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To Migrations Index, 1890
(Updated August 16, 2001)

 

Personal.

     Harry A. Eales [Eeles], a commercial traveler from Chicago, who has a host of friends in Dallas, arrived in the city this morning and is stopping at the Grand Windsor.

- January 1, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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PERSONAL.

     Harper Gilmore of Fort Worth has come to Dallas to live.

- January 1, 1890, Dallas Morning News, p. 4.
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STRANGE DISAPPEARANCE
________

Of a Citizen of Dallas in Cincinatti--Sick
or Foully Dealt With.

     On the 4th of last December, Mr. Fell Miller, who resides at 418 Bryan street, left for Cincinnati via Paris, Ill. Arriving at the latter point two days later, he proceeded on the same day to Cincinnati. On the 16th of December, Mrs. Miller, his wife, received a dispatch from him saying he would leave for home that day, and two days later, she received a letter fom him dated Cincainnati Dec. 16, saying he would leave on that day for Dallas, and stopping six hours at Paris, Ill, would arrive home on the 19th. Up to last night, Mr. Miller had not got home, and Mrs. Miller is naturally distracted at his absence. The missing man is not addicted to drinking, gambling or any bad habit, and this fact, coupled with his domestic happiness, makes his absence the more difficult to account for, leaving the presumption either that in returning home, he was taken sick, or fouly dealth with. Mrs. Miller, several days ago, telegraphed the manager of the hotel at Cincinnati, where her husband stopped, asking if he had left there and when. The reply came that he left for Dallas at 4 o'clock a. m. on the 17th. Yesterday, at her request, search was taken up by the police, who telegraphed the proper departments at Cincinnati, Paris and Peoria.
     The missing gentleman is 5 feet 8 1/2 inches high, of dark complexion, with dark hair and a small dark mustach. He wore a dark sack suit, a black slouched hat, laced shoes and a dark diagonal overcoat.
     His wife would esteem it a favor if Cincinnati, Paris and Peoria papers would interest themselves in the line of her inquiry.

- January 2, 1890, Dallas Morning News, p. 8.
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PERSONAL.

     C. H. Paddock of Gainesville, a sometime citizen of Dallas, is on a visit to the city.

- January 3, 1890, Dallas Morning News, p. 5
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Personal.

     Dr. S. J. Anderson, of Gainesville, a former citizen of Dallas, is spending a few days in the city this week.

- January 3, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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LOCAL NOTES.

     A Dallas gentleman is in receipt of a letter from the agent of a labor bureau at Raleigh, N. C., stating, that there are on his register, the names of 1000 farm hands, white and black, who are anxious to locate in Texas. He estimates that 20,000 negroes have emigrated from North Carolina to Mississippi, Florida, Alabama and Texas since last June.

- January 4, 1890, Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. ?
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Society Gossip.

     Mr. I. J. Lorch, who has been connected with the large dry goods firm of Fellman, Grumbach & Harris for some time, left yesterday for Fort Worth, where he will be connected with the firm of L. August & Co. Mr. Lorch was one of the finest salesmen in the city; a connoisseur of all kinds of dry goods and an artist in arranging them, besides being a most courteous gentleman with a large circle of friends here, who regret his departure, but who wish him every success in his new location.

- January 7, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8 col. 1.
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Personals.

     Pastor Sims of the First Baptist Church has moved to the city and will occupy the pulpit Sunday.
     C. P. Smith, who served with distinction as special city judge, was called to his former home in Vincennes, Indiana, by a telegram from his father last night, which announced the fatal illness of his mother. He expects to be absent three weeks.

- January 8, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4 col. 2.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Col. Noa Spears, of Georgetown, Ky., one of the vice presidents of the new Banker's and Merchant's National Bank, arrived this morning to make Dallas his home. Col. Spears was in Dallas 25 years ago, when the Cruthfield House was the leading hotel in north Texas. All the city was about a dozen houses near the river. He will be engaged in the bank as soon as opened for business.

- January 8, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5 col. 3.
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THE RAILROADS.

     Jack Jones, for several years employed in the general offices of the Missouri Pacific at St. Louis, is holding down a desk in the general offices of Texas & Pacific at present, having arrived in the city January 1.

- January 9, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2 col. 1.
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THE LOUNGER.

     F. W. Rice, an old-time favorite with the traveling public is back in his old position behind the register at the St. George. Mr. Rice is a gentleman who enjoys a large acquainance and is one of the most popular hotel clerks in the south. Fifteen years ago, in 1875, he came to Dallas. The St. George was known as the Lamar at that time. He was afterwards with the Le Grande, now the Windsor. In 1887, he drifted to Houston; thence to Austin, and for two years or more, he has been holding forth at Fort Worth, in one of the leading caravansaries of that city. He informed the Lounger last evening that Dallas is by long odds, the best hotel town in the state, and her future the brightest.

- January 9, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
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Personal.

     W. M. Whitesides, of this city, has purchased a ranch in Fannin county and will locate there.

- January 9, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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Personal.

