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(Updated June 22, 2007; added photo of Mesquite Elementary School, Class of 1922,
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photo of Mesquite Elementary School, Class of 1923)

1886
News from Mesquite.

     The Bois d'Arc Alliance met last night at the Bennett Schoolhouse. The President, E. D. Bennett, occupied the chair. Over 150 members of the Farmers' Alliance were in attendance. The delegates on cotton yard reported. Several were initiated, three being ladies.
     Moses Brown, a Farmers' Alliance man and a Knight of Labor, read a circular regarding boycotting the Stetson hat and Sanger Bros., of Dallas. The president ruled the matter out of order, as the next meeting (Tuesday) was appointed as the time to discuss that matter. Notwithstanding this, several called for James T. Vanston to address them. And he did, still maintain that he Farmers' Alliance had quite enough to do to mind their own business, and urging upon all present, to maintain a very conservative action in this matter, stating also that at the county convention called for Feb. 22, the matter would be acted on. Mr. Vanston notified meetings to be at Lancaster on Thursday, and at Lisbon on Friday and Haught's store on Saturday at 1 o'clock. He also stated that one week from next Saturday night, J. M. Knox and himself would organize an alliance at Elam, a station about ten miles distant, on the Trunk Railroad. The schoolhouse is clear of debt.
     Hon. T. F. Nash, it is regretted, leaves our community to take charge of the Grange store at Duck Creek. There is some talk of him becoming a Knight of Labor.
     Brother Kimbrough is high up in the ranks of that order.
     Dr. Paschall has sailed for Europe.
     The different Alliances of Kaufman County meet at Forney next Saturday at 1 o'clock.
     The farmers are getting along well with the spring work and many expected to have corn planted by the 20th of this month.
     The wheat and oat crop looks good, this fine weather benefiting it very much.

- February 11, 1886, Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

1890
MESQUITE MATTERS.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., Dec. 26.-- Yesterday was a very quiet Christmas, most people contenting themselves with a good dinner at home. All the stores were closed, most of the day, and the saloons were the only places where the loafers could warm themselves. The very cold weather prevented a children's donation meeting at the Methodist church to-day.
     Night before last, Marshal Quinn had his hands full. About 9 a. m., some parties found eight sacks of flour under Kimbrough's warehouse, which had been stolen out of the house and left under the house to be taken away later in the night. Watch was kept all night, but no one came for the flour, they having scented the watchers.
     Roll Humphreys, who stands charged with killing J. S. Staggs at this place, mounted his horse and proceeded to paint the town red, whereupon the marshal proceeded to run him down. He drew his knife on the marshal, but in a jiffy, he was disarmed and landed in the lock-up.

- December 26, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

1891
MESQUITE OFFICIAL CHANGES

_______

Matrimonial, Sunday School
and Other Items.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., May 13.--The town council met as usual last night, and it being the last for the old aldermen, that body retired and the newly-elected ones were installed. Ex-Representative J. C. Rugel and Hon. R. S. Kimbrough were elected in the places of A. L. Clark, deceased, and W. S. White, who declined the office. G. B. Gross, J. D. Brunner, T. L. Paschall, ex-Representative J. C. Rugel and Hon. R. S. Kimbrough compose the new board of aldermen and we anticipate the city's future prosperity to be great.
     Mr. Will Caldwell and Miss Linnie Paschall were united in the holy bonds of matrimony at Long Creek, Sunday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. Nelson Keen of Rose Hill, officiating. The fortunate groom is one of Long Creek's most prosperous farmers and the happy bride is the daughter of E. P. Paschall, a wealthy farmer and one of the first settlers of Dallas county.
     Senator R. S. Kimbrough and Ex-Mayor Russell left to-day for Paris to attend the state Sunday-school convention.
     Drs. Fowler and Pinson, two prominent physicians of Forney, were in Mesquite Monday.
     Messrs. Lyons and Jeff Starnes of Forney were in the city Tuesday.
     Calhoun Knox and family returned from Greenville, where they have been on an extended visit.
     Mr. Leon Calloway left Tuesday for Taylor county, to be gone several days.
     Mrs. J. J. Atchison and Miss Cora Paschall have returned from an extended visit to relatives at Farmer's Branch.
     The indications here are good for a big rain and farmers are jubilant, and the consequences are business is getting much better.

- May 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

MESQUITE MATTERS.
________

Glorious Rain--Growing Crops.
Personal Mention.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., May 18.--A glorious rain fell here last night which was badly needed for the growing crops, and farmers say the prospects are now very flattering for a large yield of cotton. that's just what this part of the country needs and Mesquite will do more business to the square inch than any town of its size in the county. R. S. Kimbrough is so assured of this fact, that he will begin the erection of a brick building in order to increase his already large stock and meet the demands of the people.
     T. E. Champion, once editor of the late Mesquiter, has moved back to Mesquite and has charge of the Democrat, while J. M. Knox, the editor, is attending the Press Association at Corsicana.
     Mr. R. P. Curtis and family arrived here yesterday from Kansas City, Mo., where they have been sojourning for the past six weeks.
     Mr. Perry Porter of Dallas is in our city to-day.
     Mrs. Kate Mallory and children of Elmo are in the city, the guests of Dr. and Mrs. Callaghan.
     Miss Minnie Riggs, an accomplished young lady of Forney, and Mrs. Jennie Jordan, her sister, of Terrell, were in the city yesterday visiting the family of J. M. Gross.
     H. B. Cox of Riley [Rylie?] was in town Saturday. Mr. Cox says the T
IMES-HERALD is the favorite of papers among his people.
     Mrs. F. P. Huff, wife of our accommodating station agent, gave a delightful entertainment to her friends Saturday night.
     The correspondent learns that Mr. John Cox, an old resident of Rylie, and postmaster of that place, died yesterday morning. He was well known here and everybody feels the loss.

