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(Updated March 16, 2004)

Divorce Suit.

     L. T. Watters brought suit in the district court for divorce from John Watters, to whom she was married in Dallas county, Feb. 1, 1878. Mrs. Watters alleges desertion Oct. 5, '91, and gross cruelty prior to that time. She asks for the custody of her children, Lillie R., aged 13, and William J. 11.

- January 3, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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WEDDING AT THE COURT HOUSE.
_______

Judge Nash Ties the Knot for Mr.
Moody and Miss Cathey.

     Judge Nash made another couple happy in the county clerk's office to-day. The contracting parties were Mr. J. A. Moody and Miss Cora E. Cathey. The groom was clad in his every day clothes. The bride, however, was a marvel of blushing beauty. She wore a dove colored gown, with Bernhardt gloves to match, and a white hat was gracefully perched on her shapely head. A goodly crowd was present when the knot was tied.

- January 5, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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HE'S A COMMON DRUNKARD.
_____

And His Wife is Tired of Giving Him
Money for Whiskey.

     Mrs. Maud Shackleton has brought suit in the district court for divorce from J. A. Shackleton. In her complaint, she alleges that he is a common drunkard, and so far from making an effort to support her or himself, is in the habit of taking the money she earns by sewing and spending it for liquor. They were married in Faulkner county, Ark., November 10, 1873, and for years, she was content to clothe and support him rather than submit to the humiliation of bringing her troubles before the public, but when he began making a practice of taking her hard earnings to buy whiskey and get drunk and abuse her, her patience gave out and forced her to sue for a divorce.

- January 6, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
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Asks For a Divorce.

     J. A. Chapman vs. Ada Chapman is the style of a divorce suit filed to-day. Chapman charges his wife with unfaithfulness to her marriage vows.

- January 9, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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Marriage Licenses.

     John Redmond and Mary Ryan.
     Jules M. Levy and Cora E. Darden.
     J. A. Harrington and M. E. Woods.
     G. L. Garrett and Melissa Todd.

- January 12, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
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Divorce Suits.

     A. S. Richardson has filed suit for a divorce from his wife, Cordie, alleging adultery.
     Hattie King is suing her husband, Charles King, for divorce, upon the grounds of cruel and inhuman treatment.

- January 18, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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MOHAMMEDAN MARRIAGE.
________

A Wedding Celebration in the Syrian
Colony in Dallas.

     County Clerk Hughes, Saturday evening, issued a marriage license to Mustapha Mahamad Elhage and Miss Mary Harah Hassan.
The parties to the marriage are natives of Syria. They profess the Mohammedan religion, and belong to a little colony of fifteen persons of that country and faith that has been established in Dallas.
     Mr. and Mrs. Elhage have taken up their residence at 139 Swiss avenue, where a T
IMES HERALD reporter found them. Mr. Elhage said that they were married in New York some months ago, by a Mohammedan priest. In Mohammedan countries, it is not necessary to procure a legal license to marry. The parties simply go to the priest, who pronounces certain incantations and the parties are considered husband and wife. On his arrival in Dallas, Mr. Elhage says he discovered that he was not married according to the laws of the country, and he, accordingly, procured the license above referred to, but he has not yet had the ceremony performed.
     Elhage follows the old time business of a house to house general dry goods business. That is to say, he peddles goods through the country. He is a Turk and speaks very poor English.

- January 30, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1-2.
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THEY DIDN'T SUIT.
_______

A Texas Woman Didn't Like the North-
west.

     Mrs. C. G. Harwood, to-day, filed suit in the district court against her husband, C. G. Harwood, for divorce. She sets forth in her petition to the court that she was married to defendant in Wallawalla, Washington, Nov. 15, 1893, and lived with him until Nov. 18, 1893, when she discovered that there existed such an incompatibility in their temperaments as to render their living together insupportable, and she forthwith quitted his bed and board and returned to her Texas home.
     Prior to this marriage, the plaintiff was Mrs. John Kuntz.

- February 2, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Will Pay for His Fun.

     Jeff Wilkes, who beat his wife with a six-shooter, threw his children out the door and then set fire to his own house, at Miller's Ferry Christmas day, was fined $500 and sentenced to two years in the county jail, by a jury in the county court to-day.

- February 7, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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Divorce Suit.

     Scynthia Emmett vs. William Emmett is the style of a divorce suit filed to-day.

- February 13, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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Marriage Licenses.

     H. M. Carpenter of Franklin and Miss Sallie Van Orten of Terrell, got license to marry at the county clerk's office to-day.

- February 15, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
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Dora Ross Desires a Divorce.

     Dora L. Ross has sued Thos. J. Ross for an absolute divorce, charging abusive language, desertion and non-support.

- February 15, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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Divorce Suit.

     Nora Belle Rodgers has filed a divorce suit against her husband, P. C. Rogers, upon the grounds of cruel treatment.

- March 1, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
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Fined For Cursing His Wife.

     George Nairn was to-day tried by a jury in Justice Lauderdale's court on the charge of cursing and abusing his wife, and fined $20, which, added to the costs, footed up about $40.

- March 1, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 6.
- o o o-

Divorce Suit.

     Lizzie Moseley has filed a divorce suit against Albert Moseley upon the grounds of abandonment.

- March 2, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
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Applicants For Divorces.

Florence E. Owen vs. Hilary O. Owen;
L. G. Winter vs. R. P. Winters;
Ruth Merrifield vs. S. B. Merrifield;
Allen Mason vs. Emma Mason
are the latest divorce suits filed.