     Capt. W. D. Love, ex-mayor of Aberdeen, Mississippi, has moved with his family to Oak Cliff, where Captain Love has just completed and will occupy a fine new residence.
     H. W. Maguire, late Deputy Coal Oil Inspector, departed for Fort Worth, where he contemplates embarking in the real estate business, this morning.

- January 13, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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IN DALLAS AGAIN.
_______

An Old and Popular Route Agent
Transferred from San Antonio to
Dallas.

     E. L. Williams, for the past three years in charge of the routes of the Southern Pacific for Wells, Fargo & Co's Express Company, has been transferred from the Alamo City to Dallas, and has charge of the routes on the Houston & Texas Central and Santa Fe lines. E. McMallen, an old and trusted messenger of the company, has been made route agent for the Southern Pacific, with headquarters at San Antonio. Mr. Williams has many friends in Dallas, having formerly resided here, and they are highly pleased with his presence among them once more.

- January 14, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Personal.

     Mr. John M. Donaghue, for the past year connected with the staff of the TIMES-HERALD, and well known to the fraternity in Texas and elsewhere, departed for New York city Sunday, where he will pitch his tend and reside in future if fortune favors him and the surroundings prove congenial. Mr. Donaghue is a gentleman of integrity and high character, an experienced newspaper man and clever writer. His departure is regretted by his associates and a large circle of friends. Their best wishes for success in his new field of labor accompany him.

- January 14, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Personal.

     Mr. W. J. Hill and family leave for Dallas to-day, to make it his future home. Mr. Hill has been a resident of Waco for a number of years and in that time has made warm friends who regret to see him leave.-Waco Day.

- January 16, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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DALLAS IN BRIEF.

     King Taylor, who was raised in this county, has returned to make his future home here, after several years residence in Wyoming. He brought with him the horns of a gigantic elk, which he killed. The formidable looking ornaments weigh forty pounds.

- January 17, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Society Gossip.

     Married at Saulsbury, Tenn., Wednesday, January 8, 1890, Mr. Joseph W. Clark of the Waxahachie Enterprise and Miss Sallie A. Chaffin of Saulsbury. They have known each other since childhood, both having been reared in Hardeman Co., Tenn....Mr. Clark came to Texas nine years ago. [Clark] was at one time a resident of Dallas...they arrived in Waxahachie Sunday night, and for the present, are stopping with Mr. Laughlin, on Dallas street.

- January 13, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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THE CITY IN GENERAL.

     Fell Miller, who left his residence at 418 Bryan street on the 4th day of last December, has been heard from in Columbus, O., where he is reported to be lying quite sick.
     E. L. Gordridge, aged 24 years, died yesterday at the city hospital. He was a native of Pennsylvania and his brother arrived yesterday and shipped the remains back to the old home.

- January 22, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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DALLAS IN BRIEF.

     Zack Harrington, one of Sheriff Lewis' efficient deputies, has tendered his resignation. He has accepted a more lucrative position in the office of the county clerk at Vernon, and will leave for his new field of labor in a few days. A large circle of friends regret his departure.

- January 23, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personal.

     Preston Ivy, the well-known printer, departed for Houston to-day and will reside there in future. [ag]

- January 24, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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DALLAS IN BRIEF.

     Jordan and Bader, left and right fielders, respectively, of the Dallas base ball club last season, have signed with the Washington league team.
     L. G. Stockwell, who was catcher of the Dallas Brown Stocking base ball club in 1884, plays right field this year for the Cleveland league club.

- January 25, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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Thirty In.

     George W. Collins, a well-known printer, for some time past foreman in the establishment of A. D. Aldredge, died at 312 Caruth street to-day of consumption. Deceased was about thirty-two years of age, a fine workman and held in high esteem by a large circle of friends. The remains will be shipped to Chicago, his old home, for interment.

- January 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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DWINDLES INTO A SHADOW

     Dr. T. T. Clifford, wife and daughter, Miss Isabella Daniels of Sedalia, Mo., are stopping at the St. George. The doctor and his family are on a pleasure trip and will visit Galveston, San Antonio and other points of interest before returning to Missouri. The gentleman is owner of property in Dallas and was a resident of Texas back in the '70's. A year ago, he visited the young metropolis of the southwest and wrote a glowing acount of his trip and his impressinos of the city, predicting that in the course of a few years, it would contain a population of 150,000 soulds and be numbered among the great commercial and manufacturing centers of the country.

- January 28, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5.
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THE CITY IN GENERAL.

     Arthur Pitts, who recently died in Denver, is well known in Dallas, having clerked in Sanger Bros.' and Lewis' shoe store. He married just before leaving here.

- January 30, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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[No Heading]

     Mrs. Nellie F. Hall, late of St. Louis, has located in Dallas and is prepared to do first class dressmaking. Her address is 26 Sycamore street.

- January 31, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1
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THE CITY IN GENERAL.