- May 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

MESQUITE NEWS.
________

Gleaned by a Regular Correspondent.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., May 25.--The prospects for the past few days for a good rain have been good, but the people have grown so accustomed to fine prospects here that they have ceased to grumble. But, we do not exactly need a big rain now, and the prospects for a big crop are very flattering indeed.
     The little girl of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Walker, who lives a few miles east of here, was knocked off the railroad track Saturday by a freight train. It was picked up and brought to town by the train men and Dr. John O'Callahan was immediately summoned to attend the case. It was found to be considerably bruised but not dangerously hurt. From what we can learn, no blame is attached to the railroad men.
     Mr. Beach, who lives a few miles north of this place, lost a child last week with the spotted fever. Mr. Wayne Futrell has a child down with the same disease, but it is getting well. With the exception of these two cases, the health of the community is excellent. The physicians have this disease under control now and the case above referred to is the only one that has died for some time.
     Hon. J. C. Rugel has gone to Kentucky as a delegate to the general assembly of the Presbyterian Church. Ex-Mayor Russell is holding down the hardware business during his absence.
     Miss Janie Worthington, an accomplished young lady of New Hope, was in town Saturday. Miss Janie is one of the belles of this county and well known to Dallas society.
     Mr. Ed Mosley, a prominent young man of Dallas, is out visiting his friend, Geo. Worthington. They are putting in the time fishing and hunting.
     Mr. Lively, the popular traveler of the T
IMES-HERALD, was in town last week. He is a rustler and is doing good work for the HERALD out here.
     Rev. Mr. Hyter of Dallas, preached to the Presbyterians here Sunday and Sunday night. In the opinion of many, he is an able divine.

- May 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Mesquite Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., May 28.--Mrs. F. P. Huff, wife of our accommodating depot agent, gave an enjoyable entertainment last night to their many friends. All present remarked that it was one of the best of the season. Mr. Forston and his sister, Miss Lee, of Dallas, were out to assist in partaking of toast that was spread before the guests. The time flew away so fast that it was after midnight before the guests departed; and when they did leave, the look of each one told how much the entertainment had been enjoyed. Mr. and Mrs. Huff never fail to make a success on such occasions.
     Mr. Chas. T. Hill, a prominent citizen of Terrell, and his sweet little daughter, Minnie, were in Mesquite last week, visiting Dr. and Mrs. ___ O'Callaghan.
     Miss Maolo New, an accomplished young lady of this place, has accepted a position in the postoffice.
     T. E. Champion, R. L. Bennis [?] and Ed Russell, left yesterday for San Antonio. They have agreed to work for Uncle Sam five years.
     J. B. Wilson of Dallas was out yesterday.

- May 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

A DOCTOR'S BILL.
__________

Local and Personal Notes From
Mesquite.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., June 3.--The town council held its regular meeting Tuesday night in the mayor's office and the account of Dr. L. M. Stroud of Terrell, against the town for $100, was discussed. Dr. Stroud was called to Mesquite during the late epidemic to consult with the local physicians and devise some means to check the further spread of the disease then raging, and which almost depopulated our town. The doctor came over, and some time after, sent in his bill to the council,, which was rejected on the grounds that it was exorbitant and that the doctor did not do the town any good. This, as a matter of course, wounded the professional pride of the eminent doctor when he heard of it and his presence here Monday night accompanied by Capt. Allen of Terrell, was in justice to himself, and merely to present the facts of the case to the council as he viewed them. He arose and presented his case to the council in a most genteel and kindly manner and only asked for fair play, as he bore no malice toward the good citizens of Mesquite and would prefer the matter to be settled without further trouble. The council finally decided to appoint a committee to visit the physicians of Dallas and present the case to them, Dr. Stroud agreeing to settle the matter by their decision. The affair has caused a great deal [of] gossip.
     Mr. Chas. T. Hill, of Terrell, is circulating among Mesquite people this week.
     Hon. J. C. Rugel has returned from Kentucky where he has been attending the general assembly of the Presbyterian Church.
     Deputy Sheriff Bollick and family, of Dallas, were out Sunday visiting the family of W. H. Cullom.'
     Ed Vanston, R. G. Chapman, Gus and Albert Moore took in East Fork bottom on a fishing expedition Tuesday. The usual amount of snake preventative was carried along.
     Miss Ada Cullom, the accomplished daughter of our popular townsman, W. H. Cullom, was out last week from Dallas, visiting her parents, accompanied by Mrs. C. Gillespie and several others, whose names the correspondent failed to learn. She returned Sunday to finish her course in music.
     Mr. Tom Worthington, Jr., of New Hope, was down Sunday visiting one of Mesquite's belles.
     Drs. Allen of Dallas, Bohannon of Scyene and Callaghan of Mesquite, met at Mr. Chases' residence, northwest of this place, Tuesday, to perform a surgical operation on his son, who injured his limb some time ago. We learn that the operation was postponed and will be performed at some other time.

- June 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

MESQUITE NEWS.
_______

Report of a Man Found Hung.
Gibbs to Speak to the
Democracy.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, June 10.--The long looked for rain fell here Saturday, which has assured a big corn crop; cotton is also looking fine and a larger crop than usual of the fleecy staple is looked for this fall.
     The county Sunday school convention will meet at Farmer's school house near Richardson on June 20. It will be the largest gathering of the season and Mesquite will be presented en mass.
     Mr. and Mrs. Judy were in the city Sunday visiting their daughter, Mrs. F. P. Huff. Mr. Judy is superintendent and general manager of the Pecos Valley railroad.
     Miss Hattie Miller has returned from Huntsville, where she has been attending the State Normal school and will spend the summer with her sister, Mrs. B. F. Tisinger, at New Hope.
     Prof. W. P. Bradshaw, traveling agent of the Dallas School Supply Company, was in town this week.
     Miss Fannie Richardson and Mrs. Dillard, of Dallas, returned home yesterday after spending several days with Mr. and Mrs. John Duff.
     Mrs. Duff gave one of her excellent dinners Sunday in honor of her Dallas guests and Prof. Bradshaw, and the correspondent were among the invited guests.
     From some cause or other, we know not how, news reached here that a man was seen suspended to a limb in East Fork bottom, between this place and Forney, but upon investigation, it was found to be a mistake. Of course, the news created a great deal of excitement, as such a thing has never happened in the history of Mesquite. A majority of the citizens were in hopes that it was the correspondent for the Kansas City Sunday Sun of this place.
     The next meeting of the Democratic club will be on the third Tuesday in this month, when ex-Gov. Gibbs will be allowed to explode.

- June 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

MESQUITE MATTERS.
_______

A Correspondent Roasted--Per-
sonal Mention.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, June 17.--The Kansas City Sun showed up here again Sunday with a write up of Mesquite. The citizens are very indignant as it spoke very disrespectful of some of the best and most respectable families of this community, and they have about come to the conclusion that the correspondent of the dirty sheet does not board in Mesquite. If he is ever found out, Canada will be a much healthier place for him than hereabouts.
     A little shower fell here last night, but not enough to do any good.
     Dr. J. O'Callaghan attended the medical society at Terrell Monday, of which he is a member.
     Rev. Mr. Brown of Lampasas county expounded the gospel at the Presbyterian church Sunday. He is quite a young man, but a fine speaker.

- June 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

BOOMING MESQUITE.
________

What About the Separate Coach
Law?--Local Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., June 24.-- Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Huff entertained their many friends at their cosy residence in North Mesquite Saturday night. After spending some time in innocent games, a royal feast was spread before the guests. The occasion was one to be long remembered by those who were present.
     Mr. and Mrs. Jake Cullom were out from Dallas Sunday, visiting the family of W. H. Cullom.
     Miss Elna Wesson, an accomplished young lady from Forney, was visiting the family of Wm. Kimbrough Sunday.
     Rev. Mr. Pinson of Forney preached at the Baptist church Sunday and Rev. Mr. Anderson, Sunday night.
     Scyene is to have a picnic next Saturday. It is one of the best places in the county for such an occasion.
     Mesquite is on a big boom at present. Her citizens are talking of having an artesian well bored right away. The capital is here to do such a thing and why not do it? The Dallas County Democrat is doing noble work toward this grand scheme, and it is to be hoped that the citizens will appreciate it enough to give it their support.
     Miss Ada Cullom was out from Dallas Saturday visiting her parents. She returned Monday, accompanied by her sister, Miss Viola, who will remain in Dallas a week.
     We have heard the question asked very often, why the separate-coach law is not enforced? The separate coach is attached to trains, but it seems that the law is not enforced. Whose fault it is, we cannot say, and not being able to answer the question, would like to hear from the T
IMES-HERALD on the subject.

- June 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Mesquite Locals.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., June 27.--The Mesquite Democracy will meet next Tuesday night. Hon. Dudley Wooten of Dallas will address the club.
     Mrs. S. D. Lawrence is at Wooten Wells for her health.
     Miss Jones, an accomplished young lady of Dallas, is out visiting Miss Janie Smith.
     Rev. Mr. Templeton of Dallas was out yesterday, circulating among his many friends.
     Mr. Wayne Bounds was seriously hurt Tuesday by coming in contact with the rear end of a mule. At this writing, he is doing very well.
     Mr. Will Lynes of Dallas and Miss Viola Cullom, of this place, were married last night at the bride's residence in Mesquite. It was a very quiet affair, only the near relatives of the bride being present. Rev. Adair officiated. The bride and groom left immediately for Dallas, their future home.
     Drs. Allen of Dallas, Bohannon of Scyene and J. O. Callaghan of Mesquite, amputated the limb of Mr. Chase, northwest of her Friday. The bone was so badly inured that nothing short of amputation would do any good.

- June 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

DIED FROM AMPUTATION.
_______

A Revival--County Sunday
School Convention--Other
Local Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, June 30.--The Methodist denomination began a protracted meeting here Sunday night. Great good is expected.
     Mr. Chase, whose limb was amputated a few days ago, of which mention was made in the T
IMES-HERALD, died Sunday. So great was the shock, that he could not survive.
     Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Wesson and Mrs. Frank James and little girl, Dallasites, were visiting friends and relatives here Sunday.
     Mrs. C. H. Malloy of Elmo is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Dr. Callaghan.
     Miss Utia Curtis of Rockwall is in the city visiting her aunt, Mrs. R. S. Kimbrough.
     The county Sunday school convention meets at Richardson Thursday. Mesquite, as usual, will be represented.
     Mr. and Mrs. John Timmins of Cedar Hill were out Saturday visiting old acquaintances. They returned Sunday accompanied by Gracie, the little daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Cullom.

- June 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

The Crops.

From the Mesquite Democrat.
     J. G. Floyd: Corn is short, and the prospect for cotton poorer than I ever saw before at this time of year. There is plenty of stock but nothing on it. It has time yet, but not if we don't soon get rain.
     A. J. Pulaski: Just the poorest and if it don't rain soon, we will not make a fourth of a cotton crop.
     John Duff: The cotton will not make a quarter of a bale to the acre.
     F. A. Harris: My crop is very good. Cotton is fruiting very well. I have seen a much worse prospect make a powerful cotton crop.
     B. D. Bohannon: I have, both of corn and cotton, a good average crop.
     S. G. Lackey: The crop prospects are better than this time last year.
     R. S. Kimbrough: I have on my place a pretty fair crop, both of corn and cotton, and I claim to know a good crop when I see it.
     James Snyder: I have not had enough rain on my crop since it came up to wet the top of the soil; yet, I have a pretty fair crop. My corn will make fully 20 bushels to the acre if it don't rain another drop. Cotton is growing right along, and since the past two weeks, has been putting on fruit.
     D. A. Davis: Corn is made and is very good. Cotton has a fine weed, but is not fruiting in proportion to the stalk. In my opinion, we need not count on a good cotton crop this year.
     W. W. Hamilton: Corn is nothing extra. Cotton is very indifferent.
     J. D. Brunner: My cotton is late, but it looks well and gives a good promise. My corn will make nearly an average crop.
     D. J. Brown: How is my crop? It is pretty good. I have noticed ever since I have been in the state that some time during a crop season, the prospect was anything but encouraging, but it generally turns out that as much, or more, is made than can be gathered.
     John Knox: My crop promises well. You can't tell anything about cotton yet. Next month is the time for cotton to do its do.

- July 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

FROM MESQUITE.
_______

Religious, Crops and Artesian
Well Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., July 14.--The Methodist meeting, which has been protracted here, closed Friday night. It was one of the best ever held in Mesquite. About twenty souls were added to the cause of Christ and pledged themselves to battle with the storm of life and fight their way on to the better world.
     The Presbyterians have employed Rev. Mr. Hyter to preach for them six months. They will begin a protracted meeting in August.
     The weather at this point has been very warm and disagreeable. Rain is needed badly, not only for crops, but nearly every cistern and well in the city is dry. Most of the farmers of this community have been interviewed on the crop prospects, and while some say not a d---n thing will be made, others say that the prospects are better now than at this time last year. This dry spell has made the people think more seriously of boring an artesian well than ever.

- July 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

MESQUITE MATTERS.
_______

The Weather, Politics, Crops
and Personal Mention.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., July 24.--As it seems to be customary to say something about the weather in communications, we will simply say that it is hot, and the indications are good for rain just now. Crops, however, do not need rain.
     The Young Men's Prayer Meeting Convention of North Texas will meet here the 1st of August and Mesquite is making preparations to entertain the visitors.
     Senator Kimbrough, by invitation, spoke in reply to Harry Tracy at Rockwall yesterday. He also addressed the citizens of Long Creek last week on the amendments to the constitution.
     The Juvenile Minstrel Club of Dallas played at Gross Hall Tuesday and Wednesday nights.
     The scholarship voting contest going on in the T
IMES-HERALD is getting to be interesting. Just watch Mesquite's nominee from now on.

- July 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

MESQUITE LOCAL NOTES.
_______

Fine Crops--Church and Per-
sonal Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, July 28.--Having heard so many complaints about a short cotton crop in the last few weeks and not having any room for doubt, the TIMES-HERALD reporter drove out in the country Sunday to see for himself and was agreeably surprised to find crops looking fine, especially cotton. In our opinion, this will be one of the largest cotton crops Texas ever had. The only kick coming to the farmer will be the low price.
     Miss Bonny Coats of Long creek and Mr. O'Neal of Vernon were married at the bride's residence Sunday evening, Rev. Adair officiating. They left for Vernon Monday morning. As the reporter was not present, we can't say how numerous and handsome the presents were.
     Rev. J. T. Pinson of Forney, assisted by Rev. Mr. Kay of Garland, are protracting a meeting at the Baptist Church.
     Miss Lena Knox of Dallas is in the city this week visiting relatives.
     Master Dennis Collins, a bright lad of Dallas, is out spending the week with Mr. and Mrs. John Duff.
     J. B. Wilson of Dallas was out Monday looking after affairs on his ranch.
     A "scrap" took place on Marshall's ranch, west of Mesquite the other day. A knife and a club were the weapons used. No serious result.
     Mr. Tom Motley, who lives north of this place, is suffering with a broken jaw. Been playing base ball.
     Mr. and Mrs. Frank Chapman have returned home after an extended visit at Denver, Col.

- July 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

Mesquite Locals.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., Aug. 5.--The young men's prayer meeting convention, after a session of four days, closed their meeting Sunday evening. About twenty-four delegates were in attendance. The delegates were royally entertained and left well pleased. Garland was selected as the next place of meeting.
     Mr. and Mrs. Will Lynes, Miss Lynes and Mr. D. Goldman of Dallas, were out Sunday, visiting W. H. Cullom's family.
     Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Curtis left Tuesday night for an extended visit to Michigan.
     Mr. and Mrs.. Locner of Terrell, are here visiting Lee Kirkland and family.
     Senator Kimbrough addressed the citizens of Futrell school house on the amendments to the constitution Monday night.
     Hon. J. C. Rugel is in Galveston as a delegate to the Grand Lodge of the Knights of Honor.
     Mr. Wall Coats of the Long Creek neighborhood was bitten by a snake the other day while fishing. The usual "antedote" for snake bite was used and he is now all right.
     Rev. Mr. Walker of Lancaster has begun a series of meetings at the Christian Church.

- August 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE WORK OF LIGHTNING.
_______

It Starts a Destructive Fire
Near Mesquite.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., Sept. 9.--At 2:30 this morning, during the electric storm, lightning struck and set fire to the barn of Mr. John Duff, who lives about a quarter of a mile from town. The barn contained a quantity of hay and immediately after the flash, a bright flame of fire shot upwards. The barn and its contents, consisting of plows, cultivators, a mower, feed and three head of horses, was consumed. The loss represents about $3000 and Mr. Duff has no insurance. He is a hard working farmer and the loss falls very heavy on him.
     A heavy rain fell in this section last night.

- September 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 4.
- o o o -

Rival Towns.

     Senator Kimbrough was in the city yesterday and was as busy as usual while here. A TIMES-HERALD man caught him on the fly between lunch and Armstrong's wholesale grocery, and the senator declared Mesquite is doing a larger business than any preceding year and that his house had its full share. "Why," said he, farmers north of us who gin their cotton at Garland bring it to Mesquite to sell, which means we have the best cotton market in north Texas."
     Editor Cullum of Garland was in to-day and carried out a big bucket of oysters for a church festival to-night. Cullum says Garland is prosperous and is handling a big cotton crop. "But Kimbrough says you gin it and he buys it," suggested the T
IMES-HERALD man. "Oh, pshaw, Kim likes to talk. Let him give his figures on cotton shipments and Garland will go him 1000 bales better. Kim will buy his goods at Garland next year."
     Both are good towns chuck full of clever, live people.

- November 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     S. A. Haught and wife to W. H. Lunley, 57 acres on Mesquite creek, $793.33.

- November 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

MESQUITE NOTES.
_______

Big Cotton Crop--Good Trade.
Farms in Good Condition.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., Dec. 4. -- This town is in a flourishing condition at present. Merchants are delighted with the daily receipts and business in every particular is lively.
     This country was blessed Wednesday night with a good rain, which was very badly needed, especially for stock.
     Cotton receipts are good, from fifty to seventy-five bales being marketed here daily. Farmers are very well satisfied with the yield.
     Several cars of cotton seed have been shipped from here this week.
     Lee Farlin, the young man who was thrown from his horse at this place last week, is still in a critical condition.
     Hon. J. C. Rugel visited your city yesterday.
     Senator Kimbrough was transacting business in Dallas yesterday.
     Dr. D. A. Paschall of this place, who has been spending several days in Dallas, arrived home last evening.

- December 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Mesquite Locals.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Dec. 10.--Cotton receipts still remain good. The principal part of the crop is gathered, but a great deal is yet unsold.
     A great maing bois d'arc posts and blocks are being marketed here. [as given]
     J. S. Frost, a prominent citizen of this place, has been shipping hat west during the past few weeks.
     Business in every particular is lively.
     Everyone would be very glad to see a good rain as everything here is very dry. Cattle are suffering considerably from that source
     A great many here are afflicted with a disease called la grippe.
     The boys of this town have organized a band. It is a good thing and should be encouraged.
     Calhoun Knox of the firm of Knox & Kimbrough, is on the sick list this week.
     Henry Ebute, a mail agent on the Ft. worth & Denver railroad, is visiting friends here.
     There is to be a ball in the Gross Hall, at this place, Friday night. A very pleasant time is anticipated.
     J. D. Bruner, a merchant of this place, spent Wednesday in Dallas on business.
     Mrs. A. A. Vanston left last Tuesday for Denison, where she will spend a few weeks with friends.

- December 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Mesquite Locals.

To the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., Dec. 17.-- Sunday night, a heavy rain fell near here. It was vary badly needed and was welcomed by all.
     J. M. Knox, editor of the Democrat, returned from Velasco this morning. He reported a pleasant trip.
     Wirt Williams, the photographer from Dallas, is out here to-day. Every one in town was on the sidewalks having their portraits taken.
     J. T. Lawrence, one of the oldest residents of this county, died Wednesday evening at his home. He died surrounded by a great many of his relatives and friends. He is an old landmark in this country, having come here about 1840. He was about 80 years old. His death is deeply felt by everyone.
     T. W. Marcum, an energetic business man of this place, visited Dallas Thursday.
     C. A. Mangold of Dallas spent Thursday here.
     The young folks of this place spent a very pleasant evening at the residence of J. T. Lynch Monday night. An oyster supper was the attraction. Among those present were: Mr. A. G. Moore and Miss Stella Humphreys, Mr. A. F. Gross and wife, Mr. E. F. Vanston and Miss Jessie Paschall, Mr. Albert Moore and Miss Bertha Tasch. To say they went home pleased, does not half express it.

- December 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

FIRE AT MESQUITE.
_______

Half the Business Houses in the
Town Burned.

Southern Afternoon Press.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., Dec. 31.--Last evening at 8:45, a fire broke out in the business of this city, and before the flames could be gotten under control, half of the business houses had been consumed. How the fire originated is not known. The bucket brigade, composed of the men, women and children of the town saved the remaining part of the business houses. The following were the losers:
     Martum's grocery store and beer house. Insurance, $1500.
     J. H. Cooper's saloon. No insurance.
     Mangold & Co. No insurance.
     A. B. Cotter's residence. No insurance.
     Mrs. Clark's blacksmith shop. No insurance.
     Dr. Holly's business house. No insurance.
     Thomas Ruinn's residence.
     The estimated loss was about $75,000.

- December 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -


1892
MESQUITE NEWS.

_____

Business, Social and Political
News.

Southern Afternoon Press.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., March 24. -- The weather for the past two weeks has been bad. Farmers are dubious about the corn crop. They seem to think the cold weather, followed by so much rain, will cause the seed to rot.
     Knox & Kimbrough sold two carloads of bois d'arc posts to J. D. Williams of Italy, Tex., last week.
     About seventy bales of cotton were marketed here this week.
     Last Monday, J. B. Wilson received a car of horses and mules; also four cars of cotton seed hulls, which were unloaded at this place.
     All a person can hear this morning is hurrah for Mills.
     Miss Texia Thompson of Terrell, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. J. H. Mercer, left for her home last Tuesday. Her departure was regretted by all, especially by the young people.
     The ball at Scyene last week was a success. Among those present from this place were Misses May Conner, Janie Smith, Lilha Torch and Jessie Paschall accompanied by Messrs. R. G. Chapman, A. G. Moore , Amos Paschall and E. F. Vanston, and Messrs. A. G. Moore and E. F. Vanston took a flying trip to Scyene Sunday evening. The attraction was Misses Eula and Lena Humphreys, two charming young ladies. The boys returned late, well pleased with their trip.

- March 24, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     J. H. Casey to Lucy Casey, two lots in Mesquite, $400.

- April 28, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

MESQUITE NOTES.
______

Political, Personal and Crop
News.

Correspondence Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., April 28. -- Considerable excitement prevails here over the race for governor of Texas. The forces in and around Mesquite are pretty equally divided. Several of three citizens went to Dallas Wednesday to hear Gov. Hogg. The Hoggs came back very well pleased, while the Clarkites are just as well satisfied that the governor is very wrong.
     The farmers here are in high spirits over the prospect for the coming crop. They are unanimous in believing it will be the best we have had for a long time.
     Several couples of young folks attended the concert at Scyene last Monday night. The exercises were highly appreciated by all.
     Miss Dora Humphreys and her cousin, Miss Minnie Aldredge of Granbury, were visiting in town last Tuesday.
     The Weekly Mesquiter at this place changed hands last week.
     Barney, the 7-months-old child of R. L. Colvin, died Wednesday.

- April 29, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

[THE COURTS]
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     J. W. Barton to George S. Edgell, 88 acres of land north of Mesquite, $850.

- June 27, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

1893
Added August 1, 2004:
DEED OF TRUST.
______

Knox & Kimbrough of Mesquite Em-
barrassed.

     The firm of Knox & Kimbrough (Calhoun Knox and W. Kimbrough) of Mesquite gave a deed of trust to secure payment of the following claims: Harris' Bank of Terrell, $1100; Ed Vanston, $400; James Lively, $150; North Texas National Bank, $500; R. S. Kimbrough, $500; Sanger Bros., $1900. G. B. Gross is named as trustee and he is authorized to take charge of stock of goods and unpaid accounts and realize on the same to the best possible advantage.

- February 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

Real Estate Transfers.

     J. S. Frost and wife to L. C. Ebrite, a lot in Mesquite, $606.

- May 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

Local Option Election.

Southern Afternoon Press.
     M
ESQUITE, Tex., June 5. -- Saturday, a local option election was held in justice precinct No. 4, which includes this place. There are saloons at only two points in the precinct -- Mesquite and Seagoville. At each place, a good vote was polled and the contest warm. Mesquite went dry by five majority and Seagoville, by fifty-two majority, The indications are that he precinct has gone wet by a slight majority. The saloon men played a sharp trick on the drys by distributing printed tickets at all voting boxes, one set printed against prohibition, the other sprinted for local option, the former being in compliance with the statute, the latter not. Quite q number of dry voters lost their votes in this way. The wet majority came from boxes where there are no saloons.

- June 5, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

WET BY THREE VOTES.
______

A Close Contest for Prohibition in the
Mesquite Precinct.

     Hon. J. C. Rugle of Mesquite is in the city to-day. In his precinct, a remarkable contest between the "wets" and the "drys" closed last Saturday, and the "wets" won by three majority, according to Mr. Rugel. The voting boxes where there are no saloons, were carried by the wets; the boxes that contained saloons gave large majorities for the drys.
     "The 'wets' worked the rabbit's foot on us," said Mr. Rugel to a T
IMES-HERALD representative. "They had printed a lot of bogus tickets and scattered them over the district; a number of our voters got hold of the tickets and voted them. Of course, the bogus tickets were not counted, and we lost the election."

- June 7, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

A BUDGET OF NEWS
_______

TAKEN FROM THE NOTE BOOKS OF
T. - H. REPORTERS.

     The school trustee election at Mesquite resulted as follows: J. E. Russell, J. D. Brunner and R. B. Cole.
     Masonic lodge No. 295, at Mesquite, elected W. C. Cullom, W. M.; H. F. Ayres, J. W.; W. B. Walthal, Jr.; W. R. Poyntor, secretary; G. H. Brown, treasurer, and W. J. Prewitt, Tyler.
     Miss Lela Dean, of Mesquite, was shot by the accidental discharge of a pistol in the hands of her brother. She was preparing dinner while her little brother was sitting near, playing with a pistol. The ball entered the left groin and passed through into the right groin. How dangerous the wound is, the physician is unable to say.

- June 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

NEWS OF THE DAY.

     Mesquite received the first bale of cotton raised in Dallas county this year. J. H. Haas brought it in and it was classed as strict middling and sold at 6 1/2 cents a pound. The planter received a premium of $20.

- August 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Mesquite's Mayor.

Special to the Times Herald.
      M
ESQUITE, Tex., Dec. 22. -- The city council, last night, elected J. E. Russell, Mesquite's first mayor, to succeed W. R. Poynter, resigned.

- December 22, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

F. Borchardt and wife to R. S. Kimbrough, lot in Mesquite, $100.

- August 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

1894
Added January 19, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds
.

     J. S. Frost and wife to Calhoun Knox, January 19, 1891, lot 6, block 9, of Mesquite, $80.

- June 5, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Added March 14, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     Texas & Pacific railroad to F. C. Rugel, November 8, 1892, lots 6, 7, 8 10 and 11, of Mesquite, $210.

Releases.

     W. H. Abrams, trustee, to F. C. Rugel, December 12, 1894, lots 6, 7, 8, 10 and 11, block 6, of Mesquite.

- December 18, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2-3.
- o o o -


1895
Added March 18, 2004:
DALLAS COUNTY
FARMERS "IN IT."

_______

SAY THIS IS THE GARDEN SPOT.
______

Hon. R. S. Kimbrough Tells How Poor
Renters Have Acquired Improved
Farms in a Few Years -- Facts
About Blackwaxy Lands.

     Hon. R. S. Kimbrough said to a TIMES HERALD reporter:
     "We know nothing about hard times out about Mesquite, except what we see in the newspapers. Cotton did not bring a big price, but we beat that by raising more of it. There is no land out that way that can be had for less than $40 an acre. Most of it is not for sale at any price. The price is getting a little stiffer all the time, and a greater acreage is, every year, being put in cultivation.
     "Eight and ten years ago, the farmers of Dallas county were poor as church mice. A cheap board house and a fence made of one wire and one plank, at that time, and for much later, constituted the entire improvements on most farms. The stock stood out in the rain and northers, as did also, the machinery, such as farmers were then able to have.
     "Now, you will see a good dwelling, large barns and cribs, with the sides bulging out with grain and hay, good fences, and either thoroughbred or high grade stock. A few years ago, all the bacon and pork was imported. Now, the farms produce their own meat. In the Mesquite country, I do not believe there is even a renter who did not kill his own meat this year.
     "Blackwaxy farmers have always made money. Heretofore, most of the profits have gone into betterments. From now [on], they will have more surplus money.
     "A man that cannot make money farming in this country, doesn't deserve to have any.
     "Men who came to Mesquite as poor renters, seven or eight years ago, now own improved farms."

- January 4, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

Added March 19, 2004:
BUSINESS CHANGES.

     The following business changes are reported in Texas since Monday:
     F. A. Tompkins & Co., of Mesquite, yesterday evening, filed a mortgage to J. E. Russell of the following described property: One stock of goods, wares, merchandise and fixtures in Mesquite, one farm of forty acres on Bear creek; also, twenty-one acres out of the I. R. Stephens survey; also, fifteen acres out of the W. D. Sheppard survey; also, a farm on the line of Denton and Tarrant counties in the R. D. Price survey, containing 143
1/2 acres, subject to a mortgage of $1000. J. E. Russell is to have and hold the property for the purpose of satisfying debts as follows: Class A -- Sanger Bros., note $1750, and for $1140.63; P. Mounts, Denton, $100. Class C -- M. D. Garlington & Co., $1450, E. Harding, Fort Worth, $35.

- January 9, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Added March 19, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     Texas & Pacific Railroad to A. P. Summers et al., December 3, 1894, lot 1, block 5, of Mesquite.

- January 9, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Added March 26, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     N. A. Holly to S. E. Champion, September 25, 1888, lot 20, block 2, Frost's addition to Mesquite, $925.
     J. T. Dobbins and wife to J. L. French, November 4, 1890, lot 20, block 2, Frost's addition to Mesquite, $671.

- January 28, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added April 4, 2004:
SCHOOL TEACHERS
AT THE COURT HOUSE.

_______

Pedagogues Holding an Institute in
the Temple of Justice.

     The County Teachers' Institute met in the library of the courthouse at 10 a. m. to-day and will be in session two days.
     The subjects discussed to-day were how to teach algebra, and how to teach language to beginners.
     Prof. C. P. Haynes, of Mesquite, led the discussion in the former branch, and Miss Jennie Bradley, of Richardson, in the latter.

- February 22, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6.
- o o o -

Added April 5, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS
Deeds.

     C. Knox and wife to J. P. Paschall, October 17, 1891, lots 4 and 5, block 1, Ebrites addition to Mesquite, $400.
     W. C. Cullom and wife to S. A. Mebane, February 20, 1895, lot 5, block 3, of Mesquite, $1,000.
     J. P. Paschall and wife to S. A. Mebane, February 20, 1895, lot 4 and 5, block 1, Ebrites addition to Mesquite, $700.

- February 26, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

Added April 18, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

Deeds.

     S. H. Chumbey to G. W. Lauder, March 6, 1895[?], lot 1, block 7, of Mesquite, $50.50.

- March 30, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added May 8, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     J. M. Goss to W. R. Poynter, September 8, 1894, lot 14, Frost's addition to Mesquite, $150.

- April 26, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

FIRST BALES.
_______

Lancaster and Mesquite Both Beat Gar-
land.

     R. S. Kimbrough of Mesquite, who is in the city to-day, says the first bale of cotton was received in that town last Monday. It was raised by Chas. Boschardt, a few miles south of Mesquite and bought by S. M. McKane at 7 cents. It was strict middling and the bale weighed 425 pounds. Mr. Borchardt received a premium of $20 in addition to the regular market price of his cotton.

_____

     Last Saturday, Lancaster received the first bale, which was raised by J. L. Oliver on W. T. Lavendar's farm. The bale weighed 1756 pounds in the seed. It was bought by Johnson & Weatherbys at 8 1/2 cents. Mr. Oliver also received a premium of $7.50.

- August 23, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -


1896
Added June 15, 2004:
FIRE RECORD.
HOTEL AND CONTENTS.

     Mesquite, Dallas Co., Tex., Jan. 1. -- The Tennessee hotel burned to-day with all household goods. The residence nearby, occupied by J. L. Lynch, was also burned. Everything in the house saved. No insurance. Damage about $1500.

- January 2, 1896, The Dallas Morning News, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

1906
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

     J. B. Adoue to J. A. Allen, lots 4, 5 and 6, block D, Ebrites' Second Mesquite addition, $400.
     L. C. Ebrite et ux to Mary Bardwell, lot 8, block G of L. C. Ebrite's Third addition to town of Mesquite, $250.

- June 28, 1906, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 2.
- o o o -

1909
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     J. J. Roddy et ux to B. L. Liles, land on North Mesquite creek, $1685.

- April 4, 1909, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 4, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

1911
TRINITY PARK DRAMATIC CLUB
TO PRESENT "HICKORY FARM."

_______

Local Talent Will Go to Mesquite and
Put on Play Which They Have
Given Successfully.

     Members of the Trinity Park Dramatic club went to Mesquite this afternoon and will, tonight, present the comedy, "Hickory Farm," for the edification of the residents of Mesquite. This club presented this play sometime ago in this city in a very successful manner. The club has declined an invitation to present the play at Rockwall because of the fact they would have to stay away from the city all night. The trip to Mesquite will be made in big wagons and about forty people will be in the party. Mesquite residents are planning to entertain the visitors.

- October 7, 1911, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 3.
- o o o -

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     August Tosch and wife to J. J. Tillery, lot 1, block 55, town of Mesquite, $100.
     August Tosch and wife to J. J. Tillery, lot 2, block 55, Tosch addition to Mesquite, $100.

- November 5, 1911, Dallas Daily Times Herald, Sec. II, p. 7, col. 5.
- o o o -


.

1922
Mesquite Elementary School,
Class of 1922
(Submitted by Deborah Massie Lacy)

(Click here for enlarged photo)

Students appearing in 1922 photo:

Top Row:

Howard Dean
Able Crawford
Slater(?) Kimble
Allen Mathis
James Singleton
Arthur Whitley
Sneede(?) Tribble
Edward Coats
Mary Cole

 

Second Row:

Loraine Kimble
Evelyn Janes
Sally Terry
Corine Moore
Bessie Malone
Ethel Pucket
Alma Bobbitt
Zula Richardson(?)
Exa Dean
Lou Ella Kirk

 

Third Row:

Ola Rouse
Christine Mc____
Lorene Prock
Fay ______

 

Fourth Row:

Vivian Marcum
Louise Rowley
Catherine Humphrey
Mary Francis McKenzie
Marie Smith
Lucille _____

 

Bottom Row:

Jimmy(?) Sanden(?)
K______ Subert(?)
Vernon Paschal
Alton(?) B______
Rosser Shelton
William Crane
Hugh Dahn(?)
Charles Cram(?)

Mrs. Brown, teacher
First Grade


.

1923
Mesquite Elementary School,
Class of 1923
(Submitted by Deborah Massie Lacy)

(Click here for enlarged photo)

Students appearing in 1923 photo:

Top Row:

Annie Meredith
Exa Dean
Lou Ella Kirk
Mary Fredrik Tosch
-----
Allen Mathis
Miss Wilson
------
Anne Milam
------
Bessie Malone
Ethel Puckett
Christine(?) McGruby

 

Second Row:

Corine Moore
Alma Bobbitt
-------
James Singleton
_____ Crawford / Charlie Crow(?)
_____ Crawford(?) / William Crane(?)
Alton Usery
Jimmie Sauten(?)
Arthur Whittley
Sally Terry
Willie Nosky
Lorene Prock

 

Third Row:

Kenneth Sweet
Frances McKinzie
Charles Crain
Louise Rowley
------
Merle Henderson
Murry Coats
Althia Thompson
Edward Coats
Catherine Humphrey
Vivian Marcum

 

Bottom Row:

--------
Rosser Shelton
--------
Le(?)___ Hodge(?)
Vernon Paschall
Leonard(?) Crane
Amanda Da___(?)
William Crane
Emmett Hodge(?)


.

1935
Added December 6, 2004:
Fair at Mesquite
Opens Casket of
Man Novel Exhibit

______

Queen Mildred Crowned;
Dolls on Parade to Be
Held Friday Night

Special to The News.
     M
ESQUITE, Texas, Sept. 19. -- All fashioned from a large cedar tree, which he obtained from Cedar Hill, Dallas County, a bed, two chests and a casket made by J. A. Dowdy, 87, who lives a mile east of Kleberg, form an interesting exhibit at the Mesquite Community Fair, which opened Thursday afternoon. Mr. Dowdy expects to be buried in the casket, which was lined with satin by a daughter-in-law.
     Another interesting exhibit, furnished by the Citizens' Conservation Corps camp at Mesquite, deals with the United States Department of Agriculture's soil conservation service. Three miniature farm models, that of Bedford Galloway at Mesquite and two others at Temple, are shown, with the effect of erosion control brought out.
     Coronation of Queen Mildred of the House of McDaniel was held Thursday night, with Harvey J. Davis, secretary of the Mesquite Fair, officiating. Felton Humphreys Jr. was crown-bearer and Margaret Ann Galloway was train bearer.
     "Dolls on Parade," with children from 3 to 6 years old participating, will be held Friday night. This will be a high point of the exposition. The fair will continue through Saturday night.
     Charles E. Turner, former Mayor of Dallas, spoke Thursday, officially opening the fair. A parade by the Mesquite school band preceded his address.
     Attending the queen were the following princesses: Helen Livesay, Elam; Josephine Terry, Edwards; Anita Love Jobson, Mesquite; Hallie Cooper, Pleasant Mound; Doris Sanders, Pleasant Grove; Virginia Lemaster, Tripp; Kathryn Conway, New Hope; Viola Lewis, Long Creek; Winnie Thedford, Seagoville; Edna Walton, Kleberg; Helen McElroy, Scyene; Exa Dean, Murphy; Grace Gillean, Balch Springs, and Lillian Bennett, Lawson.
     Music at night was furnished by the Mesquite band and the Chuck Wagon Gang, radio entertainers.
     Agricultural exhibits represent the following communities: Murphy, Edwards, New Hope, Scyene, Balch Springs, Rylie and Lawson. Eighteen commercial booths are housed in a building on the west side of the square.

- September 20, 1935, The Dallas Morning News, Sec. I, p. 4.
- o o o -


1940

Where James Boys Visited 

Staff Special to The News.
     M
ESQUITE, Texas, Jan. 25.--Echoes of the outlaw careers of Frank and Jesse James are heard whenever folks congregate at the home of the late S. D. Lawrence, landmark in Mesquite, which was built in 1873, and enlarged to its present vast dimensions in 1885. The James boys were occasional visitors, and once left a white horse as a gift, which was long ridden by members of the Lawrence family. The house today is almost hidden by an avenue of giant cedar trees, which were set out sixty-five years ago by Lawrence, after he had built the house for his bride. Of five children by that marriage, two still survive.
    The old Lawrence house now is occupied by Mrs. Lee Walker Lawrence, the second wife, and three of her five daughters. These three, with two daughters, who are married, all were given the names of precious or semi-precious stones. Mrs. Ruby Shaw lives in Mesquite and Mrs. Pearl Schell lives in Dallas. The three at home are Misses Opal, Garnet and Onyx. Hugh W. Lawrence, a son, also lives in Mesquite.
     Lawrence was born in Dallas County in 1853, four miles east of Mesquite, and lived there until his death in 1934. Of his original holdings of 450 acres of farming land, the family still retains 374 acres. Shown [in the bottom photo] are Mrs. Shaw and Misses Opal, Garnet and Onyx in the order named. Mrs. Lawrence is behind Miss Opal.

- May 6, 1940, The Dallas Morning News, Sec. I, p. 8, col. 2-3.
- o o o -