennett.
     The active pallbearers were Watt Winn, John Julian, W. E. Horton, T. W. Huffhines, Roy Scott, Gus Ford, B. E. Julian and W. M. Winn.
     The girls, Margaret, aged five years, and Clara, aged twelve, were making candy in the kitchen of their home, when the house caught fire from the wood cookstove. The mother ran to the aid of her daughters, and is in a critical condition at St. Paul's Sanitarium as a result of her burns.
     The home was totally destroyed.

- August 7, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 20, col. 7.
- o o o -

Infant Son Dies.

     Earl Roy Duncan, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Duncan, died at the family home in West Dallas, Friday afternoon. Funeral services were held at the family residence, Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Interment was in West Dallas cemetery.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6-7.
- o o o -

Will Bring Levlon
To Answer Charge

     Deputy Sheriff George Preston will leave Dallas Saturday night for Shreveport, La., to take in charge, Ernest Levlon, young white man wanted here on a charge of killing Foster Crumes in 1912. He was arrested two weeks ago. Sheriff Brandenburg was notified Monday that requisition papers had been forwarded to Shreveport.
The killing Crumes occurred near Whiterock reservoir. He was shot to death late one Sunday night while in a cold drink stand he conducted.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 7.
- o o o -

CARD OF THANKS

     MR. and MRS. BEMOUNT and family wish to express their thanks for the kind deeds, expressions and sympathies of their friends during their late bereavement, the loss of their son and brother.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 1.
- o o o -

FUNERAL WILL BE HELD
SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

     The body of J. T. Byrne, aged forty-seven years, who died at Temple Friday night at 10:30 o'clock, will be received in Dallas Saturday night at 9 o'clock.
     Mr. Byrne was vice president and superintendent of the Texas and Gulf Railway. He was born in Pennsylvania, and had been a resident of Dallas for about five years.
     Funeral services will be held at the family residence, 101 Kings Highway, Sunday afternoon. Interment will be in Oakland Cemetery.
     Surviving are his widow and three step-sons, two sisters and a brother.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 3.
- o o o -

Barthel Funeral
Sunday Afternoon

     Funeral services for Edmund Barthel, who ended his life with a pistol bullet Thursday night, will be held from the Loudermilk chapel Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment will be in Grove Hill cemetery.
     Columbian Lodge, Sons of Hermann, will have charge of the services at the graveside. Pallbearers will be chosen from the membership of the Woodmen of the World, and the Odd Fellows, to which organizations Mr. Barthel belonged.
     Judge T. A. Work held an inquest into the circumstances surrounding Mr. Barthel's death Friday.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -

G. S. Brown Dies.

     George Sherwood Brown, aged fifty-five years, died at St. Paul's sanitarium Friday. Funeral services will be held at the family residence, 2715 McKinney avenue, Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery. Mr. Brown was a native of Ohio, but has been a resident of Dallas for thirty years. He had been connected with the Moroney Hardware Co., for the past twenty-seven years. His widow survives him. Mr. Brown was not only well known in this city, but throughout North Texas, where he traveled for many years.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -

Services for Mrs. Nita Chandler.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Nita Chandler, aged thirty-four years, wife of R. E. Chandler, who died at her home, Friday morning, were held from the family residence, 4303 Travis street, Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Interment was in Cox cemetery.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -

Services for Mrs. Mattie Martin Elliott.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Mattie Martin Elliott, aged thirty-five, who died at her home Friday, were held at the family residence, 715 Hibernia street, Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery. Her husband, G. L. Elliott survives her.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -

Services for Mrs. Mary E. Eddins.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Mary E. Eddins, aged thirty-five, who died at her home Friday, were held at the family residence, 837 Oak Cliff Boulevard at 1:30 o'clock. The remains will be sent to Batarra, Ark., for burial Saturday night by Undertaker Loudermilk.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -

Mrs. Virginia Griffin Dies.

     Mrs. Virginia Griffin, age thirty-five years, died at her home, 3019 Santa Fe avenue, Friday night at 12 o'clock. She was born in Burleson county, Tex., and had been a resident of Dallas for several years. Surviving her are her husband and four children. The remains will be sent to Summerville, Texas, for burial, Saturday evening by Undertaker Charles F. Weiland.

- August 8, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 6.
- o o o -

KILLS ONE,
HURTS ONE
IN FIGHT

_______

One Negro Slain and Another
Wounded in Mill City
Shooting Scrape.

     Angered because two negro men tried to break up a social gathering at his home, Tom Robinson, middle-aged negro, shot and killed Ed Phillips and seriously wounded Oscar Windom. The affray occurred at Mill City, an addition of Dallas to the south.
     According to Robinson's story, the two men came up to his house and tried to "rough house" his party. He warned them to go away, and when they persisted on intruding, he entered his house, secured his revolver and came back, firing from the door. Phillips fell dead with a bullet through his heart. The Windom negro was wounded in the arm and leg. Only three shots were fired.
     Night Chief E. B. Lane, Sergeant Owens and Officers McCullough and Fick answered the call and had no trouble in arresting Robinson, who was carried to the city jail to await the formal charge of murder. Robinson gave a calm account of the affair.
     The body of Phillips was taken in charge by the People's Undertaking company. Windom was sent to the city hospital. He will recover.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Infant Son Dies.

     Funeral services for the nine-months-old son of Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Duncan, who died at the home of his parents in West Dallas, Friday morning at 10 o'clock, were held at the family home, Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment was in West Dallas Cemetery.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 6-7.
- o o o -

UNKNOWN MAN
IS FOUND DEAD
UNDER VIADUCT

     An unidentified white man was found dead under the viaduct, just beyond the railway signal tower, Saturday afternoon. The police are of the opinion that the man died from hemorrhages, as there were several pools of blood near the body, and there were no indications of wounds on the body.
     The remains were taken in charge by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking Co. There was nothing in the man's pockets that could lead to his identity.
     He was about forty-three years of age and wore grey trousers, a blue working shirt, black high top shoes, a brown hat, and black suspenders with a white wavy line in them. He would weight about 135 pounds, and is five feet, six inches in height. He has light red hair and reddish-grey mustache. Apparently, he had just had his hair cut and his face shaven.
     Up to a late hour last night, the police had received no report of any one missing and none who viewed the body at the undertakers knew the man.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

S. R. Trammell Case
To Be Called Monday

     Judge W. L. Crawford, Jr., of criminal district court No. 2, Monday morning, will call for trial, the case against S. R. Trammell, charged by indictment with the murder of Patrolman Jesse Wright. The killing occurred several weeks ago at the Southland Pharmacy, Main and Murphy streets. Defendant's plea will be self-defense. He will be represented by Attorney Robert B. Allen and Williams & Williams. County Attorney Currie McCutcheon will have charge of the prosecution. He will be assisted by Chief Assistant Charles A. Pippen.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

Mrs. T. H. Anderson Dies.

     Mrs. T. H. Anderson, age forty-three years, died at her home, 2307 North Carroll avenue, Saturday afternoon. Mrs. Anderson was born at Cedar Hill, Tex., December 30, 1871, and had been a resident of Dallas for ten months. The body will be sent to Cedar Hill for burial Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock by Ed C. Smith & Bro., undertakers. She is survived by her husband.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 2.
- o o o -

Services For J. T. Byrne.

     Funeral services for J. T. Byrne will be held at the family residence, 101 King's Highway, Oak Cliff, Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, Father Harrington officiating.
     Mr. Byrne was born in Pittsburg, Pa., Feb. 26, 1863, and had been a resident of Dallas for about five years. He was vice president and superintendent of the Santa Fe railway. Surviving are his widow, three step-sons, one brother and two sisters. Mr. Byrne died in a sanitarium in Temple, Texas, Friday night.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 1.
- o o o -

Funeral Today of
Edmund Barthel

     Funeral services for Edmund Barthel, age fifty-two years, who died at his home, 2804 Gould street, Thursday, will be held at Loudermilk's chapel, Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Rev. Mr. Stumpf of Lancaster will officiate. Columbian Lodge No. 66, O. D. H. S., of which Mr. Barthel was an honor member, will have charge of the services at the cemetery. He was also a member of the Woodmen of the World and the Odd Fellows.
     The honorary pallbearers will be Frank K. Boohle, W. G. Schliepake, L. B. Howell, John Lott, R. P. Henry Sr. and Frank Winniford, Julius Baumann, Alfred Pachman, John Hamilton, John McCullum, Carl White and Ross Howell will serve as active pallbearers. Interment will take place in Oakland Cemetery. It will be an automobile funeral.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 3.
- o o o -

Are Holding Remains.

     The body of Charles B. Smith, aged twenty-five years, who died at St. Paul's Sanitarium Friday night, are being held in the parlors of George W. Loudermilk's undertaking establishment, pending instructions from his parents at Edinburg, Miss.
     Mr. Smith had been a resident of Dallas county for several years and was a member of India Camp, No. 960, W. O. W.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 3.
- o o o -

Remains Sent to Former Home.

     The remains of Mrs. Mary E. Eddins, who died at her home, 837 Oak Cliff Boulevard, Friday, were sent to Batarra, Ark., Saturday by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk for burial.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 3.
- o o o -

FUNERAL NOTICE.

BARTHEL -- Edmund Barthel died August 6 at his home, 2804 Gould street, aged fifty-two years. Funeral services at Loudermilk's chapel this (Sunday) afternoon at 3 o'clock, Rev. Mr. Stumpf officiating. Columbian Lodge No. 66, O. D. H. S., will have service at Oakland Cemetery, where burial occurs. Automobile funeral.

- August 9, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 10, col. 1.
- o o o -



 Man Found Dead
Not Yet Identified

     Although a number of people visited the morgue of the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company Saturday, Sunday and Monday, in an effort to identify the man found dead Saturday afternoon under the viaduct, none was able to give any definite information concerning him. Several were of the opinion that they had seen him in the city recently, but knew nothing of him personally. The body will be held for several days in order that others can have an opportunity to view it.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 7.
- o o o -

Rumors of Investigation.

     Rumors of another grand jury investigation regarding the death of Miss Florence Brown, more than a year ago, were heard Monday at the court house. Miss Brown was murdered at a real estate office on Field street. Three grand juries have investigated, but no bill has ever been returned.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 4.
- o o o -

CARD OF THANKS

     Thanks to all friends who stood by us in the hours of sorrow with their sympathy; especially to Reverend Spence of Lancaster for his consoling words; the orders of the Woodmen, Odd Fellows, Sons of Hermann in their united efforts. Ida Barthel and Son and Mrs. Botschon.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 1.
- o o o -

Charge of Murder
Formally Filed

     Formal charge of murder was filed Monday morning with the county attorney against Tom Robertson, negro. It is alleged he killed Ed Phillips, another negro, last Saturday night at Mill City. In the fight, another negro was probably dangerously wounded.
     The charge against the defendant was filed by Officer Frank Scott before Assistant County Attorney Frank Harmon. A preliminary hearing will be held next Thursday in Justice Leslie Stewart's court. The grand jury, Monday, began an investigation of the case.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 5.
- o o o -

Negro Dies in Jail.