     George W. Winn, at one time publisher of the Texas Post, has located in Dallas.
     The Kalamazoo Buggy Company, O. M. Allen, proprietor, will move to this city. A block of ground in the manufacturers' reserve in North Dallas has been secured as a site for the plant.

- February 3, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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[No Heading]

     Mr. Henry Holtcamp, who went to California several years ago, has returned. He is amazed at Dallas' growth, and says she is far ahead of San Diego and Los Angeles.

- February 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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DALLAS IN BRIEF.

     P. M. Chisum of Paris, has purchased a residence in Dallas, and he intends making his home here.

- February 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

JAS. B. ENNIS, ALIAS LAWRENCE.
________

Inquiries from New York--His and
His Wife's Fate.

     Parties in Horsehead, N. Y., are writing here, making inquiry about one F. W. Lawrence and his wife. A photograph of the latter was enclosed, showing the fine features of a handsome woman.      Lawrence came to Dallas with his wife three years ago, and entered the calling of a carpenter. He claimed to be an ex-member of the New York police force, and he made several unsuccessful attempts to get on the Dallas force. Mrs. Lawrence, it is said, left the city in company with a hotel clerk last summer. They were bound for St. Louis, and nothing is known of them in this city from that time forward.
     Lawrence, the letter states, is an assumed name, his real name being Jas. B. Ennis. The party in question died in this city about a month ago, from pneumonia, which was brought on by an attack of la grippe.

- February 25, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
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UNDER THE DOME.

From Monday's Daily.
HIS OLD STAMPING GROUND.

     Col. D. A. Williams, prosecuting attorney, takes a deep interest in the movements of the crusaders at Spicardsville, Lathrop, Trenton and other towns in northern Missouri. That ccountry was the colonel's stamping ground in his boyhood. His father founded a town near Spicardsville, in Grundy county many years ago, before the railroads spread network of rails over the country. The town boomed and became a good sized hamlet and a well-known trading point. But, the railroad fever struck the country. A line was built to the north of the prosperous village several miles and it went down like a rocket. In those days, there were live boys in the country district. They drank whiskey, ran horses, were inveterable gamblers, and when they visited a town, it was for the purpose of running it. Now, all is changed. In all country districts, saloons are prohibited by the local option law. That is, they were until a very recent date, when a judge decided that the local option law was null and void in Grundy county owing to some oversight in giving the proper notice of the election. The county court, however, refused to grant dramshop license and club houses and "joints" soon began to flourish. The ladies of the county charged that the officers winked at this lawlessness and made an attack on the saloons in many places, completely demolishing the same. They were arrested and fined, and the Colonel, as well as other Missourians in Dallas, are patiently awaiting new developments in this latest mode of warfare inaugurated by the women of Northern Missouri against an enemy which they regard as the greatest curse ever visited upon humanity.

- March 1, 1890, The Weekly Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Personal.

     Dr. W. T. Baird, of El Paso, will make his home in Dallas.
     Mrs. Jennie Arnold and daughter, Eula, of Earlville, Ill., arrived in Dallas yesterday, and are stopping with Dr. Benton, Mrs. Arnold's father. Mr. Arnold will make Dallas his future home.

- March 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     F. M. Potter, a well-known and popular locomotive engineer, who has been running an engine on the Missouri, Kansas & Texas with headquarters at this place, has been transferred to Denison and departed for that place to-day, to the regret of his many friends.

- March 7, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
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Personal.

     L. Cohn, a former citizen of Dallas, and now traveling in the interest of the Eisen vineyard company of San Francisco, after a pleasant visit with friends in the metropolis, departed this morning for New York City.

- March 10, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
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College Hill Notes.

     Mr. P. M. Chism of Paris, Tex., has bought of L. J. Berry the elegant residence, corner Bryan street and Garrett avenue for $11,000, and will move to Dallas.

- March 15, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Shamrocks of Ireland.

     Eddie Gleason, the hustling commercial agent of the Santa Fe was given a reminder of old Ireland yesterday by Hugh P. Kane, nothing more, nor less, than a shamrock, direct from old Ireland. Mr. Kane received several by mail from his mother, a resident of the County Kildare, and distributed them among his intimate friends.

- March 19, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Society Resume.

     The Louisville Courier-Journal of March 19, says: "Miss Etta Jarvis will be married to Mr. Seth Shepherd at Dallas, Tex., this evening. Miss Jarvis is pleasantly remembered here, as Louisville is her native home, and she resided here until a few months ago. Mr. Shepherd is a resident of Dallas, where they will immediately go to housekeeping."

- March 22, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Late Locals.

     Otto F. Neulen Hahn, of Hermann, Mo., is in the city to locate. He is a young lawyer.

- March 26, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

A CONUNDRUM.
_______

Is Oscar Kingsley, a Guest at the
City Prison.