- March 10, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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Divorce Suit.

M. A. Slagle vs. W. C. Slagle.

- March 12, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
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Big Wedding at Jimtown.

     A. L. Ledbetter and Mrs. Bertha Myers were married yesterday afternoon at the home of the bride's father, Squire Myers, at Jimtown. The marriage was celebrated in old fashioned style, all the country round about being in attendance.

- March 12, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
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Divorce Suit.

Sally Sellers has filed suit for divorce against her husband, W. H. Sellers, charging him with abandonment and adultery.

- March 14, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
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Married on the Square.

     Ben Schwartz and Miss R. L. Lyle were married to-day by Rev. W. F. Barcus, at his news stand on the court house square. The couple then took a hack for the Windsor hotel.

- March 28, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
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Divorce Suit.

R. A. Sharpe vs. L. C. Sharpe, is the latest divorce suit filed.

- March 28, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
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A ROUNDABOUT WAY.
______

Murt Phelon Overcomes Matrimonial Ob-
stacles in a Unique Manner.

     Murt R. Phelon, the wag who runs the courthouse elevator, and who makes a friend of everybody that rides with him, got married yesterday evening, under what would have been great difficulties to most young men, but which were trifling with Phelon.
     His betrothed was Miss Zeola Tarter. The young lady was an orphan and under age, and her married sister seriously objected to her marrying. Phelon had County Judge Nash to appoint Andy Moore, her guardian and then got the guardian's consent. The wedding took place at the groom's home, corner Horde, and Magnolia streets, in the presence of a number of the friends of the parties.

- March 28, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 7.
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Divorce Suits.

     Hattie E. Sellers has filed suit for divorce against Will Sellers.
J. M. Walker has filed suit against his wife, Mollie Walker, upon the grounds of abandonment.

- April 2, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 7.
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Divorce Suit.

     Mandy Williams, to-day, filed suit against James Williams for divorce on the ground of abandonment.

- April 3, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
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Divorce Suit.

     F. R. Coffin, Jr., has filed suit for divorce against his wife, Mollie Coffin.

- April 5, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
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AN INDIFFERENT HUSBAND.
_____

Mrs. Lemann Desires to be Divorced and
Gives Her Reasons.

     Lydia Lemann has filed suit for divorce against her husband, Fred Lemann. In her original petition just filed, her allegations are of a most peculiar and sensational character.
     Article No. 2 of the petition reads as follows: "That plaintiff and defendant lived together as man and wife without any serious trouble until about two years since, when the defendant was seized with some kind of religious frenzy or enthusiasm, and pretended that at all times, he was moved to his acts by departed spirits through mysterious communications." Mrs. Lemann further alleges that though they shared the same board and bed, her husband refused to act the part of husband toward her, and insulted her by charging her with improper conduct toward other men.

- April 6, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 7.
- o o o -

Divorce Suit.

Mrs. Anna Mitchell, to-day, filed suit for a divorce from her husband, W. D. Mitchell.

- April 11, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 5.
- o o o -

Three Divorces.

     The following petitions for divorce were filed in the district clerk's office to-day:
     William Wren vs. Ellen Wren; abandonment.
     Caroline A. Beattie vs. David Beattie; ill treatment.
     Sophrona Shuck vs. C. T. Shuck; cruel treatment.

- April 18, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 7.
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ABOUT MARRIAGES
AND DIVORCES.

______

PERSONS WHO CAN'T WAIT TILL
THEY ARE OF LEGAL AGE.

______

A Chapter on the Natural History of Per-
sons Who Figure in the Divorce
Courts of the Land.

     B. F. McAdams, a beardless boy, got license yesterday evening to marry Miss Lizzie Powell, who was also under age. McAdams produced a written permit from his parents and also from Miss Powell's.
     For several days, there has been an average of one wedding per day, in which one or both parties were under age, which has led some to question if the legal age to enter into the marriage state should not be lowered by the legislature.

_____

     A gentleman who has had excellent opportunities to observe the workings of the divorce courts, said to a TIMES HERALD reporter to-day: "When persons institute suit for divorce, in nine cases out of a possible ten, they have already made all the arrangements to marry again, and when the applicant is a woman, it is not infrequent that her intended assists in getting a lawyer and seeing about the divorce. Yes, applicants for divorces, instead of looking sad, as many would naturally suppose they would look, are quite as chipper as if they were getting a marriage license. Come to think of it, why should persons blow in their good money these hard times for something they have no immediate use for? And, of all useless things, I fancy that to a person who had no notion or prospect of marrying, a decree of divorce would be the most useless, and at the same time, cheerless thing in the world."

- May 2, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Joined in Wedlock.

     Yesterday, Justice Ed. S. Lauderdale joined Mr. Geo. Smith and Miss Katie Perkins in wedlock, and Judge T. F. Nash performed a like service for Mr. A. Kalklosh and Miss Theodrine Dumain.

- May 4, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Matrimonial.

     Charles Lockley and Miss Ora Thomas, of Arlington, were married in the county clerk's office to-day by County Judge Nash.

- May 22, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -


OPEN TO THE WORLD.
_____

Everybody Invited to Hon. Patrick
O'Keefe's Wedding.

     Mr. Pat O'Keefe, who will be married to Miss Ahles in the Bryan Street Catholic church at 7 o'clock to-morrow evening, says that it was his intention to invite everybody, but it is probable, that in the confusion incident to such a crisis in a man's life, he has overlooked a few, and he does not wish anybody to remain away on account of not receiving an invitation. On the contrary, he wishes everybody to come and load the church down to the guards.

- June 5, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
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Matrimonial.

     John Logan and Miss Georgia Wadkins were married in the County Clerk's office by Rev. W. H. Hughes.

- June 5, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 5.
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DIVORCE PROCEEDINGS.
______

A Man Who Did Not Know When Things
Were Coming Smoothly.

     Mrs. Mary A. Miller, yesterday, filed suit for divorce from J. W. Miller, setting forth that they were married in Kaufman county, October 25, 1891, and lived together until June 15, 1894. She had four half-grown children by a former marriage when she married Miller, shortly after which, they came to Dallas county, and went on a farm near Haut's [Haught's] store.
     She says further, that while Miller always was, more or less, harsh to her and her children, he has lately grown much more so; that he abused and beat her and her children and made still more serious threats as to what sort of treatment he meant to subject them to, so much so, that she preferred charges against him, and he is now in the county jail.
     Mrs. Miler goes on to say in her petition that she and her children have worked like dogs in the field in order to make a crop and get ahead in the world.

- June 21, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

AN ELOPEMENT YESTERDAY.
_______

Young Peoples' Strategy Stronger Than
Parental Authority.

     Love once more defied parental authority in the old fashioned style yesterday evening, when Mr. G. E. La Baume and Miss Carrie Hanaway were married. Miss Hanaway has been the gust of her sister, Mrs. John Morris on Akard street, and was expected to leave last evening for her home in San Antonio, but instead, was driven in a buggy by Mr. La Baume to the church of the Incarnation and married by Rev. E. E. Wickens. The couple were attended by Mr. Will Noguira and Miss Jimmie Butler, who followed in a buggy. After the ceremony, the party drove to the residence of the groom's parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. V. La Baume, 127 South Harwood, where they were met by Dr. Rosser and wife and a pleasant evening enjoyed.

- June 25, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5-6.
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MARRIED.

     At Plymouth Congregational church (colored) Monday evening, June 25, Joshua S. Smith and Willie Tanner, Rev. E. E. Sims officiating.

- June 26, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
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Suits in District Court.

Mary J. Cox vs. J. H. Cox; divorce.
Mary Williams vs. Horace Williams; divorce.

- June 29, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
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SUING FOR DIVORCE.
_____

Two Women Who Wish to Get Free From
Their Husbands.

     Mary Williams, to-day, filed suit against Horace Williams for divorce. They were married Aug. 15, 1890, and Horace withdrew from the union in the following February.
     Mary Jane Cox has instituted suit against J. H. Cox for divorce. She says they were married in Falls county, Dec. 14, 1873, and lived together until April, 1894, when J. H. deserted her and took up with one Mary Pine, with whom he long lived as if she were his wife.

- June 29, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -


Suits in District Court.

Lizzie Allen vs. Edward Allen; divorce.

- July 6, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
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Suit for Divorce.

     Lizzie Allen, yesterday, filed suit for divorce from Edward Allen. She sets forth in her petition that they were married in Dallas in October, 1890, and separated in 1892; that the trouble was that Edward was a worthless drunkard, and not only failed to provide for her, but beat and kicked her like a dog.

- July 6, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4.
- o o o -

Came to Dallas and Married.

     Last evening, the Daniels House was the scene of a quiet wedding, when Mrs. Ella Wallace and Mr. C. L. Davis, of Weatherford, accompanied by their immediate friends, got the better of the worry and trouble attending nuptial fetes, came to Dallas and were married by Rev. E. L. Spraggins.

- July 12, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits in District Court.

     Richard Schweickhardt vs. Saledad Schweickhardt; divorce.

- July 23, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

MR. SCHWEICKHARDT
SUES FOR DIVORCE.

______

HE SAYS HIS WIFE HAS AN UNGOV-
ERNABLE TEMPER.

______

She Causes Great Scandal by Her Treat-
ment of Him and Makes Unfounded
Charges -- He Prays the Court to
Give Him Custody of their Child.

     Richard Schweickhardt has filed suit in the District Court, praying for divorce from his wife, Soledad Schweichardt.
     He sets forth in his petition that they were married in the City of Mexico, February and wife until April 15, 1894.
     He avers that in a few months after their marriage, she commenced a course of unkind, harsh, jealous and cruel treatment towards him. She accused him of going off on a trip with a lewd woman, when she well knew he had gone to the bedside of his father in his last illness, and on his return home, she, in the hearing and presence of neighbors, made a violent personal attack upon him, saying she did not love him, and that she was afraid he would give her poison, thus causing great scandal in the neighborhood.
     Plaintiff further avers that defendant used obscene language to hucksters near plaintiff's home in the hearing of neighbors. He also charges that she appeared in the yard in a semi-nude condition, scandalizing the whole neighborhood.
     Finally, he asserts that she is a woman of ungovernable temper, to which she gives full rein.
     Plaintiff prays the court to grant him a judgment dissolving the marriage bonds, and giving him custody of their only child, Louise, aged six months, upon the ground that defendant is not a proper person to have charge of it, whereas, plaintiff is.
     Mr. and Mrs. Schweickhardt have lived unhappily for several months and recently have been separated. A few weeks ago, the woman returned from Mexico, having gotten trail of her child, which had been taken from her and located in St. Louis. A hard legal battle followwed before Judge Valliant, who finally decided that Mrs. Schweichart was perfectly sane, and in every way, a proper person to have the custody of her child, and the little girl was, accordingly, turned over to her. This divorce suit, once more, places in jeopardy, the future of the little one.

- July 24, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

MRS. GIBSON DRAWS
A SHABBY PRIZE.

______

A MELANCHOLY EXPERIENCE WITH
THE CONNUBIAL GRAB-BAG.

______

A Psychological Phenomenon Commonly
Attributed to Cupid, but Really Pro-
ceeding from the Prince of
Darkness.

     Mrs. Elsie Gibson has applied to the Court of the Forty-fourth Judicial District for a divorce from John Gibson, with whom she cast her fortunes for better or for worse in July, 1891. And, according to her story, as related in the petition, very few women in the history of the marriage institution ever ran their arms into the connubial grab-bag and pulled out a more thoroughly worthless husband.
     During the courtship, John spruced himself up, kept sober, at least while in her company, evinced lofty aspirations and a love of the most approved things in the world, and a contempt for the bad -- a temporary state of mind, which a case of love invariably brings about in the lover, which is supposed to be a contrivance of the devil to fool the women into marrying the men.
     But, this strange fascination for the good, the beautiful and the true, wore off as soon as the marriage was over, and Mrs. Gibson alleges that her husband gave himself entirely over to a continuos spree and proceeded to treat her in a most outrageous manner. He would come home in an advanced state of intoxication, and curse her for every vile thing the limited scope of his imagination would admit of. Finally, he got to lifting his hand against her, and on two or three occasions, she owed her life to the circumstance that he was too drunk to catch her when he undertook to kill her.
     Mrs. Gibson prays the court to grant her a divorce and to give her some property in Dallas and Calvert that might otherwise go to her husband.

- July 27, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

Suits in District Court.

Elsie Gibson vs. John Gibson; divorce.

- July 27, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -


Suits in District Court.

Amos C. Carr vs. Susie Carr; divorce.

Samuel M. Stein vs. Martha Stein; divorce.

- August 6, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

FRANK D'ORSA'S RUSE.
_____

He Made His Sweetheart's Father Believe
He Had the Rheumatism.

     The TIMES HERALD has lighted upon some additional particulars in the elopement which took place in Italian circles night before last.
     It appears that Mr. Lapresto kept such a close watch on his daughter, that Frank D'Orsa had to resort to a ruse to throw the old man off. Some time ago, the young man had an attack of rheumatism, which, for a while, interfered with his powers of locomotion. He affected to suffer a return of this malady. He not only limped, and screwed his face up, as if in pain, but he wrapped his leg so as to give it a swollen appearance. He seemed to be in such misery that his employer, Joe Abozzo, told him to go to his room. On retiring to his room, D'Orsa grew rapidly worse, and the report went abroad that he could not walk a step. This report was welcome news to Mr. Lapresto, who, upon receipt of it, realized his vigilance over his daughter, and gave the young couple the desired opportunity to elope.
     Before night, D'Orsa engaged two carriages to be in readiness at a certain point But, just before he was ready to elope, he changed his plans and dismissed one of the hacks, and this move came very nearly being the means of frustrating all his well laid plans, for the driver of the dismissed carriage was not going to be beaten out of a "load." Accordingly, when the elopers had gotten a good start, he drove down and informed the old man of what had happened, and told him his hack was at his disposal.
     The irate father was thus in the hands of a driver who knew the plans of the young couple, but the ambition of this driver was exhausted when he secured the "load." He had no desire whatever to prevent the marriage, and while he drove very rapidly, he took care to take the longest route, in order not to overtake the elopers, and it was as much through the skillful maneuvers of the old man's driver, as anything else that the old man was kept in the background until Justice Skelton could tie the knot. All parties were dodging around through the weeds and alleys of the neighborhood of Judge Skelton's home in a most comical manner. As the old man was snooping about the premises, pistol in hand, he stumbled and fell across an old cow, who got up with such a lunge as to toss him on his back in a bunch of weeds.
     Finally, when the driver of Mr. Lapresto's carriage saw that the wedding was over and the parties had gone, he closed upon on the house, and Mr. Lapresto and the young man he had selected for his daughter's hand, under the impression that the elopers were still in the house, puled their guns and stood guard until they should come out, and it was some time before they discovered the birds had flown.

- August 11, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

A FAILURE IN ONE CASE.
_____

A Dallas Woman Gives Her Married Ex-
perience for One Year.

     Sallie Woodruff has filed suit in the district court for divorce from C. G. Woodruff. She says they were married in Dallas in June, 1893, and went to live near Eagle Ford.
     If the petitioner's statement is to be relied upon, C. G. proved to be a cruel and heartless husband and made her life miserable. She was taken down with a slow fever, and when too weak to wait upon herself, he went away from home and remained away over night. Next day, he tossed her into a wagon and hauled her into Dallas and left her at her mother's, where she has since remained. He has, several times, sent her word he was going to kill her.

- August 11, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 5.
- o o o -

Suits in District Court.

     Cynthia Bryan vs. Charles Bryan; divorce.

- August 15, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

Divorce.

     Cynthia Bryant vs. Charles Bryant. Plaintiff and defendant were married in Hopkins county, Texas, in 1887, and lived together as man and wife until June, 1890.
     Plaintiff alleges in her petition that the defendant left her in June 1890, and since that time, has contributed nothing toward her support.
     She does not know defendant's whereabouts and asks for citation by publication. Plaintiff is a resident of Dallas.

- August 15, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

The Courts.
Suits in District Court.

     L. L. Sharp vs. C. E. Sharp; divorce.

- August 22, 1894, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o-

THE WRONG NAME.
______

A Married Man Figures in His Broth-
er's Marriage License.

     Ed Templeton, of Garland, yesterday sent word to John Sanders, of Dallas, to get him [a] license to marry Miss Ida Fletcher.
     John rushed off to the County Clerk's office and attended to the matter, and forwarded the license.
     When the preacher went to marry the couple last night, it was discovered that Will Templeton's name, instead of Ed's, had been inserted in the license by error. Will is a brother to Ed, and has been married for a number of years.
     The trouble was straightened out by telephoning to the County Clerk, and the marriage was consummated.

- August 22, 1894, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o-

A Negro Wedding.

     Cal Johnson and Hattie McCullough, negroes, were married on Caroline street Tuesday night. Rev. Taylor, of the African Baptist church, officiating.

- August 23, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Suits in District Court.

     T. H. Hass vs. J. F. Hass; divorce.

- August 25, 1894, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o-

Matrimonial.

     Mr. J. K. Yates and Miss Flora M[__] Bragdon, living in the southern part of the county, came to town yesterday and were married by Justice Skelton.

- August 27, 1894, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -


MRS. RICHARDSON'S
TWO HUSBANDS.

______

SHE TAKES BACK THE FIRST, WHO
WAS LOST FOR THIRTY YEARS.

_____

Mr. Terrell, Her Consort in the Interim,
Tries to Hold the Family Property,
But is Dispossessed by the Sheriff.
He Will Try the Law.

     The newspapers, a few days ago, gave the details of a very complicated matrimonial affair, wherein Mrs. Ann M. Richardson was called upon to decide for this world, a question the Savior settled for the next.
     To recapitulate briefly: In 1864, Mrs. Richardson's husband, W. H. Richardson, went with a bunch of horse to Mexico, but he got sick and temporarily lost his eyesight down there, and could not communicate with her. After the lapse of several years, without any tidings from him, Mrs. Richardson concluded he was dead, and after becomingly mourning him as such, she put aside her weeds, and in due time, became the wife of P. F. Terrell.
     After living for thirty long years with Mr. Terrell, Mrs. Richardson's first husband, a few days ago, suddenly turned up, as one returned from the dead, and explained that when he recovered his eyesight, he made inquiry and was informed that she was dead.
     Mrs. Richardson was not long in deciding that she was the wife of Mr. Richardson, instead of Mr. Terrell. She, accordingly, took him in and gave Mr. Terrell his walking papers.
     Now, when Mr. Richardson left home 30 years ago, he left his wife on a farm near Duncanville, and with the title to other land in the vicinity. When Mr. Richardson married Mr. Terrell, the latter took charge of the property, and proceeded to cultivate and improve it. By the time Mr. Richardson returned from his Rip VanWinkle jaunt to Mexico, the lands had wonderfully enhanced in value, were in a high state of cultivation, and stocked with all manner of pure blooded and graded horses, mules, cattle, sheep, swine and poultry; the sides of the barns were bulging out with grain, and haystacks dotted the meadows; and under the sheds were many kinds of improved machinery.
     Mr. Terrell was willing to give up Mrs. Richardson, but he was not disposed to give up the fruits of his labors for the last thirty years. Mrs. Richardson claimed that Mr. Terrell had nothing when he married her, and that the property is nothing more nor less than the natural increase of what she had.
     Mr. Terrell appealed to the law, and yesterday evening, Deputy Sheriff Sloan Lewis sequestered the two farms, and the various and sundry things on and appertaining to them as above party described.
     The property will remain in the hands of the Sheriff until the law decides the vexed question of what deposition shall be made of it.

-September 1, 1894, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

MRS. FISHER TIRED
OF MR. FISHER.

______

SHE MARRIED HIM IN DALLAS AND
LEFT HIM IN FORT WORTH.

______

He Says He Was Too Poor to Supply Her
With Everything She Desired, and
She Says He Was Cruel and That
She Will Sue for Divorce.

     On the 28th of September last, Miss Julia Higgins, of this city, was married to R. E. Fisher, a machinist and plumber. The bride's family being in competent circumstances, and having made life easy for their daughter, opposed the marriage to Mr. Fisher, but love, as usual, carried the point and the young couple were married.
     Mrs. Fisher left her home in Fort Worth last Thursday morning and returned to her family in Dallas, leaving behind their infant in care of a nurse.
     Mr. Fisher, who lived in this city at the time of the marriage, but is now in Fort Worth, states that his wife was unhappy from his inability to give her all she wanted. That they loved each other, and that he spent all he made upon his wife, going deeply into debt, and the result was a decision on her part to cut short the troubles by returning to Dallas to her parents.
     Mrs. Fisher states that her husband has treated her with the greatest cruelty since the early part of their married life, that he did not make a living and owed many debts. Mrs. Fisher also states that she left her child, as she had heard her husband asserts that he would never part with it, and she knew that it would bring trouble if she had attempted to take the child.
     Mrs. Fisher intends to bring suit for a divorce at one, when she says that the facts on her side will be developed.
     The lady is with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. O. Higgins, on Park street, in this city.
     Her father, Mr. Higgins, when approached on the subject, said: "The long and short of the matter is my daughter was tired [of] living with such a good for nothing man and took advantage of the first opportunity to leave him."

-September 1, 1894, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits in District Court.

M. A. Lane vs. S. J. Lane; divorce.

- September 3, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
- o o o -

PERSONAL.

     Mr. Lucien Huffmaster and Miss Anna Tenison will be married to-morrow evening at 5:30 o'clock at the First Presbyterian church. No cards.

- September 3, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
- o o o -

SUES FOR DIVORCE.
______

Thomas Quales Tires of His Matrimo-
nial Venture.

     Thomas Quales filed suit in the District court to-day, praying for divorce from Mollie Quales.
     He sets forth in his petition that they were married in Red River county in 1879, and lived together until 1892, when she left him and took up with one Calvin Jones, with whom she has, even to this good day, continued to live in adultery, and to whom, she has borne several children.

- September 5, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Suits in District Court.

Thomas Quarles vs. Mollie Quarles; divorce.

- September 6, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits in District Court.

Mattie Wren vs. J. F. Wren; divorce.

- September 7, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits in District Court.

Rita Lewise Pollard vs. A. S. Pollard; divorce.
J. B. Tingle vs. M. J. Tingle; divorce.
N. J. Drumheller vs. Maggie B. Drumheller; divorce.

- September 10, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

WILL TRY IT OVER.
______

A Couple Divorced Last Spring Get Li-
cense to Marry Again.

     Last spring, Judge Gray, of the District Court, granted a decree severing the matrimonial bonds between David Beattie and Caroline Ann Beattie.
     Yesterday, the divorced pair applied at the County Clerk's office for license to marry again, stating that they had had time to reflect during the long summer, and they had learned the lesson that people must put up with each other's frailties and shortcomings in the married state, otherwise, the divorce courts would be called upon to divorce folks as fast as they married.

- September 12, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Matrimonial.

     Mr. J. B. Butler, of the editorial staff of the Texas Sandwich, and Miss May Smith will be married this evening.

- September 13, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

HE MARRIED THEM.
______

Judge Oeland Performs His First Nup-
tial Knot-tying.

     Judge I. R. Oeland, special County Judge during the illness of Judge Nash, came down this morning with his mustache cleared off his face, and had a surprise sprung on him by the boys in the courthouse.
     George Bray and Miss Eliza Hornle wanted to be married. They are Germans. The groom has been in America only a few months, and his bride has just arrived and cannot speak a word of English.
     Judge Oeland had never thought of performing a marriage ceremony, and therefore had no form for it at command. He, however, managed to improvise one which answered very well.
     The groom offered the judge a $10 note, but he declined it.

- September 24, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -


MISS GIBBS' WEDDING
______

It Will be Solemnized at the Family
Home This Afternoon.

     The marriage of Miss Sallie Haynes Gibbs, daughter of ex-Governor and Mrs. Barnett Gibbs, to Dr. Samuel E. Milliken, of New York city, will take place this afternoon at 5 o'clock, at the family home on Live Oak street.
     Mr. and Mrs. Milliken will leave this evening for their home in New York city, via Galveston.
     The wedding will be a quiet family affair.

- October 3, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Asks for Divorce.

     Hattie Neal, to-day, filed suit in the Fourteenth District court for divorce from Christopher Neal, alleging that they were married in Arkansas, Oct. 1, 1874, and that he abandoned her in 1889, and has since lived apart from her.

- October 4, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

DIVORCE STATISTICS.
______

Much Changing of Partners in the
Matrimonial World.

     Mr. Henry Jones, deputy clerk of the District court, has just hunted up the divorce statistics of the county for the year 1893, and he reports that the total number of divorces granted was seventy-one.
     This liberates from the matrimonial yoke, 142 persons, but the condition of family matters is not half so bad as would appear to most people, as fully 135 of these persons have gone right back into the same old state again.

- October 18, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -



 

WISHES A DIVORCE.
______

John Norton Wishes to Cut Loose
From Rose.

     John Norton, to-day, filed a petition in the 14th judicial District court, asking for a divorce from Rose Norton.
     He sets forth that they were married in Fort Worth in May, 1893. Soon thereafter, Rose began to display a weakness for other men. This is why he wishes to cut loose from her.

- November 2, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

DIVORCE SUIT.
______

Alcy Porter Asks to be Set Free From
Richard Porter.

     Alcy Porter, yesterday, filed suit in the District Court for divorce from Richard Porter.
     She says in her petition they were married in Dallas, February 27, 1886, and lived together until September, 1894, when he left her without cause, and has since lived apart from her and failed to contribute anything towards her support.

- November 14, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

THIS MARRIAGE
WAS A FAILURE.

_______

MR. MOELLER SUES FOR DIVORCE
______

He Says His Wife Kept Company With
Other Men, and Spit in His Face
and Struck Him With
a Buggy Whip.

     Arthur F. Moeller has filed a petition in the Forty-Fourth Judicial District Court for divorce from Ella Moeller.
     The plaintiff sets forth that they were married in Dallas, June 6, 1892, and lived happily together until along in August, 1893, when she went off with Jim Hammond and did not return until next day, and when asked to explain her conduct, she flew into a rage and was never afterwards the same toward him.
     From this time on , she went and returned as suited her pleasure, often being absent several days at a time. Plaintiff put up with these whims and little irregularities in defendant until along in September, when she spat in his face and struck him with a buggy whip, and left him and has not since returned.

- November 19, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

SIGHS FOR RELEASE.
_____

R. Y. Clem Asks for a Divorce From
His Wife.

     R. Y. Clem brings action in the Forty-fourth Judicial District court for divorce from his wife.
     They were married in Dallas, Christmas eve, 1892, and after a very stormy married experience of three months, parted company, April 1, 1893.
     Plaintiff avers that defendant treated him with great cruelty, so that their longer living together was insupportable.

- November 22, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 6.
- o o o -

TOUGH MEN
AND TENDER WOMEN.

______

TWO DIVORCES APPLIED FOR.
______

A Couple of Marriages That Did Not Come
Up to Expectations -- Two ex-Husbands
Get Strong "Roastings" From Their
Former Connubial Partners.

     Jennie McDaniel has filed suit for divorce from Floyd McDaniel. She states in her petition that they were married in Dallas, July 27, 1892, and lived together until Oct. 16, 1894. She says the honey-moon lasted only three weeks, at the end of which time, he cursed her out and charged her with want of chastity, and that when the baby was born, he went to Waco and was absent ten days. Moreover, she avers that he is a man of high temper, and on the slightest provocation, would throw the chairs across the room and even into the yard, and that his money was invariably squandered at the gaming table, while she wore her mother's old dresses. On the day of their final separation, he cursed and abused her in the hearing of neighbors. She says she submitted to all this cruel treatment with great humility in the hope that he would, in time, see the injustice of it and change to a milder course of conduct, but it was all of no use.

________

     Virgie B. Hall also wishes divorce from Walter H. Hall. She informed the court that they were married in Kaufman, April 11, 1892, and lived together until August 11, 1894. Instead of the kind, tender and indulgent husband that love's young dream had imagined he would be, she says he was just about as tough as they make them. Shortly after their marriage, he began towards her a course of slow torture, which he ended by beating her up, kicking her black and leaving her. During all this, she treated him with the utmost kindness, but she found him like the only animal that cannot be tamed -- the grizzly bear.

- November 23, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

MRS. McDANIEL
GETS THE CHILD.

______

HER HUSBAND GETS ROASTED.
______

The Sunday Sun Man Sues For the Cus-
tody of His Child, But Judge Clint Turns
it Over to its Mother, and Gives
His Opinion of the Sun.

     Judge Clint held a session of court last night to hear the habeas corpus case brought by Floyd McDaniel to recover possession of his child, which was in the keeping of his wife, whose suit for divorce from him was mentioned in the TIMES HERALD yesterday. She set up as grounds for divorce that her husband not only blew in his money at gaming and failed to provide for her so that she had to wear her mother's old dresses, but he abused and mistreated her in a most shameless manner, charging her with a want of chastity, etc.
     Several witnesses testified to McDaniels' general worthlessness, and that he is correspondent of the Sunday Sun, and in his writing, pretends to be horrified at the low moral tone of many citizens.
     The Court took occasion to roast McDaniel for his connection with the Sunday Sun, saying that it is a most disreputable publication and should not be permitted to circulate in the State, and that a man that would write for it ought to be drummed out of the community, and that if he knew of any means by which the paper could be kept out, or its correspondent run out, he would certainly apply such means at once.
     The verdict of the court was that Mrs. McDaniel have custody of the child, but that its father be permitted to see it once a week on such day and such hour as the mother may designate.

- November 24, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

HOW McCARTY
GOT MARRIED.

_______

UP WITH THE BOYS LAST NIGHT.
______

He Was Short of Finances and Everybody
Was Willing to Help Him Through.
"Old Grizzly" Piloted Him to
Justice Lauderdale.

     Mr. E. K. McCarty, a young man from Cedar Hill, met Mrs. Rosa McGaughey, of Decatur, in Dallas last night for the purpose of marrying her.
     Marrying was an entirely new business with Mr. McCarty, and he proceeded with extreme caution. He was a stranger in the city, and this fact operated to make him go even slower than he otherwise would have done. He and Mrs. McGaughey registered at the Phoenix, and at 7 o'clock, he started forth to get the license. It was 11:30 o'clock when he reached County Clerk Hughes' house and called him out. Mr. Hughes came down and provided him with a license. Armed with this, the candidate for matrimonial honors took a stroll to meditate and hesitate on the costs and expediency of the final steps in the matter. While revolving this in his head, he dropped into Felix Tanco's saloon, corner Commerce and Akard streets, to confer with a small crowd of men, including Felix, Mr. Parry, "Smithy" the hack driver, "Old Grizzly," a T
IMES HERALD representative and the colored porter.

_____

     Mr. McCarty soon interested the sympathies and hearty co-operation of the whole party. Mr. McCarty stated that he was afflicted in two ways, -- first, with an ignorance of where a preacher could be found, and second, with a stringency of finances.
     "Smithy" suggested that while it was the high-toned thing to be married by a preacher, still a Justice of the Peace would answer just as well and would come much cheaper.
     "What would a Justice of the Peace charge?" asked McCarty.
     "Why," replied "Smithy," "the law allows them $1, but, of course, you couldn't ask a man go get out of bed at this hour for less than $1, making $2; and then, I am driving a hack merely for the purpose of covering expenses, and giving my services away, and I will do all the necessary hauling for another $2, making $4 all told.

______

     The TIMES HERALD representative, unwilling to have a hackdriver outdo him in generosity, then tendered Mr. McCarty his room , just across the street, for a bridal chamber.
     These propositions were received by Mr. McCarty with the proper thanks, but he seemed to hesitate about closing with them, and he remarked that it was so late, he suspected his intended had given him out and retired, and he didn't know, but he had better let the matter go over until morning.
     The T
IMES HERALD man then got a city directory and located Justice Lauderdale at the Billows House.
     Old Grizzly, who, a few moments before, had remarked to the T
IMES HERALD man on the side that he believed McCarty was weakening and liable to back out, here plucked the young man aside and the two went out and down the street. The eagle-eye of "Smithy" taking in the situation at a glance, he remarked.:
     "Well, I'll be durned, boys, if Old Grizzly ain't going to get the rake off himself. He's found out where Lauderdale lives and he's going to show the young man the way for four bits."
     During all his troubles and perplexities, the young man never took a drink. At 1:30 a. m., Justice Lauderdale married him and the widow.

_____

     Mr. Tim Hawpe, a farmer living four miles east of the city, came to town yesterday to proceed against Mr. Rice, a neighbor young man who ran away with his 15-year-old daughter last Saturday. He said on his way to Dallas, he came by Mr. Rice's house and the young man told him he had married his daughter in East Dallas, and she was then his wife.
     Mr. Rice, however, did not get his license in Dallas county.
     Mr. Hawpe says he is going to prosecute his son-in-law for perjury in swearing his daughter was of age.

- November 26, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

SHE ELOPED
WITH J. C. HAVEN.

______

AND SKIPPED TO AUSTRALIA.
_____

Mrs. Lamkin Leaves Her Husband and
Takes Up With a Dude -- The Guilty
Pair Gone to Grow Up With
a New Country.

     D. Lamkin filed suit in the Fourteenth Judicial District Court to-day for divorce from Sue F. Lamkin. He says they were married in Atlanta, Texas, Aug. 29, 1875, and lived together until April 19, 1893, when she eloped with one J. C. Haven and went to Australia, where he learns that they have since lived as husband and wife.
     Plaintiff states that, during their married life, they amassed property in Dallas and in Seymour, which the plaintiff wishes the court to turn over to him, along with the decree of divorce.

- November 28, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -




FAMILY JAR.
_______

A Husband Who Had a Temper and
Two Names.

     Susan English, yesterday, filed suit for divorce from Spencer English, alias Spencer Jones.
     Plaintiff tells a sad tale in her petition. She married defendant in Dallas early in 1889. He soon tipped his hand by cursing and abusing plaintiff, and the following summer, struck, her in the forehead with a piece of scantling, knocking her down and leaving a permanent, ugly scar. After this, he threatened to kill her and chased her off the place. Defendant then left home and did not return for two years, when he seemed worse possessed than ever, for he had not been home two days when he chased her with a butcher knife.

- December 6, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

FIREMAN BRICE
TURNS LOCHINVAR.

_____

TRUE LOVE IN AN ENGINE HOUSE
______

A Member of the Dallas Department
Drowns Out an Ennis Rival -- Successful
Elopement with Miss Laura Brant-
ley -- Married in Dallas Yesterday.

     A heroic affair, in every sense of the word, occurred yesterday evening in the dormitory of fire station No. 4, and event that proved that romance is still alive, and the modern Lochinvar still comes out of the West.
     Fireman W. C. Brice, of station No. 4, had a pretty little sweetheart, Miss Laura Brantley, of Ennis, and to whom he was solemnly engaged, notwithstanding the opposition of unrelenting parents. As a precautionary move, these same unrelenting parents had bestowed their daughter's hand (a free American hand, it should be remembered), without her consent, upon a young man who manipulated drygoods in an Ennis emporium, and the wedding was announced for the 22nd of this month. Mr. Brice and Miss Brantley set a prior date, the 18th, for the only nuptials they intended, should take place, and armed peace reigned until yesterday, when the gallant Dallas fireman received a telegram from his lady love, stating that she would be in Dallas on the 6:35 train, as the old people had discovered their intentions.
     As the north-bound train drew up in front of the oil mills, the fleeing young lady was caught on the fly, pretty much as a way-station mail bag, by her intended, placed in a hack and driven at a high rate of speed to fire station No. 4, on Commerce street.
     Upon their arrival, they were received by a noble phalanx of the city's protectors, the uniformed firemen of station No. 4, supported by the noble body of policemen, who are the next door neighbors of this particular station.
     Justice Skelton and the license having been providentially procured earlier in the day, the deed was soon consummated and true love triumphed.
     The bridal party was the recipient of an oyster supper by Willet Haney, and Mr. and Mrs. Brice are at home at the corner of Main and Pearl streets.
     Fireman Brice has been granted a 15-days leave of absence, in which to break the news to his parents-in-law and reconcile them to the inevitable.

- December 12, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Mrs. Fred Duebler was granted a divorce in Judge Burke's court to-day.

- December 12, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

SINNED WITH HER
HUSBAND'S BROTHER.

______

Unusual Grounds for Starting Divorce
Proceedings.

     Albert Smith has filed his petition in the Forty-fourth District Court for divorce from Nannie Smith.
     He says they were married in Dallas, May 15, 1891, and lived together for fourteen months, when defendant was discovered in adultery with Franklin P. Smith, the plaintiff's brother, and that she has, to this day, continued to live in adultery with plaintiff's brother in Collin county.

- December 15, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Amanda A. Bolinger filed suit to-day for divorce from John Bolinger. They were married in Missouri in 1888 and lived together until 1891, when her husband left her and has since lived in adultery with one Della Brown, of Temple.

- December 18, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1-3.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     John B. Warren, who travels for the McCormick harvester, was married Tuesday night to Miss Maggie Deane, of Wills Point.

- December 20, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 6.
- o o o -

City News Notes.

     Dr. R. L. Rawlins and Mr. T. Marvin Cullum met in the County Clerk's office this morning on the same business. They wished marriage licenses. The former got license to marry Miss Cora L. Stemmons, and the latter to marry Miss May Lemmon. Both marriages will take place this evening, the former at Miss Stemmons' mother's home in Oak Cliff, and the latter in the Central Christian church.
     Thomas Manning, a well known operator employed by the Western Union Telegraph Company, was married last night. The drop fell at 8 o'clock and Tom has a smile on him like a slice out of a watermelon.

- December 26, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -