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[No Heading]

     Ed Keef, of Mesquite... to Austin as door keep...

- January 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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Personals.

    W. R. Howell, a former Dallasite, but recently from Bryan, has returned to the city to locate.
    Mike Connoly, formerly with the Morning News, has gone to Memphis, the former home of Mrs. Connoly, where he accepts a position on the Avalanche.

- January 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Personals.

    Mr. W. R. Howell, once a wholesale boot and shoe repair dealer of Dallas, now a banker at Bryan, is in the city.

- January 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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[No Heading]

    Mrs. Mary Burns, of Gadsden, Ala., wants to know the whereabouts of her husband, John Henry Burns, who worked for a Mr. Strickland and boarded with R. L. Pool. Prior to June 21, she addressed his letters to 720 Commerce street, since which time, she has heard nothing from him. They have a family of five children, and she will thankfully received any information leading to the discovery of his present location.

- January 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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Personals.

    W. H. Coleman, formerly of Dallas, but more recently from Uvalde, has returned to take up his residence in this city.

- January 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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City News.

    Engineer Burt D. Willis has resigned his position in the city fire department to accept a place in the El Paso department.
    Ike Morrison, who skipped the city about a year ago...said to be residing in Baltimore.

- January 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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A FLY YOUNG MAN.
_______

Ed C. Kelly Arrested Under Charge
of Being a Suspicious Character.

     A few days ago, Chief Arnold of the city police department, received a card from the city marshal of Fort Worth offering a reward for one Ed C. Kelly who, it was stated, was suspected of firing Schwartz' photograph gallery in that city on the morning of the 1st inst. and stealing a large lot of lenses.
     Detective Cain and Patrolman Kirby were detailed to spot Kelly if, perchance, he was in the city. The officers had been watching only a short while, when one evening, they discovered a man suiting Kelly's description eating supper at the Tennessee hotel. Matters, as they developed, convinced them that Kelly was the right party, and this morning, they took him into custody and searched his room at the Tennessee hotel. An inventory of his effects show two valises, a small trunk and a handsome case containing photographers' lenses; also, letters were found acknowledging receipt of lenses which he has shipped to parties. From his person were recovered two pair of elegant opera glasses, one of pearl and gold finish, a gold chain and watch, the case of which was made in imitation of a shell. A pawnbroker's ticket was found on him showing that he had pawned another watch at one of the shops in the city.
     A description of the young man is about as follows, and it was on this description that the officers were led to suspect him: About 21 years old, about 5 feet 6 inches high, weighs about 155 pounds, dark sallow complexion, dark eyes, black hair, smooth face and round, full cheeks. It tallies well with the prisoner, who wore clothes cut tailor fashion, and a white hat after the pattern of that worn by the western dude. He is an accomplished guitar picker, and the instrument was found in his room. He claims to hail from Birmingham, Ala., but more recently from Kansas City, where, he says, he was the successful proprietor of a pawnbroker's shop.
     Chief Arnold telegraphed Marshal Farmer to come and get his man and identify the goods.

- January 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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PERSONALS.

     Dr. James T. Melton will move his family here from Fort Worth about the 1st of next month.
     Mrs. Naylor, of Galveston, contemplates making this city, which she is now visiting, her home. She lived here when court was held in a log house, and her husband was the first mayor of the town. She will be pleased to meet any of her old friends.
     D. P. Williams arrive last evening from Franklin, bringing with him his bride, nee Miss Bozeman.
     C. L. Hubbard, recently from Montague, has located in the city.

- January 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Personal.

    Mr. Frank Wheat, of Nashville, Tenn., has announced his intention of making Dallas his home in [the] future. This is Mr. Wheat's old home.

- January 17, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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City News.

    Inquiry by Mrs. Martha A. Burk, whose postoffice address is Lafayette, Indiana, makes inquiry concerning Charles D. Burk, her husband, who was last heard of three months ago while he was in this city...

- January 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Personal.

   Pat O'Keif [O'Keefe], a former resident of this city, who numbers many acquaintances among its population, but more recently, a resident of Fort Smith, Ark, has returned to the city to live.

- January 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Likes South America.

     Mr. W. H. Patterson, the well-known "Pat the Druggist," who did business on the corner of Main and Poydras up to last fall, has just returned from Buenos Ayres, the principal city of South America, and is to-day, greeting his old friends. "Pat" looks well, having gained some twenty pounds in the South American capital. He says that country is booming and prosperous; European capital is going in there by the millions. England recently loaned two millions each to several states, and Antwerp capitalists have just loaned eight millions. Mr. Patterson has been representing a big life insurance company there and says he has done well, learning the Spanish language rather slowly. About 25,000 of the 400,000 people in Buenos Ayres are English speaking. He is going back in a few months to make his permanent home there.

- January 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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CITY NEWS.

     S. H. Hurlock, formerly of this city, was arrested in Fort Worth Wednesday and carried to Sherman to answer ten charges of passing forged instruments. He was released on bail.

- January 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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CITY NEWS.

     Mrs. W. A. Hudson left this morning on a two weeks visit to parents and relatives in Waxahachie, her former home.
     Mr. Webster Snyder, late general manager of the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe railway has taken up his residence in Dallas.