     Oscar Kingsley is an inmate of the city bastille, and he is a puzzle to the police. His wife is staying at a boarding-house on Pacific avenue. She married at Mound City, Ill., two weeks ago, and claims to have a brother at Mount Carmel, who is a hayseed detective of the Grannan brand. Mrs. Kingsley says her husband told her that he was wanted at Mt. Vernon Ind., for seduction, but she appears to know very little of the antecedents of her husband. The officers are of the opinion that Williams is the name of their prisoner. Kingsley arrived here a few days ago and claimed that he was robbed of $80 and his watch and chain at a variety theatre. He afterwards admitted that he had lied. "He's a bird," Detective McCane says, "even if his feathers are gone."

- March 31, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Alderman M. T. Cone departed for Maysville, Ky., via Denison this morning. Mike is a Kentuckian by birth, an Irishman by instinct, and a Texan by adoption. Mayville is the home of his boyhood, and he anticipates a pleasant visit among old friends and old scenes.
Julius Wittsock, who has been with Logan, Evans & Smith for the past eighteen months, and who is one of the best boot and shoe salesmen in the south, will go to Fort Worth Wednesday, to take charge of the retail department of the firm at that place. Jule is a popular gentleman, and his Dallas friends regret his departure.

- March 31, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Braxton C. Fuller, a former architect of Dallas, died at his home at Atlanta, Ga., recently.
     William J. Dial, a well-known newspaper reporter, was killed by a train at Fort Worth yesterday. Dial was on his way to Galveston to accept a position with the Tribune people. Deceased was forty-five years of age, and was, for several years, connected with the Dallas press.

- March 31, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -



 

City Notes.

     The presiding officer in the Fifth ward reports that he turned away from the polls not less than thirty-five foreigners who could not speak one word of English and who were unable to give their place of residence.

- April 3, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Dr. George A. Nelson, a noted physician, and for many years, a resident of Terrell, has moved to Dallas, where he will reside permanently. His headquarters are at Shook & Boykin's.

- April 8, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5. col. 3.
- o o o -

UNDER THE DOME.
LANDAHL ARRESTED.

Frank Landhal was arrested at Galveston Tuesday, and returned to this city by Deputy Sheriff Sloan Lewis. Landhal formerly worked for the New Home Sewing Machine Company, and was indicted for embezzlement.

- April 16, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5. col. 3.
- o o o -

For Sheriff.

     Monroe Ferguson...has been deputy sheriff under Sheriff Lewis and Smith for the past three years..is a native of Mississippi and has been in Dallas county for 13 years, farming just beyond West Dallas, until he entered the sheriff's office three years ago.

- April 22, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

[Railroad News]

     It is rumored in railroad circles that Mr. M. P. Morrissey, Santa Fe freight agent at this point, will be transferred to Galveston, to take charge of affairs at that place. His friends will regret his departure.

- April 25, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -


 

A Missing Husband.

     Mrs. John Severt, of Portland, Oregon, left home in search of lost silver mine in Texas.

- May 7, 1890, Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Jake Stern of Eufaula has returned to Dallas to live.

- May 20, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
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[No Heading]

     Mr. Thos. Hurley and family, who moved to Louisville, Ky., some time ago, have returned to the city. They were in the recent terrible cyclone in the Fallas City and had a close call.

- May 26, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Preston Ivy, a well known member of the typographical craft, and recently secretary of the Dallas Typographical Union, and at present, an attache of the Houston Post, is in the city on a visit.

- May 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Personal.

     J. S. Evans, a newspaper man of Coffeeville, Miss., is stopping at the St. George. Mr. Evans is the representative of the Memphis Commercial and the New Orleans Picayune at Coffeeville. He did his first reportorial work on the Dallas Herald ten years ago.

- June 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Miss Eva Fallon, daughter of Mr. H. C. Fallon, 519 Harwood St., returned home yesterday from Butler, Alabama, where she has been attending school the last four years.
     M. H. Rice arrived in the city yesterday from Mopane, California, where he has visited his daughter. After a brief sojourn with his son, Officer Rice, the old gentleman will go to Moberly, Mo., his old home, to visit another son, who is chief of the fire department of that city.

- June 7, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Llano
Some Points of Superiority over other Iron Fields

     ...an intelligent talk with Mr. F. R. Malone, formerly of Dallas, but now of Llano. (ad on same page)

- June 7, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Alderman Mike Cone, who is visiting at Maysville, Ky., the home of his boyhood, writes that he will return to Dallas the coming week.

- June 14, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. ?.
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City Notes.

     Rev. B. H. Crumpton of Greenville, Ala., has accepted the call to the pastorate of the East Dallas Baptist Church.

- June 16, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     J. F. Peske, formerly of Dallas, but now of Fort worth, is in the city.
     C. D. McCarty of Vernon, a former Dallasite, is in the city. Mr. McCarty is spreading the fame of his section.

- June 20, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Elder J. T. Toof, having resigned his work with the Commerce Street Christian Church, will depart for New Haven, Conn., July 1.
     Miss Jeffie Walker, who spent the winter in Dallas with her mother, Mrs. Jay Smith, has returned to Georgia.

