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Updated December 27, 2001

 

 

1891
JUSTICE BRASWELL'S COURT.

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Several Dark-Skinned People in Court.

     Selby Donnus is an Arabian and runs a fruit stand. Selby is sad to-day. This morning, he got tangled up in the meshes of the law, and it cost him a modest little pile of his accumulated dust to get out.
     It seems that Selby and Louis Zerefonete, a product of one of Italy's sunny valleys, got mixed up in a row over a wagon, and Selby called Louis a d---- thief.
     Louis studied over the matter and concluded that things had reached a point where forbearance ceases to be a virtue, so he had Selby arrested for abusive language.
     The trial came off in Justice Braswell's court this morning.
     Louis was placed on the witness stand and testified. He swore that he and Selby were the best of friends, that he loved Selby.
     The jury found Selby guilty, and taxed him $30.

- September 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
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ARABIAN KNIGHTS.

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They Quarrel and Are Run In

     Tony Shelby, an Arabian, was before Justice Braswell yesterday afternoon on the charge of cursing and abusing George Mazarhany, a brother Arabian.
     There were a host of Greek and Arabian witnesses, who testified to a little of everything. Some of them not only swore that Tony "cussed" George, but lifted his scalp to boot. Others swore that George did all the "cussin" and Tony was as quiet as a tombstone. And, there were witness who swore that the defendant and prosecuting witness both "cussed" and "cussed" each other so liberally, that the air was still blue where the row took place.
     George swore that Tony did "cuss" him most awfully and threatened his life.
     Tony, who was sitting near the witness, jumped up and said: "Dat vas a tam lie, a tam lie!" and continued a repetition of the assertion until he was stopped by the court.
     Tony was found guilty and fined $40.

- October 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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