- February 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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CITY NEWS.
Items of Interest to Dallas People.

     At a citizen's meeting held recently, Rev. W. H. Hughes and Capt. W. White were authorized to tender Bishop Galloway of Brookhaven, Miss., a residence at Oak Cliff, adjoining the Methodist female college, which is to be built.

- February 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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THE WAGES OF SIN.
_______

Suicide of a Woman Well
Known in Dallas.

     The Fort Worth Gazette of Wednesday's date contained a special from Laredo, giving details of the suicide in the last-named place of Mrs. Mattie Tracy, who had some acquaintance in Dallas, where she formerly lived. She was the wife of J. W. Tracy, a carpenter, formerly of Marshall and Tyler:
     The family, consisting of man and wife, had been but two months in Laredo, and were living in a house occupied by several families as a tenement house. To all outside appearances, they were living happily together, but it was known that there was trouble between the couple, it is supposed on account of the fondness of the husband, for liquor and his abuse of his wife while under the influence of liquor. In fact, the wife, the day before, is said to have committed the rash act told a lady living in the house that she could not live in that manner and intended to kill herself. After the fatal shot was fired, Tracy, who was the only occupant of the room at the time of the shooting, ran out of the house and called his neighbors, crying that his wife had shot herself. The neighbors crowded the room and found Mrs. Tracey seated in an armchair by a table, gasping for breath, with a ghastly wound over her heart. A doctor was sent for, but the victim was dead long before he arrived. Tracey said his wife had been writing at the table, and then, with the parting words, "Good bye, Jack," shot herself before he could do anything to prevent it. He had been lying on a pallet on the floor some ten feet away. He was under the influence of liquor at the time the deed was done. A rigid search was made for the letter which the dead woman was writing, but it could not be found at the time. Afterwards, it is alleged to have been picked up in the room on the floor. Witnesses are willing to testify that it was not there immediately after the killing. The letter found bade her husband good bye. She says she will meet him in heaven or hell; says she had tried to be a good wife to him, but that he had broken her heart and calls on God to have mercy on her soul. Suspicions are expressed that all is not right in connection with the matter, and a grave mystery is hinted at, in which a prominent woman is thought to have had connections.

THE TRACY FAMILY IN DALLAS.

     During their residence in Dallas, which was some time last summer, Tracy, the husband of the woman who took her own life, was not unknown to the police. He was a dissipated, improvident fellow, and his home life was none of the most felicitous. It is related of him that during a Sunday debauch at home one day last June, while a clock on the mantle was striking, he seized a pistol or rifle and discharged its contents into the dial plate of the offending time piece, and for this disturbance of the peace and good order of the neighborhood, he was locked up in the calaboose. His wife, at one time, was employed as a saleswoman in a leading dry good house here, but, failing to give satisfaction, was dismissed. They subsequently went to Fort Worth, and thence probably to Laredo, when the tragedy a few days ago recalled the circumstances of their residence in this place.

LIVING IN ADULTERY.

     The woman's maiden name was Eggleton. She married a barber by the name of Goldwire and they separated in Fort Worth. She was the mother of two children, and after taking up with Tracey, made an attempt once in this city to kill him. The Laredo coroner, after spending two days in holding the inquest, returned the following verdict:
     After hearing all the evidence that could be adduced, I find that Mrs. Goldwire, alias Mrs. Tracy, of Sherman, Texas, came to her death by a pistol shot wound in the heart, fired by her own hands, and that J. W. Tracy, her alleged husband, had been living with her in adultery for the past twelve months, and is morally responsible for her death.

- February 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1
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Personal.

     J. C. St. John, has returned to reside in Dallas.
     Mr. Rush Montgomery, the young attorney who disappeared under mysterious circumstances about two weeks ago, has returned to the city.

- February 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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Personal.

     W. L. Diamond of Henderson has settled in Dallas.
     Egbert Kirby from Anson, in Jones county, has located in the city.

- February 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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Personal.

     W. M. Clark and family have gone to California to make that state their future home.

- February 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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CITY NEWS.

     Mr. James T. Hampton of New Orleans and Mrs. Jennie Connelly were united in marriage last evening by Rev. A. P. Smith. They left immediately for their home in New Orleans.

- February 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Personal.

     J. T. Skipper, of Wolf City, has arrived in the city to make his home here.
     A. L. Elliott and bride, nee Barnes, have arrived from Rockwall, where they were married, to reside in Dallas.

- February 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Ernenwein.

     Prof. Onderdonk, of San Antonio, has located in Dallas.

- February 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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CITY NEWS.

     Sheriff Lewis has received a letter from his old home in South Carolina informing him of the death of his father, aged 77 years, from paralysis.
     S. B. Hilton, of Waterloo, Ill., wants information concerning Samuel Trail, who came to Dallas in 1882, and engaged in cattle driving. The desired information is of great importance to two small orphan girls.

- March 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
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Personal.

     Judge J. N. Wharton and family have moved here from Marlin, Falls county. They come to reside in Dallas.

- March 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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CITY NEWS.

    Geo. McKenzie, an ex-deputy sheriff of this county, has just returned from a three years stay in Australia, where he is reputed to have made a "barrel" of money.

