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1891 
NEW HOPE NEWS.

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A Prayer for Rain Answered.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     N
EW HOPE, Tex., June 9.--Our town was thrown into excitement by the arrival of a bear show. The admission was a chicken or one dozen eggs. We pronounce it a 2:40 humbug.
     Miss Hattie Miller has just graduated at Huntsville, Tex., and is spending a few days with her sister, Mrs. B. F. Tisinger. Miss Hattie is a lovely young lady.
     Ed Mosley, Harry Hunter and G. P. Worthington left this morning for a two weeks' hunt and fish in Henderson county. The boys went loaded for bear and snakes.
     Saturday was quarterly meeting at Pleasant Ridge and by request of the preachers, Brother Adair prayed for rain, and before the service was over, the rain came in torrents. "Now some foks says dey ain't no 'ficiency in prair, but we would like to know what would have become of dis community hadn't it been for dat prair?"

- June 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
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NEW HOPE NEWS.
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Fine Crop Prospects--Old Cit-
izens Buried.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     N
EW HOPE, Tex., June 26.--This community was blessed with a nice rain Sunday night--hardly enough for corn, but plenty for cotton, which is blooming and looks fine.
     T. P. Worthington says he has the finest prospect for a crop that he has had for years.
     Messrs. Wells & Miller are going right ahead with their gin, and say they will be ready for the new crop with a vim. They are energetic men and we wish them success.
     Quite a number of our citizens attended the Sunday school convention at Seago and report a fine time.
     Mr. Hill Hamby and Uncle H. Wadsworth, two of Dallas county's most prominent citizens, were buried last week. Their funerals were the largest in attendance ever witnessed at the grave yard.

- June 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
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Gin Fire Near Mesquite.

Associated Press.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., Sept. 29.-- The gin of Miller & Wells, at New Hope, four miles north of this place, burned Sunday night. It is supposed that it was set on fire, as it was Sunday night and there was no fire about the premises, and the fire caught in the gin proper. Two wagons and about six bales of cotton were burned. There was no insurance. Loss about $2000.

- September 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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NEW HOPE NEWS.
_______

Burning of a Gin--Cotton and
Wheat Prospects.

Special Correspondence.
     N
EW HOPE, Tex., Sept. 30.-- There is a good deal of excitement in this community over the burning of a gin belonging to Wells & Miller. The ginner's loss was near $1200. There [were] two wagons and six bales of cotton burned and nine other damaged. It is a mystery how the gin caught. There was no fire there Saturday evening, and at eleven that night, it was discovered burning. On account of the rain late that evening, most of the cotton on the yard was saved. The neighbors meet to-night to make arrangements to rebuild the gin.
     The bulk of the cotton in this community is out and a great many are picking their cotton for the last time. Three weeks dry weather and the farmers will be ready to begin a new crop.
     Those that have planted wheat have a good stand, and it looks fine. On account of the surplus of cotton and scarcity of corn, we advise farmers to plant wheat for winter pasture.
     Some of our good citizens are being called before the grand jury. We hope the jury will do close work as we need it.
     We attended the literary society at Samuel's School-house Saturday night and it was an enjoyable affair. This, perhaps, is the oldest literary society in Dallas county, having been going on for nearly ten years. It continues winter and summer. We will give them an individual write up soon.

- September 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
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NEW HOPE AGITATED.
______

The Mysterious Disappearance
of Farmer Wells.

     About two weeks ago, Mr. G. H. Wells, a prominent farmer of the New Hope neighborhood, left there for Dallas, ostensibly to buy a pump, since which time, nothing has been seen or heard of him, except a report that he was seen by an acquaintance on the east bound train passing Mesquite. The district around New Hope is much disturbed over the disappearance, and fears are entertained that some trouble has befallen him.
     His wife was in ill health and is prostrated over his absence. His family consisted of a wife and several small children. The family are highly respected citizens of New Hope. No theories are advanced that would occasion his sudden departure, and the mystery thereby deepens as time passes away.

- February 3, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
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