     Silas Scater, negro, held at the county jail on a charge of insanity, died Monday morning in his cell at the bastille. Deceased had been in jail since the early part of July.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 5.
- o o o -

ALBERT WEBER
PIONEER RESIDENT
DIED MONDAY

     Albert Weber, about sixty years of age, died at his home, 1009 Marion street, Monday morning at 6:30 o'clock. Funeral services will be conducted at the family residence Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock by Dr. William Greenburg. Interment will be in Emanu-El Cemetery.
     Mr. Weber was born in Germany, and had been a resident of Dallas for forty-two years, moving here in 1872. He was a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor. He was also a member of the local I. O. B. B., having been a member for forty years. For twenty-seven years, he was secretary of the latter order.
     Surviving are his widow and three children -- Sol and Bertha Weber of Dallas and Mose Weber of Fort Worth. Five grandchildren also survive him.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 7.
- o o o -

Body Sent to Old Home.

     The body of Charles Smith, age twenty-five years, who died Friday night, will be sent to Edinburg, Miss., Monday night by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk. Mr. Smith was a resident of Dallas county for some time, and was a member of the India camp No. 960, W. O. W.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 7.
- o o o -

Lue Soloman Herring Dies.

     Lue Soloman Herring, aged thirteen years, died at the Baptist sanitarium Sunday night at 8:30 o'clock. The body was sent to Turney for burial Monday morning at 7 o'clock by Undertaker Charles F. Weiland.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

Services For Edmund Barthel.

     Funeral services for Edmund Barthel were held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock at Loudermilk's chapel, Rev. C. H. Spence, past of the Presbyterian church of Lancaster and a personal friend, conducting the services. Columbia Lodge No. 66, Sons of Hermann, conducted services at the grave. Interment was in Oakland cemetery.
     Frank K. Boehle, W. G. Schllepake, L. B. Howell, John Lott, R. P. Henry Sr. and Frank Winniford, were honorary pallbearers, and Julius Baumann, Alfred Pachmann, John Hamilton, John McCullum, Carl White and Ross Howell were the active pallbearers.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

Services for Edmund Barthel.

     Funeral services for Edmund Barthel were held Sunday afternoon at 8 o'clock at Loudermilk's chapel, Rev. C. H. Spence, pastor of the Presbyterian church of Lancaster and a personal friend, conducting the services. Columbia Lodge No. 66, Sons of Hermann, conducted the services at the grave. Interment was in Oakland cemetery.
     Frank K. Boehle, W. G. Schllepake, L. B. Howell, John Lott, R. P. Henry Sr., and Frank Winniford were honorary pallbearers, and Julius Baumann, Alfred Pachmann, John Hamilton, John McCullum, Carl White and Ross Howell were the active pallbearers.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

Mrs. Louisa Christina Carretti Dies.

     Mrs. Louisa Christina Carretti, age sixty-two years, died at her home, 613 Center street, Sunday morning. She had been a resident of Dallas for the past ten years. Surviving her are her three children, Edward, Edith and Theresa. Funeral services were held at St. Joseph's Church Monday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, Rev. Father Platte officiating. Interment was in Calvary cemetery.

- August 10, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

CARBOLIC ACID
PROVES FATAL TO
CLARENCE MOSS

     Clarence Moss, the young man who drank park of the contents of a three-ounce bottle of carbolic acid, died about 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at 1509 Grand avenue from the effects of the poison. The body was taken in charge by Undertaker Loudermilk and is being held pending funeral arrangements.
     No one was at home at the time, and the first intimation that anything was wrong, was when neighbors next door heard groans coming from the house at 1509 Grand avenue. An investigation resulted in the finding of Moss in an unconscious condition.
     A note, which was sealed and addressed to Mrs. Moss, was found. The contents of this note are not known.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -


POLICE LOCK
UP SUSPECT IN
KILLING CASE

     Pedro Gonzales, alleged by the police to be the slayer of Pedro Vasquez, Mexican, who was killed on the night of July 7, in a hotel near the Union Depot, has been arrested in Austin, Texas.
     Chief of Detectives Henry Tanner was notified by the Austin police of the capture by the long distance telephone Tuesday morning. He will leave to bring the man back to Dallas Tuesday evening.
     Vasquez was butchered while he slept, by his roommate, who after taking his watch and money, jumped through a window to an alley beneath, and escaped. Police alleged that Gonzales accompanied Vasquez from Austin to Dallas for the purpose of killing him and getting his money. Austin is Gonzales' home.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 6.
- o o o -

Thomas Bennett Dies.

     Thomas Bennett, aged fifty-five years, a local telegraph operator, died at St. Paul's sanitarium, Tuesday noon. Funeral services will be held from the chapel of the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking establishment Wednesday. Interment will take place in Grove Hill cemetery. Mr. Bennett had been in the employ of the Western Union Telegraph company for a number of years.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 5.
- o o o -

CARBOLIC ACID
POISON MAY
CAUSE DEATH

     Clarence Moss, about twenty-nine years of age, is reported in a serious condition Tuesday afternoon at 1509 Grand avenue, from the effects of carbolic acid. It is said the young man drank a portion of the contents of a three-ounce bottle. He was living with an uncle, but there was no one at home when he took the acid. Neighbors heard his groans about 12:30 o'clock and rushed to his aid. He is unconscious. He left a note. He is being attended by Dr. Roelkey, and his condition is reported critical.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 6.
- o o o -

Henry Mayer Dies.

     Henry Mayer, age twenty-one years, died at his home, 3901 Cleveland avenue, Tuesday morning. Funeral services will be held at the family residence Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery. Mr. Mayer was born in Dallas Jan. 8, 1893, and is survived by his parents.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 6.
- o o o -

CAN'T LOCATE
RELATIVES OF
MAN FOUND DEAD

     Interns at the City Hospital identified the white man who was found dead beneath the viaduct Saturday afternoon as James Walker, of Wilson, Ok.
     It was stated by the internes that the man had appeared at the emergency hospital for treatment for his hemorrhages a few days previous to his death. He was transferred to the city hospital, where he remained but two days. Here, he gave his name and address. He stated that he was a single man and had been in Dallas one day.
     A Mexican passing under the viaduct Saturday afternoon, found Walker almost unconscious from loss of blood. He reported his find to the keeper of the signal tower near the viaduct. Henninger-Brewer Co., Undertakers, were notified and when they arrived, he was dead.
     The doctors who had attended Walker at the city hospital, saw of his death in the papers and identified him at the morgue.
     George Brewer, of the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking Co., wired the mayor and chief of police at Wilson, in an effort to locate relatives of the dead man, but had received no information Tuesday morning.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 7.
- o o o -

DIES AT AGE OF SIXTY YEARS.
________

Funeral Services for Albert Weber, a
Pioneer Citizen of Dallas, Will Be
Held from Residence Today.

     Albert Weber, aged 60 years, a pioneer citizen of Dallas, died yesterday morning at his home, 1009 Marion street. The funeral will be held from the residence at 4 o'clock this afternoon, Rev. W. H. Greenberg officiating. The burial will be in Emanu-el Cemetery. The pallbearers will be E. M. Kahn, H. L. Sheline, A. Gardner, L. Phillipson, Ben Goldbaum and Louis Kleinman.
     Mr. Weber, who was a native of Germany, settled in Dallas in 1872. He is survived by his wife, and three children, Sol Weber and Miss Bertha Weber of Dallas, and Moses Weber of Fort Worth. He was a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor, and of the I. O. B. B. He had been a member of the latter order forty years, and had served as secretary twenty-seven years.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Morning News, p. 10, col. 2.
- o o o -

ERNEST LEVLON
WANTS HEARING FOR RELEASE

     Deputy Sheriff George Preston returned Tuesday from Shreveport, La., having in charge, Ernest Levlon, wanted here on a charge of complicity in the murder of Foster P. Crumes. Tuesday morning, Attorney H. Bascom Thomas filed a writ for a habeas corpus hearing in Judge Crawford's court. The hearing will take place Wednesday morning.
     The killing of Crumes occurred more than a year ago in a little stand he conducted near the White Rock reservoir. He was shot to death.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 2.
- o o o -


NECROLOGICAL.

Remains Sent to Old Home.

     The remains of Charles Smith, who died Thursday, were sent to Edinburg, Miss., Monday night, by Undertaker Loudermilk.

Mrs. Ida H. Marquart Dies.

     Mrs. Ida H. Marquart, age twenty-seven years, died in Fort Worth Monday evening. The body was received in Dallas Tuesday afternoon at 12:50 o'clock by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk. The funeral services were held at the Interurban station, Rev. J. O. Shelburne officiating. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. Mrs. Marquart was formerly Miss Ida Bozzell.

Services of Albert Weber.

     Funeral services for Albert Weber, age about sixty years, Dallas pioneer, who died at his home, 1009 Marion street, Monday morning, will be held from the family residence Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Rev. W. H. Greenburg officiating. Interment will be in Emanu-El cemetery. The pall bearers will be E. M. Kahn, H. L. Sheline, A. Gardner, L. Philipson, Ben Goldbaum and Louis Kleinman.
     Mr. Weber was a resident of Dallas for forty-two years and is survived by his widow, two sons, and a daughter. He was a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor and I. O. B. B. He was a member of the latter order for forty years, twenty-seven of the time, being its secretary.

- August 11, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
p. 11, col. 2.
- o o o -




BODY OF MAUS
WILL BE BURIED
IN MISSOURI

     Clarence P. Maus, age twenty-seven years, died at the home of W. A. Vaughan, 1509 Grand avenue, Tuesday afternoon at 2:20 o'clock, from the effects of carbolic acid.
     Mr. Maus, who was employed at the Walk-Over Boot Shop, left the place Tuesday morning at about 8:30 o'clock, saying he had some business to attend to. He obtained the key to his brother-in-law's home from a neighbor, and about 12:30 o'clock, Mrs. Lawrence Sommers, 1507 Grand avenue, was disturbed by groans coming from the Vaughan house. She went to the home of Charlie Haupt to get the key, which the Vaughan family had left while on a camping trip. Here, she discovered that Mr. Maus had secured the key some time before. Accompanied by Mr. Haupt, she went to the Vaughan home. They found Mr. Maus in a front bedroom in an unconscious condition. Near him, was a bottle labeled poison. Dr. F. D. Roelkey was summoned and worked with the young man until his death.
     Mrs. Maus has been sick in bed for some time.
     The body of Clarence P. Maus will be sent to Schell City, Mo., for burial Wednesday evening by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk.

- August 12, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Judge T. E. Conn
Dies at Hospital

     Thomas E. Conn, for many years a resident of Dallas county, a native of Virginia, and commonly known as Judge Conn, died Tuesday afternoon at the city hospital. Deceased was, at one time, one of the most prominent members of the Dallas bar. Declining health, however, caused him to retire from active practice.
     No funeral arrangements have yet been made. The only relative known to live in Texas is a stepson. He has not been located. Until further arrangements are made, the body will be held by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company.

- August 12, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Services for Albert Weber.

     Funeral services for Albert Weber, aged sixty years, who died at his home, 1009 Marion street, Monday, were held at the family residence Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Rev. William H. Greenburg officiating. Interment was in Emanu-Elm cemetery.
     The pallbearers were E. M. Kahn, H. L. Sheline, A. W. Gardner, L. Phillipson, Ben Goldbaum and Sam Levy.

- August 12, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Services for Henry Mayer.

     Funeral services for Henry Mayer, aged twenty-one years, who died at his home, 3901 Cleveland street Tuesday, were held at the family residence Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery. Mr. Mayer is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Mayer.

- August 12, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Services For James Walker.

     Funeral services for James Walker, who was found dead under the viaduct Saturday afternoon, will be held at the chapel of the Henninger-Brewer undertaking establishment Thursday noon, Rev. Father Donahue officiating. Interment will be in Grove Hill cemetery.
Relatives of the man, believed to be in Wilson, Okla., could not be located.

- August 12, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 5.
- o o o -

Mrs. Elisa Wilkins
Died Wednesday

     Mrs. Elisa Wilkins, aged seventy years, died at her home, 2005 Masten street, Wednesday morning at 6:30 o'clock.
     Mrs. Wilkins was born in Bremen, Germany, and had been a resident of Dallas for the past forty years. She had also resided in New Orleans for a number of years before she moved to Dallas.
     Surviving her are three daughters, Mrs. August Zapffe of Milwaukee, Wis., Mrs. John Selcraig, and Miss Kate Wilkins of Dallas, and three sons, Fred, George and John Wilkins of Dallas.
     Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

- August 12, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 6.
- o o o -

Infant Son Dies.

     The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Vaughn died at the family residence, 925 Dale street, Wednesday morning. The body will be sent to [Gilmer], Tex., for burial Wednesday night by Undertakers Ed C. Smith & Bro.

- August 12, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 6.
- o o o -

James A. Wright Dies.

     James A. Wright, aged sixty-five, died at Woodlawn hospital Thursday morning. The remains are being held at the Henninger-Brewer undertaking establishment pending funeral arrangements.

- August 13, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -


NECROLOGICAL.

Funeral Services For Mrs. Wilkins.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Elisa Wilkins, age seventy years, who died at her home, 2005 Masten street, Wednesday morning, will be held at the family residence, Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Rev. L. M. Waterman officiating. Interment will take place in Greenwood cemetery.
     Mrs. Wilkins was born in Germany and had been a resident of Dallas for the past forty years. She is survived by her three daughters and three sons.

Services Held For Thomas Bennett.

     Funeral services for Thomas Bennett, aged fifty-five years, who died at St. Paul's sanitarium Tuesday, were held at Henninger-Brewer's chapel Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery.

Body Is Sent to Missouri.

     The body of Clarence P. Maus, who died Tuesday, was sent to Schell, Mo., for burial Wednesday night by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk. A brother, A. H. Maus, and Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Bond accompanied the remains.

Services For James Walker.

     Funeral services for James Walker, who was found dead beneath the Oak Cliff viaduct Saturday afternoon, were held at St. Patrick's church Tuesday noon, Rev. Father Donohoe officiating. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery.

Infant's Body Sent to Gilmer.

     The body of the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Vaughn, who died Wednesday afternoon, was sent to Gilmer, Tex., for burial Wednesday night by Undertakers Ed C. Smith & Bro.

- August 13, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 14, col. 6.
- o o o -


W. F. Ramsey Dies.

     W. F. Ramsey, aged about thirty years, died at the Baptist Sanitarium Wednesday evening. Mr. Ramsey was the son of H. M. Ramsey, prominent banker of Joplin, Mo., and traveled for a St. Louis firm, in the Southwest. The remains will be sent to Joplin, his old home, Thursday evening at 8:30 o'clock by Undertakers, Palmer, O'Connor & Weisenant.

- August 13, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 14, col. 6.
- o o o -

J. B. Nolan Dies at
Denver, Colorado

     J. B. Nolan, aged forty-three years, died at Denver, Colo., Thursday. The body will be received in Dallas by the Charles F. Weiland Undertaking Company, Friday evening. Mr. Nolan was a telegraph operator in the employ of the Mackey Telegraph company, and had gone to Colorado to recuperate from a breakdown he suffered about two months ago. He resided at 1005 St. Louis street and is survived by his widow, two sons, John and Edwin Nolan, and a daughter, Miss Louise Nolan.
     Funeral services will be held at the family residence Saturday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, and at St. Patrick's Church at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakland cemetery.
     James Corle, O. W. Bodell, William Byrd, W. H. Winkle, Sam Wallick and W. S. Dillon will act as pallbearers.

- August 14, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 2.
- o o o -

Body Is Sent to Alvarado.

     The body of James A. Wright, aged sixty-seven years, who died at Woodlawn hospital Thursday afternoon, was sent to Alvarado Friday morning for burial by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company.

- August 14, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 2.
- o o o -

Services For Mrs. Elisa Wilkins.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Elisa Wilkins will be held at the family residence Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Rev. L. M. Waterman officiating. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.
     Mrs. Wilkins was seventy years of age and one of the old settlers in the city.

- August 14, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 2.
- o o o -

Body Is Sent to Joplin.

     The body of W. F. Ramsey, who died at the Baptist sanitarium Wednesday evening, was sent to Joplin, Mo., for burial Thursday evening by Undertakers Palmer, O'Connor & Whisnant. Mr. Ramsey was thirty years of age and was the son of H. M. Ramsey of Joplin.

- August 14, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 2.
- o o o -

Miss Sarah Allen Dies.

     Miss Sarah Allen, aged sixty-five years, died at her home, 108 East Ninth street, Thursday night. Funeral services were held at the residence Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock, Rev. E. R. Barcus officiating. Interment was in Oak Cliff cemetery. The pallbearers were M. M. Garrett, L. Z. Skaden, C. E. Carter, Cleftine Lively, Rufus High and Edward Lively.
     Miss Allen is survived by two brothers, C. M. Allen of El Paso, and Ashbury Allen of Rome, Ga., and two sisters, Mrs. B. F. C. Loughridge of Ardmore, Okla., and Miss Callie Allen of Dallas. She was a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor and of St. Luke's Methodist church of Oak Cliff.

- August 14, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 2.
- o o o -

Shooting Victim
To Be Buried Here

     Benjamin Greer, the Dallas man who was shot and killed in St. Louis, Wednesday night, will be buried in Dallas next week.
     Mrs. W. J. Brady, of 3604 Cedar Springs avenue, received a telegram Friday night, announcing that Benjamin Greer, her brother, had died. He was shot through the abdomen and lived for some hours.
     R. F. Greer, of Gotebo, Okla., has left for St. Louis and will bring the body of his son back to Dallas for interment. Mrs. Brady says that her brother left Dallas for Mineral Wells a few weeks ago. She did not know that he was in St. Louis.
     Besides Mrs. Brady, Greer has another sister, Mrs. J. J. O'Reilly, Swiss and Cantegral, and a brother, L. R.[?] Greer, living in Dallas. His father, R. F. Greer, who had lived in Dallas for fifteen years, left here a few weeks ago to make his home in Gotebo, Ok.

- August 15, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Theodore Lambert
Claimed by Death

     Theodore Lambert, age twenty-three years, died at the home of his brother, John D. Lambert, 3708 Worth street, Saturday morning at 9 o'clock. Funeral services will be held at the residence of his brother, Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Rev. Henry Alfred Porter officiating. The remains will be sent to Kaufman, Texas, for burial Saturday evening at 6:20 o'clock.
     Mr. Lambert had been a resident of Dallas for some time and is survived by his brother, John D. Lambert, and Frank, Carl and Ernest Lambert of Kaufman.

- August 15, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 5.
- o o o -

Services for Mrs. Eliza Wilkins.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Eliza Wilkins, who died Wednesday, were held at the family residence, 2005 Masten street, Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Rev. L. M. Waterman officiating. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery.

- August 15, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 5.
- o o o -

Services for J. B. Nolan.

     Funeral services for J. B. Nolan, age forty-three y ears, who died at Denver, Colo., Thursday, were held at the family residence Saturday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock and at St. Patrick's church at 4 o'clock. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. James Coyle, A. W. Bodell, William Byrd, A. H. Winkler, Samuel Wallick and W. S. Dillon acted as pallbearers.
     Mr. Nolan was a local telegraph operator and is survived by his wife and two sons and one daughter.

- August 15, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 5.
- o o o -

MEXICAN MEETS
DEATH UNDER
TRAIN WHEELS

     Ygnacio DeLeon, a Mexican laborer, about twenty-six years of age, was run down by a Santa Fe freight train, Friday afternoon at 5 o'clock and fatally injured. The man was taken from the Santa Fe crossing and Chestnut street, where the accident occurred, to St. Paul's Sanitarium in Charles F. Weiland's ambulance. He died as a result of his injuries about an hour after the accident. The body is being held at the Henninger-Brewer undertaking establishment pending funeral arrangements.
     DeLeon was a member of a special Frisco work crew and resided in a work car situated near the Santa Fe yards.

- August 15, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 7.
- o o o -

Funeral Today of
Accident Victim

      Funeral services for Ygnacio DeLeon will be held at the chapel of the Henninger-Brewer undertaking establishment, Sunday. DeLeon was a member of a special work crew on the Santa Fe Railway and was run down by a freight at the Chestnut street crossing, Friday evening. He died about an hour later, from his injuries, at St. Paul's sanitarium.

- August 16, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

TWO WOMEN
ARE SHOT;
ONE DEAD

______

Negro Gunman Wiped Out
Family in Shooting Affray
On Gibson Street.

     Jesse W. Coleman, negro, who according to the police, came here from Oklahoma last week with the avowed intention of "cleaning up" with his relatives, left a trail of death behind him at their home, 2121 Gibson street, Saturday night.
     Five shots from a cheap pistol killed his mother-in-law, Ellen Johnson, and mortally wounded Savannah Coleman. After the shooting, Coleman walked up the street and gave himself up to the officers who answered the shooting call. "I wish you would kill me," he pleaded to them.
     Shortly after 8 o'clock, Night Desk Sergeant W. C. Brasher was notified of the shooting. Night Chief Lane and Officers Erwin and Roddy went to the place at once. On Harwood, near Marilla, they caught Coleman, who was walking up the street with a pistol in his hand.
     "I guess I am the nigger you want. I wish you would kill me," he said as he handed over his weapon.
     Going further, the officers entered the Coleman house. They found Savannah Johnson bleeding from four pistol bullet wounds in her stomach, neck, hip and shoulder. Ellen Johnson was unconscious from a bullet hole through her stomach. She was a woman sixty years old and died before an ambulance could be summoned to take her to the hospital.
     Savannah Coleman, twenty-six years old, was still living at the city hospital at a late hour Saturday night. Doctors say that she will die, however.
     Coleman, when questioned at the police station, stated that he had come to Dallas from Oklahoma to find his wife was living with her mother-in-law. He said that she left him some weeks ago. The man was put in the county jail facing charges of murder.

- August 16, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. I, p. 1, col. 5; continued on p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Services Held For Theodore Lambert.

     Funeral services for Theodore Lambert, age twenty-three years, who died Saturday morning at the home of his brother, John D. Lambert, 3703 Worth street, were held at his brother's home, Saturday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Rev. Henry Alford Porter officiating. The remains were sent to Kaufman for burial Saturday evening at 6:20 o'clock by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk. Mr. Lambert is survived by his four brothers.

- August 16, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

CARD OF THANKS

     WE WANT to thank all of our friends for the many kindnesses extended us during the illness and death of our mother, Mrs. Elisa Wilkins. The Family.

- August 16, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 10, col. 1.
- o o o -

E. L. TAPP DIES
AS RESULT OF
ACID POISONING

     E. L. Tapp, thirty-eight years old, was found in a dying condition Sunday afternoon at his home, 2107 Bryan street, as the result of carbolic acid poisoning.
     Dr. Carr, at the emergency hospital, was notified and answered the call with the city ambulance. On his arrival at the Tapp home, he found that other physicians had been summoned, and that the man was beyond medical aid.
     The body was taken in charge by Ed. C. Smith Undertaking Co., where it is being held pending funeral arrangements. E. L. Tapp came to Dallas from Kentucky two years ago. He is survived by his widow and a brother and sister.
     Despondency is the only cause advanced by friends for the act of Mr. Tapp. Mr. Tapp was a switchman by occupation, but was not employed at the present time.

- August 17, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Mrs. Jessie Eastwood Dies.

     Mrs. Jessie Eastwood died at Woodlawn hospital Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. Mrs. Eastwood resided at the Freeman Bros.' dairy, about eight miles north of the city, and is survived by her husband and one son. The body will be taken to Wheatland for burial Monday afternoon, by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company.

- August 17, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

W. E. Perry Dies.

     W. E. Perry, age thirty-five years, died at Woodlawn hospital Sunday night at 8:20 o'clock. He was a United States soldier and is survived by his mother, Mrs. Sally C. May, 1719 Cockrell street. The remains are being held at the Henninger-Brewer undertaking establishment, pending funeral arrangements.

- August 17, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Artie Johnson Dies.

     Artie Johnson, age twenty years, died at St. Paul's Sanitarium Monday morning at 3:40 o'clock. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Johnson, and was born in Denver, Colo. He had been a resident of Dallas for several years. Funeral services will be held at the family residence, 713 Cantegral street, Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Rev. J. O. Shelburne officiating. Interment will take place in Greenwood cemetery.

- August 17, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

DALLAS MAN WHO
WAS SHOT WILL
BE BURIED HERE

     The body of Benjamin [Greer], the young Dallas man who died last week in St. Louis from a pistol bullet wound received in a rather mysterious manner, will arrive in Dallas at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday evening on the Katy. The body will be received by the Weiland Undertaking company and taken to the family home, 2015 Orleans street. The remains will be accompanied to Dallas by R. E. Greer, father of the young man, who hurried to St. Louis as soon as he received news of the fatal shooting of his son.
     The funeral will be held at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the family home, followed by interment in Oakland cemetery. The services will be under the auspices of the Odd Fellows and Woodmen, of which organizations the father is a member. Young Greer was only twenty years of age. He was well known in Dallas.

- August 18, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Letter Carriers
Adopt Resolutions

     At a recent meeting of Lone Star Branch No. 133, National Association of Letter Carriers, resolutions were adopted relating to recent deaths in the families of three members of the association. The resolutions were prepared by a committee composed of J. W. Prather, W. W. McLellan and Sam Hedpold. Among the resolutions was one offered to E. W. Scott, a member who lost two young daughters at one time when his home on Cedar Springs road, just north of the city limits, was destroyed by fire. Mrs. Scott was also seriously burned at the same time in an effort to save her children. One of the resolutions of sympathy was addressed to E. A. Lowery, who recently lost his wife, and the other was to C. H. Garvin, president of the local association, whose wife also died recently.

- August 18, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

NEGRO SLAYER
IS ARRESTED
BY OFFICERS

_______

Quick Work on Part of Police
Results in Capture of the
Slayer of Ed Blaylock.

     Adolph Parchman, nineteen years old, a negro, is held in the county jail on charges of murder, following the shooting of Edward Blaylock, a fruit peddler, Monday afternoon.
     Evading a man hunt, which started immediately after the killing, Parchman hid under a negro house on State street. After dark, he crawled out and attempted to make a run for safety. Quick work on the part of the police resulted in his arrest, however. He was pulled off a North Belt car by the officers.

Shot Through Heart.
     Edward Blaylock was shot and killed by the negro because he resented the man stealing apples from his wagon The killing took place at Washington and Watt streets at 5 o'clock Monday evening.
     Blaylock was standing near his wagon when the negro passed by and took an apple. Blaylock told the negro to put the apple back. The man drew a pistol and shot point blank at the peddler, the bullet penetrating his heart. Blaylock fell dying to the sidewalk and the negro took to his heels.

Citizens Chased Negro.
     J. P. Holcomb, 3803 Watt street, saw Blaylock shot down. He was standing on his front porch at the time. Mr. Holcomb stepped into his house and got his shot gun. The negro was within range and he took aim at him as he ran. He was unable to shoot because some children got in the line of fire.
     Holcomb gave chase, however, and called on others to follow. Several men ran the negro up State street, where he vanished. Chief Ryan and a party of officers went to the scene, but they could find no trace of the man.
     Parchman had crawled under a house on State street and lay concealed, while the officers passed within a few feet of him. At about 8:30 o'clock, he crawled out. A couple of men saw h im and watched him board a North Belt car. They telephoned the police station.
     Leslie Dooley took Chief Ryan, Night Chief Lane and Officers Roddy and Askins in his automobile and managed to head off the North Belt car at Haskell and Ross avenues. Parchman, who was standing on the back platform, gave himself up without resistance.

Negro Admits Killing.
     The negro admitted that he had killed Blaylock. He claimed that Blaylock had struck him when he took an apple from his wagon. He says that he hid under a house and took the street car in order to reach his sister's house in East Dallas.
     The body of Edward Blaylock was taken in charge by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking Company. It is held, pending funeral arrangements. Blaylock had lived in Dallas some years, his home being at Santa Fe and Corinth streets. He was about forty years old and is survived by his widow and a brother.
     Through good work on the part of Chief of Detectives Henry Tanner, the two young negroes said to have been with the negro who did the killing, were located Tuesday. They are being held as witnesses. The boys are John Harvey, aged fifteen years, and Tommie Savannah, aged thirteen. They are in charge of juvenile court authorities.

- August 18, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 5-6.
- o o o -

Remains Sent to Kentucky.

     The remains of F. L. Tapp, who died at his home, 2107 Bryan street, Sunday morning, will be sent to Slaughter, Ky., Tuesday night by Undertakers Ed C. Smith & Bros. for burial.

- August 18, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 3.
- o o o -

John Barrett Dies.

     John Barrett, aged fifty-five years, died at St. Paul's sanitarium Monday afternoon. The body is being held at the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking establishment pending funeral arrangements.

- August 18, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 5.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.

Infant Son Dies.

     The infant son of W. B. and Lee C. Powers died at the home of his parents, corner of Waverly and Watt streets, Monday. Funeral services were held at the family residence Monday afternoon at 6 o'clock. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery.

Mrs. O. B. Wiley Dies.

     Mrs. O. B. Wiley, age twenty years, died at her home, 1318 Caldwell street, Monday afternoon. Funeral services were held at the family residence Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery. She is survived by her husband, H. G. Wiley.
     Mrs. Wiley was born in Whitewright, and had been a resident of Dallas for the past three years.

Dana M. Gibson Dies.

     Dana M. Gibson, aged twenty-three years, died at his home, 1408 Corinth street, Monday night at 11:45 o'clock. The body will be sent to Hillsboro for burial Wednesday by Undertaker Geo. W. Loudermilk. Mr. Gibson is survived by his mother, Mrs. Nancy Edmondson of Tupele [Tupelo?], Tex., and two brothers, J. C. and D. E. Gibson, of Dallas.

Services Held For Artie Johnson.

     Funeral services for Artie Johnson, aged twenty years, who died at St. Paul's sanitarium Monday morning, were held from the family residence, 713 Cantegral street, Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery.

- August 18, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
p. 12, col. 6.
- o o o -



FATHER SAYS
ROBBERS SLEW
DALLAS BOY

     The body of Benjamin Greer, the Dallas boy, who was shot and killed in St. Louis last week, arrived here for burial Wednesday morning. It was received by the Charles F. Weiland Undertaking company and services were held from the family residence, 2015 Orleans street, Wednesday afternoon to Grove Hill cemetery. Rev. Dr. Marshall officiated.
     Accompanying the body of his son, was R. F. Greer, formerly of Dallas, but lately of Tulsa, Okla. Mr. Greer went to St. Louis when notified of the tragedy. He declares that his boy was attacked and killed by highway robbers, who knew that he had some money on his person. He says the lad was planning to visit him in Oklahoma at the time of his death. R. F. Greer is an oil man. His son was only twenty years old when he was killed. A Dallas man is held by the St. Louis police in connection with the killing.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Mrs. Artie A. Ackermann Dies.

     Mrs. Artie A. Ackerman of Ennis died at St. Paul's sanitarium, Tuesday. The body was sent to Cleburne for burial Wednesday morning at 7:06 o'clock by Undertaker Loudermilk. Mrs. Ackermann was fifty-two years of age. She is survived by her husband, L. F. Ackerman, and two step-children. She was the daughter of Capt. John H. Smith, who, during his life, was one of the prominent men of Cleburne.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

RAILROAD MAN
FOUND DYING
IN THE STREET

     John H. Burns, thirty-eight years old, was found unconscious in the street at Griffin and Caruth by Officer McClure late Tuesday night. He died at the emergency hospital an hour later.
     For some time, the man was not identified, but finally, Mrs. J. H. Burns, 2121 Masten street, identified him as her husband. She told doctors at the hospital that her husband had been in ill health for some weeks, and had only that evening been treated by a doctor, who gave him medicine.
     Suddenly, he seemed to have gone out of his mind, for he demanded his insurance papers and bank book, rushed out of the house, climbed the back fence and ran down Masten street. He did not even stop to put on his shoes, so Mrs. Burns said.
     Mrs. Burns, and a friend, ran after the man, but he soon outdistanced them, and was lost in the darkness. She was notified of her husband's death and went to the hospital.
     The body was sent to the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company's establishment. The body will be sent to Rector, Arkansas, for interment. Mr. Burns was a car inspector in the employ of the Katy railway.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -



 

Mrs. Freda Tholl
Claimed by Death

     Mrs. Freda Tholl, aged forty-two years, died at her home, 2522 Live Oak street, Wednesday morning at 6 o'clock.
     Mrs. Tholl was the widow of the late A. S. Tholl, and was born in Germany. She is survived by her daughter, Sylvia, aged nine years, a sister, Mrs. Fred Laun of St. James, Mo., and two nieces, Mrs. R. W. Beggs and Mrs. Charles Rice of this city.
     Mrs. Tholl was a member of Southland Hive, No. 105, Ladies of the Macabees.
     Funeral services will be announced upon the arrival of her sister, Mrs. Laun, from Missouri. The body is being held in the parlors of Undertaker Loudermilk.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 1.
- o o o -

Emil Heintz Dies.

      Emil Heintz, age thirty-six years, died at his home, 5609 Columbia avenue, Tuesday night at 10:30 o'clock. Mr. Heintz was born in Germany, Aug. 22, 1878, and had been a resident of Dallas for six years. Funeral arrangements will be announced upon the arrival of his two brothers. His mother and four sisters also survive him.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 1.
- o o o -

W. M. Rippey Dies.

     W. M. Rippey, age forty-nine years, died at his home, 3402 Swiss avenue, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. He was a painter and is survived by his widow and several children. The body is being held at the Henninger-Brewer undertaking establishment pending funeral arrangements.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 1.
- o o o -

Services for E. W. Perry.

     Funeral services for E. W. Perry, age thirty-five years, who died at Woodlawn hospital Monday night, were held at the chapel of Henninger-Brewer's undertaking establishment Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, Rev. G. M. Gibson officiating. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. The pallbearers were R. E. Short, T. M. Hawlein[?], R. Harry, George Beutel, R. Henneberg and W. J. Condon.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 1.
- o o o -

CAPT. WEBSTER
PASSES AWAY
IN GERMANY

     Capt. Felix P. Webster, one of the best known cotton factors in the South, died Sunday in Bremen, Germany, according to a cable received by relatives in Dallas Wednesday morning. The sad news was received from Rotterdam, Holland, where the body was taken shortly after Mr. Webster's death. Arrangements have been made by his wife and friends to accompany the body to America on a Holland steamship liner, the first sailing to be Aug. 29. It is expected the funeral will take place in Dallas about Sept. 15.
     Capt. Webster had been in ill health for some time, but lately, he seemed somewhat improved. His death, while not unexpected, was a severe shock to his host of friends in Dallas.
     Capt. Webster was born in Alabama sixty-eight years ago. He came to Texas more than a quarter of a century ago, first settling in Paris. About seventeen years ago, he moved to Dallas. He was connected with the cotton firm of H. L. Edwards & Co. as one of the owners for approximately twenty years.
     He leaves a wife, who was with him at the time of his death, and the following daughters: Mrs. John MacBryde of Sewanee, Tenn., Mrs. W. H. Prather of Dallas and Misses Sarah and Carrie Webster of Dallas.
     Capt. Webster was considered one of the most expert cotton men in the entire South. He was an authority on cotton grades, and he was a deep student of the economic features of the trade. His advice was eagerly sought by cotton men over the country.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

Young Man Who
Was Shot to Death

BENJAMIN GREER

R. F. GREER SAYS
HIS SON WAS
SHOT AND ROBBED

     R. F. Greer, father of Benjamin Greer, twenty year old Dallas boy, who was killed in St. Louis, Thursday, Aug. 13, made the following statement, Thursday morning:
     "I was notified of my boy's death and went to St. Louis immediately. I learned from the internes at the hospital that Ben had been shot Thursday afternoon, August 13, at about 5:30 o'clock. He died in the city hospital at St. Louis, Friday, August 14 at about 6 p. m.
     "I was present at the inquest," said Mr. Greer, "and heard the evidence. Ben arrived in St. Louis with a man who said he was a common laborer. This man swore that he and Ben arrived in St. Louis Thursday afternoon and went in a barber shop. The barber testified that the two men had entered his shop, and for an hour or so, had sat in the shop and talked in undertones. 'Presently,' the barber said, 'the other man jumped to his feet and exclaimed, 'You come across with me white. I've always treated you white.' Ben answered him in low tones and they went to a saloon and purchased some sandwiches and beer, for which Ben paid. They then returned to the barber shop, and the other man went out and purchased a can of beer. The two then went behind the barber ship, into some weeds, a few hundred feet from Winchester avenue.
     "A carpenter, who was in a saloon a few doors from the barber shop, testified that my son came staggering into the saloon a few minutes later and exclaimed that his 'pal' had shot and robbed him. 'How much money did you have on you?' asked the carpenter. Ben told him, $27.50. He also asked the carpenter to telegraph to me. The carpenter called the police. The mounted police had a description of the other man and arrested him some time later. He had a .38 calibre pistol in his right hip pocket, with one chamber exploded, and the others loaded.
     "This man stated to the police that Ben had shot himself. He stated, also, that he had tried to follow Ben, but did not know where he went. This man also said that he went to a saloon after the shooting and bought some tobacco and a drink. He had in his possession, a knife about eight inches long. When asked why he did not summon medical aid for his friend, this man stated that he did not know where Ben had gone.
     "This man was asked by the police if he had not escaped from an Oklahoma penitentiary. He replied that he had, but that he had gone back.
     "A lawyer, who I met on the train, said that this man was wanted in Seminole, Okla., on a murder charge at that time. Ben just had a dollar on him when taken to the hospital. The other man is held in St. Louis pending action on the case by the grand jury."
     The body of Benjamin Greer arrived in Dallas Tuesday night and was received by Undertaker Charles Weiland, and taken to the home, where funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery. Rev. Mr. Marshall officiated at the service.
     Benjamin Greer is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Greer, five brothers and two sisters. He was a well driller by profession and resided at 2015 Orleans street.

- August 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Well Known Man
Who Died Tuesday

E. J. HEINTZE

     Funeral services for E. J. Heintze, who died Tuesday night at the family home, 5609 Columbia avenue, will be held at 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon from the residence. The services will be conducted by Rev. E. M. Roberts and interment will be made in the Oakland cemetery. The death occurred following an illness of some duration.
     Mr. Heintze was born in Shounekan, Germany, on August 24, 1879, and was consequently nearly thirty-five years of age when death came. He had been a resident of Dallas for the past twenty years, and was, for some time, in the employe of the Southwestern Telegraph & Telephone Company as an auditor, working for this company until ill health forced his retirement.
     The deceased was unmarried, but is survived by two brothers, W. F. and P. R. Heintze, and four sisters, Misses Leda, Frieda, Hattie and Eloise, and his mother, all of Dallas. Mr. Heintze was well known, especially among the German-Americans of Dallas, he being a leader in activities of the German organizations of the city.

- August 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 6.
- o o o -

Services for W. M. Rippey.

     Funeral services for W. M. Rippey, aged forty-nine years, who died at his home, 3409 Swiss avenue, Tuesday night, were held at Henninger-Brewer's Chapel, Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock, under the auspices of Painters and Paperhangers' local, No. 53, Rev. Mr. Gainor officiating. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. The pallbearers were Al Edwards, Charles Crews, J. S. Peacock, L. K. Walker, E. S. Smith and Emmett Hauptman. The burial was in Oakland cemetery.

- August 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 6.
- o o o -

Services For Mrs. Tholl.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Freda Tholl, aged forty-two years, will be held at the family residence, Friday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. William M. Anderson officiating. Interment will be in Oakland cemetery.
     Mrs. Tholl is survived by one daughter, Sylvia, aged nine years; two sisters, Mrs. Fred Laun of St. James, Miss., and Mrs. Lovella Slough of St. Louis, who arrived in Dallas Thursday morning. She also leaves two nieces in Dallas, Mrs. R. W. Beggs and Mrs. Charles Rice.

- August 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 6.
- o o o -

George W. Choyce Dies.

     George W. Choyce, age fifty-five years, died at his home in Hutchins, Thursday. He was born in Illinois, and had been a resident of Dallas for many years. Surviving are his five sisters -- Misses Sarah and Nancy Choyce, and Mrs. Ellen Gasnell of Hutchens [Hutchins?], Mrs. Margaret Barrick of Ponca City, Okla., and Mrs. Elizabeth Miller of Dallas, and one brother, James Choyce of Villa Grove, Ill. Funeral services will be held at Hutchins, Friday.

- August 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 6.
- o o o -

Infant Daughter Dies.

     Ora May Whaley, fifteen-months-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Whaley, died at the family residence, 509 South Ewing avenue, Oak Cliff, Thursday morning at 7:30 o'clock. Funeral services will be held at the family residence, Friday morning, at 10 o'clock. Interment will be in Oak Cliff Cemetery.

- August 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 6.
- o o o -

R. W. Ripberger Dies.

     R. W. Ripberger, sixty years old, died at the home of his son-in-law, Frank Krutz, 4520 Columbia avenue, Thursday morning. Mr. Ripberger was born in Indiana in 1854, and had been a resident of Dallas for several years. The funeral will be held from the home, to Grove Hill Cemetery, Friday.

- August 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 6.
- o o o -









Funeral Today of
Samuel G. Brewer

     Funeral services for Samuel Green Brewer, aged sixty-eight years, will be held at his home, 3116 Lemmon avenue, Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery. Rev. M. M. Davis will officiate at the services.
     Mr. Brewer was born in Mt. Meigs, Ala., and had been a resident of Dallas for thirty-three years. He served throughout the war in the Confederate army and was in many of the important engagements. He was a member of the Sterling Price Camp Confederate Veterans.
     Mr. Brewer was intimately connected with the building of the Galveston jetties, and also with the first permanent paving of Elm street and Main street in this city. He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Robert Allen Terrell, a sister, Mrs. F. E. Harry, and a brother, Dr. J. C. Brewer, of Dale, Texas.
     The honorary pallbearers will be selected from among his old friends of Sterling Price Camp, Confederate Veterans. The active pallbearers will be J. E. Lockhart, Richard Bramlett, Dr. W. E. Howard, Dr. Edgar S. Fortner and Howard Cox.

- September 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 6.
- o o o -

Mrs. Felina D. Woods Dies.

     Mrs. Felina D. Woods, aged sixty-two years, died at her home on Philps street, Saturday afternoon. She was born in Polk county, Mo., Nov. 20, 1852, and had been a resident of Dallas since 1865. Surviving are her husband, J. L. Woods, three sons, W. H. and P. R. Woods, and C. J. McClanahan, and a daughter, Miss Mary Lillian Woods. Funeral services will be held at the family residence Sunday at 12 o'clock. Interment will take place in Cox cemetery.

- September 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 6-7.
- o o o -

Mrs. Sarah B. Farley Dies.

     Mrs. Sarah B. Farley, wife of W. W. Farley, died at her home, 2500 Corinth street, Saturday morning. Mrs. Farley was born in Missouri, February 1, 1853, and had been a resident of Dallas since 1882. Funeral services will be held at the family residence, Sunday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakland cemetery.

- September 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 7.
- o o o -

Bart Moran, Engineman for Thirty
Years, Will Be Missed By Many

     In the death of Bart Moran last Wednesday evening at his home, 3924 Simpson street, one of the most unique characters in the annals of Texas railroad history, early and modern, has passed. Born in Joliette, Ill., in 1850, of full blood Irish parents he inherited all the wit and fine sense of honor, characteristic with the race and his close association with humanity, in all its phases, only served to add a higher polish to his heritage.
     He entered the railway service at the age of fourteen years, and during his fifty years' experience, had served through every branch of the mechanical department. His first railroading was done in the North and East, but he came to Texas to seek his fortune early, among the latter contingent of pioneers.
     His first run in this state was out of Houston and made with one of the old wood burning locomotives of early railroad history. With the opening of the Texas & Pacific railroad, he secured an engine on that line, and for thirty-five years, he has handled its trains across the Lone Star state, and for twenty-six years, has rode the engines drawing its fastest and largest passenger trains.

Was Unassuming Man.
     Being of a very modest nature, it was difficult to persuade him to tell his experiences, and then the engineer was always kept well in the back ground. However, there are some things that will not stay under cover. Here are a few:
     Long before the day of the mighty air brake and the great mogul engine, Mr. Moran's train had pulled out of Fort Worth over an hour behind time, and instructions were to pull into Marshall "on the dot." Near where the town of Handley now stands, and while his train was making the limit of trains of those days, Bart saw a baby playing on the track ahead of his train. There was no hope to stop, so he signaled with his whistle for all brakes to be set, and jamming home the throttle, he left his post, and climbing along the running board beside his engine, he made his way down to the pilot, just in time to slap the baby off the track. The force of his blow knocked the little one senseless, but saved it from death beneath the train.

Ran Into Open Switch.
     Someone had carelessly left a switch open, just west of the State Fair grounds and Mr. Moran's big passenger engine with its train of human-ladened coaches, crashed into it. Bart Moran, with his throttle jammed home and his emergency air working to its limit, stopped his train, just as the great machine pushed its nose through the wall of the historic old wooden Exposition building.
     Just beyond Mineola was a bad place in the track, which had been the subject of many complaints by train crews, and had, at last, been reported repaired. This time, with his throttle wide open and his train doing every inch he could get out of it, the track spread and the engine, and every car, turned turtle. Upon inspection, it was found that his engine had been reversed and the emergency air worked to its full capacity in one last effort to save his precious load of human freight.
     But, as the wonders of the air brake grew and expanded, so did the steel-like nerves of Bart Moran grow still more hardened. The "Cannon Ball," pride of the Texas & Pacific system, had left Dallas, and going east under full steam pressure and giving gravity full swing, his train was making division record time, when the steel structure at White Rock creek gave way under his engine. Bart Moran knew his wife and baby girl were in the coaches, and with his usual courage, he sent the last ounce of air to the flying wheels and saved his train from a plunge down a forty-foot embankment, into the turbid water of an overflowing creek. (The marks from this smash-up can still be seen in the wrenched castings of the bridge supports).
     These are some of the reasons why he was loved and honored by men of the railroad fraternity.
     His heroism was not displayed just when on duty. No fellow man in need ever appealed to Bart Moran in vain. His word of cheer was always good to hear, and it was always backed by the clank of silver.

Stricken at Post of Duty.
     As a resident of Dallas, Mr. Moran and his family have a record that is hard to equal. For nearly twenty-four consecutive years, his home was at 2706 Commerce street, and for all that time, he has been one of nature's noblemen among his friends and neighbors in that vicinity.
     On January 17, 1912, after he had pulled the "Cannon Ball" from Marshall to Fort Worth on the 16th and had been called to make the return run, he suffered a paralytic stroke, from which he never recovered. He will be sadly missed by every one who knew him.

- September 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 2-4.
- o o o -

JURY REACHES
GUILTY VERDICT
IN MADDOX CASE

     F. M. Maddox, nineteen-year-old white boy, was found guilty late Saturday of manslaughter in connection with the killing of Chas. Colson last July on Camp street. His punishment was fixed at four years' confinement in the state penitentiary. The case was tried before Judge R. B. Seay in the criminal district court. The jury had deliberated about two hours, returning its verdict at 7 o'clock.
     Trial of the case was begun Thursday. Defendant's plea was temporary insanity. Self-defense plea was also submitted to the jury. The killing occurred in front of the barns of the Dallas Transfer company. The defense alleged that Colson had given the defendant a drink of whiskey that had been drugged, rendering the defendant insane at the time. Colson died from stab wounds.
     Maddox was represented by Attorneys R. B. Allen and A. S. Baskett.

- September 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 13, col. 6.
- o o o -

TWO KILLING CASES
COME UP MONDAY.

     Two killing cases will be called for trial Monday morning in the criminal courts of Dallas county.
     In Judge Crawford's court, the trial of John Parchman, charged with killing Ed Blaylock, on August 17, will be called.
     Before Judge Seay, the case of R. T. Adams, former bicycle policeman, charged with killing Duard Mize, will be called.

- September 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

NEW TRIAL MOTION
FILED WITH COURT.

     Formal motion for a new trial in the case of the state of Texas vs. W. A. Burgess, was filed Saturday morning by Attorneys Bird & Bird. Defendant was convicted several days ago. He was given two years in the state penitentiary for killing C. C. Long last July 9, in front of an Elm street rooming house. The motion will be heard next week by Judge Seay. It is probable no appeal of the case will be taken.

- September 20, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 7, col. 4.
- o o o -

PARCHMAN PLEADS
GUILTY; IS SENT
TO PEN FOR LIFE

     John Parchman, a nineteen-year-old negro youth, pleaded guilty to murder Monday morning before Judge W. L. Crawford, Jr., of criminal district court No. 2, and was sentenced to the penitentiary for life. It only required about one hour for the jury to be empaneled and the negro sentenced to serve the rest of his life behind the walls of the state penitentiary. Parchman shot and killed Ed Blaylock, a huckster, on August 12, at the corner of Washington avenue and Watt street. The shooting occurred when Blaylock made the negro drop an apple which the black had taken out of a wagon.
     In the court room, Parchman was very nervous and appeared to be badly frightened. Parchman was captured several hours after the shooting as the result of quick work on the part of the officers. He admitted the shooting at this time, but claimed that Blaylock attempted to strike him with a clod.
     As far as the Dallas county records show, this is the quickest disposition of a murder case ever known in Dallas county where the defendant was sent to the penitentiary for life.

- September 21, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4.
- o o o -

John Martin Dies.

     John Martin, age sixty years, died at St. Paul's Sanitarium, Sunday night. The remains are being held by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking Company, pending funeral arrangements.

- September 21, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 2.
- o o o -

Murder Case up Tuesday.

     Jessie Coleman, charged with the murder of Ellen Johnson on August 15, will go to trial Tuesday in Judge Crawford's court. The killing occurred on Young street. The woman was shot to death. Defendant is now in jail. A special venire of one hundred men has been summoned for the trial.

- September 21, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 7.
- o o o -

Miss Clara Brown Dies.

     Miss Clara Brown, aged thirty-five years, died at the Baptist sanitarium Monday morning. The remains will be sent to Waxahachie Monday at 6 p. m. by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company. Miss Brown was a trained nurse.

- September 21, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 7.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.

H. R. Looney Dies.

     H. R. Looney, aged sixty years, died at the home of his son, M. R. Looney, two miles south of Oak Cliff, Sunday. He was born in Bowie county and had been a resident of Dallas for two years. Mr. Looney is survived by his mother, Mrs. J. A. Looney, of Sanger, Texas, his widow and seven children -- M. R., W. E., Albert, Mrs. D. S. Rutter, Mrs. F. W. Willis and Louis Looney, all of Dallas, and M. D. Looney, of Snyder, Texas.
     Funeral services were held at Ed C. Smith & Bros. chapel Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock. The remains were then sent to Garrett, Tex., for burial.

J. E. Kenny Dies.

     J. E. Kenny, aged about fifty-five years, died at the city hospital Monday morning. He was a huckster and resided at the corner of Second avenue and Calvin street. The remains are being held at the parlors of the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking establishment, pending the arrival of two brothers. Funeral announcement will be made later.

Mrs. Julia Mae Moore Dies.

     Mrs. Julia Mae Moore, aged nineteen years, wife of C. J. Moore, died at her home, 3728 Colonial avenue, Sunday. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. D. Moody of Dallas. Funeral services were held at the family residence, Monday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Interment was in Oakland cemetery.

Miss Margie Sellers Dies.

     Miss Margie Sellers, aged seventeen years, died at St. Paul's sanitarium Sunday. She was born in Limestone county and is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Sellers of Mexia. The body was sent to Mexia for burial by Ed C. Smith & Bros., undertakers, Sunday.

Mrs. Willie Sewell Dies.

     Mrs. Willie Sewell, aged fifty-one years, died at her home, 3905 San Jacinto street, early Sunday morning. The body was sent to Belton, Tex., for burial by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company Sunday. She is survived by her husband, J. W. Sewell.

- September 21, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 2.
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Mrs. W. W. Thocker, Dies.

     Mrs. W. W. Thocker, aged thirty years, died at Woodlawn hospital Monday afternoon. Funeral services will be held at Henninger-Brewer's chapel Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. Interment will be in Grove Hill cemetery.

- September 22, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
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Mrs. Hugh Perry
To Be Buried Here

     As was told in Monday's late edition of The Times Herald, Mrs. Hugh Perry, aged fifty-two years, 4405 Swiss avenue, died at Johns-Hopkins sanitarium, Baltimore, Md., where she had been under medical treatment since March. The body will be received in Dallas Wednesday evening by Undertaker George W. Loudermilk.
     Funeral services will be held at the family residence, Thursday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. George W. Truett officiating. Interment will be in Oakland cemetery.
     Mrs. Perry was born at Bonham, Tex., and was a resident of Dallas for about ten years. She is survived by her husband, Hugh Perry, and a son, Victor Perry, of Dallas.

- September 22, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4.
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Mrs. Sadie Estelle Young Dies.

     Mrs. Sadie Estelle Young, aged twenty-eight years, died at her home, 1160 Fleming street, Monday night. She is survived by her husband, J. D. Young. Mrs. Young was the daughter of W. C. Glover and was born in St. Louis. She had been a resident of Dallas four years.
     The remains were sent to Denison, Texas, for burial by Ed C. Smith & Brother, Tuesday afternoon at 2:45 o'clock.

- September 22, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4.
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Services for Mrs. Julia Mae Moore.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Julia Mae Moore, aged seventeen years, who died Sunday, were held at her home, 3722 Colonial avenue, Monday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. She is survived by her husband, C. J. Moore.

- September 22, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4-5.
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Services for J. P. Kenny.

     Funeral services for J. P. Kenny, aged about fifty-five years, who died at the City Hospital Monday morning, will be held at Henninger-Brewer's chapel Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Lagow cemetery. Rev. Glenn L. Sneed will officiate at the services.

- September 22, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
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Negro Up Wednesday
On Murder Charge

     Charge of murder against Leonard McIlvain, negro, will be called Wednesday before Judge Crawford. The negro is charged with killing of Bessie Robins, negress, last May 16. Defendant is now in jail. The case has never been tried. McIlvain is represented by Attorneys Long and Simpson. Assistant County Attorney W. F. Bane will have charge of the prosecution.

- September 22, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
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Miss Vera Esther Summers Dies.

     Miss Vera Esther Summers, age twenty-one years, died at her home, 2117 West Tenth street, Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services were held at the family residence Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The remains will be sent to Sulphur Springs, Tex., Thursday morning at 9:40 o'clock, by Charles F. Weiland, undertaker.
     Miss Summers is survived by her mother, Miss Esther Summers; two brothers, H. W. and R. W. Summers of Dallas, and a sister, Mrs. Clara Bryan of Timpson, Texas.

- September 23, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 16, col. 2.
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William Gaston Dies.

     William Gaston, aged sixty-five years, died at Parkland hospital Tuesday evening at 7 o'clock. The body is being held at Henninger-Brewer's undertaking parlors pending funeral arrangements.

- September 23, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 16, col. 2.
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Services for Mrs. W. W. Thocker.

     Funeral services for Mrs. W. W. Thocker, who died at Woodlawn hospital Monday, were held at Henninger-Brewer's chapel Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. Claud M. Simpson officiated at the services. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery.

- September 23, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 16, col. 3.
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CARBOLIC ACID
PROVES FATAL
TO DAN WATKINS

     Dan Watkins, aged about thirty years, drank an ounce of carbolic acid while at his home in Mesquite Wednesday about noon, and died from the effects of the poison within an hour. The remains were prepared for burial by the undertaking firm of Humphrey & Vanston of Mesquite and were sent Thursday to Forney for interment. Vanston [Watkins] leaves a wife, but no family.
     Watkins was a day laborer and had resided at Mesquite for some time. Despondency is the only cause assigned for the rash deed. Justice of the Peace Russell held an inquest and rendered a verdict to the effect that Watkins died from the effects of poison taken with suicidal intent.

- September 24, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
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Services for Mrs. Hugh Perry.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Hugh Perry, aged fifty-two years, who died at Baltimore last Sunday, were held at the family residence, 4405 Swiss avenue, Thursday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. George W. Truett officiated. Interment was in Oakland cemetery.
     Mrs. Perry is survived by her husband and one son, Victor Perry. She was born at Bonham, Tex., and had been a resident of Dallas for ten years.

- September 24, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
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NECROLOGICAL.

T. H. Armstrong Dies.

     T. H. Armstrong, age forty years, died at the Baptist sanitarium Wednesday afternoon. He was a resident of Mabank, Tex. The remains will be sent to Mabank for burial Friday morning at 7 o'clock by Ed C. Smith & Co., undertakers.

Remains Sent to Sulphur Springs.

     The remains of Miss Vera Summers, age twenty-one years, who died at the home of her mother, Mrs. Esther Summers, 2117 West Tenth street, Tuesday, were sent to Sulphur Springs, Thursday morning at 9:40 o'clock for burial by Charles F. Weiland, undertaker.

Miss Connie Jenkins Dies.

     Miss Connie Jenkins, age sixty-three years, died at her home, 2712 North Ball [Boll?] street, Wednesday night at 9 o'clock. Funeral services will be held at the family resident Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery.
     Miss Jenkins is survived by four brothers, J. T. Jenkins, Savoy; M. E. Jenkins, Clarendon, and W. L. and W. D. Jenkins, Sanger, Texas; and four sisters, Mrs. M. A. Cochran, Mrs. G. A. Knight and Mrs. E. M. Lively, all of Dallas, and Mrs. C. B. Fladger of Honey Grove.

William Gilford Dies.

     William Gilford, age seventeen years, died at the City Hospital, Wednesday night, after a prolonged illness. The body is being held at the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking establishment, pending funeral arrangements.

Remains Sent to Athens.

     The remains of Mrs. Edna Fern Spencer, aged twenty-four years, were sent to Athens, Texas, for burial, Wednesday night by the Lamar Undertaking Company. Mrs. Spencer was the wife of F. S. Spencer, and died at her home, 531 Melba street, Tuesday night.

- September 24, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
p. 4, col. 4.
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 Mrs. H. Clark Dies.

     Mrs. H. Clark, age twenty-four years, died at her home, 2210 Sumner avenue, Wednesday afternoon. She is survived by one son, two brothers, Charles Smith of Van Alstyne, Doc Smith of Ardmore, Okla., and three sisters, Mrs. Charles Abbott of Dallas, and Misses Pearl and Jessie Smith of Houston.

- September 24, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 5.
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NECROLOGICAL.

Infant Son Dies.

     The six-months' old son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Florence died at the family home, 3307 Pecan street, Thursday evening at 7 o'clock. The body was sent to New Hope, Texas, for burial by Palmer, O'Connor & Whisenant, undertakers.

Mrs. Ray Kronenberg Dies.

     Mrs. Ray Kronenberg, age about thirty-five years, died at St. Paul's Sanitarium Friday morning at 5 o'clock. Mrs. Kronenberg was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. Yonack. Funeral services were held at the family residence, 1305 Powhatan street, Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment was in White Rock cemetery.

Services For Miss Coonie Jenkins.

     Funeral services for Miss Coonie Jenkins, who died at her home, 2712 North Ball street, Wednesday night, were held at the residence Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery. The pallbearers were Henry Lively, Willie Knight, James McNabb, Frank Collins and Porter and Will Cochran.

Services for William Gilford.

     Funeral services for William Gilford, aged seventeen years, were held at Henninger-Brewer's chapel Thursday afternoon at 5 o'clock. Interment was in White Rock cemetery.

Infant Daughter Dies.

     Mattie Sojtik, five-week-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Soptik, died at the family residence, 3112 Elm street, Friday morning. The remains are being held by George W. Loudermilk, undertaker, pending funeral arrangements.

J. M. Norman Dies.

J. M. Norman, aged seventy-seven years, died at the corner of Marilla and Ervay street, Friday morning at 9 o'clock. He was formerly a resident of Rockwall, Tex., and is survived by his widow, two daughters, Miss Sallie Norman, and Mrs. E. J. Adams, of Fort Worth, and a son, P. M. Norman, of Centerview, Mo. The body was sent to Rockwall for burial by George W. Loudermilk, Friday afternoon at 2:45 o'clock.

- September 25, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
p. 2, col. 3-4.
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HERE'S CHANCE
TO ASSIST AN
UNFORTUNATE

     A number of charitably-inclined ladies of Dallas, among them being Mrs. N. Nigro and Mrs. H. D. Hoffmaster, are trying to raise a small fund to help a worthy man who has been overcome by sickness and misfortune. The man in question, C. T. May, recently buried one of his little children, and he has just recovered from a long illness of fever. He and his wife were found living in a tent by the ladies, and the family was moved into a house. If the man can get money sufficient to buy him a horse, he will be able to earn a living for himself, as he has a wagon, the only property he possesses.
     Anyone wishing to assist this worthy cause is requested to telephone Mrs. Hoffmaster, at Haskel 2236, Automatic phone.

- September 25, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
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NECROLOGICAL.

Mrs. S. P. Weisiger Dies.

     Mrs. S. P. Weisiger of El Paso, Tex., died Friday morning at Chicago, where she had gone for medical treatment. She is survived by her husband, a son, Earl H. Weisiger; her mother, Mrs. A. J. Holland; three sisters, Mesdames E. G. Myers of Dallas, J. J. Vannoy of Tehuacana, R. T. Flewellin of Waco, and a brother, E. J. Holland.
     Mrs. Weisiger had a number of friends in Dallas and over the state.

Services for Mrs. H. Clark.

     Funeral services for Mrs. H. Clark, who died Wednesday at her home, 2210 Summer avenue, were held at the family residence Friday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock. Interment was in Greenwood cemetery. Rev. George W. Truett officiated at the service.

Rev. J. M. Bruce Dies.

     The Rev. J. M. Bruce, aged sixty-three years, a resident of Horse Cave, Ky., died at the Baptist sanitarium Friday afternoon. Dr. Bruce had been to Colorado for his health, and finding the altitude too high for him, had started home. When he reached Dallas, he was too ill to proceed farther and was taken to the sanitarium. The body was sent to Horse Cave Friday night for burial by Ed C. Smith & Bro., undertakers.

L. N. Smith Dies.

     L. N. Smith, aged fifty-nine years, died at Woodlawn hospital Friday afternoon. Funeral services will be held at the residence of W. M. Howell, 2602 Forest avenue, Saturday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakland cemetery.

Services For Infant.

     Funeral services for Mattie Foytik, aged five weeks, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Foytik, who died at the family residence, 3112 Elm street, were held at the family residence Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Interment was in Calvary cemetery.

- September 26, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
p. 3, col. 1.
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NECROLOGICAL.

Infant Son Dies.

     Milliard E., infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Davis, died at the family residence, 291 South Pacific avenue, Saturday morning. Funeral services were held at the home Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment was in Oakland cemetery.

Services for L. N. Smith.

     Funeral services for L. N. Smith, age fifty-nine years, who died at Woodlawn Hospital Friday afternoon, were held at the residence of W. H. Howell, 2602[?] Forest avenue, Saturday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Interment was in Oakland Cemetery. The active pallbearers were W. C. Pettey, O. Johnson, I. Owens, I. L. Reed, R. H. Campbell and I. H. Robinson.

- September 27, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. I, p. 2, col. 3.
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Mrs. Sarah Adeline Carter Dies.

     Mrs. Sarah Adeline Carter, age sixty-eight years, died at her home, 2417 Warren avenue, Saturday night at 9 o'clock. She is survived by five sons, R. V. Carter of Arkansas, G. B. L. Carter of San Antonio and J. S., W. E. and J. D. Carter of Dallas. Funeral services will be held at the family residence Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment will be in Oakland Cemetery.

- September 27, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 3, col. 2.
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CARD OF THANKS

     PLEASE accept our sincere thanks for the kindness shown us during the illness and death of my husband and father; also to thank you for the beautiful floral designs. Especially The Times Herald. Mrs. B. Moran and Family.

- September 27, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 10, col. 1.
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NECROLOGICAL.

Services For Infant.

     The infant of Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Pulliam, who died Saturday night at the family residence, 2412 Lucille street, was buried Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock in Mount Calvary cemetery.

Services For D. A. Allen.

     Funeral services for Daniel A. Allen, who died at his home, 2620 McKinnon street, Sunday morning, were held at the family residence Monday afternoon at 2:45 o'clock, and at the Free Methodist church at 3 o'clock. Rev. B. F. Harris officiated at the services. Interment was in Grove Hill cemetery. Mr. Allen was a member of Couer de Leon No. 8, Knights of Pythias, which lodge will officate at the cemetery. Pallbearers are T. P. Gordon, C. J. Marder, S. E. Berry, J. F. McClellan, A. A. McKnight and H. A. Martine. Mr. Allen is survived by his wife, two sons, John Wesley and Walter F., and one daughter, Mrs. R. H. Burton.

Services For Mrs. Sarah Carter.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Sarah Carter, aged sixty-six years, were held at the family residence, 3417 Warren street, Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Interment was in Oakland cemetery. The pallbearers were Will Richardson, Jack Hawkins, Lee Doughty, Lewis Hawkins, E. Doughty and Harry Berth.

- September 28, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
p. 3, col. 5-6.
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Say Negro Was Shot
By T. & P. Watchman

     Officers Roddy and Lovell, late Monday afternoon, went to Leonard street and Cottage Lane and viewed the body of a negro who died as the result of a pistol bullet through his heel sometime during last night.
     The policemen say that the man was Willie Wilkinson, the negro who engaged in a pistol duel with Special Officer R. S. Sparkman of the Texas and Pacific railroad in the T. & P. yards about ten days ago.
     Sparkman caught a negro robbing a box car and opened fire on him when he would not submit to arrest. The negro shot back and one of the bullets pierced the crown of the officer's hat grazing his scalp.
     Officers Roddy and Lovell say that there is little doubt in their establishment of the man's identity. In some quarters, it was believed that the dead negro had been connected with the shooting of Judge Hurley of Rockwall county.

- September 28, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 5.
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Robert Crane Dies.

     Robert Crane, aged thirty years, died at Parkland hospital Tuesday morning. The remains are being held at Henninger-Brewer's undertaking parlors pending funeral arrangements.

- September 29, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
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Death of Infant.

     The infant of W. E. and Mary Pinkston died at the family residence, 4029 Junius street, Monday. The body was sent to Corsicana for burial by Ed. C. Smith & Bro., undertakers, Monday night.

- September 29, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
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MRS. E. G. SENTER
DIES FOLLOWING
LENGTHY ILLNESS

     Following a lengthy illness, Mrs. E. G. Senter, wife of former State Senator E. G. Senter, died at an early hour Tuesday morning at the family home, 112 West Twelfth street, Oak Cliff. The funeral services will be held from the home at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning, Rev. G. M. Gibson, pastor of the First Methodist Church, will conduct the services and interment will be in the Oakland cemetery. While the death of Mrs. Senter was not unexpected, yet, it came as a great shock to the members of the family and their many friends.
     Mrs. Senter was forty-three years of age and was a daughter of Capt. and Mrs. A. R. Dillon of Lancaster. Besides her parents and husband, she is survived by two sons and two daughters. The sons are E. G. Senter, Jr., and Seldon Senter, and the daughters are Mrs. Percy Davis and Miss Elizabeth Senter. A sister, Mrs. Ned E. White, also survives.
     Up to the time that Mrs. Senter lost her health, she was active in women's affairs and was well known in Dallas social circles. The husband, Hon. E. G. Senter, was formerly a well known newspaper man and was connected with various papers over the state. He also represented Dallas county in the state senate and is a prominent member of the Dallas Bar.
     Mr. and Mrs. Senter were married at Lebanon, Tenn., twenty-five years ago, they having met while Mr. Senter was attending school at Lebanon. Mrs. Senter was a native of Dallas county, but at that time, her parents had moved back to Tennessee.

- September 29, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4-5.
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H. C. Darwin Is
Claimed by Death

     H. C. Darwin, age seventy-one years, died at the Baptist Sanitarium Monday night. Funeral services will be held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. J. Bishop, 1812 Peabody avenue, Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment will be in Greenwood cemetery. Rev. J. Frank Smith will officiate at the services.
     Mr. Darwin was born in Washington, Rhea county, Tenn. He came to Texas in 1872, and had been a resident of Dallas since 1885. For many years, he was a prominent contractor in Dallas, but had not been engaged in active pursuits for some time prior to his death. He is survived by the following children: Mrs. D. M. Witte of Sherman, and Mrs. M. J. Bishop, Mrs. J. W. Sing, Mrs. Charles B. Thompson and Mrs. L. Jones of Dallas. He also leaves five grandchildren and one great grand-child.

- September 29, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
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Stricken on Street;
Dies at Hospital

     J. E. O'Brien, driver of a delivery wagon for the Dallas Brewery, died at the city hospital Tuesday morning as the result of a stroke of heart failure. O'Brien was stricken while near the corner of McKinney avenue and Lamar street about 7 o'clock. He was placed in the ambulance of Henninger & Brewer and taken to the city hospital. At this place, physicians worked with him some time, but without avail. The body was taken in charge by the Henninger-Brewer Undertaking company, and is being held pending funeral arrangements.
     O'Brien was twenty-nine years of age and had been a resident of Dallas for many years. Apparently, he was in the best of health early Tuesday morning and his death was quite a shock to his friends and relatives.

- September 29, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 2.
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Many at Funeral
Of Mrs. Senter

     Funeral services for Mrs. E. G. Senter, who died early Tuesday morning, were held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock from the family home, 122 West Twelfth street. The services were conducted by Rev. G. M. Gibson, pastor of the First Methodist Church, assisted by Dr. S. M. Hayden, a well-known Baptist divine. Interment was in Oakland Cemetery.
     A large concourse of friends of the deceased and family followed the remains to their last resting place in the beautiful Oakland Cemetery. The floral offerings were numerous and beautiful, attesting the esteem in which Mrs. Senter was held by all who knew her. Both the officiating ministers paid high tribute to her and the good influence that she had exercised on the community. The song service was rendered by the Oak Cliff Odd Fellows Quartette.
     The pallbearers were J. E. Penry, D. Frank Carden, E. J. Kiest, A. S. Laird, C. G. Quillain, and Walter B. Whitman.

Services for Mrs. M. E. Saxon.

     Funeral services for Mrs. Mosouria E. Saxon, age fifty-six, were held Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock at the family residence, 2501 St. George street, Rev. Slater officiating. Mrs. Saxon was born Georgia and had resided in Dallas for some time. She is survived by her husband, Benjamin F. Saxon. Interment was in Oakland Cemetery.

Services for J. E. O'Brien.

     Funeral services for J. E. O'Brien, age twenty-nine, who died at the city hospital of heart failure, Tuesday morning, were held at the Sacred Heart cathedral Wednesday morning at 9:30 o'clock, Rev. Father Diamond officiating. Interment was in Oakland cemetery.
     Mr. O'Brien had been a resident of Dallas for several years and is survived by his wife, fathers, a brother and sister. He resided at 3703[?] Thomas avenue.

- September 30, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 1.
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Pioneer Woman of
Dallas Died Sunday

_________

     Mrs. Augustina Cretien, age seventy-nine years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Roessler, 1814 Fitzhugh avenue, Sunday. Mrs. Cretien was born in Bloies, France, and had been a resident of Dallas for fifty-nine years. She is survived by two sons, George Cretien of Dallas, Emil Cretien of Irving, and two daughters, Mesdames Charles Roessler and Hans Kreissig of Dallas.
     Funeral services were held at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Roessler Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Interment was in Oak Cliff cemetery.

- October 12, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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1915
NECROLOGICAL.

Peter Belberel Dies in Sanitarium.

     Peter Belberel, aged thirty-two years, died at 10 o'clock Tuesday night at St. Paul's sanitarium. Surviving him are a fourteen-year-old daughter and his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Belberel, who reside at 2220 Caroline street, the home of Mr. Belberel. The body is being held by the George W. Loudermilk Undertaking company pending funeral arrangements.

Mrs. Sallie V. Malone Dies.

     Mrs. Sallie V. Malone, aged 83 years, died Tuesday night at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Laura Alexander, 4415 Roseland avenue. Mrs. Malone, with her husband, Prof. James R. Malone, who died several years ago, came to Texas from Georgia shortly after the Civil War, and established at Mound Prairie, Tex., an academy which was famous in that day. The funeral service will be held Friday morning in the First Baptist Church at 10 o'clock, the Rev. Geo. W. Truett officiating. Interment in Greenwood cemetery.

C. E. Oliphant Died.

     C. E. Oliphant, aged 23 years, died Tuesday evening at his home on Holmes street. He is survived by his widow and one child. The funeral will be held at the residence at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.

Body Sent to Whitewright.

     The body of W. T. Wendell, aged 53 years, who died Monday night at his home, 405 Crisler street, was sent to Whitewright Wednesday morning for burial. Mr. Wendell is survived by his widow and two sons.

Funeral of Mrs. McNeeley Held.

     Funeral services over the body of Mrs. S. V. McNeeley, aged 83 years, who died Tuesday morning at Parkland hospital, were held in the Palmer, O'Connor & Whisenant Chapel Tuesday morning. Interment was in Oak Cliff cemetery.

Four-Year-Old Son Buried.

     The funeral of Fisher B. Thomas, the 4-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Thomas, who died at the West Dallas home Monday night, was held at the residence Tuesday afternoon.

- July 14, 1915, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 14, col. 7.
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