- March 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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[No Heading]

     John F. Behrman, formerly employed in the auditor's office of the T. & P. railway, has gone to Corsicana to accept the position there as treasurer of the Cotton Belt.

- March 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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Personal.

     A pleasant reunion, of old boyhood chums, was that this morning in the meeting of Jno. A. Saddler, of Denison, J. A. Cox and C. D. Chambers, of Terrell, and Mr. J. W. Clark, of Clark & Ford, printers. These young men were raised in Saulsbury, Hardeman county, Tenn., and were then school-mates and chums, and this is their first meeting since 1873, when they scattered from Saulsbury. The pleasures of the meeting are better imagined than described.

- March 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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IN DESTITUTE CIRCUMSTANCES.
_______

A Woman and Her Four Little Girls
Appealing for Help.

     A woman with four little children---the oldest of whom was not to exceed seven years, and all girls---called at the mayor's office this morning for assistance. The applicant's appearance showed refinement; her children were bright and pretty, dressed neat, and an endeavor to make the best use of resources at hand was plainly visible.
     Her story was simple and touching. Her husband, who is deaf and nearly blind, came to Dallas looking for employment. Their last cent has been spent and still he has no hopes of success in securing work.      They were reduced to destitution and the wife was forced, for the sake of their bright little children, to go out and appeal to public charity.

- March 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Personal.

     M. L. Botlorff from Edna, Kan., has settled in Dallas.
     Rev. M. P. Matheney has gone to Georgia to represent the interests of Waco Baylor University in that state. He makes his headquarters in Atlanta.
     E. W. Groves, a civil engineer from Ann Arbor, Mich., arrived in the city yesterday and will locate here. At present, he occupies rooms at Mr. Will Hunstable's on Wall street in South Dallas.

- March 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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Personal.

    Rev. N. Givens, publisher of The Texas Church News, is in the city...has been printing his paper in Fort Worth...but moves to Dallas.

- March 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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IMMIGRATION TO TEXAS.
______

The Difficulties of Inducing It to
Come to the State.

     The partial failure of all efforts by the people of Texas to induce a large and steady inflow of immigration to the state is a matter of current history. Many attempts have been made to effect this purpose, but the fact remains indubitable that these attempts have not been so successful as their promoters had anticipated or desired. It is true that the population o f Texas is constantly increasing, but not with that rapidity which the inducements the state has to offer to the home-seeker ought to secure.
     Mr. A. D. Rust, editor of the Waco Plaindealer, and formerly immigration agent in the North for several railways in Texas, is in the city, and was accosted by a reporter for the T
IMES-HERALD this morning for his views on the subject. Mr. Rust is a very keen observer of events, and his views are of special interest. The reasons, in Mr. Rust's opinion, why the movements to secure a larger volume of immigration to Texas have not been more successful is because of the competition of other sections of the Union for it. ["]California, New Mexico, Arizona, Montana and Washington Territory have innumerable agents throughout Illinois, Iowa, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana and other states advertising the advantages of the sections soliciting immigration. These agents are plentifully supplied with immigration literature describing in extravagant language, the country in whose interest they are working. Their efforts are greatly aided by the railroad companies giving greatly reduced rates to prospectors and immigrants. Consequently, the bulk of the immigration has been directed to the West and a considerable portion to the far northwest, in Washington Territory and Montana.  The Western railroads are directly interested in the development of those sections, and hence, are lending their co-operation and influence in the work of settling them with a desirable class of people. While Texas has been pretty well advertised, the other states and territories competing with us for immigration, have outdone us in that matter. In addition to this, the Northern man is imbued with the idea that the climate of Texas will produce physical deterioration, and he prefers a higher latitude."
     "Are there any political or sectional prejudices against Texas""
     "There may be some sectional prejudice still existent in the North, but it is not sufficient to cut any figure in the matter. A man would have to look for it to find it. There is, however, a pretty general idea that Texas is a lawless state, and this misapprehension is militating against the interests of the state. It is hard to convince the people of the North that the people of Texas are the most law-abiding of any in the Union. This impression of lawlessness in Texas took root in the Northern mind some years ago, when there was probably more reason for it, and it has never been quite eradicated. Here is a work which should enlist the best efforts of the Texas immigration agent."

- March 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Personal.

    Mr. Hal Noble, of Ervay street, returned last night to Swanee College, in Cumberland Mts., Tennessee. His departure after vacation was delayed by sickness. He will be absent a year.

- March 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Personal.

     Capt. A. D. Saddler of Galveston, who has been appointed district oil inspector under the new act, has arrived in the city and will establish his office here.

- July 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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Personal.

     Frank Pierce, recently from Victoria, is making his home in Dallas.
     Pat Roberts and wife leave this evening on a two or three months trip to Kentucky, Mr. Roberts' boyhood home, going by way of New Orleans. They will visit relatives in Indiana and take in the St. Louis fair and exposition on their return trip.

- July 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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An Important Transaction.
Mr. Ed C. Smith purchases Siler's Transfer Line.

    W. P. Siler, the proprietor of the well-known Siler's transfer line, has sold the property and business to Ed. C. Smith, who will hereafter control and operate it. Mr. Siler will be connected with the business for some months yet, at the expiration of which time, he will leave for North Carolina. Mr. Smith has purchased eligible grounds on Ervay street near Wood and Jackson, and will soon begin the erection of commodious stables and an office thereon.

- July 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Personal.

     Robert Smith has returned to the city after a year's sojourn in England.

- July 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8?, col. 1.
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Personal.

     Mr. John Bryan, of Burnet county, the first child born in Dallas , January 9th, 1846, is, at present, a guest of Mrs. Sarah H. Cockrell. He is the first child of John Neely Bryan, the first settler of Dallas county, now deceased, and his wife, nee Margaret Beeman, yet surviving.

- July 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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About the City.

    Rev. J. S. Kendrick, now in Boston, writes to have his Times-Herald changed to follow him from East Harwick, Mass., and says: "I have been receiving it all right, which has been very pleasant for me to hear from home every day, and then you give so full an account of the local news. I hope that success may follow you."

- July 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 1.
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[No Heading]

    D. H. Woodworth, who recently came here from Dongola, Ills., has been using the mails since his arrival to enlighten some of his old acquaintances on the advantages offered by Dallas, and the result is he had received word that several of them are going to locate here with their families.

- July 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
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The Lone Star State.

    The drug store of Myer Bros. drug company of Dallas in Gainesville, which has been under the management of Adolph Hoffman, a young man from Dallas, burglarized...

- July 30, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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Personals.

    Miss Roberta L. McChesney of New Orleans, will make Dallas her home, and at present, she is stopping with her cousin, Mr. E. L. Gwartney, on Ross avenue. Miss McChesney has gained a wide reputation for her charitable works.
    Chas. Sheldon, agent of the Wells-Fargo Express Company in this city, has resigned his position to take effect August 1. Mr. Sheldon will preach the Gospel, and his first charge will be the pastorate of the Jennings, La., Congregational Church, which he will accept soon.

- July 30, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personals.

    Mr. E. L. Perry has arrived from Houston to succeed Mr. C. F. Shelton as manager of the Wells Fargo express at this place.
    Chas. H. Schuhyler, a well known printer, has returned to the city to live.
    W. M. Protzman, of Memphis, has located in Dallas.

- August 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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IN AND ABOUT DALLAS.

     Mr. Blankenship has returned from a visit to the home of his boyhood in Kentucky. He looks improved by the trip. His address while gone was Denmark, Ky., by rail to Campbellsville, thence 20 miles in buckboard, thence 10 miles horse back, thence 5 miles afoot.

- August 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

     The daughter of Mrs. Mary Hobbs makes inquiry about her. Chief of Police J. C. Arnold will gladly receive any information of her whereabouts.

- August 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personal.

    W. R. Lotz, wife and children, of Baird, who are en route to their future home in Washington Territory, are stopping in the city visiting relatives.
    E. W. Cole, of Memphis, Tenn., late of Dallas, spent a couple of days in the city this week, visiting his wife and son. He left for the east Friday.

- August 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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ABOUT THE CITY.

     Rev. M. T. Brown (colored) of Paris, has been called and accepted the pastorate of the Young Street Christian (colored) Church.

- September 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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[No Heading]

     Miss Sallie Judkins of Dallas, formerly manager of the Western Union Telegraph office at Gainesville, has gone to Gainesville to take charge of the telegraph office during the vacation of Mr. John Prudhomme at the magnetic springs in Lebanon, Mo., where he goes for his health.

- September 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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Personal.

     Mr. Milligan's wife and daughters, Misses May and Lena, have gone to join him in California, where their home is to be in the future. Mr. Milligan is an old citizen of Dallas, long engaged in the printing business here, and there are many friends who part with him with regret.

- September 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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ABOUT THE CITY.

     A move wagon loaded with household effects of Mr. Jones of Oak Cliff floated off a bridge while coming into the city this afternoon and the goods carried away by the current. Mr. Jones is moving to Houston, where he has taken charge as assistant general freight agent of the Houston & Texas Central.

- September 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personal.

     Friends at Oak Cliff regret the departure of Mr. H. C. Jones and family, who leave to-night for their future home in Houston.

- September 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Personal.

     J. W. Lessenberry and family returned yesterday from their old home near Milam, Tennessee. They were called there by a protracted illness resulting in the death of Mrs. Lessenberry's father.

- September 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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DALLASITES
_________

Talk to a Times-Herald Reporter
on Various Topics.

     G. R. Weatherington, formerly of Brownwood, now of Dallas, has recently located in this city.
     E. M. Longcope of Lampasas is now in Dallas and will make it his home in the future. He will fill the responsible position of cashier in the Central National Bank. Mr. Longcope has been for a number of years, engaged in the banking business in West Texas, and, being a gentleman of pluck, push, energy and enterprise, will be quite an acquisition to the business and social circles. Thus, a good man makes a good move.

- September 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Rosser-Curtice.

The following is from the Louisville Courier-Journal:
     There was at noon yesterday, a quiet home wedding at "The Pines," the handsome country residence of Mr. W. H. Curtice, near Eminence, Henry county. The contracting parties were Dr. C. M. Rosser of Dallas, Texas, and Miss Elma Curtice, eldest daughter of John Curtice, Esq.  The ceremony was pronounced by Rev. W. H. Whitsitt, of this city, in the presence of a few relatives and intimate friends. The newly-wedded pair came to this city last evening accompanied by Miss Betty Curtice and Mr. J. M. Curtice, brother and sister of the bride, andheld a reception at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, where they recieved the hearty congratulations of many friends. They left last night for St. Louis and will go thence to New Orleans and will make their future home in Dallas.
     Dr. Rosser is the editor of the Texas Courier-Record of Medicine, and is a young physician of prominence and popularity. His bride is a charming lady, highly accomplished, who has many admirers and friends.

- September 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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ABOUT THE CITY.

     Mrs. H. Schultz of 2327 Carr street, St. Louis, makes inquiry of the whereabouts of her husband, Wm. Schultz, a baker. She says he went to Houston June 15 last, and then to Dallas.

- September 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Personal.

     Mr. Frank G. Bean, a popular citizen of Marlin, and a well-known business man, has taken a position with the extensive lumber firm of Messrs. Petrie & Co. of this city.

- September 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personals.

     J. W. Hearne has arrived in Dallas. Mr. Hearne recently received the appointment of internal revenue collector for this district.

- September 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personals.

     John F. Legler, who has been manager of the B. F. Avery & Sons' business at Fort Worth since it was established, has resigned and accepted a position with the Keating Implement Company of this city.

- September 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Coy Cupid's Conquest.

     Miss Minnie Alston of Dallas and Mr. Harry E. Farrell of St. Louis, were united in marriage at the Church of the Sacred Heart in this city yesterday evening at 5 o'clock, Father Martiniere officiating. Ushers, Mr. Gloer and Dr. C. B. Lewis. Miss Alice O'Maley of Denison and Mr. Eugene Brenlett of Dallas, with Miss Adeline Alston, niece of the bride, and Master Willie Keating were the attendants. At the conclusion of the beautiful and impressive ceremony, the bridal party were given a magnificent reception at the residence of Mrs. Edwin Smith's, the bride's grand-mother, on Pearl street.
     Miss Minnie is a refined, accomplished and highly-cultured young lady, very popular in society and social circles.
     Mr. Farrell is chief clerk in the general freight office in St. Louis of the St. Louis, Arkansas & Texas railway, a nice, clever and intelligent gentleman.
     They left on last night's north-bound Central for St. Louis, their future home.

- September 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Robbed by Negroes.

     Last night, about 8:30, a white man reports to have been robbed on San Jacinto street by two negro men of the sum of $54.75. He gives his name as William Wood, and lives on Lake avenue. He has been in Dallas only a few months and says he came from Hillsboro. His coat and shirt were badly torn, which he claims was done in the scuffle with the negroes. He had started home, and while walking along San Jacinto street, he was held up by one of the robbers, inviting him to look down the barrel of a pistol, while the other made ready to go through him. About this time, Wood called for help, agreeable to his statement, but no one came to his relief. The passengers and driver of a street car were passing the victim, but failed to come to his calls. It is claimed that the robbery was done on that portion of the street where many people reside, and being at an early hour, it appears strange that not a single person offered assistance.

- September 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
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HIS ARM CUT OFF.
______

The Life Misfortune that Befell a
Brakeman.

     Last night, about 11 o'clock, W. F. Shuttleton, a brakeman who was engaged in switching cars in the Central yard, caught his foot in a guard and stumbled and fell across the track. He managed to release his foot and throw his body off the rail in time to save his life, but a truck caught his left arm and nearly severed it from the body. The wounded man was carried to Patterson's drug store, where amputation was successfully performed and he was removed to the city hospital. To-night, he will be transferred to the railway company's hospital at Houston. Shuttleton is a single man, a native of Indianapolis. He has been railroading in and about Dallas the past twelve years and he has many friends among all classes who will be pained to hear of his misfortune.

- October 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4
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Personal.

     Mrs. Pierce of Victoria arrived in the city yesterday, and she and her husband, who recently located in Dallas, will reside on Cabell street.

- October 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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Personal.

     John P. Rogers resigned his position as record clerk of the Texas & Pacific in the car department yesterday, and left immediately for his home in St. Louis.

- October 10, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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[No Heading]

     After a number of years of practice in Chicago, Detroit and New York, Dr. Wilkins has located permanently in Dallas and, with his superior facilities, proposes to make Dallas headquarters for everything pertaining to dentistry. Teeth, $6; gold fillings, $1.

- October 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4
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COURT PROCEEDINGS.

     C. G. Frost, a native of Germany, and at present a resident of Oklahoma, took out final naturalization papers here to-day.

- October 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Personal.

     Ben Collins, formerly of the Texas & Pacific, now of San Antonio, is in the city.

- October 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
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Personal.

    H. W. Godbold of Los Angeles, Cal., an old Dallasite, is in the city, the guest of T. F. King.

- October 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
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[No Heading]

     Dr. Otis Williams from Chappel Hill is in the city visiting the fair and he speaks of locating here.

- October 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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Personal.

     E. G. Myers leaves to-night for San Antonio, where he takes charge as manager of the San Antonio Newspaper Union.

- November 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personal.

     E. B. George has gone to his old home in Enterprise, Miss., in response to a telegram announcing the dangerous illness of his mother.
     Mr. R. M. Johnson, for many years, editor in chief of the Houston Post, has resigned his position there and accepted a position as aid to editor Jinkins of the Dallas Morning News.
     Mr. Robert P. Tool, for some time past on the editorial staff of the Post, resigned his position and returned home to Dallas yesterday. Mr. Toole, besides being a splendid journalist, is a most agreeable gentleman, and the Post management parts with him with genuine regret. He returns to North Texas with the hope that a change may repair his health, and the good wishes of all of his fellow employes on the Post go with him.---Houston Post.

- November 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
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City Notes.

     The body of Joe Hargrave passed through here from the Indian Territory en route to Duncanville yesterday evening. His brother-in-law, John Penn, received a telegram stating that Hargrave was killed, but which gave no further information on the subject.  Deceased, who is a son of Dr. Hargrave, who recently moved to Denton, is well known in this city, and has been always looked upon as a good natured, though reckless young man. It is generally believed that he met with foul play in the Indian country.

- November 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-2.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS

     The First Baptist Church has called Dr. W. W. Laudrum [Landrum?], pastor of the Second Baptist Church at Richmond, Va., to its pastorate.
     Dr. J. W. Gurley, for six years a successful dentist of Nashville, Tenn., has recently located in Dallas and has an office at 734 Elm street, and a card in the T
IMES-HERALD. Those needing work in his line would do well to call on him.

- November 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Personal.

     Mr. H. S. Moore and daughter of Kenton, Tenn., arrived here last night and will hereafter reside in Dallas. Mr. Moore is a brother of W. C. J. Moore, a merchant of this city.

- November 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personal.

     Julius Busch, a leading merchant of Lamonte, Mo., who recently visited Dallas, writes to a friend that he will dispose of his interests in that state and embark in mercantile pursuits in Dallas, according to his opinion, the best city in the country.

- November 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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[No Heading]

     V. O. Hildreth and J. N. Edmonson, two young disciples of Blackstone, were admitted to the practice of law in Texas in Judge Burke's court to-day. They were introduced to the judge by Col. Crawford, who gave the a most flattering send-off, saying that they came highly reommended from Lexington, Ky., where their respective families are among the first in the land. Messrs. Hildreth and Edmonson graduated from Ann Arbor, Mich., were admitted to the bar in that state, but have decided to locate in the imperial city of Texas.

- November 19, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
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Personals.

    Mrs. C. V. Holland and daughter, of Eminence, Ky., arrived in the city this morning. They will make Dallas their future home.

- November 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Mr. Phillip K. Baker of this city, and formerly of Columbus, Miss., was married yesterday evening to Miss Annie Bishop at the residence of her mother, Mrs. Mary E. Bishop, corner of Marion and Cadiz streets.
     A. W. Flemming, a Massachusetts man, has come to this city with the avowed intention of starting a frog farm. He believes that there is a great profit in the business when manged by men who thoroughly understand the routine. Mr. Flemming thinks he will have no trouble in obtaining a lease of undrained land on the Trinity river close to the city which will prove favorable to the growth of the frog; and, moreover, he believes that the Dallasites will cultivate a taste for this toothsome reptile.

- November 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2-3.
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[No Heading]

     Died on the 22d inst. at Junction City, Kimble county, A. E. Fisher, 57 years of age. The deceased was a brother to W. A. Fisher of Elm street, in this city, where they were in business together until recently. Mr. Fisher was a Royal Arch Mason in good standing.

- November 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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A Mother's Love.
She Travels Hundreds of Miles to Locate Her Boy.

    Mrs. J. H. Shammons, of Lawrence, Ks....son, ca. 18 or 19 years old. She is staying at the Arlington Hotel.

- November 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
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Her Search Futile.

     Mrs. J. W. Shammons, of Lawrence, Kans., whose arrival in this city in quest of her son was noted in these columns yesterday, is still in the city stopping at the Arlington. It seems that her son, who is a telegraph operator, left the paternal roof a year ago, taking with him a considerable sum of money, belonging to his mother. No tidings of the young fellow reached Lawrence until a few days ago. Mrs. Shammons was led to believe that the graceless youth was holding forth in Dallas. Yesterday, she visited all the hotels and boarding houses and, to-day, will visit the telegraph offices. The chances are that the object of her search is not a resident of Dallas. The anxious lady was very despondent over the failure of her mission last evening, and if success does not crown her efforts to locate her son to-day, she will abandon the search return to her home.

- November 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
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A GIFT FROM IOWA.
______

A Magnificent Farm Wagon Pre-
sented to Confederate Home at
Austin.

     J. H. Matthews, of Lampasas, a former resident of Dallas, is in the city. Mr. Matthews, who is state agent for the Orchard City Wagon Company, of Burlington, Iowa, was a brave Confederate soldier, and takes a deep interest in the welfare of his old comrades-in-arms who are inmates of the Confederate Home. Last evening, Mr. Matthews forwarded the following letter, which is self-explanatory.
     DALLAS, Nov. 25.--- Major F. Waltman, vice president railroad traveling men's C. A. association: Dear Sir.--It affords me unbounded pleasure to inform you that I have, this day, shipped to Hon. Walter Tips, an elegantly-finished Orchard City wagon, donated to the Confederate Home at Austin, by Messrs. Funck & Hertzler, the manufacturers.
     Will you please tender this wagon the directors of the home, that they may make such disposition as they think best. To you and myself, as well as to all old soldiers of the lost cause, this gift from Messrs Funck & Hertzler is the more pleasing since they wore blue in the late unpleasantness. Hoping that your association may meet with the success your undertaking deserves,
I am yours truly,
J. H. M
ATTHEWS.
State agent for the Orchard City wagon.

     Several months ago, Mr. Matthews wrote to the firm, and in his letter, he enclosed a copy of the appeal spread broadcast by Governor Ross. Mr. Matthews asked that a single wagon be forwarded by the company to be placed on exhibition at the Dallas Exposition, their representative in Texas agreeing to pay the freight charges on same. In a few days, a reply came. The manufacturers regretted that they could not send a wagon to be placed on exhibition, but that they would turn out one of the best ever made and present it to the Confederate Home, in response to the appeal of Governor Ross. Mr. Matthews informed a TIMES-HERALD reporter to-day that the present is a beauty and the sides are decorated with stars and bars.

- November 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Conference Notes.

     The Rev. D. F. Fuller, late pastor of the Floyd street M. E. Church South, will preach at that church to-night, when he will take final leave of his members. This divine has ably filled this pulpit the past year, and only goes to his new field of labor, Phoenix, Arizona Territory, from a sense of duty, in response to an urgent appeal from Bishops Hargrove and Key as to the exigency of the case. The scene upon the conference floor was very touching and deeply impressive as he bade them farewell...

- November 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
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WHERE IS TRASK?
_______

A Woman Who Has Spent Thou-
sands in an Effort to Locate Her
Son.

     Two years ago, Alfred E. Trask, a Boston boy, graduated from school in that city and was furnished capital to embark in the merchant tailoring business in New York City by his mother, a widow lady of means. Young Trask found business lie irksome and he fretted and fumed under the restraints placed upon him. He sold out his business for $3000 in cash and disappeared. The mother spent hundreds of dollars in a vain effort to ascertain what had befallen him and finally concluded that he had been waylaid, murdered and robbed and his body secreted in the slums of New York. She married a wealthy wholesale furniture dealer and removed from Boston to a western state. Three weeks ago, a traveling salesman in the employ of her husband startled the lady by announcing her son was not dead, but was a clerk in the offices of the Santa Fe at Topeka. She visited Topeka and became convinced her son had been a resident of that city, under the alias of Frank Green for several months, but had purchased a ticket for Dallas, Texas, a day or two before. She came at once to Dallas and called at the Gould building to-day, and was shown through the various departments by the auditor. New additions have recently been made to the clerical force, but Trask, alias Green, was not among them. The lady placed the case in the hands of a private detective, instructing him to locate her son at any cost, and will return to her Northern home this evening.

- November 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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THE SICK CURED WITHOUT MEDICINE.
______

Magnetism is Crowned the King
That Rules the Destiny of Every
Human Ill.
"TIS LIFE'S ENCHANTED CUP."

     Dr. F. Clement Dillings, the recognized "Prince of Healers" by means of his strange magnetic power, and also expert specialist in medicine for the treatment of chronic diseases, will deliver a free lecture upon the various methods of treating disease at the hall lately occupied by Evangelist Sayles, No. 715 Elm street, Wednesday night at 8 o'clock, all invited. After the lecture, the doctor will heal the sick free of charge, without money and without price. Those who do not feel able to pay for treatment are especially invited to be present as the doctor withholds his healing power from none. Free healing by the magnetic method will be given on Thursday, Friday and Saturday forenoons at the same hall between 10:30 and 11:30 and which the public care invited to attend. The doctor's office and reception rooms are at the St. George hotel, where he grants free consultation. Though he has only been in the city for a few weeks, he has effected several remarkable cures which are attracting considerable attention. The doctor is lately from Topeka, Kan., where he was located several years. He comes to Texas for the benefit of our milder climate.

- November 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Mr. and Mrs. Grant Campbell arrived in Dallas from Fort Worth this morning. Mr. Campbell expects a position in the post office department, while his wife will probably be sought by the parishioners of St. Patrick's church to join the choir.

- November 30, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Personal.

     Rev. Lee A. Hanson of Alabama, who was appointed to Oak Lawn Station, M. E. Church, South, by the North Texas conference recently held in Greenville, reached the city to-day and will occupy his pulpit at 11 o'clock a. m. and also at 8 o'clock p. m. to-morrow.
     Miss Hattie Nye, a young lady who was at one time noted in Dallas for her dramatic talent, is now on a visit with Mr. and Mrs. Albert Mann. Miss Nye's home is now in California, where her step father, Rev. Mr. Daniels, at one time Congregationalist minister of Dallas, is now residing.

- November 30, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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THE RAILROADS
______

E. P. SILER'S DEPARTURE FOR THE
CITY OF MEXICO.

To-night, Mr. E. P. Siler, for fifteen years engaged in the transfer business in this city, departs for the City of Mexico to engage in a similar business in the halls of the Montezumas. He takes with him letters of introduction to Mastellar Clark of the Two Republics and other prominent Americans in that city. Mr. Siler sold out his interests in June last and journeyed to Mexico. There he met E. C. More, consul general of the United States, a most affable gentleman, and was shown by him over the city and heartily welcomed there by men of the English speaking races. So favorably impressed was he with the country and its surroundings, that he determined to locate there. He will establish a transfer and bus line and is confident that he will reap a big harvest on the capital he invests. The TIMES-HERALD regrets his departure to that distant city. He is one of the land marks of Dallas, a pioneer in the history of the Queen City. In his new home, may he reap fortune and fame is the sincere wish of his legion of friends.
J. A. Smith, the affable and accommodating division freight agent of the M. K. & T. in Texas, has returned to the city. Althoug a young man, Mr. Smith has won a high place for himself in railroad circles. He was called from a responsible position at Waco by the receivers of the M. K. & T. and has won golden encomiums in his present position.

- December 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1-2.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     On Wednesday evening at 7:30, services will be held at the Church of Incarnation, and later on, a reception will be given at the residence of Rev. Mr. Wickens in compliment to Rev. Mr. Turner, the new dean of St. Matthew's Cathedral.
     The Rev. Sam R. Hay, the appointed pastor for the Floyd Street M. E. Church, South, this conference year, will arrive on to-morrow's train from Sherman and preach to-morrow night. The members are preparing to give he and his wife a royal reception, after services, at the parsonage, in the way of the substantials of life.

- December 3, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     Mrs. Sydney Tabor and family, who have just arrived here from England, will make their home at Oak Cliff.

- December 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
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Personal.

    Mrs. Grant Campbell, sister to T. J. Murnane, of this city, arrived here this afternoon from Fort Worth. Mrs. Campbell has been requested by the pastor of St. Patrick's church to take the leadership of the Catholic choir.

- December 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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THE RAILROADS.

     Charles T. Dye, the good-looking young gentleman who has been holding down the Missouri, Kansas & Texas offices, has resigned his position and will take his flight northward in a few days.

- December 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     The First Baptist Church of this city, in conference to choose a pastor, unanimously elected Dr. A. M. Simms, of Cleburne, Tex. He is a Virginia by birth, a nephew of Rev. John A. Rhoades, president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary at Louisville, and a gentleman of great learning and ability.

- December 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Personal.

     Mrs. Hugh Fitzgerald, wife of one of the TIMES-HERALD reporters, arrived in Dallas yesterday from Sedalia. Mr. Fitzgerald having preceded her a few weeks. Mrs. Fitzgerald has accepted a position as society editress of this paper, and courtesies extended her will be appreciated by the TIMES-HERALD. Mrs. Fitzgerald has had abundant experience in her line of work, and the society people of Dallas will find her department in the TIMES-HERALD complete and interesting.

- December 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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Personal.

     George A. Carden, a well-known young attorney of this city, drifted from journalism into his present field of usefulness. In days gone by, he was a member of the press gang in the cities of St. Paul and Kansas City. He boomed the Indian Territory country for the Kansas City Times, represented the Pioneer Press in the Black Hills country, and served in the capacity of traveling correspondent for the Chicago Times in the days when Wilbur F. Storey, the great founder of that journal, was at the helm.

- December 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Lockhart-Swanson.

    Mr. William Lockhart of Fort Worth and Miss Ada Swanson of Dallas, were married in this city yesterday evening at the residence of the bride's family, Eld. J. H. officiating. The happy couple left for Fort Worth, where they will reside...

- December 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
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A DISTRESSED MOTHER.
_______

She Has Not Heard From Her Son
Three Years Past.

     A gentleman in this city is in receipt of a letter from Mrs. Sarah Bouch, Batersea park road, London, England, in which the lady makes diligent inquiry after her son, Albert Edward Bouch, age 29 years, who left home in London in June 1884, and was last heard from in Galveston. The distressed mother says: "I have not heard from my dear son since three years last August. If you can give me any news of him, please do so, or if you can tell through any account of him, please do all in your power to relieve the feelings of a broken-hearted mother. If you are a parent yourself, I am sure you will be pleased to do all in your power."
     Any information regarding the young man's whereabouts will reach the lady at the address given above.

- December 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

RAILROADS.

     Tom Barrett has resigned his position with the Missouri, Kansas & Texas railroad, and accepted a more lucrative one with the Mexican National. He will leave to-night for the City of Mexico, and his Dallas friends trust that his lines will be cast in pleasant places.

- December 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE RAILROADS.

     Mrs. Frank Trumbull, wife of Col. Frank Trumbull, at one time auditor of the Texas & Pacific railroad, died in Denver Saturday last. The remains were taken to Sedalia, Mo., where the parents of deceased reside, for interment. Mrs. Trumbull was a most amiable woman, a great favorite in Dallas society, and the announcement of her demise was received with unfeigned sorrow by those who loved her in Dallas.

- December 30, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
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