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1892
Real Estate Transfers.

     Z. E. Coombes and W. B. Gano to the Oakland Cemetery Company, 60 acres, two and one-half miles southeast of the court house, $36,000.

- August 24, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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1899
NOTICE OF CEMETERY LOT OWNERS' MEETING.

    The deed of dedication, duly executed by the Oakland Cemetery company and filed for record on the 8th day of December, 1892, and recorded in book 158, page 628, Dallas county deed records, contains the following provision, to wit:
    "Provided, however, and it is hereby expressly understood, that the use and benefit of said grounds shall be limited exclusively to the purchasers respectively of lots therein; and that 25 per cent of the sum received in the sale of each and every lot in all time to come shall be, and is hereby set apart and made a perpetual fund to be loaned upon the best securities by three trustees, one to be selected by the company and two by the lot-owners; and the interest received therefrom devoted to the care and keeping of the grounds, graves, etc., in said cemetery, under the rules and regulations of said company."
    The Oakland Cemetery company hereby gives notice of its purpose to select one trustee, as provided, and further hereby notifies all lot-owners in said Oakland cemetery to meet at the office of the company, No. 255 Main street (up-stairs), in the city of Dallas, Tex., on Saturday, the 25th day of March, 1899, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon, for the purpose of selecting two trustees by the lot-owners, provided for in the dedication aforesaid, and to transact such other business as may come before said meeting.
J. L. H
ARRIS, President.
S. S. L
ONG, Secretary.

- March 22, 1899, Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
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1907
NEW CITY CEMETERY
FORMALLY OPENED

______

Plenty of Room Provided for Burial
of City's Poor.

    Mayor S. J. Hay, Commissioner Doran, J. M. Strong and Undertaker P. J. Donovan took a trip to the new city cemetery located adjoining the east side of Oakland cemetery, early this morning and officially announced that the cemetery was opened to the public. The ground, which is comprised of some six acres, was surveyed and divided, one-half to be used for whites and the other half for negroes.

- July 26, 1907, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
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1909
ARE IMPROVING
POTTER'S FIELD

________

City Has Gang of Men Clearing Plot
of Underbrush.

    For several days a gang of men under the direction of Street Superintendent Sira have been engaged in clearing the underbrush and rubbish from what is known as the potter's field or old city cemetery, adjoining Greenwood cemetery in North Dallas. Already the clearing work has progressed to a considerable extent but it may take at least another week to completely clean up the grounds and put them in first-class condition. The plot of ground, several acres in extent, was used for many years as a burying ground for the unfortunate poor.
    It became so crowded about two years ago that a new plot was acquired adjoining Oakland cemetery. While little attention was paid the grounds while it was being used for burial purposes, practically no attention was given to the plot since it was abandoned for burying purposes and the weeds and underbrush has grown up in rank profusion.

- January 22, 1909, Dallas Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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1914
WOODMEN
WILL UNVEIL
MONUMENTS

______

Many "Choppers" Will Be in
Dallas Today on Way
to Galveston.

     Woodmen of the World head camp officials are to unveil twenty-two monuments of deceased sovereigns who are buried in Oakland Cemetery this afternoon. They are to the assisted by many of the uniform rank companies of the order that will assemble in Dallas to-day, en route to the State Uniform Rank Encampment of the Woodmen of the World, which opens in Galveston Monday morning.
     At 2 p. m., the head camp officers, uniform rank companies and W. O. W. bands will assemble at Woodman Hall, 416 North Harwood street, where they will form for a parade, headed by a band, followed by automobiles bearing Sovereign Commander W. A. Fraser, Sovereign Clerk John T. Yates and other sovereign camp officers, who will arrive on the Katy this morning en route to Galveston to attend the encampment. Next following, will be autos bearing the head camp officers, Head Consul H. W. Wiseman of Cleburne, H. T. McGrath, acting head adviser for R. H. McDill of Dallas; Head Banker Will A. Harris of Dallas; Head Clerk H. Russell of Mineral Wells; Head Escort W. P. Brady of Pecos; Head Watchman S. J. Flood of Waco; Head Sentry Will T. Brady of Georgetown, and sovereign delegates, followed by uniform rank companies under the command of Major N. A. Coombs of the Third regiment.
     The parade will go south on Harwood street to Main, and down Main street to the loop, where special street cars will be waiting to take the party to Oakland Cemetery, where the unveiling ceremonies will be held at the big W. O. W. monument, which was erected at a cost of $3,300 in memory of thirty-three sovereigns whose burying places are not known, but whose names are inscribed thereon. A company of the uniform rank will form about each of the twenty-two monuments to be unveiled, and at a given signal, will simultaneously lift the veils and each company will carry out its part of the ceremony in unity at given signals.
     Hon. Louis Wilson will deliver the unveiling oration, Mrs. J. J. Verbert will recite the Woodmen poem and Sovereign Commander W. A. Fracer will make an address.
     Special trains will carry the uniform companies and officers to Galveston, arriving in that city at 7:30 a. m., Monday, where the encampment will last until August 22, giving he sovereigns a real touch of military life.
     The encampment grounds are located on the seawall boulevard facing the Gulf of Mexico, and Colonel R. H. McDill of Dallas has been quartered there for the past few weeks, preparing the grounds and receiving equipment to be used, including cooking utensils, tents, boots, blankets and all other equipment generally used in military camps.

- August 16, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. I, p. 3, col. 1.
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