- June 23, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Personals.

      Rev. B. H. Crumpton, of Alabama, arrived last night to enter upon his duties as pastor of the East Dallas Baptist Church.

- June 27, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     There were twenty-three additions to the Commerce Street Christian Church yesterday. There will be preaching and baptizing to-night by the pastor, J. T. Toof. This closes his pastoral work here. He will leave to-morrow evening for New Haven, Connecticut, on the west-bound Texas & Pacific train at 6:30.

- June 30, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
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Condensed Telegrams.

     Charles Crompton, formerly of Dallas, and a street car repairer by occupation, was killed in the yards at Marshall yesterday.

- July 2, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Thomas F. King departs for Chicago, Waukesha and Milwaukee this evening. Tom will be at home in Chicago and Waukesha. He talks the English and Celtic languages fluently, but he will need the services of an interpreter at Milwaukee, where German is the official language. Sweilager.

- July 5, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Died.

     At Fort Worth Saturday night, Barbara Wooten Lane, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Lane, formerly of this city. The interment took place at Fort Worth yesterday.

- July 7,1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     Rev. B. H. Crimpton, of Alabama, recently called to the pastorate of the East Dallas Baptist church, preached last night at the First Baptist church. Although advanced in years, he give a vigorous presentation of the gospel, and doubtless he is a valuable addition to the ministry of Dallas.

- July 7,1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Fred Wagner has returned from New York, where he has been the past three years. He will make his home in Dallas.

- July 7,1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Formerly of Dallas.

     El Paso, July 8.- A man named Ellis has been arrested and jailed, charged with forgery. He obtained the indorsement of Mr. Hardy Moore to a check on a Denver bank for $150, and the intelligence has been received by wire that the signature of Ellis is a forgery. Ellis was formerly in the real estate business in Dallas.

- July 8,1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

PERFIDIOUS PAYNE.
________

He is Jailed on Charge of Kid-
naping His Child.

_______

OFFICER KIRBY DEPARTS FOR
EL PASO TO RETURN WITH
MRS. PAYNE.

________

The Grand-Mother and the Little Girl
--Young Payne Mum--His
Father Heard From--A
Bold Conspiracy.

     Lester Payne is in jail. He was arrested last night by order of Chief Arnold and placed behind the bars. He is the father of the little girl said to have been drowned in the lake at Oak Cliff Sunday, the son of an old lady now in the hands of the El Paso police charged with kidnaping.
     The T
IMES-HERALD stated last evening that Mrs. J. M. Payne, the grandmother, had been arrested at El Paso by order of Chief Arnold and that the child, Eva, was found in her possession.
...
     The Paynes are old residents of Dallas. J. M. Payne, the father of the prisoner, conducted a blacksmith shop on Elm street for many years, and was highly esteemed as well as the other members of the family. About three or four years ago, the Paynes emigrated to California and have been residents of San Bernardino for some time past.
...

- July 8, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Rev. Mr. Bricklay of Gainesville, entered upon the discharge of his duties as pastor of St. Patrick's Church, to which he was recently appointed.

- July 11, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Personal.

     M. W. Carrico, at one time engaged in newspaper work in Dallas, but now of Fort Worth, is in the city to-day.

- July 12, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Prominent Contractor Dead.

     B. J. Dillard, a well known contractor, for a number of years, a resident of Dallas, died at Pecos last week.

- July 17, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3
- o o o -

Who Was He?

     Chief of Police Arnold received a letter from Osage Mission, Kansas, to-day, notifying him that a young man, name unknown, but supposed to be from Dallas, had been run over and killed by the cars at that place. Both arms of the deceased were tattooed. On one was a tombstone in India ink, and below it, the inscription. "In memory of my mother." He was neatly dressed, but neither money nor papers were found upon his person.

- July 23, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Leon J. Nvara, a leading member of the Y. M. H. A. Club, and a popular gentleman, departed for Marshall this morning, where he has accepted a position with a leading business house.

- July 28, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

LOOKS LIKE DESERTION.
_______

A Hunt County Man's Involuntary
Possessions--A Sad Case.

     A man giving the name of Thompson appeared before the chief of police this morning, representing that he was in trouble and seeking counsel as to how he should proceed to get out. He said that a man by the name of Manson Surratt engaged him, with his wagon and team, to move his household effects and his family from Hunt county to Dallas. They arrived here several days ago and pitched camp on the west bank of the Trinity, at the foot of the Commerce street bridge. Surratt looked around a day or so, but he gave no orders to Thompson about unloading. Finally, Thompson told him that he was compelled to return home and his wagon would have to go with him. Then, he says Surratt told him that he had no money with which to get a house and he could not rent one without the cash. Thompson, in the goodness of his heart, says that he gave Surratt $8, all the cash he had, except $1.50, and told him to go and secure a horse. Surratt left the camp, but up to this morning, he had not returned, although he has had two days in which to find a house.
     Thompson became convinced that he was "in a box" with the wagon load of household goods and the family, consisting of a wife and two little boys, on his hands. He was compelled to return home to-day, he said, and under the circumstances, he could do nothing but leave the deserted woman and her effects on the banks of the Trinity. He had but $1.50 and she was without money, food, or employment, and a stranger in a strange land.

- July 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 7.
- o o o -

Personal.

     G. P. Phillips and J. G. Loudon, merchant and banker, were in the city yesterday and to-day, and paid the TIMES-HERALD a pleasant visit. They give favorable reports from flourishing Abilene and the beautiful Abilene country, as fertile and fair to look upon as any upon the continent.
     Mrs. L. Kirkbride returned home with her on a visit at 1884 Elm street, where she will be glad to see her old friends.
     Dallas carpenters and joiners will be represented at the carpenters and joiners national convention which meets in Chicago, August 4th, by the following: J. T. W. Loe, H. L. Givens, S. H. Snell, Mr. Morris and Mr. Diffey. Before returning to Dallas, Mr. Givens will visit his old home in Terre Haute, Ind.

- July 31, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -


 

Personal.

     F. R. Foote, one of District Clerk Stewart's efficient deputies, will leave to-night for Athens, Ala., his old home, for a three weeks' visit. He anticipates a pleasant time among the "Yellow Hammers."
     Information wanted as to whereabouts of George Noland, an engineer, who, two or three years ago, was engineer for the Dallas Electric Light and Power Company. Address T
IMES-HERALD.

- August 2, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Mrs. Norma Exford has returned, having been absent from the city a month visiting friends, relatives and her old home in the southern part of the state.

- August 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     James McCane, ex-city detective, came in from the southeast this morning.-

August 8, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Mr. J. Nat Davis, a valued member of the TIMES-HERALD family, with his wife and children, departed to-day for his old home in East Tennessee, where he will remain until the middle of next month, the guest of relatives.

- August 11, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Cast Them Aside
Return of J. J. Eckford from a
Trip to Georgia, the State of His Nativity.

(no other details in article)

- August 11, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

RAILWAY RACKET.
_________

Notes and Personals Concerning
Railways and Railway Men.

     John P. Miller, who, for the past three years been connected with the general freight offices of the Texas & Pacific in this city, has accepted a position in the general freight offices of the Union Pacific at Denver. Mr. Miller is an efficient and capable railroad man and will prove a valuable one in his new position.

- August 13, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Col. Andy Faulkner of Houston, the affable and efficient general passenger agent of the Houston & Texas Central is here chatting with old friends and enjoying the cool breezes of the Trinity valley.

- August 16, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Personal.

     W. H. Fisher, the well-known liveryman of Seymour, Baylor county, and an ex-member of the Dallas police force, is in the city. He subscribed for the TIMES-HERALD, which he considers the best paper published in the city, his oldhome.

- August 22, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

Convention of Northern Men.

     Secretary Wolfson, of the Board of Trade, has received a communication from citizens of Lampasas, calling a convention of residents of Texas, whose former homes were in the northern states, to be held at Lampasas next Tuesday, September 2. The promoters of the scheme have concluded that it would be a grand idea for men of northern birth to meet in convention and organize to secure northern capital and also northern home-seekers for this most favored section of the Union. Another object is to better advertise the state abroad. It is thought that the convention will be largely attended.

- August 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Tom Jackson, formerly of Dallas, was dangerously injured at Ranger by coming in contact with a barbed wire fence.

- August 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

[display ad]
DIBOLL & CHARLTON
(formerly of New Orleans)
Architects and superintendents
No. 729 Elm street
(Third Floor.)

- August 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -



 

UNDER THE DOME.
______

Quiet Reigns and Business is
Dull.

     Sheriff Lewis had just come in from the country and was discussing South Carolina politics with a few friends. Henry was raised in Anderson county and Sloan, his brother, served under Wade Hampton in 1876, the year which recorded on the dial plates of time and the pages of history, the redemption of the Palmetto State from negro and alien rule.
     Henry agreed that Ben Tillman will be the next governor of South Carolina, but he stoutly maintained that Wade Hampton and M. C. Butler will go back to the United States senate without any opposition.

- September 1, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Mrs. Martha A. Burk, writing to the chief of police of this city from 334 South Beaudry street, Los Angeles, Cal., makes inquiry after the whereabouts of her son, Chas. D. Burk. She states that he is 19 years old, that he came to Dallas two years ago and engaged to heard cattle for F. M. Howtz. She will be glad to get information concerning him.

- September 2, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Personal.

     M. D. Brumby of Atascosa, has accepted a position with the Southern Mercury, the Alliance paper.
     F. R. Foote, deputy in the district clerk's office, has returned from a visit to relatives and friends at his old home in Alabama.

- September 2, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

GOOD IMMIGRATION WORK.
_______

What a Northwester Has to
Say About the Times-Herald.

     Geo. L. Smith, of Oshkosh, Wis., in a letter addressed to J. M. Skelton of this city, say in reference to the special edition of the TIMES-HERALD, a copy of which Mr. Skelton mailed to him: "I believe if they were sent free all over this north country, that Texas and Dallas would have a flood of northern men and money, for we have a very poor idea of Texas. My idea was a great deal like two-thirds of the people here and it was a very poor one. I won't tell it to you in detail, as I know you will laugh at it. * * * The summer is lovely here, but the winters are tough, often below 25 to 30 degrees, and that's cold. Why farmers will go to Dakota, Minnesota and Kansas, when they can go to Texas, is just because they think as I did about Texas, and a few copies of the paper scattered through the country would go far towards changing their mind."

- September 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Personals.

     Mr. William C. Keller and bride, formerly Miss Cornelia Lindsay of Siloam Springs, Ark., returned home yesterday.
     John Meagher, who has been representing the Fort Worth Gazette here, has gone to Tyler to accept the secretaryship of the Board of Trade.
     W. H. Clark, of the Coney Island, returned last evening from New York city after a visit of six months to his old home. He spent the summer season at Coney Island, Long Branch, Cape May and other resorts on the Atlantic coast and says that he had the pleasantest time of his life. Mr. Clark went to New York by steamer and returned by rail and gives his preference to the former mode of travel.

- September 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Personals.

     Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Macey and son departed tonight for Sedalia, Mo., to make that city their future home. Mrs. Macey has been an invalid for the past eighteen months, and is now sufficiently recovered to go with her husband to Sedalia, where he holds a responsible position with the Missouri, Kansas & Texas.

- September 8, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Maurice Levison has gone to Austin to make his home there in the future.

- September 9, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personals.

     M. W. Allen, formerly in the real estate business at Fort Smith, and afterward with the C. C. & I. company in Colorado, arrived in the city this morning from Pueblo and will locate here.

- September 12, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Harvey Milligan, who has been absent several years in California, is in the city visiting relatives.

- September 15, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     At 5 o'clock to-morrow afternoon, there will be a meeting of the Mississippians in the city hall auditorium to arrange to celebrate Mississippi day at the fair. All Mississippians are invited to be present. It is intended, among other matters, to come before the meeting to extend an invitation to Gen. Chas. E. Hooker, the famous orator of that state.

- September 23,1890; Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

TENNESSEEANS MEET.
______

And Arrange the Preliminaries
for Tennessee Day.

     The meeting of Tennesseeans in the city council chamber yesterday to take preliminary steps towards arranging for a proper celebration of Tennessee day at the coming fair was well attended...

- September 23,1890; Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

New Arrivals.

     Judge Lauch McLaurin and family, of Mississippi, have arrived, and are now at home in their delightful cottage at Oak Cliff, and will prove valuable acquisitions to that thriving little city. The Port Gibson (Miss.) Reveille has the following to say of the distinguished lawyer, who has decided to cast his fortunes with Dallas, the proud metropolis of Texas:
     Chancellor McLaurin has made known his intention of tendering his resignation, to take effect October 1. The bar of Vicksburg, where the judge is now holding court, drew up a memorial expressing regret at learning of this purpose, and declaring their high opinion of his ability and faithfulness to his duties. The Commercial-Herald says: "Judge McLaurin is truly one of the very best men in the state. He was one of the youngest judicial officers, at date, of appointment Mississippi ever had. He has served seven years as chancellor, and was twice appointed over competitors many years his senior and of distinguished ability as lawyers. He ranks among the foremost of the judicial officers of the state, as the Mississippi supreme court reports will verify. By his pains-taking industry; his fairness toward litigants and his uprightness as a judge, and in his private life, he has endeared himself to all who have had business in his court, or who have had business in his court, or who have met him in private. He leaves this state to take up his residence in Dallas, Texas, where he will resume the practice of law, and by his profound knowledge of the law and his large experience, both as practitioner and judge, he cannot fail of success. Those who know him best will trust him most. He surely has the commendation and best wishes of his people."

- September 24, 1890, Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Personal.

     John Donoughue, for several years a valued and popular member of the Texas press gang, came in from Cincinnati, Ohio, where he has been employed on the Enquirer since last April, last night. The growth of Dallas since his absence was a big surprise to him, and he is ready to make affidavit that the metropolis is the most progressive city in the land.
     B. A. Butler and J. H. Denis of Gainesboro, Tennessee, are in Dallas with a view of locating in Texas.

- September 26,1890; Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -


 

He Will Return
Jim Purcer, the embezzler from Nashville.

     ...of Nashville, shipped to Texas and came to Dallas some time ago.

- October 1,1890; Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

LIKE JAPHET.
______

A Kid is in Search of His
Father.

     A nine-year-old boy, evidently a stranger in the city, was picked up on Main street by Officer Durham to-day. The lad gave his name as Richard Maddox. He says his father, Richard Maddox, Sr., is a resident of Dallas and a printer by trade. Young Dick has been making his home with an aunt at Fort Scott, Kan. A few days ago, the good woman resolved that she had done her part by the boy and wrote to his father to send money to pay his fare to Dallas. No letter came in response to her invitation, so she purchased a ticket and shipped her nephew to the metropolis of Texas. The police will make an effort to locate Maddox and introduce him to his son.

- October 3, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Rev. B. W. N. Simms, pastor of the Baptist Church at Gonzales, who was recently called to the church at Honey Grove, came in to-day for a brief visit with his brother, Rev. A. M. Simms, of this city. Mr. Simms has not accepted the Honey Grove pastorate yet, but he will occupy the pulpit there Sunday.

- October 3, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Dr. Lawrence Ashton, of Fredericksburg, Va., has moved to Dallas with his family and located here.

- October 13, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Home Again.

     H. A. Archer, the genial and hustling representative of the Ohio and Mississippi railroad for the southwest, returned home last night, after an absence of several weeks, spent in the home of his boyhood, in Michigan, Mr. Archer enjoyed his visit, and his health was greatly improved by the trip. His old army friend, Colonel Tom Kingsley, of the Louisville and Nashville railroad, had arranged to meet him at the depot with a brass band, but owing to a hitch somehwere along the line, the scheme failed to pan out.

- October 14, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

I. Lowehaupt from New York City

has opened his elegant tailoring establishment in the new Exall building. His stock is the finest in the south and his facilities complete as he brought his cutter and tailors from the east. Give him a call.

- October 16, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mr. and Mrs. Sam Williams, of Bonham, are in the city visiting relatives and attending the Fair. Mr. Williams is an old Dallas boy and travels for a Philadelphia house.

- October 27, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -


 

[No Heading]

     W. A. Frots, auditor of the Santa Fe, has resigned to accept a similar position with the Mexican Central with headquarters in the city of Mexico.

- November 15, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

SOCIETY MIRROR.

     Mr. and Mrs. Sam Cundiff, of Longview, have taken up their residence in Dallas. Mrs. Cundiff is said to be a very fine musician.
     R. Ward Coleman, one of the lecturers of the national Farmers' Alliance and a brilliant young newspaper writer, was married at Currie, Ind., on Nov. 12, to Miss Carrie Simpson, a leading society lady of that place, as well as a most beautiful woman. Mr. and Mrs. Coleman area expected in Dallas, their future home, in a few days. Mr. Coleman is a member of the editorial staff of the Mercury, the organ of the Farmers Alliance.

- November 18, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

[City Notes]

     John B. Stone, one time a prominent resident of Dallas, but for several years past a resident of Kansas City, writes to his friend, A. E. Bouche, that he will remove at an early day to Spokane Falls, Washington, and take up his residence in that city.

- November 19, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Col. H. S. Ervay, ex-mayor of Dallas, but now a resident of Colorado Springs, is in the city meeting old friends. He will remain for about two weeks.

- November 22, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

SOCIETY MIRROR.

     Mrs. Charles Titch, nee Miss Wertheimer, a former social favorite of this city, is the guest of her uncle, Mr. J. Dunkelspeil and family.
     Mrs. Herman Elsas, now a resident of New York, accompanied by her sister, Miss Tillie Reinhart, has returned to Dallas. Miss Tillie is a beautiful and acomplished young lady, and will be a great acquisition to Dallas society.

- November 26, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Major Henry Cornwell of Scottsville, Ky., is the guest of his nephews, Edward and Robert Cornwell. He has not been in Dallas since 1876, and the changes are numerous.

- November 27, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mr. George G. Garrett, a well-known young Dallasite, who as been in the employ of several local electric companies several years, has gone to New Orleans, where he has secured a responsible position with a company in that city.

- December 6, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Mr. B. S. Leiper, of Louisiana, formerly of Nashville, Tenn., is in the city with a view of locating.

- December 10, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 7.
- o o o -

Society Mirror.

     Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Coleman arrived in the city yesterday and are stopping at the Windsor. The young couple have just completed their bridal tour of six weeks in Florida, Louisiana and a visit with relatives in Mississippi and Georgia. Mr. Coleman is one of the lecturers of the national alliance and was for several years on the editorial staff of the National Economist, published at Washington, D. C. Mr. and Mrs. Coleman will make Dallas their home in future. Mr. Coleman being now connected with the editorial department of the Southern Mercury. Mrs. Coleman is an Indiana girl, a most charming lady, and the Times-Herald welcomes her to the proud metropolis of the empire state of the South.

- December 15, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

Personal.

     George W. Edwards, ex-sheriff of Bowie county, is in the city, the guest of John Norton, and talks of locating in the metropolis.
     Z. T. Harrington of Vernon is in the city, visiting old friends.

- December 16, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Society Mirror.

     Misses May and Ella Cole left Saturday for a visit in Abilene, their former home, where they will be the guests of Gen. Sayles and family.

- December 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -