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(Updated August 2, 2004)

Licensed to Wed.

A. P. Schneider and Maggie Atwood.
A. B. Isaacs and Josephine Hewitt.
Joe Mason and Katie Polk.

- January 4, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

SUIT FOR DAMAGES
...

The other suits filed to-day were as follows:
Addie Stone vs. Charles Stone; divorce.
Mollie Buck vs. Rudolph Buck; divorce.

- January 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

[THE COURTS]
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

Minnie Truett vs. B. W. Truett; divorce granted.

NEW SUITS FILED.

M. M. Simpson vs. T. W. Simpson; divorce.

- January 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

NEW SUITS FILED.

Mattie L. Parker vs. Fred L. Parker, divorce.

- January 7, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

Mary E. Hutchinson vs. C. C. Hutchinson; divorce.

- January 13, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS
LICENSED TO WED.

     The county clerk issued the following marriage licenses yestrday:

Frank Bledsoe and May Crumble, colored.
Edward B. Hogard and Miss Marian Newcomb.

- January 17, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

DAY IN THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

M. A. Johnson vs. William Johnson; divorce.

- January 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Marriage licenses issued: W. A. Curfman and Bertie Mewshaw; T. B. Wynn and Nellie Ford.

- January 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

NUGGETS OF NEWS

     The following licenses to wed were taken out Saturday afternoon: Albert Marks and Dillie Coates; Thomas Hooker and Julia Harrison. J. D. Dagnal and Alice Nice. George D. Wills and Winnie D. Brice. Abe Turner and Emeline McGhee.

- January 23, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

A DAY IN COURT.
________

An Interesting Libel Suit on Trial in
Judge Burke's Court To-day, in which a
Daily Dallas Newspaper is Defendant-
County and Justice Court Proceedings.
New Suits Filed.

JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     The case of C. W. Fitzgerald vs. the Dallas News has been on trial since yesterday. Fitzgerald is a carpenter and formerly resided on Commerce street. Upwards of two years ago, he was arrested for the theft of a stove and other goods by officers of the city and taken to the central station. The stove and other articles were found by the owners, Messrs. Scott and Berry, at the residence of Fitzgerald and reclaimed by the owners. The press of the city chronicled the arrest of Fitzgerald on charge of theft and also noted that the goods were found at his residence. He brought a civil suit for damages against the Dallas News, claiming that he had been injured to the extent of $20,000. The defense introduced witnesses to prove that plaintiff had been arrested as charged and that the stolen goods were found at his house. The plaintiff, on the stand, declared that he knew nothing whatever about the stolen stove or the other goods. He didn't know who brought them to his house, or who removed them. One of the witnesses for the defendant was the divorced wife of plaintiff, who testified strongly against her former husband.

- January 26, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

RATCLIFFE HOLLINGSWORTH.
________

He Was at One Time a Resident of This
City.

     "I see that the News says that Ratcliffe Hollingsworth is not known in this city," said a Dallas attorney to a TIMES-HERALD reporter to-day. "This is a mistake. Hollingsworth lived here and his relatives reside here now. If he has contracted a secret marriage of late, there is a screw loose somewhere. A few months ago, he engaged a young friend of mine, a well-known Dallas attorney, to bring a divorce suit for him. His wife was a San Antonio girl, I believe, and Hollingsworth was very anxious for a time to obtain a legal separation from the woman. It is all bosh, this talk about Hollingsworth's wealth. An uncle died recently in Louisiana, and bequeathed Ratcliffe Hollingsworth some wealth, but it was not a bonanza by any means.

- January 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Ratcliff Hollingsworth, who stated to the St. Louis detectives that he married secretly in this city, did not take out a license in this county. The police have no acquaintance with the gentleman.

- January 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

PERSONAL.

     R. B. Allen departed for Homer, La., yesterday, where he will wed Miss Agnes McCranie. He was accompanied by W. R. Allen, E.A. Moseley, A. A. Jackson and Dr. C. A. Sherman.

- January 30, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, p. 2.
- o o o -


LOCAL COURTS.
Justice Courts.

     Rice Coaksey was arraigned to answer a charge of seduction preferred by Carrie Cornet. Rice quailed in the presence of the majesty of the law, sent for the girl and the twain were made one flesh.

Suits Filed.

Mrs. Dollie Witt vs. W. J. Witt; divorce.
W. W. Werdlein vs. Lizzie Werdlein; divorce.

- February 7, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

DAY IN THE COURTS.
Judge Harris' Court.

     Lydia King vs. G. Ralph King; judgment for the plaintiff. Divorce suit.

- February 8, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

PERSONAL.

     "Walter Wyatt of this city will go to Dallas to-day to marry Miss Minnie Denrooch," says the Fort Worth Gazette.

- February 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

WAS INDICTED FOR BIGAMY.
________

But He Thinks He Will Certainly Beat
the Case.

     The Garland News publishes the following item of local interest:
G. W. Brown, of Pleasant Valley, was in town Monday and called at the News office. Mr. Brown was indicted last fall by the Dallas county grand jury for bigamy, and his case was transferred to Rockwall county, he having married Miss Griffin in that county. About the first of December, he escaped from the Rockwall jail with two other prisoners, and after skirmishing around in Rockwall and Dallas counties a few days, during which time he came near freezing to death, he made a trip to Columbus, Ga., the place where he is alleged to have married the first time. He returned a few weeks ago and gave himself up to the Rockwall authorities, and was released upon $500 bond with L. L. Jackson and G. W. Griffin as sureties. Mr. Griffin is Brown's father-in-law.
     Mr. Brown thinks he will beat the case against him when it comes up. He says it is a plot to down him, but he thinks it will be unsuccessful. His case will not come up for trial before next May or June.

- February 11, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

A DAY IN COURTS.
Licensed to Wed.

Alonzo Miller and Miss Nora E. Lumley.
Robert Harper and Lucy Bush, colored.
J. F. Elam and Miss Lizzie Newman.
S. D. Lawrence and Miss L. H. Walker.
B. Cross and Josie Philips.

- February 13, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

ASSAULTED HIS WIFE
________

WITH A HATCHET, DID CHARLES T.
UTTERBACK.

_______

A Painter, Residing on Harwood and Jack-
son Street, Last Night -- The Fellow
Placed Behind the Bars by the Officers --
The Woman's Nose Cut in Twain.

     Charles T. Utterback is a painter and a Salvation Army follower. This is no discredit to the Army people, as a church cannot always have a membership composed entirely of angels. Occasionally, one of the other kind will slip in.
     Last night, Officers Henry Waller and Tom Martin were summoned to Utterback's residence. They found Mrs. Utterback in a demoralized and dilapidated condition. She said her husband had beaten her and also struck her in the face with a hatchet, splitting her nose in twain and inflicting other wounds on her. She said he left her insensible on the floor and fled. The neighbors came in, placed the unfortunate woman on her bed, washed away the blood and summoned a physician, who dressed her wounds.
     Officer Waller left his partner at the house and started after the wife-beater. Thirty minutes later, he captured the fellow and landed his prisoner at the central station, where a charge of assault with intent to murder was placed against him.
     This morning, Mrs. Utterback was unable to appear against her liege lord, master and whipper, but he was ordered held by the chief of police.
     The legislature should establish the whipping post in Texas for wife-beaters. About 300 lashes on the bare back would take the whipping propensities out of these fellows.

- February 15, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

WOLSEY'S WIVES.
______

His First Wife Deserted Him, It is
Claimed.

     A TIMES-HERALD reporter was informed to-day by a party qualified to speak, that the first wife of J. L. Wolsey deserted him in this city eight or ten years ago. Wolsey afterwards went to Grayson county. While there, he received a letter from a party, stating that his first wife was dead. The man who wrote the letter stated that on her dying bed, the woman requested him to get her children, three in number, and keep them. The letter closed "you will never get them, you bet." Wolsey married again, and then No. 1 appeared on the scene and prosecuted him for bigamy. He was acquitted. Judge R. E. Burke secured him a divorce from No. 1 and then he re-married the woman who cost Faburn his life at Denison.

- February 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

[COURTS]
Suits Filed.

Joseph Biashop; vs. Rachel Biashop; divorce. [Barshop?]
Carrie Hewett vs. James Hewett; divorce.

- February 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     C. P. Brown and Julia Foursong; C. M. Jackson and Gertrude Palmer were licensed to wed yesterday.

- February 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

Rasbury Cooxey vs. Carey Cooxey; divorce.
Emma Miller vs. Hayde Miller; divorce.
Delia Griffin vs. John Griffin; divorce.
Mollie Thomas vs. John Thomas; divorce.

- February 25, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -


Suits Filed.

Emma Dixon Snyder vs. C. V. Snyder; divorce.

- March 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

[COURTS]
Suits Filed.

Lidia Seaman vs. Fred Seaman; divorce.
Nannie L. Williamson vs. W. M. Williamson, divorce.

Licensed to Wed.

J. H. Van Dynie and Fannie P. Armstrong.
Joe Kiser and Georgia Wesley.
Miller Jourdan and Eddie Cole.

- March 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
Judge Burke's Court.

     Motion docket:
     W. W. Weiden vs. Lizzie Weiden; motion for alimony; alimony allowed the defendant in the sum of $40 per month. Plaintiff directed to pay to the clerk of this court within five days from this date, the sum of $40.

Suits Filed.

     Amanda McCaulley vs. Willie McCaulley; divorce.

- March 13, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS
Suits Filed.

     Christine Hammerschmidt vs. R. Hammerschmidt; divorce and injunction.
     Fanning [Fannie?] Norris vs. Henry Norris; divorce.

- March 14, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

THEY ARE MARRIED, NOW.
_____

And the Old Man Should Say "Bless
You My Children."

     I. R. Picklesimer and Miss Mattie Letot came in from Letot station this morning, secured a marriage license and were united in marriage by Justice J. M. Skelton. Picklesimer was a clerk in the employ of G. Letot, and pretty Miss Mattie was the accomplished daughter of the proprietor. The young couple purchased tickets for the World's Fair and departed for Chicago via the Texas & Pacific railway. The old gentleman was very angry at first, but will no doubt say, at the proper time, "The latch string hangs on the outside, my children."

- March 15, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
Licensed to Wed.

Robt. W. Swann and Miss Virginia G. Hill.
B. F. Atkinson and Miss Mattie Richer.
J. F. Harvey and Miss Kittie Spencer.
S. L. Morris and Miss Una Barrett.
S. J. Hay and Mrs. Norma Oxford.
G. R. Jones and Miss Mary J. Blair.

- March 16, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
Judge Tucker's Court.

Susan Crumble vs. William Crumble; divorce granted plaintiff.

- March 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

Lee Smith vs. Nellie Smith; divorce.
C. E. Faby vs. C. S. Faby; divorce.

- March 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

TWICE MARRIED.
_____

Once in the Indian Nation and Again in
Texas.

     A gentleman called at the office of County Clerk Lee Hughes to-day and secured a marriage license to marry his own wife. Seven years ago, in the Indian Nation, he wedded the girl of his choice. The decision of Judge Bryant, a year or two ago, to the effect that Indian Territory marriages, of parties from other states, were illegal, alarmed the couple. Recently, they investigated and ascertained that the witnesses to the ceremony in the Nation were dead. To guard against accidents, it was decided to take out a license and have the ceremony performed again. The couple are highly respected and have considerable property.

- March 30, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

Marp [Mary?] E. Piper vs. N. Piper; divorce.

- March 30, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Melissa Utterback vs. Chas.T. Utterback; divorce.

- March 31, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -


THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

     Lacy L. Key vs. G. N. Key; divorce.
     Rachel Baishop [Barshop] vs. Joe Baishop [Barshop]; divorce.

- April 10, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
The House of David.

     Simon David filed a suit for a divorce to-day from his wife, Barbert David. Simon alleges that he was united in marriage with Barbert in August, 1892, and if his story is to be believed, he must have enjoyed a picnic with Barbert. He alleges that she called him "an old hog," "an old stinking thing," "wished that he were dead," and refused to permit him to sleep in her room. These little burdens he bore like a meek and humble worm of the soil, but when she put poison in his food on two occasions, then, and not till then, he resolved that marriage with Barbert was a failure. He further alleges that she is an opium eater and resides in McLennan county, hence, he prays that the Gordian knot be severed by the sharp steel pen of the presiding judge.

- April 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Joe J. Eckford and Miss Jessie Prather will be married at 6:30 this afternoon at the residence of the bride's father on Gaston avenue. No cards. The bridal couple will leave on the 8 o'clock T. & P. train to-night for a visit to Mr. Eckford's old Georgia home, Atlanta. Hearty good wishes of host of friends of handsome Joe and his lovely bride, go with them.

- April 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     John C. Locke of Vernon and Miss Fannie Moss were married at 8 o'clock last night at the residence of the bride's father, Mr. J. H. Moss, 584 North Masten street. Both parties are mutes. The ceremony was performed by Rev. W. O. Millican and Dr. J. F. Carter acted as interpreter. Mr. H. Locke, brother of the groom, and who is also a mute, accompanied his brother to Dallas. The following mutes were in attendance: Richard T. Murphy of Hillsboro and John Lowery, Willie Vaughan and J. B. McCurry of Dallas. The bride lost her hearing as a result of meningitis when she was 4 years old. The groom and his brother both had their hearing destroyed by fever when they were quite young. The groom is a farmer in Wilbarger county, and owns the farm to which he will take his bride.

- April 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Josie Haynes vs. Will Haynes; divorce.
     Isabelle M. Laffrey vs. W. H. Laffrey; divorce.

- April 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     Annie E. vs. T. J. Oversheimer; divorce granted as prayed for and custody of children awarded plaintiff.

- April 24, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

     Agnes G. Welch vs. Darius Welch; divorce.

- April 24, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Emma Rowland has filed suit for divorce against James Rowland.

- April 25, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.

     Paul Watson vs. Rebecca Watson; dismissed for want of prosecution.
E. J. Alberts vs. E. T. Albers; divorce granted as prayed for. Decreed that property described in plaintiff's petition is community property and each party is entitled to one-half thereof. W. H. Prather, C. F. Crutcher and J. R. Curry appointed appraisers.

- April 25, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

TWO DESERTERS.
_______

A Printer and a Music Teacher Alleged
to Have Eloped.

     J. C. Havens is a dashing and curly-headed printer, who made his home in this city for several years past. Three weeks ago, he resigned his job and accompanied by his wife, went to Memphis, Tenn. Last Wednesday, he returned to the city and that night, he disappeared again.
     Mrs. Duncan Lamkin, a lady well-known as a teacher of music, has also resided in this city for several years past. She had a comfortable home, and her husband, it is said, was ever kind and dutiful as husbands should be. Last Wednesday, Mrs. Lamkin announced she was going to Luling to visit her father and brother. And, Mrs. Lamkin also disappeared.
     Her father and brother were in the city yesterday, and held several conferences with the different officers. Mrs. Lamkin never visited Luling, and it is now accepted as a dead certainty, that Havens and the lady left the state together. They were fast friends and saw a great deal of each other for months past.
     Telegrams have been sent to the heads of the police departments of leading cities, but as yet, no trace of the missing parties has rewarded the vigilance of the detectives.
     Haven is about 36 years old and a good-looking fellow, smart as a steeltrap. His wife is at Memphis. Mrs. Lamkin is about 36 years old, a tall blonde and a fine musician. Fortunately, there are no children to be involved in the affair.

- April 26, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     Andrew T. Todd vs. Margaret Todd; W. S. Simkins appointed [to] represent non-resident defendant. Divorce granted as prayed for; $10 allowed attorney ad litem. Costs taxed against plaintiff.
     I. A. Palmer vs. H. K. Palmer; divorce granted as prayed for and plaintiff restored to her maiden name, Ithema A. Atterbach.

- April 26, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

A DAY IN COURTS.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     Alexander McCoully vs. Willis McCoully; divorce granted as prayed for.

Suits Filed.

     Y. B. Hunley vs. Robert C. Hunley; divorce.

- April 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

A DAY IN COURTS.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     Mattie L. Parker vs. Fred Parker; divorce granted as prayed for upon grounds of cruel treatment as alleged; plaintiff awarded the care and custody of her two children named in the petition.

Judge Burke's Court.

     Robert T. Fair vs. Mollie C. Fair; divorce refused and costs taxed against the plaintiff.

- April 28, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Burke's Court.

     Eva Levlon vs. O. P. Levlon; divorce granted to plaintiff on grounds as prayed for; care and custody of his minor sons awarded to plaintiff; title to houses and lots set out and described in plaintiff's petition decreed to plaintiff.
     Thomas Scoggins vs. Lizzie Scoggins; K. R. Craig is appointed attorney for defendant, cited by publication; divorce granted to plaintiff on the grounds prayed for; costs taxed against plaintiff K. R. Craig allowed a fee of $10 to be taxed as costs.
     James T. Jourdan vs. Annie W. Jourdan; divorce granted to plaintiff as prayed for; costs taxed against the plaintiff.

Judge Tucker's Court.

     J. W. Williams vs. Margaret M. Williams; divorce granted as prayed for.

Suits Filed.

     E. A. Thomas vs. Clara Thomas; divorce.

- April 29, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -


THE COURTS.

     Mrs. S. C. Cocks vs. S. R. Cocks; divorce granted to plaintiff on grounds set out in her petition; care and custody of minors named in petition is awarded plaintiff; title to the house and lot is decreed to plaintiff and costs taxed against defendant.

Suits Filed.

     Kate Palin vs. Thomas L. Palin; divorce.

- May 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Married on the 30th ult., by Justice Lauderdale, at the residence of the bride, 164 Live Oak street, Mr. M. B. Stone and Mrs. L. J. Westrup.

- May 2, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
Judge Tucker's Court.

Delia Griffin vs. John Griffin; divorce granted.

- May 5, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 1.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Frank Mitchell and Effie Leggett were licensed to wed yesterday.

- May 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Burke's Court

     Julia Lynch vs. Edward Lynch; divorce granted as prayed for.
     Martha J. Hopper vs. Jim Hopper; divorce granted as prayed for.

- May 12, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Burke's Court.

     Amelia Rosenburg vs. Louis Rosenburg; divorce granted to plaintiff on the grounds alleged.
     Willis Campbell vs. Carry Campbell; divorce granted to plaintiff.

- May 13, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Charge of Assault to Murder.

     Charlie Hammock was jailed last night on a charge of assault with intent to murder, the complainant being his father-in-law, Bud Morise, a carpenter. The row was over his wife, whom he married six months ago. Hammock says his wife was induced to leave him by her parents. Last night, he met her opposite 519 Main street and engaged her in conversation. Her father stood on the opposite side of the street. Hammock seized his wife by the arm and noticed that she had a pistol wrapped up in a newspaper. The father-in-law ran across the street and assaulted Hammock with a cane. Hammock took the pistol away from his wife, and says he discharged its contents into the ground. No one was injured.

- May 13, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     James Rorark and Miss Alice Cordell were married Saturday evening at the residence of Mrs. Felan on Beaumont street and Park avenue.

- May 15, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

     Mary D. Mexia vs. Clarence W. Mexia; divorce.

- May 16, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2-4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

Omer J. Clark vs. Ida E. Clark; divorce.

- May 17, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Burke's Court.

     Fanny Nervis vs. Henry Nervis; divorce granted to plaintiff on the ground of abandonment; costs taxed against the plaintiff.
     Minnie B. Wells vs. George D. Wells; divorce refused.

Suits Filed.

Elina Garvey vs. Daniel Garvey ; divorce.
Anna Greer vs. Jim Greer; divorce.

- May 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Miss Evy Nix and F. W. Whittaker, prosperous young people, were united in marriage in the office of County Clerk Lee Hughes, this morning. Justice J. W. Skelton performed the ceremony, and the entire force of the office tendered congratulations.

- May 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Burke's Court.

     Fanny Cherry vs. Wm. Boughton; divorce; continued by operation of law.
     Rachal Barshop vs. Joe Barshop; divorce granted to plaintiff on grounds of cruel treatment; plaintiff restored to her maiden name, Rachal Loeb; costs taxed against plaintiff.

- May 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits filed.

Mrs. Kate Palin vs. Thomas L. Palin; divorce.

- May 22, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

John Anderson vs. Dora Anderson; divorce.

- May 25, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

Mary Brick vs. J. J. Brick, divorce.
Vina Clank vs. Rufus Clank; divorce.

- May 29, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -


CITY NOTES.

     E. S. Tresper and Julia Elnor Cole were licensed to wed yesterday.

- June 2, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

Julia Burney vs. Charles Burney; divorce.

- June 3, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Licenses to marry have been issued to A. J. Peterson and Mrs. Mollie Brown; William Tutz and Miss Mattie S. Cumbie.
     Prof. E. S. Brewer, principal of the Berry Creek high school, a popular and deserving young man, and Miss Annie Bond of Dallas county were married yesterday at Terrell.

- June 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Mr. George Nairn and Miss Fannie Warren were married last evening at the residence of Mr. Adam Green, in South Dallas, by Rev. Dr. Young.

- June 7, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

A BUDGET OF NEWS
_______

TAKEN FROM THE NOTE BOOKS OF
T. - H. REPORTERS.

     Hugh Davis and Miss Mary Rhode were married last Wednesday night at the residence of the bride's father near West Dallas, by Eld. W. F. Barcus.

- June 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

Johanna Engers vs. Jacob Engers, divorce.

- June 15, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Tucker's Court.

Suits Filed.

     Mary Buris vs. James Buris; divorce.

- June 17, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

AROUND THE CITY.

     A. D. Ewell and Miss E. E. Joshua[?], prominent in Afro-American circles, were married last Thursday by Rev. E. G. D. Isaacs. It was the swell colored wedding of the year and many presents were received by the couple.

- June 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

A DOUBLE WEDDING.
______

Four Young Hearts Made Glad This
Morning.

     Four young people came in from Forney, bright and early this morning, and hastened at once to the court house, long before the hour for the people's servants to materialize. Finally, Chief Deputy County Clerk Elliott appeared on the scene and granted licenses to marry to Mr. J. M. Updike and Miss M. S. Lovelace and Mr. E. A. Baker and Miss Jennie Carr. A courier was dispatched to the temple of justice in which Justice Skelton abideth, and he hastened at once to the parent temple to relieve the suspense that weighed down four fond and palpitating hearts. He pronounced the words in his eloquent and fatherly manner. Congratulations followed and the newly-wedded couples departed for their hotel.

- June 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     J. A. Holsomback and Miss Jennie Mahanna were united in marriage by Judge Thomas F. Nash this afternoon.

- June 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

A CHICK FROM CHICO
_______

INDUCES A YOUNG GIRL TO COME
WITH HIM TO DALLAS

______

Under Promise of Immediate Marriage.
This Morning He Backs Out and Re-
fuses to Fulfill His Pledges -- Blue Coats
Make Him Change His Mind.

     Officers Gunning and Busbee rounded up one J. D. Lockett, from the little town of Chico, in short order this morning. The officers were informed that a little country girl in a hotel on Pacific avenue needed their attention. They visited the house, and the girl, who gave her name as Lidia Ferrell, stated that Lockett had induced her to come from Chico to Dallas, promising to marry her. She is a green, ignorant little thing and an orphan. They registered at a Pacific avenue hotel last night, Lockett promising to marry her this morning. This morning, Lockett coolly repudiated his pledge and left the hotel. The girl gave a description of the man, and the officers located him on Main street.
     "We want you," said Gunning.
     "What for?" said Lockett.
     "For many things."
     "What, has she dun gone and tol' you?"
     "Yes, she has." 
     "Well, I didn't think she was that big a fool."
     Lockett and the girl were taken to the court house, about 100 spectators bringing up the rear. The girl was indignant at Lockett's conduct, but said she would marry him to save him from the penitentiary. A license was procured and Judge Thomas F. Nash tied the not. The girl is 16 years old, and came from Tennessee a few months ago to Chico.

- June 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

NUGGETS OF NEWS.

     Yesterday, B. S. Conway and Miss Alice Hays of Denton appeared in Justice Ed Lauderdale's court and asked to be married. Mr. Conway showed a license procured in Denton. Justice Lauderdale joined them in wedlock and they departed.

- June 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

DAY IN THE COURTS.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     Charles T. Utterback, charged with assault to murder, was arraigned for trial this morning. He made a fight for a continuance, but the motion was overruled and the prisoner ordered to trial. Utterback assaulted his wife with a hatchet, and his crime was of the most aggravated type. The case will go to the jury this evening.

Suits Filed.

     Rosa Hutton vs. F. K. Hutton; divorce.

- June 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     Charles T. Utterback, the wife-beater, was convicted of aggravated assault and battery and given one year on the county farm. Utterback and his wife were, at one time, members of the Salvation Army. Utterback can think his stars that he was not sent to the penitentiary, as the attack upon the woman was brutal in the extreme, and nothing but the whipping post would do the subject justice.

- June 22, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

     Relis Hyland vs. Celline Hyland, divorce.

- June 23, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

NUGGETS OF NEWS

     Peter Hyland wants a divorce from his wife, Catherine.
     Mrs. Charles T. Utterback, whose husband was given a year on the county farm for wife-beating Wednesday, was granted a divorce by Judge Burke to-day.

- June 24, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

     Maria Shaffer vs. John H. Shaffer; divorce.

- June 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     The following licenses to wed were issued yesterday afternoon: H. H. England and Mrs. Margaret E. Holloway; Robert Cole and Miss Jane Hall; E. E. Wilcox and Mrs. L. A. Welch.

- June 30, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -


DIDN'T PAN OUT.
______

On a Very Troubled Matrimonial Sea.

     Edward Givens, residing at 140 Lamar street, called at Chief of Police Arnold's office to-day to invoke the strong arm of the law against his son-in-law, Charles Woodruff. He stated that he came to Dallas in February last from Johnson county. Soon after his arrival, Charles Woodruff began paying attentions to his daughter, the courtship winding up with a marriage two weeks ago yesterday. The couple took board with the bride's father. But, they did not get along as romantically and smoothly as they had done during the courtship. According to Mr. Givens, Woodruff inaugurated a system of cruel and overbearing treatment of his wife, which he carried to the extent of throwing her out of the house and threatening to kill her if she returned. For protection, she fled to the room of her parents. He says Woodruff, armed with a broomstick, threatened to break into the room and wear the broomstick out on her. Next day, she packed her grip and left for parts unknown. Mr. Givens says Woodruff is trying to get the assistance of the officers in searching for her, with the avowed object of murdering her, while he is in interested in keeping her whereabouts from being known to Woodruff. Chief Arnold told the old gentleman his remedy was a peace warrant. Mr. Woodruff's side of the story has not been heard.

- July 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     E. E. Wilcox and Mrs. L. A. Welch were married, Thursday last, by Rev. J. C. Russell.

- July 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Licensed to Marry.

Robert Hall to Miss Jane Hall.
E. E. Wilcox to Mrs. L. A. Welch.
Will Grimes to Mary Sims.

- July 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

JEALOUSY AND DRINK.
_______

FRENZIED BY THE TWIN DEMONS
THOMAS RUSSELL EASTERLING

______

Makes Murderous and Cowardly Attack
Upon a Woman Who Calls Herself
His Wife-Statement of an
Eyewitness to Crime.

     A cowardly attempt at assassination took place at the residence of Mrs. M. E. Davis, 207 Canton street, at a late hour last night. The victim was Minnie May Bancroft, daughter of Mrs. Davis. the perpetrator of the crime was Thomas Russell Easterling, formerly a druggist of this city and a well-known man about town-noted more for his dissipated habits than anything else. Easterling stood on the gallery and fired three shots at his wife, through the window, with a Winchester rifle. After he thought he had consummated his terrible work of vengeance, he fled. Drs. V. P. Armstrong and Aronson were hastily summoned by the mother of the young woman, and J. R. Scholfield, a roomer at the Davis residence visited police headquarters and notified the officers. The alarm was given and a search was instituted for the would-be murderer. The search was futile. He could not be found. One ball took effect. It entered the left thigh four inches below the body of Mrs. Bancroft-Easterling, and went through, cutting a branch of the femoral artery, causing a great loss of blood.
     This morning, a reporter of the T
IMES HERALD called at the Davis residence. The physicians were there dressing the wound of their patient, who was said to be very weak, owing to the great loss of blood. Her condition was said to be dangerous. Mrs. Davis answered the call and ushered the scribe into the room where Easterling shot the woman who claims to be his wife. The cottage is situated at the foot of Canton street on the northwest corner and the premises are a perfect flower garden. It is a one-story building and in the northwest room, facing Canton, the bloody evidences of the work of Easterling are visible. Two great pools of blood stained the Brussels carpet. There is a bedstead in one corner of the room and the footboard was riddled with bullets. The weapon used was a Winchester rifle. Easterling fired through the window. He stood outside on the gallery, not six feet from the object of his fiendish rage. The wire screen contained three large apertures made by the bullets, and everything in range was "shot full of holes." Easterling was there for business. The reporter asked for an interview with the young woman, but the mother, whose eyes were red from excessive weeping, said her daughter was not able to talk. Finally, Mrs. Davis was prevailed upon to make a statement of the causes, or alleged causes, leading to the shooting. She said "Thomas Russell Easterling came here to kill my daughter and myself. I first met him under the following circumstances: After his first wife died nearly two years ago, he had an advertisement in the paper for board for his three children and himself. I answered it. Easterling called, and although I did not like his appearance, I agreed to take the children, but it was agreed that he should not board with me. He was granted the privilege of coming to see his children on Sunday, and in case of sickness, I was to nofity him. I told my daughter, Minnie, then that I did not like the appearance of the man. I believed he was a morphine eater or whisky drinker. Instead of coming every Sunday, he began to visit my house every day. Finally, as he was here the greater part of the time, I concluded I might as well take him as a boarder. After his youngest child died, I declined to keep the other children. Easterling fell in love with Minnie, and the poor girl, against my repeated warnings, reciprocated and loves the brute now after his attempt on her life and mine. Finally, Easterling took his two children and moved over on Leonard street and Minnie went with him to care for the children. When he was drunk, he said ugly things to her; when reason returned, he made abject apologies. I got rid of his children, his father at Forney taking one and his sister at Vernon, the other. Six days ago, Easterling told Minnie he was going to leave her; that she could return to her mother, or make her living some other way. Minnie packed his goods for him. Monday, she came home and left some of her things. Monday night, she returned to the house and remained alone there the entire night. I had a presentment that he would kill her and notified the officers. I did more. Without her knowledge, I stood guard outside of the house all night. Yesterday, Minnie came home. Last evening, we decided to return to the house on Leonard street and get a few packages that Minnie had left there. J. R. Schofield, the young man who rooms here, accompanied us. I told him that the chances were, he would get in trouble if he went along with us; and might get into trouble if he remained at home. He said he would go along. We visited Minnie's house, got the packages, came by the postoffice downtown, visited Delgado's and purchased lunch and returned home. When inside of the house, I noticed that the inside gate was open and remarked, 'Someone has been here.' Mr. Schofield placed the packages on the table and I lighted the lamp. I heard a knock on the front door and hastened to answer the call. It was Easterling. He had an ugly look in his eye, and laughingly said: 'Now, d----n you, I've got you.' With these words, he picked up a Winchester rifle and I slammed the door in his face, and ran to my daughter, intending to drag her into a dark room. He fired through the window before I reached Minnie. She gave a cry of pain and fell on the floor in a dead faint. He fired twice after that. I ordered Mr. Schofield to go for the police and ran out the back door and called someone to go for a physician. I returned immediately and dragged my daughter into a room where there was no light. I really believed that he would enter the house and complete his work of destruction. After firing three shots, he walked away. He had provocation, no cause. Last February, he shot at me, and also attempted to burn my house over my head. On account of my daughter, I condoned these offenses."
     Mrs. Daivs is the wife of Dr. R. P. Davis, but the couple separated several years ago. Her daughter is a rather handsome brunette, 22, or 23 years old, who is madly infatuated with Easterling. Easterling is about 3__ years old; is below medium height, of slender build, has brown eyes, dark hair and dark moustache. Easterling and the woman whose life he sought to take, say they are legally married; Mrs. Davis told the reporters to-day that her daughter was not married to Easterling. He has evidently been the bane of her life, her evil spirit. Not many months ago, the couple were arraigned in the police court on charge of lewd conduct and fined $25 each. Easterling paid the fines.

- July 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Olivia Peck vs. M. R. Peck; divorce.

- July 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

A DOMESTIC RACKET.
_______

A WIFE BRINGS UP HER ELOPING
HUSBAND WITH A SHORT TURN.

_______

She is a Poor Marksman, But Got There
Just the Same-The Other Wo-
man's Exculpatory State-
ment-Other Facts.

     There was a sensation on Jackson street last night, arising from strained domestic relations. The sensation was sprang by the crack of a pistol in Mrs. C. T. Utterback's domicile. Pistol shots always attract attention, and this one assembled quite a crowd. Mrs. Belle Russell stated to the crowd of curious that she had fired the shot and aimed it at her husband, who was about to elope with Mrs. Utterback, in proof of which latter statement, she called attention to the fact that the woman had her household effects packed preparatory to leaving.
     Mrs. Russell was arrested and taken to police headquarters, but she was found to be in such a delicate condition that the officers turned her loose on her own recognizance, as they did not wish to make a lying-in hospital of the calaboose.
     Mrs.Utterback and her husband formerly belonged to the Salvation Army, but last fall, they had a row all within their own family circle, which he brought to a close by hitting her on the head with a hatchet, for which he was yanked up and given a long term on the poor farm, where he still languishes.
     Mrs. Utterback states most emphatically that there have never been any improper relations between herself and Mrs. Russell's husband. All there was in it, she said, was that she was going to leave town and Mr. Russell, hearing of it, thought she might need some assistance in packing up, and he came down to render such assistance, and Mrs. Russell, being nervous on the combined account of her condition and the weather, magnified the trifling matter into a mountain and went on the war path.
     The shot fired by Mrs. Russell went wide of its mark, and it is probable that all parties concerned are glad of it.
     An old gentleman commendint on the affair, says the dog star is in position at this season of the year to exert a most malign influence on this portion of the globe, and all sorts of rackets are likely to occur.

- July 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

DAILY NEWS BUDGET.

     Thomas Russell Easterling is still at large. On the day before the shooting, he had $2000 in his possession and is in excellent financial shape to seek other fields of conquest. Mrs. Bancroft-Easterling produced last evening a certificate showing she married her would-be murderer in Miller county, Ark., and that a Christian preacher officiated.

- July 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col.1.
- o o o -

CHING COON MARRIED.
_______

Justice Lauderdale Ties Him to Miss
Mabel Brown.

     At the residence of the bride in Frogtown last night, Ching Coon and Miss Mabel Brown were united in marriage by Justice Ed. S. Lauderdale. Those present were the justice of the peace, a TIMES HERALD reporter, Ching Coon, Mabel Brown, Mabel's baby and two leaders of colored society in that neighborhood. It was a very recherche affair, and the TIMES HERALD was the only newspaper in the wide, wide world honored with an invitation. There were several innovations introduced. Justice Lauderdale did not kiss the bride. He declared that the custom originated in the effete east and should be frowned upon by the stalwart yoemanry of the boundless southwest; the bride introduced a real live baby a year old to her celestial lord and master, another innovation imported from the Orient or some other far-away clime; and lastly, Ching attempted to smack his bride on the rich, red, ripe lips, but she prevailed upon him to spare her blushes until the TIMES HERALD reporter and Justice Lauderdale had departed. After the ceremony had been performed and congratulations showered upon the slant-eyed son of Confucius and his white bride, the TIMES HERALD reporter and the justice of the peace ordered their coupe and were driven to their respective palaces.
     N. B.-Before the T
IMES HERALD missionary withdrew from the scene of festivities, Ching ordered the TIMES HERALD sent to his address, saying: "Belly glood paper; great leligious daily; send him to Ching Coon." They all take it!

- July 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

GAY AND GIDDY RUSS
_______

ARRESTED AT DENISON BY A DEP-
UTY MARSHAL TO-DAY.

______

Sheriff Cabell Dispatches An Officer to
That City-He Will Return
With His Man This Evening.

     A description of Thomas Russell Easterling was scattered broadcast by the officers the day following his desperate attempt at murder. Many believed that the badly-wanted individual was in hiding in the city and two or three parties were confident that they had planted their optics upon him. It was evidently an apparition of the gay and giddy Russ that haunted them. This morning, Sheriff Cabell received the following telegram:
       D
ENISON, July 21.
     To Sheriff Ben E. Cabell, Dallas-
Have your man Russell B. Easterling. Shall I bring him, or will you send for him? Answer. J. F. F
ORE,
Deputy United States marshal.
     Sheriff Cabell dispatched Deputy Fon Simpson on the first train in custody. Thomas Russell Easterling will look at the stars through iron bars to-night.
     The condition of Mrs. Easterling, who was desperately wounded, it will be remembered, continues to improve, according to the physicians in attendance upon her.

- July 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Hymenial.

     Mr. J. F. Smith of Dallas and Miss Laura Sims of Bryan were married at Groesbeck by Rev. D. Pennington on the 18th inst. Mr. Smith left this morning for Bryan where his bride will meet him and return with him to Dallas. It seems that Miss Laura was spending a week with her uncle near Hearne, and that, in order to overcome parental objections, Cupid led them to the altar at Groesbeck. It is understood, however, that the parents have been duly notified and that the usual reconciliation has taken place.

- July 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
SUITS FILED.

     Mary Jane Wright vs. West Wright; divorce.
     Leona Hinckley vs. W. T. Hinckley; divorce.

- July 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

DAILY NEWS BUDGET.

     Two or three months ago, J. D. Lockett came to Dallas from Hico with a young girl named Lydia Ferrell. Under promise of marriage, the next day he induced the girl to occupy the same room with him overnight. The next morning, he attempted to desert the unfortunate child, who is not more than 14, but was overhauled by Officer Gunning and compelled to right the wrong by marriage, Judge Thomas F. Nash performing the cermony. The girl said she would marry Lockett to keep him out of the penitentiary, but she did not believe he would live with her. She was right. Mrs. Lockett is now at an East Dallas boarding house penniless and friendless, and her husband has disappeared.

- July 22, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

DAILY NEWS BUDGET.

     Mr. and Mrs. Ching Coon are reveling in the honeymoon period of their existence and are reported to be very happy.

- July 24, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

DAILY NEWS BUDGET

     The divorce suits filed in this county in 1892 were 145 in number; marriage licenses issued, 714.

- July 25, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Ida Pearle vs. Morris L. Pearle; divorce.

- July 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.

LICENSED TO WED.

C. D. Richardson and Minnie L. Carden.
E. R. Cox and Norma Young.

- July 28, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

THEY ARE FAR AWAY
______

IN THE SUNNY CLIME OF AUSTRA-
LIA RUSTICATING.

______

More About J. C. Haven and Mrs. Lamp-
kin, the Giddy Elopers From Dal-
las -- A Nemesis on Their
Track.

     Three or four months ago, J. C. Haven, a curly-headed and dashing printer, surprised his friends by eloping with Mrs. Lampkin, a music teacher. She left a husband, father and brothers; Haven deserted a wife.
     The latter furnished for publication, a letter after the escapade of her husband, in which Haven was given a fearful excoriation, and the woman was touched up as only an outraged and repudiated wife can apply a vitriolic castigation to one guilty of the petty larceny of a husband's love.
     The pair were tracked to San Francisco, and there the matter rested, so far as the public was concerned. To-day, a prominent citizen of Dallas said to a T
IMES HERALD reporter:
     "Well, Havens and Mrs. Lampkin are in Australia."
     "What authority have you for that statement?"
     "A letter from a party qualified to speak," said the party. "After Haven's flight, he was traced by means of a membership card in the International Typographical Union. He could not deposit the card without his identity being made public as the news of his desertion of his wife and elopement with the wife of another had been scattered broadcast. And so, after remaining in San Francisco for a short time, the fleeing couple boarded a Pacific mail steamship and took passage for Melbourne, Australia. They are at Melbourne or some other city in the antipodes at present, but you can rest assured that an avenging Nemesis is on their trail, and that the guilty couple will not be permitted to bask in each other's smiles in peace."
     The T
IMES HERALD'S informant also said that weeks before the elopement, Mrs. Haven had called on the husband of Mrs. Lampkin and warned him that an intrigue was on between his wife and her husband. He did not believe it, however, and told her that she was an intermeddler and given to gossip, where there was no foundation for talk. The denouncement came and his eyes were opened when it was too late.

- July 31, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Judge Clint's Court.

     The grand jury returned a true bill against Thomas Russell Easterling Saturday night, and this morning, his case was set for next Saturday. He will be tried for assault with intent to murder. His wife recovering rapidly.

SUITS FILED.

Lucinda J. Dorris vs. J. M. Dorris; divorce.

LICENSED TO WED.

W. A. Jameson and Miss Mollie E. Hartman.
Walter White and Miss Mary Willis.
Walter Offord and Miss Katie Matthews.
W. L. Sharp and Miss N. C. Jestice.
Aaron Williams and Lizzie Watson.

- July 31, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -


THE COURTS.
LICENSED TO WED.

J. W. Stubblefield and Miss L. A. Durrett
N. F. Reade and Miss Myra James
Jesse Sloan and Miss Mary Seaton.

- August 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED

Julia Henry vs. William Henry; divorce.
Sallie Canady vs. George Canady; divorce.

LICENSED TO MARRY.

M. F. Reade and Myra James.
F. E. Stokes and Ida Cain.

- August 2, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

W. S. Kirby vs. J. M. Kirby; divorce.

LICENSED TO MARRY.

T. E. Girdley and Felia Strange.
A. J. Church and M. E. Foster.

- August 4, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
LICENSED TO MARRY.

Joe Northcott and Jessie Richards.
John Childres and Dora Todd.
W. J. Hall and Effie[?] Markham.
J. E. Reagon and Dora Porter.

- August 5, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

Nelson Luster vs. Millie Luster; divorce.
Minnie Easterling vs. Thomas R. Easterling; divorce.

LICENSED TO WED.

R. B. Vestal and Miss R. Nettie Stephens.

- August 7, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
LICENSES TO MARRY.

R. S. Jones and Miss S. L. Laughlin.

- August 8, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.

SUITS FILED.

W. A. Sharp vs. L.[?] C. Sharp; divorce.
P. Thomas vs. W. C. Thomas; divorce.
Ella Smith vs. Richard Smith; divorce.
Julia Johnson vs. Jim Johnson; divorce.

LICENSED TO WED.

Jeff Pearson and Sallie Broody.
A. C. Gillespie and Miss Francis Hester Cole.

- August 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

SOCIETY NOTES.

     Cards have been received for the marriage of Miss Susie Solomon to Mr. Joe M. Shapira of Hillsboro. The wedding will take place Sunday afternoon, Aug. 20, at Phoenix hall.

- August 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
LICENSED TO WED.

Tillman Allen and Adele Leonard.
R. W. Carnes and Carrie C. Griffiths.
J. J. Lawrence and Mamie Hieronymous.
J. T. Davis and Jennie Sisler.
Hiram Cozart and Ida Richburg.

- August 10, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

DIVORCE CASE.
_____

Mary Piper Makes a Matrimonial Mistake
and Pulls Out of the Arrangement.

     Judge Tucker, to-day, granted a decree dissolving the matrimonial union between W. N. Piper and Mary E. Piper, at the instance of the later. The petition, which was drawn up by Judge Blewitt, set forth that the parties were married in 1885, and that W. N. Piper had done nearly everything that a man, short of a genius, could devise, to violate the vows he took at the altar. While he had presented a most pleasing and promising appearance during the courtship, he had proved, after the marriage, to be a trifling, worthless fellow, and a morose, drunken vagabond. He not only failed utterly to contribute anything to her support, but forced her to give up money that she sewed for in order that he might buy red liquor. When he got pretty thoroughly brutalized, he became very abusive, going so far as to charge her with being unfaithful to him. All of this went with the patient woman, until he got to lifting his hand against her. She drew the line on this and began the proceedings that culminated to-day in a divorce.

- August 11, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

GEORGE NEICE'S LAMENT.
_______

Declares His Wife Has gone With a False
Friend.

     George Neice, who resides at 462 Pacific avenue, called at police headquarters last night and state that his wife and child had disappeared from the city with one T. Tackett, a stonecutter. The latter boarded with the family. Two or three days ago, Mrs. Neice told her husband that they had better go to the country to live. Neice went to Lancaster to rent a place. On his return, he discovered, that during his absence, his wife had packed up her goods and chattels and disappeared, taking their child along.

- August 11, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Sallie E. Smith vs. Will Smith; divorce.

- August 16, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
SUITS FILED.

Alice Hearld vs. Jefferson Hearld; divorce.

- August 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE SPIRIT ORDERED
______

AND MRS. SUSAN E. HOGUE
OBEYED THE COMMAND.

______

Marriage of Madame Hogue, the Spirit-
ual Medium, and Julius Bryer,
at the Court House This
Morning.

     Madame Susan E. Hogue, the renowned spiritual medium and clairvoyant, who resides on North Washington avenue, changed her name this morning and will be hereafter known in private life as Mrs. Julius Bryer.
     This morning, an elderly female and an elderly male called at the office of the county clerk and introduced themselves to the accommodating chief deputy, Mr. A. L. Elliott. The lady was Madame Hogue and the gentleman, Julius Bryer.
     Madame Hogue informed Mr. Elliott that she received a long communication from her father (who has been dead many years) yesterday, urging her to marry Mr. Bryer immediately. The dutiful daughter bowed to the wishes of her parent in the spirit land and, accompanied by Mr. Bryer, visited the court house yesterday for the purpose of securing license. Unfortunately, the clerk does not do business on Sunday, and it became necessary to postpone the event until this morning. The spirit interposed no objection.
     Mr. Elliott, when this strange tale to him was unfolded, moved about with alacrity. He filled out the blank marriage license and dispatched a courier to the office of Elder W. F. Barcus, who does business in the vicinity. The man of God lost no time in getting to the court house and he tied the knot with neatness and dispatch. It was not a bad day's work for the Elder, either. Bridegroom Bryer handed him a $5 William for his services.
     Mr. Bryer, it was stated, had been a helper for Madame Hogue in her business. This is the first marriage of record in Dallas arranged and brought about by an inhabitant of another world.

- August 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
COUNTY COURT.

     Geo. and Julia Brown of Farmers Branch are on trial this afternoon. George Brown was arrested a year or more ago on charges of bigamy, it having been alleged that he had a wife in Georgia when he married the daughter of a prominent citizen of Farmers Branch. The case is now pending in the district court of Rockwall county, having been removed from Dallas county on a change of venue. The Dallas county girl remained true to Brown and the grand jury indicted the couple for adultery.

LICENSED TO WED.

H. E. Faugh and Sallie Dennis.
J. M. Shapira [Shapiro?] and Susie Goldman.
F. E. Saylor and Rosa Plume.[?]

- August 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
LICENSED TO WED.

Henry Clemons and Julia Hill.
W. J. Tevis and Annie Moxley.
C. W. Gollipugh and Annie L. Davidson.
J. H. Bumpas and Ella Dollar.

- August 22, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 1.
- o o o -


UN-PLEASANT VALLEY
_______

FILLED WITH SCANDAL AND A
CHOICE MORSEL OF GOSSIP.

______

A Marrying Gentleman From Georgia
Strikes These Arcadian Precincts,
Stirs Up Much Excitement and
Gets into Trouble.

     The county court was occupied all day yesterday, investigating a charge of adultery against George W. Brown. George lives in the Pleasant Valley community, and the interest his neighbors have in him was plainly attested by the manner in which they left off work and came to town to hear the trial.
     It appears from the testimony that George Brown came to Texas in the fall of 1891, leaving a wife and child in Georgia. He had been married to this wife since 1888. After his arrival in Texas, he wrote a few letters home, but brought the correspondence to an abrupt close by stating that he was going to another part of ht estate, but as soon as he got settled, would write and give his address. He got settled at Pleasant Valley, where he went to work for old man Griffin, but it appears that he became so infatuated with his employer's daughter, Miss Julia, a very attractive young lady, aged 17, that he forgot all about the folks in Georgia, and did not send his address as he had promised to do. Miss Griffin also saw some good points about her father's new hand, and, it was not long until they went to Rockwall county and got married. In some unaccountable way, the people in Georgia got on to George, and wrote Capt. Griffin in regard to his son-in-law's entangling alliances east of the river. The outraged father-in-law laid the matter before the grand jury in Dallas, and in indictment for bigamy was promptly ground out. In 1892, the case came to trial in the Dallas county district court, but the attorneys for the defense pleaded to the jurisdiction, showing that the case properly belonged in Rockwall county, and got it dismissed from the docket.
     At this stage of the proceedings, Capt. Griffin relented, perhaps softened into so doing by the entreaties of his daughter, and got George out of jail. On regaining his liberty, George went back to the roof of Mr. Griffin. But, the grand jury of Dallas county, after getting through looking after those arch-offenders, the fruit dealers and soda water vendors of the city, made some casual inquiry concerning their old friend George, and his neighbors, who seem to look after him with watchful and tender solicitude, reported that he had quit the bigamy business and was living in adultery with his second wife, nee Miss Griffin. This was simply awful -- worse, if possible, than selling fruit or soda pop on Sunday -- and an indictment for adultery was made out in a jiffy. The case, as above stated, was tried yesterday. The testimony was that George and his second wife were living in the same room. But, the defense was they occupied different beds. the case was given to the jury last night, and that body was given until next Thursday to deliberate and see if they could find a suitable verdict. The members of the jury went their several ways and each will think on the case in his own way until day after tomorrow. Meantime, the people of Pleasant Valley are in great suspense.

- August 22, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

BROWN OF GEORGIA.
______

He Commits Bigamy and Then
Forges a Defense.

______

THE FATAL LETTER.
________

EZRA COLLINS SWEARS FALSE-
LY TO SAVE A FRIEND.

_______

He Becomes Conscience Stricken and
Voluntarily Makes a Confession in
Order to Purge His Own Soul
of Sin -- Brown Convicted.

     One of the most sensational cases in the criminal history of Dallas county came to an end this morning in Judge Nash's court. The closing chapter was as sensational as a page torn from one of Zola's novel. Tuesday, the TIMES HERALD gave in detail, the bigamous adventures of George W. Brown, who came from Columbus, Ga., to Texas in the fall of 1891 and located in the Pleasant Valley community, where he found employment on the farm of J. H. Griffin, a staid and prosperous old farmer. The latter had a daughter, a pretty girl of 15 years, who fell in love with Brown, who induced the child to go to Rockwall county and become his wife.
     There came a letter one day from Georgia to Father-in-law Griffin, saying that Brown had deserted a loving wife and two interesting babes in Georgia. There was a terrible scene, and the upshot of the matter was that Farmer Griffin placed the facts in the case in the hands of the county attorney. The grand jury indicted the wife deserter and gay Lothario for bigamy. In 1892, the case came to trial in the Dallas county district court, but the attorneys for the defense pleaded to the jurisdiction, showing that the case properly belonged in Rockwall county, and got it dismissed from the docket. Brown was indicted by the grand jury of Rockwall county and placed behind the bars of the Bastille at Rockwall. In June last, Brown succeeded in inducing his father-in-law to believe that when he married Julia, he was under the impression that his wife in Georgia had sued for and obtained a divorce. He had a letter purporting to come from Ezra Collins of Columbus, Ga., to that effect. Farmer Griffin softened. His daughter loved the prisoner and finally, the old man made a bond and secured the release of the Georgian from the Rockwall county jail. He did more. He took him to his home. The censors of public morals of the neighborhood looked askance. They were scandalized. They came to Dallas and poured their tales of woe into the ears of the grand jurors. The grand jury, composed of latter day anchorites, regular icebergs of purity, returned true bills against George and Julia Brown for violating the laws of God, man and Pleasant Valley by living together in adultery. Stroud & Chanler of Rockwall, the attorneys for Brown in the bigamy case, instructed Phil Barry Miller to defend their client, and Farmer Griffin retained him to defend his unfortunate daughter.
     The state made out a strong case, and then the defense showed its hand. Mrs. Julia Brown, or rather, Miss Julia Griffin, testified that Brown slept on a pallet in her room since his release from the Rockwall county jail in June. She had never sustained the relations of a wife to him since his arrest for bigamy. Her little brother also occupied a bed in the same room.
     Brown testified, also. He declared, that in pursuance of an agreement between them at the time of his release, he had never cohabited with her. In fact, they had decided to indulge in platonic love only, until "the clouds have rolled away." Brown is a chirpy youth, and he swore with all the abandon of on old-time professional in the good old days of early life in California.
     Brown identified a letter introduced as evidence written to him by Ezra Collins of Columbus, Ga. The letter purported to have been written in the fall of 1891 and warned Brown that the courts of Georgia had granted his wife a decree of divorce.
     Ezra Collins was sworn and testified that he was the author of the letter and believed, at the time, it was true in every particular.
Monday afternoon, the attorneys argued the case and Judge Nash charged the jury. No verdict was reached and Judge Nash, who was called to Austin, discharged the jury until Thursday morning.

COLLINS' BOMBSHELL.
     At 10 o'clock this morning, court reconvened. I. R. Oeland, assistant prosecuting attorney, requested that he jury be withdrawn, as he desired to make a short statement to the court. It was so ordered, and Mr. Oeland made the astounding statement that Ezra Collins, the author of the famous letter, had come to him this morning and confessed that it was rank forgery, a conspiracy planned by Brown himself to escape the penitentiary, and that Collins had been his unwilling dupe. He asked that the jury be recalled and that Collins be permitted to make an open confession of his complicity in a startling crime. Mr. Miller made a vigorous protest against re-opening the case, saying it was contrary to law and precedent, and would jeopardize his client, Miss Griffin. Judge Nash stated that it would be bad practice, as a general rule, but this was an exceptional case, the most flagrant attempt to evade justice he had ever known. He ruled that the confession of Collins should go to the jury. That body was recalled and Ezra Collins made his advent for the second time. The court room was packed, and in the language of the horse editor, Collins was the cynosure of all eyes. Collins is a young man of 28, a blond with a blond mustache that does not grow luxuriantly. He is of medium height and will weigh 145 pounds. He has an honest face, is intelligent and of good address. The witness was sown and then ordered to make a statement to the jury, which he did in a clear and resonant voice, as follows:
     "Gentlemen of the Jury -- In defense of my manhood and my God, I desire to make a general confession and retract and atone for the wrong I did the other day. George Brown came to Columbus, Ga., in June last. I was out of work and had no money. He urged me to come to Texas. I informed him that I had no money. He said he would lend me money and get me work. I accepted his offer of friendship and aid and came with him. He told me then he had trouble in the courts of Texas, but produced a statement to the effect that the case had been disposed of in some way. Shortly after arriving in Dallas county, he said he desired to use me as a witness. He had read of a case where a letter had saved a man accused of bigamy from the penitentiary. One day, he came to Dallas and had me subpoenaed as a witness in the case. He composed the letter introduced at the trial the other day and then I copied it. He was my friend, and thinking it would save the honor of the girl and aid him, I [agr]eed to do as he said. I was 1000 miles from home and did not realize the great wrong I was doing until after I had testified in the case Monday. Neither the lawyers for Brown, Miss Julia Griffin, or any member of her family, were aware of the fraud that had been practiced upon them by Brown and myself in this forged letter business. After leaving the witness stand, my part in the transaction weighed heavily upon my mind. My conscience troubled me. I could not sleep, and finally, yesterday morning, I went to Mr. Griffin, father of the girl, and made a clean breast of it. He told me to come to Dallas and confess all to the county attorney. I did so, and this morning, I told Mr. Miller as well. I do this that justice may be done, and that I can, at least, atone in part for that which I have done that is a reflection on my manhood."
     The witness was excused, and as he walked from the courtroom, Judge Nash, in his sternest tones, said: "Young man, you are conscience smitten. Your conduct and your face shows that. Were it not for this face, I would order you under arrest and remand you to jail."
     The bombshell did not startle Brown in the least. He was as complacent as a June bug under a vine. The girl whose life he has blasted, buried her face in her hands and shed bitter tears.
     Judge Nash instructed the jury that the confession of Collins was not to be considered, so far as Miss Griffin's case was concerned. He did this at the request of Mr. Miller. It did not take the jury long to agree. In ten minutes, they reported finding Miss Griffin not guilty, and George W. Brown guilty, and assessing his fine at $250 and costs. The girl was taken in charge by her friends and Brown was remanded to the county jail. The fine and costs amount to $350, and it will just take 700 days of Brown's valuable time on the county road to square accounts with the courts.
     Ezra Collins is a locomotive engineer and has a license issued by the board of railroad commissioners of Alabama. He informed a T
IMES HERALD reporter that Brown's wife is a noble little woman, and there is naught against her character. He said that on Monday last, Brown asked him to blacken the character of the woman when he was called to testify. He refused point blank, and then and there, began to weaken in his friendship for Brown. Collins says he has a wife and two children himself at Columbus, Ga., and never before did anything unbecoming a good citizen.

- August 24, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5-6;
continued on p. 8, col. 1-2.
- o o o -



NEWS OF THE DAY.

     V. M. Tate and Maude Burkhead of this city were married at Shreveport yesterday.

- August 25, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

NEWS OF THE DAY

     Mr. A. D. Judy and Miss Epa May Yount came in from Garland this morning on business bent. They sought out Lee Hughes, the accommodating county clerk, and secured a license to wed. A messenger was dispatched for Elder W. T. Barcus and that gentleman responded with alacrity. The knot was tied, congratulations showered upon the newly married, and then they departed for their hotel, with their faces wreathed with smiles.

- August 26, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

WEIR'S WOES.
_______

He Loves Pretty Dora Hawpe, but She
is Under Age.

     Saturday last, a middle-aged man, evidently a Hibernian, judging from the Corkonian flavor of his musical brogue, called at the office of the county clerk and requested a marriage license for Henry Weir and Dora Hawpe. The bridegroom expectant did not put in an appearance himself; he sent an ambassador in the person of the gentleman who first saw the light in the "Cove of Cork."
     "How old is the lady?" queried the clerk.
     "Shure, the divil a day over 14, sur, and, be heavens, it is not shure I am, that the colleen is that."
     "Well, she is under age and I can not issue the license," interposed the clerk.
     "The divil a hair I cares. Shure, I can get the license beyant in Fort Worth," and the avaunt courier stalked out of the office.
     The young lady in the case is the daughter of Tim Hawpe, a farmer, and when he got on to the game, he broke it up quicker than greased lightning slides along a barbed wire fence. It was discovered that Weir had his marriage license issued by the county clerk of Tarrant county, and the party who obtained it swore that Dora Hawpe was of age. Weir says he hired an Irishman, name to him unknown, and the officers are camping on the trail of the unknown party. They want him bad.

- August 22, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
JUDGE NASH'S COURT.

SUITS FILED.

     Bettie Willis vs. Ellis Willis; divorce. Mrs. Willis, in her petition, alleges that when she was 19 years old, defendant seduced her and was forced to marry her, August 5, 1891. In December, 1891, her babe was born. Willis deserted her on the night of the wedding after cursing her and cruelly treating her. She asks for the dissolution of the marriage ties and custody of their child, a little girl.

LICENSED TO WED.

Frank K. Polk and Mrs. Annie Albert.
Dennis Hatten and Lily Hughes.
C. G. Miller and Ethel Moss.
John Little and Della Ann Louisiana Washington.

- August 24, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
SUITS FILED.

Perry M. Matthews vs. Alabama Matthews; divorce.

LICENSED TO WED.

L. J. Hook and Miss Kittie Martin.

- August 29, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
SUITS FILED.

Sam Lander vs. M. E. Lander; divorce.
Hans A. Hansen vs. Barbara Hansen; divorce.
Lizzie Ewell vs. Cyrus Ewell; divorce.
Mrs. S. E. North vs. J. M. North; divorce.

LICENSED TO WED.

W. L. Anderson and Mary E. Anderson.
J. H. Delfs and Miss Teressa Preman.

- August 30, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 1-2.
- o o o -


Wants a Divorce.

     Mrs. Mollie Cox has filed suit in the district court for divorce from __. I.[?] Cox. She sets up in her petition for the decree, that they were married in Falls county in 1873, [and] lived together until 1892, when [he] abandoned her without cause or provocation, and has since refused to come near her or contribute in any way to her support, although he is deriving considerable revenue from a restaurant business. She further alleges and charge that he has been guilty of repeated acts of adultery. Of their marriage, three children were born, Belle, Ada and Florence, the oldest being now 16 years of age.

- September 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

THEODORE'S TEMPER.
______

Broke His Wife's Head and Made Her
Miserable.

     Carrie Huffman wants a divorce from Theodore Huffman, and filed her petition to-day.
     In June, 1890, they were united in the bonds of wedlock in Dallas county, and not long thereafter, according to the petition of the plaintiff. Theodore proved false to his marriage vows. Last fall, plaintiff alleges that Theodore beat her with a stock because supper was not ready on schedule time. He also accused her of want of chastity and conferred upon her titles that flourish only the cocaine district. Unable to bear his cruel treatment, she left him and wants a divorce instanter.

- September 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

[THE COURTS]

LICENSED TO WED.

A. J. Burnett and A. J. Pemberton.

- September 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
Suits Filed.

     William Webb vs. Lula Webb; divorce.

- September 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Licensed to Wed.

E. J. Burson and Miss Edna Day.
Wilson H. Page and Mary E. Ash.
Robert Taylor and Lula Clemons.
Dick Collins and Anna M. Stout.

- September 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -



Licensed to Marry.

John A. Holley and Miss Ollie Cronk.
H. B. Hicks and Miss Edero Moore.
C. D. Morey and Miss Carrie L. Bellas.

- October 2, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

MRS. WILSON'S WOES.
______

Declares That Her Husband Abused and
Maltreated Her.

     Mrs. M. J. Wilson has sued her husband, James M. Wilson, for divorce. The plaintiff alleges that she married defendant in Johnson county, Texas, in 1889, and that he made it interesting for her until she was compelled, by cruel treatment, to leave him. Plaintiff says her liege lord and master accused her, on different times, of being unfaithful to her marriage vows, refused to compel his daughter, by a former marriage, to assist in doing the house work. In addition, the defendant threatened her life. In April 1893, the plaintiff separated from defendant.

- October 4, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

Notice to the Public.

     My wife, Sarah J. Hansen, having left my bed and board without cause or provocation, you are hereby notified not to lend any money on any of the four lots situated on the corner of Houston and Polk streets, in the city of Dallas, Texas, nor to purchase the same or any portion thereof. Said property stands in the name of Sarah J. Siler or Sarah J. Lynch, but now her name is Sarah J. Hansen.
O. H
ANSEN, her husband.

- October 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 4.
- o o o -

SUES FOR DIVORCE.
______

Dallas Girl is Anxious to Be Single
Again.

     Mrs. M. L. Seymore, nee Miss Bertie Dale, filed her petition in the district court Saturday for divorce from B. P. Seymore. The attorney for plaintiff merely docketed case, carrying the petition back to his office with him. The grounds for the action cannot therefore be ascertained.

- October 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Licensed to Wed.

Dr. E. S. Borders and Mrs. Texana Miller.
J. F. McClanahan and Leonora Boshers.
J. J. Dickey and Jessie M. Bond.

- October 10, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

FOOLED THE OLD MAN.
______

Zona Brown Outwitted Her Father and
Married Her Choice.

     Sunday, near Kleburg, P. H. Holman and Zona Brown were married, and the event created a stir in the Brown household, as Zona was not 16 and Holman was not the choice of Zona's "stern parent."
     The old farmer came to town with blood in his eye, and called at the office of the county clerk. He discovered that Zona had secured a marriage license by an order purporting to be the written consent of Father Brown to the union. Holman could not be prosecuted for false representations, as he had made none, and it would not do for a man to prosecute his own flesh and blood.
     At noon, the mother of the girl and Mr. and Mrs. Holman were in consultation at the office of the county clerk. Mrs. Brown had relented, and it was whispered about the corridors that Mr. Brown was on the eve of relenting and extending the usual congratulations.

- October 10, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE WIDOW'S DAUGHTER
______

Fled with the Man of Her Choice and
Married Him.

     A widow named Houghton called on Deputy Sheriff Sloan Lewis last evening. She was in distress and in tears. Her young daughter, she said, had fled from home with a young man named Ollie Baker. Sloan is a natural born protector of widows and orphans, more especially orphans of the gentler sex in their teens, and he began working the wires at once. To-day, an answer came from the city marshal at Terrell, that Ollie Baker and Miss Houghton had been made one by a holy man of God, and that they would make Terrell their home. And then, the widow smiled through the mist of her tears and thanked the gallant deputy for his kindness.

- October 10, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

Wishes to Be Single Again.

     Vicie Watkins, yesterday, filed her petition in the Fourteenth district court for divorce from William Watkins. She sets forth that they were married in Dallas, March 25, 1889, and lived together as husband and wife until about the end of the following month; when William, without cause or provocation, deserted her to live in adultery with Minnie Story, whom he afterwards married. She further avers that Williams is a habitual drunkard, and altogether, a very undesirable husband.

- October 13, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

A POPULAR DRUMMER.
_______

Sued by His Wife for Absolute Divorce
To-Day.

     Mrs. Mary G. Jackson has sued her husband, J. Edward Jackson, for divorce, alleging brutal treatment, intemperance and failure to support her. The parties were married in Huntsville, Ala., in 1885. One child, a beautiful 5-year-old girl, is the fruit of the union. The plaintiff asks for divorce, the custody of the child and permission to resume her maiden name, Mary. G. Farris.
     Mrs. Jackson is well known in social and literary circles and her husband is one of the popular commercial travelers in the city.

- October 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 6.
- o o o -

COURT NEWS.
_______

A Divorce Granted.

     Judge R. E. Burke, of the fourteenth judicial district court divorced Mrs. Susan Cooper from her husband, John Cooper.

- October 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

FOUR HEARTS HAPPY.
_____

Judge Edward Gray Grants Two Divorces
To-Day.

     Judge Edward Gray made four hearts happy by granting two divorces this morning. E. A. Thomas was released from Clara Thomas and Kate Polin is no longer the wife of Thomas L. Polin.

- October 23, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

MARRIED A CHILD.
______

May Murray and Frank Valdez Join
Fortunes.

     Frank Valdez and May Murray were united in marriage last evening by Judge Thomas F. Nash. the bride had the form and features of a girl of 12, and her mother was compelled to make affidavit that her daughter was 16 years old before the license was issued.
     The parties came from McKinney and the youthfulness of May shocked the clerk and his assistants. Valdez is 25 years old.

- October 25, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

A GIRL WIFE IN COURT.
______

Defendant in a Divorce Suit -- Decision in
Her Favor.

     In the forty-fourth judicial court this morning, the Wilkes divorce case was disposed of.
     The suit was brought by John D. Wilkes, against his girl wife, Belle, 17 years old. They were married in July, 1892, and in July, 1893, Wilkes filed his bill of divorce, alleging harsh and unkind treatment and an attempt to take his life.
     The girl wife filed a cross bill, alleging cruelty, instancing an occasion where he whipped her with a buggy whip three months before the birth of their child. She also complained that he had accused her of infidelity, in her mother's presence, and that after a long course of ill treatment, his cruelty culminated in desertion.
     Judge Gray granted the divorce and gave the mother the custody of Agnes E. Wilkes, aged 3 months, the fruit of this unhappy union.

- October 28, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

The Divorce Mill.

     Judge Gray wrestled with three divorce cases to-day, in which the parties were negroes. One case presented peculiar features. It was the complaint of Millie Browders against John Browders. They have been married 43 years, and Millie asks separation because John said she had been caught kissing another man.

- October 31, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -


SOCIETY

     Our column has received from Montgomery, Ala., an account of the marriage of Mr. Emile Stern of this city to Miss Belle Dreyfus, of Montgomery, which occurred in that city, Wednesday, Nov. 15.
...
     After the ceremony, an elegant reception was held at the residence of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sol Dreyfus, on North Court street. The bride was one of the most popular belles of the Jewish circles of her city, and her departure is the cause of much regret among her large number of friends. Mr. and Mrs. Stern left for the north and east on an extended tour, after which they will make Dallas their future home.

- November 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Mrs. Duerig Faints.

     Mrs. Duerig, the plaintiff in the case of Mrs. M. E. Rodgers (she has married since the filing of the suit) vs. the Dallas Consolidated Street Railway company, which is on trial in Judge Gray's court, fainted on the witness stand this morning. Deputy Sheriff Ferdinand Tucker and W. E. Parry, clerk of the court, gently placed Mrs. Duerig on a cot and sprayed her face with water. She was for some time, so weak that she rested on the cot.

- November 23, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

HE MARRIED A GIRL.
_______

How a Negro Escaped a Trial for Seduc-
tion.

     D. Tanner, a burly negro boy of about 25, has been in jail several months, under a charge of seduction preferred against him by Mary Andrews, a copper skinned female of 19 or so.
     This morning, Mary came to town, accompanied by her father and purchased a marriage license for herself and Tanner.
     Tanner was offered marriage as the price of his liberty and accepted the terms.
     The sheriff was notified and Tanner was brought into the county court, where Judge Nash married him to his deluded victim.
     The case against the prisoner was then dismissed and [Tanner] and bride left the court house rejoicing.

- November 23, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 5.
- o o o -

Marriage Licenses.

Joseph Reynolds and Mrs. Ella King.
George Johnson and Miss Florence Chester.

- November 28, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Going to Wed.

     Walter F. McMahan got license to-day to marry Mrs. Sallie L. Chowning, widow of the late lawyer Chowning.

- November 30, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -


Married by a J. P.

     D. H. Cole and Mrs. Mary Johnson were married by Justice Lauderdale at his office yesterday afternoon.

- December 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

COURT HOUSE WEDDING.
_______

Another Country Couple Joined in Mat-
rimony -- The Bride's Costume.

     Another country couple were married in the county clerk's office this morning, Rev. W. F. Barcus officiating. The contracting parties are Charles Holden and Mattie King.
     The groom wore every-day neglige attire, white shirt, not spotlessly clean, brown jacket and dark trousers, but the bride was rigged "out of sight." She wore a blue merino dress with purple sleeves and purple silk bands around the skirt. Over her shoulders, hung a short crimson silk shawl with white satin stripes. Her hat was a drab beaver buried under a white feather and a bunch of orange blossoms.
     She simpered and blushed as she pronounced the marriage vows, but the groom looked serious and stolid.
     After the ceremony, the bridegroom pulled out a $10 note and asked the minister if he had change. He replied that he had none. Change was procured from the county clerk and the newly married man handed the parson a lonely dollar, after which, he marched off with his blushing bride clinging to his arm.

- December 7, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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Marriage Licenses.

G. W. Rennick and Miss Louisa Collins.
C. A. Bordner and Miss Rosa McGlasson.

- December 9, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
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ASKS FOR DIVORCE.
______

Tom Angus' Wife Tried of the Marital
Bonds.

     Mrs. Tom Angus, wife of the hack driver who was sent to the penitentiary in 1890 for five years for killing Bradley, the baseball player, has applied to the courts of De Witt county for divorce and restoration of her former name, of Mrs. Martha E. Phipps. She married Angus after he committed the murder.

- December 11, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
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ELOPED AND MARRIED.
_______

Picturesque Marriage in the County
Clerk's Office Yesterday.

     O. C. Morell and Mrs. Fannie Scott of Eagle Springs ranch, 35 miles west of Eddy, N. M., arrived in the city Sunday night and were married in the county clerk's office Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock,
     The groom is a cowboy and proud of his calling. He is quite a stripling, and does not look the "twenty-one," which he claims to be. The bride is at least 26, and the elopement is ascribed to be objection of her parent and her six big brothers.
     The young groom wore a hand-me-down suit of blue cloth, white flannel shirt and cowboy hat. The bride wore a navy blue walking suit, blue polka dot necktie and black sailor hat. She has brown eyes, Roman nose and, altogether, is a demure looking little lady of a refinement of manner not usual in the neighborhood which she hails from.
     Judge Nash tied the nuptial knot. The boyish groom was nervous and looked anxiously to the door, expecting momentary interruption from the infuriated parent, but Judge Nash put him through the ordeal in two minutes, and the young man breathed a deep sigh of relief.
     The bride wanted a certificate of marriage, but her liege lord said it was not necessary. If wanted, they could send for it. He seemed in a great hurry to get away. The lady prevailed, however, and a copy of the record was duly furnished.
     The newly married couple took the first train for Sweetwater, Montana.

- December 12, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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Marriage Licenses.

R. H. Smith and Miss Lillie Offatt.
Joe Brocken and Miss Maggie Davis.
A. H. McCollum and Miss Nellie Newman.
D. M. Crompton and Miss Emma Newman.
P. B. Hamer and Miss Henrietta Coit.

- December 12, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
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Marriage Licenses.

Eugene Walker and Miss Ada Robertson.

- December 14, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
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Marriage Licenses.

J. C. Barksdale and Miss Mary E. McGaughy.
W. F. Miller and Miss Tennie Compton.
J. R. Compton and Miss Dora Florence.

- December 15, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
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MARRIAGE STATISTICS.
____

Dallas County Lads and Lassies are
Marrying Numerously.

     One of the notable marks of progress in Dallas county is the rate at which young people are entering the matrimonial state. During the year ended, Saturday, 911 marriages were issued from the county clerk's office, against 850 for the corresponding period last year. For the month of December, up to last Saturday, the increase over last year was eight. Between now and the holidays, this gain over December, 1892, is likely to be tripled.

- December 18, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
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Marriage Licenses.

M. P. Hawthorne and Miss Annie Sewell.
C. S. Sumerford and Miss Mary Moore.
J. F. Raney and Miss Cora Hayes.
Frank Morris and Miss Clara M. Scripture.

- December 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
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Marriage Licenses.

J. C. Winters and Miss Gussie Hendricks.
W. B. Mahon and Miss Mittie L. Gibson.
Fred Webb and Miss Ella Myrtle Smith.
Albert F. Maber and Miss Mattie L. Rowland.
Phil G. Deam and Miss Cora A. Taylor.
Andrew M. Bell and Miss Maggie McDonald.
J. W. King and Miss Annie Burns.
Chas. F. Barham and Miss Lena Young.
H. F. Madewell and Miss Dute Gaddis.
J. B. Moore and Miss Katie[?] A. Harmon.

- December 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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Asks to Be Divorced.

     Allie Wells vs. Harvey Wells is the title of a divorce suit filed to-day in the district clerk's office. The plaintiff, in her original petition, alleges that the defendant has not carried out certain promises, and, in fact, has forgotten in toto, pledges made prior to their marriage, and that life with him has been anything but the beautiful connubial existence which marriage should produce. She sets forth a state of affairs not altogether unlike the relations existing in the Macbeth family, subsequent to the assassination of Duncan, and asks that he law absolve the obnoxious ties that bind her.

- December 28, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2-3.
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Marriage Licenses.

B. F. Wiley and Miss Lillian McCarty.
W. L. Gault and Miss Minnie Elliott.
J. S. England and Miss Melissa Baldwin.
Ed. Miller and Minnie Floyd, colored.
Jeffrey Jones and Sylvester Jackson, colored.

- December 28, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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Filed a Divorce Suit.

     Nina T. Bates has brought suit for divorce in the district court against T. K. Bates, to whom she was married on July 24, 1893. She alleges cruel treatment, failure to support, and abusive language, consisting of imputations against her marital fidelity. She asks that her maiden name, Bartlett, be restored to her.

- December 29, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
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Was Just Joking.

     Jack Johnson, on Tuesday, procured license to marry Miss Maggie McDonald. To-day, he returned the license to the clerk's office, stating that Maggie said she was just joking with him and never had any serious notion of marrying him.

- December 29, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
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