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(Updated December 30, 2001)

Local Notes.

     Mr. Edward J. Archinard, of this city and Miss Julia Cuney, of Austin, were married at the latter place yesterday.

- January 1, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 9, col. 2.
- o o o -

[Heading?]

     Mr. E. W. Parr, of this city, recently an employe of the Dallas News, was married yesterday morning at 9 o'clock at Greenvile to Miss Rosa Pullen of that city, Rev. S. L. McAmis, officiating. The couple immediately came to Dallas, whence they proceeded to Oak Cliff, which place they will make their future home.

- January 6, 1891, Dallas Morning News, page ?
- o o o -

[State News]

     Mrs. Mollie Malone and her babe are in the Fort Worth jail. She is the woman who ran away from her husband, Ike Malone, and married H. C. Trout.

- January 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     W. H. Hitzelberger files suit against his wife, Laura Hitzleberger for a divorce.

- January 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6.
- o o o -

A WIFE BEATER ARRESTED.
_______

Fills Up on Mean Whiskey and
Creates a Scene.

     At a late hour last night, Officers Steele and Miller, while walking along Austin street in South Dallas, were startled by the screams of a woman in a house near by. They started for the house as rapidly as their feet could carry them, increasing their speed at every scream which rent the night's darkness as it if their author were in terrible pain. The officers rushed into the house and beheld a woman in her night robes screaming with all her might, and a drunken man choking and beating her beyond mercy.
     The officers took the man in tow and conducted him to the central station. He gave his name as G. G. Eddie, and said he was temale peddler and the woman was his wife.
     It seems he had tanked up on mean whiskey and went home and lit into his wife, who was dreaming on her pillow.
     The woman was badly bruised up, and her husband will get his reward in the county court.

- January 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE CREAM OF THE NEWS,
_________

Covering Last Night's Dis-
patches in a Condensed
Form.

     H. C. Trout, who stole away the wife of Ike Malone at Wilmer, was given two years for bigamy.

- January 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     H. E. Weaver, a harness maker, was arrested last night for brutally beating his wife. The couple are living apart, and the assault took place in a saloon.

- January 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

SHE FLED FROM FINNEGAN
_______

THAT IS WHAT THE LATTER'S
WIFE DID.

________

A Romance That Began in New
Orleans and Ended in Jail
for the Hero.

     Yesterday, a gentleman came to Detective Kirby and gave his name as James Finnegan, and said his home was in New Orleans. He informed Detective Kirby that he was searching for his wife, who left home on December 31, and came directly to Dallas to meet a man by the name of C. W. Bakewell, a fresco painter and decorator.
     Mrs. Finnegan and Bakewell were soon located and Finnegan had Bakewell arrested this morning on the charge of living with his wife.
A T
IMES-HERALD reporter called on Bakewell at the county jail and had an interview with him. He said that he was a fresco painter and decorator, and that he left New Orleans and came to Dallas on December 15; that Mrs. Finnegan arrived here on December 30, and he met her at the train.
     "Did you have an understanding with Mrs. Finnegan before you left New Orleans?" the reporter inquired.
     "The understanding between us was that she was to be divorced from her husband and eventually marry me."
     "Have you lived as man and wife since her arrival?"
     "She bore my name."
     Blackwell is a native of Pennsylvania and is 37 years old. He has black, curly hair, brown eyes and dresses neatly.
     The reporter called of Mrs. Finnegan at 430 Wood street, where she is boarding and asked her for an interview. She said that she preferred not to make any statement just at present. She answered a few unimportant questions, however. She said that she and Finnegan were married in New Orleans, July 13, 1888. She denied coming to Dallas to meet Bakewell, or living as his wife since her arrival. She said that her husband called to see her early this morning, but she refused to see him. Just at this point of the conversation, the door of the room in which Mrs. Finnegan and the reporter were in, opened and a clean-shaved gentleman, neatly dressed, and who looked to be about 30 years old, entered. He glanced from the reporter to Mrs. Finnegan, and stretching out his hand appealingly, said, "Jennie." Mrs. Finnegan arose from her seat and ejaculated, "Well!"
     The reporter, recognizing in the gentleman by his actions, Mrs. Finnegan's husband and feeling the weight of his presence, retired from the room into another, where he thought to wait for an interview with Finnegan, but owing to the fact that the husband and wife, in their excitement, raised their voices so that almost every word they spoke could be heard by the reporter, he left the house, not caring to be a listener to their conversation.
     Mrs. Finnegan is a native of Louisiana and is 30 years old. She is very intelligent and seems to possess a considerable force of character. She is a tall, graceful blonde and has a pretty face.

- January 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

The Courts.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     John T. Luther was granted a divorce from his wife, M. E. Luther.

- January 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

FACTS FROM MR. FINNEGAN.
________

HE NEVER MISTREATED HIS
WIFE.

_______

Bakewell Ruined His Home and
Must Suffer the Conse-
quences.

     Mr. Bakewell, who was arrested and jailed yesterday on the charge of living in adultery with a Mrs. Finnegan, is a "much married man," if statements made in a New Orleans publication, which circulates under the name of "The Mascot," are true, and Mr. Finnegan, the injured husband, says they are. The Mascott says that Mr. Bakewell has a wife and three children living on Rampart street in the city of New Orleans. Another lady living in Gretna, a suburb of the above city, also claims the honor of being the only and original Mrs. Bakewell, it is stated by the Mascott. The same journal hints that a rumor is in the swim that a colored woman is mourning the absence of the alleged wayward Bakewell. It is also hinted that Mr. Bakewell was, while in New Orleans, the financial secretary of one of the prominent secret orders and carried away a small amount of the order's loose change.
     Mr. Bakewell told a T
IMES-HERALD reporter that he had never been married, and denied being a father.
     Mr. Finnegan says he did not follow his wife to induce her to return with him, but rather, to induce her to go to her parents.
     He will remain in the city and prosecute Bakewell, "who broke up his home," he says, and will also obtain a divorce from his runaway wife.
     Mr. Finnegan is a traveling man. He says he has always drawn a good salary, furnished his home in splendid shape for his wife, provided her with jewelry and an elegant ward-robe and never ill-treated her in his life. During the month of September, 1890, he was in Chicago, and during his absence from home, Bakewell formed the acquaintance of Mrs. Finnegan and brought disgrace upon their happy home. Finnegan never saw Bakewell until his arrival in Dallas. Before leaving New Orleans for Dallas, he hunted up the wife of Bakewell and was informed by that lady that her husband had deserted her. Detective Chris Kane, well known in this city, located the runaway couple in Dallas and gave Finnegan many valuable pointers.
     Mrs. Finnegan is at the Wood street boarding house, where she was found by Detective Kerby yesterday.

- January 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Ella Lee files suit against James Lee, her husband, for a divorce.

- February 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Charles Bakewell, who was charged with eloping with the wife of James Finnegan of New Orleans, was fined $250 and costs in Judge Bowen's court yesterday. Finnegan and his wife have become reconciled and returned to New Orleans. It will take about 18 months of time to liquidate his fine and costs.

- February 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Sirra Kindberg, sues her husband, for a divorce.

- February 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Jackson Toloin was given two years for bigamy in Judge Tucker's court Saturday.

- February 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mr. C. W. Bakewell, who was sent to the county farm a short time since, for living in adultery with a Mrs. Finnegan of New Orleans, was married at the county farm yesterday to Miss Minnie Dansupt.

- February 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     Jacob Engers, the man who has made two attempts to have his wife sent to the insane asylum, was arrested yesterday for contempt of court. His wife brought suit for a divorce and alimony a short time before Christmas, but as the case could not be heard until the present month, her husband was required to furnish her $40 per month. He was arrested yesterday for refusing to pay. After his arrest, he came up with the money and was released.

- March 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Sallie Steele files suite for divorce from her husband, Richard Steele.
     Mary Clendering sues for a divorce from her husband, John H. Clendering.

- March 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

HE DESERTED HER.
______

And She Believes Her Husband
is in Business in
Dallas.

     The daughter of a prominent Georgian writes to the city authorities, inquiring about her husband, who deserted her and came to Dallas. The lady is the daughter of a gentleman who served ten years in congress with Roger Q. Mills and Senator Reagan. She says she has information to the effect that her liege lord and master is in business in Dallas; also, that he is living with a woman who is not his wife, and give it out that she does not want to reclaim her man who swore to love, cherish and protect her, but she does want the facts in the case.
     The city of Dallas is not conducting a private detective agency--hence the letter, undoubtedly, was consigned to the waste basket.

- March 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

SUITS FILED.
_______

Two Ladies Who Consider Mar-
riage a Failure.

     The following suits were filed in the office of the clerk of the district court to-day:
     Cora M. Morgan vs. John J. Morgan, divorce. The parties were married in Fannin county in 1875. In 1889, according to plaintiff, they separated and afterwards came together again, sold their property and came to Dallas. Plaintiff makes shocking charges of cruelty, ill-treatment and non-support against defendant. Here they separated and the plaintiff alleges defendant made a proposition to the plaintiff to live with him again and he would permit her to "have another fellow on the sly." She asks for the custody of their only child and a decree of divorce.
     Bettie Saunders vs. Henry Saunders; divorce. The parties were married in 1877 and have one child, a boy, named Carl. Plaintiff alleges that defendant has failed to support for a period of five years; has treated her cruelly and life with him is a Hades on earth. He has property in Dallas, a judgment against the Texas and Pacific railroad for $7,500 and cattle in Baylor county. She asks for an allowance of $75 per months, $250 for attorney fees, inventory of all property and decree of divorce.

- March 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

New Suits Filed.
Fourteenth District.

     Bettie Sanders vs Henry Sanders; suit for divorce on ground of cruel treatment.
     Mrs. C. Morgan vs. John T. Morgan; suit for a divorce on the grounds of cruel treatment.

- March 11, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
Judge Tucker's Court.

     The case of S. B. Putman, charged with seducing Miss Amanda Ray, is on trial to-day. At the time of the seduction, the young lady was 16 years old.

- March 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Record of the Courts.
14th District.

     Sina Kindberg vs. J. F. Kindberg; divorce granted.

- March 15, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 12, col. 2.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     S. J. Miller vs. J. M. Miller, divorce granted as prayed for and plaintiff awarded the custody of her child, Ida Field Miller.

- March 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     Laura Meredith vs. John Meredith; divorce granted as prayed for.

- April 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8 col. 3.
- o o o -

ANOTHER CHAPTER.
_______

In the Famous Cash Tragedy

     At five o'clock Saturday evening, Clark Cash, and his divorced wife were married by Justice Braswell in the office of Colonel Stillwell ____ Russell. The letters from Young ___ Mrs. Cash, and from the woman to the murdered man, were consigned to the flames. The newly wedded pair and their children departed for Arkansas City, Kan., last night, where they will reside in future.
     It is understood that Colonel Russell advised his client to espouse ___ woman and blot out the past. The acquitted murdered took his advice.
     It is dollars to dimes that the final chapter in this famous story of ___ love and cold-blooded murder has now[?]/never[?] been written.

- April 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 6.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Court.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     The case of Isaac Ferris, charged with living in bigamy with Laura Coleman, went to trial to-day.

- April 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

NEWS IN A NUTSHELL.

     H. A. Trout, who skipped with the wife of Farmer Malone from this county, was released from the Fort Worth jail yesterday.

- April 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Additional Society.

     At 118 Motley ave., Dallas, Tex., April 21, 1981 [sic], by M. M. Davis, Pastor Commerce Street Christian Church, Mr. E. H. Blanton, of Ennis, to Miss Laura Reed, of this city. The bridal party left on the 6 o'clock train for their home in Ennis, where they groom is a prominent railroad man.

- April 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

WHERE IS NOWL?
_______

Mysterious Disappearance of a
Cook.

     Henry Nowl, a cook employed at a Main street restaurant, has not been seen since Tuesday, and his wife, who resides at 763 Commerce street, is greatly worried and fearful that she has been deserted by her liege lord and master.
     The neighbors say that Mrs. Nowl is almost destitute and, to make her condition more deplorable, is in an interesting condition, and approaching confinement.
     Nowl had a small bank account, but it is said that he drew the cash Tuesday and his wife fears that he has departed for other fields.

- April 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Married.

     Sunday morning, at the residence of Rev. Dr. Farr, W. P. Avery of this city and Mrs. Nellie Waggener, of St. Louis, were united in marriage. Mr. Avery is well known here, and the TIMES-HERALD extends to both its hearty congratulations.

- April 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -



NEW SUITS
_______

Filed With the Clerk of the
District Court.
Fourteenth district:

     Fannie Cox vs. Joseph E. Cox, suit for a divorce on the ground that plaintiff was only thirteen years old at the time of marriage.
     Louisa Arnoldt vs. Charles Arnoldt, suit for divorce on the grounds of cruel treatment.

Forty-fourth district:

     Sallie Hinson vs. S. M. Hinton; suit for a divorce on the ground of cruel treatment.

- May 6, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1
- o o o -

THE NEWS IN A NUTSHELL
______

CONDENSED FROM LAST
NIGHT'S DISPATCHES.

     Mrs. R. E. Saunders, of Decatur, sues P. O. Saunders, of Dallas for divorce. She alleges, in her petition, that Saunders detains their 15-year-old son in Dallas against her will. [as given]

- May 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
Judge Burke's Court.

     Lizzie Bassart vs. F. Bassart; divorce granted as prayed for.

- May 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     Mrs. F. V. Routh was granted a divorce from her husband. Cruel treatment charged.

- May 21, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Annie Smith sues Lee Smith for a divorce.
     Sam Fisher sues Mattie Fisher for a divorce.
     Kate Thomas sues Isaac Thomas for a divorce.

- May 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

The Old Story.

     Ruth Merrifield sues for a divorce from her husband, S. B. Merrifield, and for the custody of their two-year-old child named Alfred. Cruelty and adultery are alleged.

- May 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Sues For Divorce.

     Simon David sues for a divorce from his wife, Bettie David. the petition states that the plaintiff and defendant were married in Cleveland, O., in 1870. That the defendant was abusive to the plaintiff and neglected her household duties. That in 1876, the defendant deserted the plaintiff. It is further alleged that the defendant, since deserting the plaintiff, has been often guilty of adultery and has become the mother of a child. On these allegations, the plaintiff seeks a divorce.

- May 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Solena F. Gray sues for a divorce from her husband, M. C. Gray.
     Fred Minor files suit against Alice Minor for a divorce.

- May 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     J. E. Penry, of the Dallas Abstract Company, arrived in the city this morning with his bride, nee Miss Nellie G. Warring, late of Herrington, Kansas. They will reside in this city.

- May 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Placed Under Bond.

     Lon Rays, a Mexican, was placed under a $100 peace bond to-day by Justice Braswell, under the charge that he tried to almost slay his spouse. His spouse is an American woman.

- May 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

A Husband Wanted.

     The following circular notice was picked up this morning:
"John Burleson, if this should meet your eyes, come home or let me hear from you at once. I am terribly worried and grieved over your absence.
                    Your wife,
                B
ECKY BURLESON."

     Mrs. Burleson lives at Waxahachie, and she would gladly receive any information of the whereabouts of her husband, who left Paris, Tex., for his home on the 20th of May.

- June 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

SOCIETY MIRROR.

     A correspondent at Trinity, Tex., writes, under date of May 29:
     W. D. Doremus, a popular Missouri, Kansas & Texas railway conductor, and Miss Carrie L. Cassedy, one of Trinity's fairest belles, were happily united in the holy bonds of matrimony at the Methodist Church here last night, Rev. W. H. Crawford, officiating. Only a few of the bride's relatives and friends were present. Not even Rev. Mr. Crawford was advised that his services would be required until after he had dismissed the evening prayer meeting and was about to leave the church, when he was confronted by the handsome ticket puncher and requested to perform the solemn ceremony that would bind the young couple together for life. Mr. Doremus left this morning for Dallas, where he and his lovely bride will make their future home. Mrs. Doremus will follow in a few days, after receiving the congratulations of her numerous friends, who all unite in wishing her a voyage of serene bliss over the sea of life in the matrimonial craft in which she has embarked.

- June 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Additional Society.

     Miss Ella M. Deadrick, a handsome young lady, who is well and pleasantly known in this city, having been connected with the house of Sanger Bros. for the past year, was marred on Tuesday evening in Navasota, her home, to Mr. C. C. Camp, a prominent and prosperous citizen of Grimes. Her many friends in Dallas join those in Navasota in extending happy congratulations.

- June 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

CONSTABLE ARRESTS.
________

They Jug a Number of
Citizens.

     Henry Jacoby, a deputy constable, arrested Nathan Hannan last night. Nathan is charged with threatening to kill his spouse.

- June 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

LOOKING FOR HIS DAUGHTER.
______

WHO CLANDESTINELY WEDDED.
______

Tom McGuire and Gertie Hayden
Set up for Themselves.

______

Gertie's Father Not Reconciled
to the Match--Says His
Daughter is Only
Fifteen.

     This morning, a TIMES-HERALD reporter met Mr. J. M. Hayden, formerly foreman for the Consolidated Traction Railway Company, who lives in the south end of the city, at the country clerk's office. He was wrathy. A son-in-law had been forced upon him without his knowledge or consent. There was the evidence upon the public records, and he was breathing out dire threatenings upon the head of the youth who walked off with his daughter.
     The marriage license record showed that yesterday afternoon, licence was issued for the marriage of T. J. McGuire and Gertrude Hayden. Deputy Clerk Larkin remembered issuing the papers. McGuire called for them and he gave his age at 20 years. Mr. Larkin told him that it would be necessary for him to first obtain the consent of his parents. He left the office and returned in the course of an hour, bearing a note of consent from Mrs. S. J. Boyle, the note reciting that the application bore the relation of her son. The usual oath was administered and McGuire swore that his affianced was over 18 years of age and that there were no legal objections to their marriage. The documents were issued and a few minutes afterwards, Justice Lauderdale officiated at the performance which made them man and wife.
     "Why, that girl is only 16 years old," said the irate father to the scribe. "I'll go and see Dave Williams and have him arrested. Why, he went to my house yesterday evening and told my daughter was sick. They started over there and this morning, I heard they were married. She's nothing but a little fifteen-year-old girl, and I'll just go and make her go home."
     So saying Mr. Hayden started east on Commerce in the direction of the abiding place of the couple. Anticipating a scene, a T
IMES-HERALD reporter called at the former home of McGuire on Harwood street, between Elm street and Pacific avenue. He was not there, but his mother said she gave her consent to the marriage. A chum of the new bridegroom joined the reporter in an effort to find the pair. They were located in an Elm street boarding house east of the Central railway. Their lives were quiet and serene and they appeared to be basking in the sunshine of new born love. There was no evidence about the premises of the expended fury and wrath of an irate parent. They are a young looking pair--Tommie McGuire, a beardless youth, and his young wife, a bashful little beauty. Tom said she was 18, and she said she was 18 the 25th day of last October. Tom says that was the most reliable information which he had on the subject and he mad affidavit accordingly.
     "Did her parents object to your marriage?" he was asked.
     "They didn't know anything about it," he chuckled.
     "Why didn't you ask them!"
     "Oh, we just wanted to give the old folks a surprise."
     "Were they surprised?"
     "Well, I reckon so. I went down to get her clothes this morning and her mother seemed awfully surprised, but the didn't appear to be mad."
     "Do you know that her father is looking for her?"
     Tom chuckled again, and assuming the air of a staid old benedict, said, firmly: "Well, she's mine now. The old man will have nothing to do with her. I'll take care of her. That's all."
     Tom admitted that one of his friend got his wife away from the parental roof by telling her parents her sister was sick.
     By trade, young McGuire is a plumber.

- June 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     Sallie Steele vs. Richard Steele; plaintiff granted a divorce and custody of minor children.

- June 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

Married.

     Mr. James H. Edwards and Miss Nettie Boles of Glen Rose were married to-day in this city. The bride is the daughter of Prof. Boles, at one time superintendent of Dallas public schools.

- June 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Max Hahn sues his wife, Annie C. Hahn, for divorce. Cruel treatment is alleged.

- June 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

A Buggy Wedding.

     Mr. B. F. Crawley and Miss E. M. Jordan, who live in the country, drove up to the county clerk's office this morning in a buggy. Mr. Crawley obtained the requisite papers, while Miss Jordan held the lines. Justice Lauderdale, across the street, was called and, sitting in the buggy, the twain were made one flesh. The justice was properly rewarded and all parties were made happy.

- June 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Ella Sims sues her husband, W. A. Sims, for a divorce. The plaintiff alleges in her petition that the defendant's conduct toward her was brutal, that he did not support her, but made her support him and that he finally deserted her.

- June 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -



Married.

     Marrying this morning at 10 o'clock in the Phoenix hotel, Mr. Joseph Scott and Miss Mary McLennon, both recently of California. Pastor Simms of the First Baptist church performing the cermony.

- July 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

A CELEBRATION SPOILED.
_______

THE OLD FOLKS GOT HOLD OF
THE SECRET

_______

And the Wedding is Indefinitely
Postponed--Officers Take
a Hand.

     Yesterday, the TIMES-HERALD published the following:
"E
NNIS, Tex., July 3, 1891.--To S. B. Scott, Dallas, Tex.: Who made oath to obtain marriage license for Dan Young and Lizzie Linton. Answer.
                                        J. M. H
AILY.
     As the T
IMES-HERALD anticipated, there was something behind the item if nothing more than an angry father. But, this morning, it develops that a well-arranged combination, through which, two young loving hearts were to be united for life in the metropolis to-day, was also disarranged.
     This morning, bright and early, Mr. Haily, the author of yesterday's telegram, put in an appearance at the county clerk's office. He is a middle-aged, compact, well built gentleman, and he resides near Ennis. He wore a half-satisfied expression on his face, but his mission brooded no good for the man on whose trail he proposed to set the officers. He related his story, which, in substance, brought out the following facts:
     He is the step father of Miss Lizzie, an handsome young lady who has just rounded her sixteenth year, and she and an Ennis boy by the name of Dan Young, are deeply in love, so deep, in fact, that they resolved to bring their love dream to a culmination in marriage. As is often the case, the barrier of parental objection was in the way on the young lady's side of the house. To avoid contact and open rebellion to this, they sent a party here yesterday who gave the name of L. D. Alexander, to procure a marriage license. They intended to visit the city to-day under pretext of attending a Fourth of July celebration, which pictured out as a quiet wedding, and a celebration indeed to them. But, the mistake was made, it seems, in obtaining the license a day before needed. Anyhow, Mr. Haily discovered their little game, and hence his telegram. Now, it transpires that the party who gave the name of L. D. Alexander, and who made affidavit to the ages of the couple, swore that there was no objection to their marriage, was not Alexander at all, but somebody else who presented himself to the clerk under a fictitious name. That did not trouble Mr. Hailey in the least, because the clerk furnished a description of the party, and on this description of the party, Mr. Hailey settled on his man and made affidavit against him before County Attorney Williams for false swearing.
     It is needless to state that the expectations of the young couple were not realized. They went the way of so many shining air castles which vanish. They did not go to the picnic together, and it is not even recorded that Miss Lizzie attended the picnic at Ennis. Parents and guardians are on duty and the sheriff has a warrant for the arrest of the nom de plume, Mr. Alexander.
     Too bad!

- July 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Annie Mach filed a petition in the fourteenth judicial district court for a divorce from Johan Mach. She bases her petition on allegations of cruel treatment, followed by abandonment. Plaintiff recites that at the time of their marriage, she was possessed of considerable property, which the defendant squandered in excessive indulgence in intoxicating liquors.

- July 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     Hank Adams was granted a divorce from Bessie Adams. The parties are well-known in the variety circles. The plaintiff alleged adultery and a young and dudish young man, flashily dressed, sporting a dark mustache, between giggles and smirks, admitted that he had been indiscreet with the defendant on several occasions. Neither Adams or his wife were present. The plaintiff secured a divorce.
     John Dade did not secure one. His wife, Rhoda, still holds him, the judge having refused to grant the divorce.

SUITS FILED.

     Mary M. Salmons against J. M. Salmons, divorce, based upon the allegations of cruel and inhuman treatment.

- July 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     E. B. Lambert filed divorce proceedings against his wife, Mrs. B. A. Lambert.

- July 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

Wedding at the Clerk's Office.

     The close of business at the county clerk's office was observed late yesterday by the marriage of Mr. R. F. McCarty and Miss Mollie Brock, a young couple from Decatur, Wise county. Justice Lauderdale officiated in his usual brief and pleasant style, which always add to the couples' happiness.

- July 15, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

A RENOWNED SPIRITUALIST
______

BECOMES POSSESSED OF AN EX-
CEEDINGLY BAD SPIRIT.

_______

Gets on a Rampage, Causing
His Wife to Seek Shelter
With a Friend.

_______

Smashes in Doors With an Ax,
and Whets Immense
Butcher Knives.

_______

Landed in a Cell After a Hard
Struggle With an
Officer.

     Prof. Sharp Henry is one of the "renowned" local spiritual mediums who earns a livelihood telling fortunes and forecasting the future for those who believe in his powers to communicate with the spiritual world. He lives on the south side of Main street, between the Tabernacle Methodist church and Harwood street, and the tables and curtains in his apartment are suggestive of his calling and avocation.
     But, it seems the Professor had a hard struggle between the spirits with whom he is supposed to communicate and that fiery demon of wrath, known as red liquor. Last evening, it was the latter spirit which controlled him, and he moved around and made such bad breaks, that his wife left home and sought refuge with a friend in East Dallas. From all accounts, he had a rollicking time with this spirit last night, and up to the time of his arrest this morning by Capt. Henri Waller, of the police force.
     A visit to his home by two newspaper men after his arrest, furnished a startling disclosure. The front door had been battered in with an ax and the broken glass was scattered over the floor. The rear door suffered likewise, having been splintered by blows from the same ax. Things were scattered helter-skelter and it looked as if the spirits had indulged in a regular jamboree.
     Mrs. Henry reluctantly talked of her husband's escapade. She gave a woeful story of a life filled with apprehension and fear. She stated that her husband drank copiously, and during the last year or so, he should have been arrested once every two weeks. When in his cups, she believed him to be dangerous. She has a 13-year-old boy, Jimmie Johnston, against whom, she says, Prof. Henry directs his ill feelings when he is drinking. Yesterday, according to her statement, he abused him as usual, and she took her son's part. This irritated the professor, and in the course of a caustic controversy with her, he sprang for his pistols which usually hang at the head of the bed, but she had taken the precaution to hide them. He told her she had as well give them up, because he would get them anyhow, and if he couldn't get them, he would get others. He made the wildest kind of threats to demolish every officer in the city who should undertake his arrest, and to take her life, if she reported his conduct to the officers. It became so uncomfortable at home, that she took her little son and went to spend the night with friends. This morning, Jimmie returned home before his mother. While he was saddling his horse in the yard, the professor began smashing in the doors. Soon after, his mother came and viewed the wreck. She said she left the doors open and there was no occasion for breaking them in. Her husband was in the house, but by this time, had cooled off. He very politely requested the return of his pistols, and when his wife refused to give them up, he left. When she went in the front room, she was horrified to see lying on the table, two long butcher knives, each with a keen edge freshly put on. She lost no time in hiding these before the professor's return. But, he did not return. This trip, he fell into the hands of the Philistines.
     His wife telephoned the police for protection and Capt. Henri Waller went out in quest of the professor. He located him in Keller's saloon, and after indulging in a little forcible persuasion, he had the professor subdued and in hoc. When searched, a couple of long bladed pocket knives were found on his person. Charges of "creating a disturbance" and "malicious mischief" were lodged against him while he was lodged in a cell to himself. He took the confinement unkindly. The officers think the man is crazy.

- July 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     Stella Lewis was granted a divorce from Sam L. Lewis and awarded the custody of the child. Failure to support and cruel treatment was alleged on the part of the defendant.

SUITS FILED.

     William Lenchow wants a divorce from Nettie Lenschow. The parties were united in marriage in Galveston, March 22, 1887, and came to Dallas to reside. The plaintiff alleges that he was a model husband, a good provider and, in fact, all that Nettie should have wished for to make her a happy woman. She has fallen by the wayside, he alleges, and is now an inmate of a house of ill-fame in Dallas. William says that this is a little more than human nature can stand and he wants a divorce.

- July 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Married.

     At the residence of Mr. Marion Fannin in the city of Dallas, on the evening of July 22 at 9 o'clock, Mr. James T. Williams and Miss Bettie C. Kieth, both of West, Tennessee, Brother Dr. N. C. Osborn officiating.

- July 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

MESQUITE LOCAL NOTES.
_______

Fine Crops--Church and Per-
sonal Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     M
ESQUITE, July 28.-- Miss Bonny Coats of Long creek and Mr. O'Neal of Vernon were married at the bride's residence Sunday evening, Rev. Adair officiating. They left for Vernon Monday morning. As the reporter was not present, we can't say how numerous and handsome the presents were.

- July 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE DAY IN THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Elizabeth Brown vs. Henry C. Brown; divorce.

- July 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Mary E. McDonald vs. Joseph E. McDonald; divorce.

- August 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

UNHAPPY MARRIAGES.
_______

Domestic Discord Brought to
the Attention of Officers.

     The police have been called upon the last few days to deal with a number of family broils growing out of domestic infelicity.
     Monday, R. H. Norvell was fined $7.50 for raising a disturbance with his wife.
     On the same day, Martin Ganderson, a Norwegian, was fined for assaulting his wife.
     Only yesterday, a Mrs. Parker, living on East Commerce street, complained to Captain Arnold that her husband had locked her out of her house and refused to let her in to get her personal effects.
     Monday night, Policemen Durham and Martin arrested a negro by the name of Frank Robinson, living in the Eighth ward, who pounced upon his spouse and was administering to her a brutal beating.
     Several weeks ago, Joe Kohler, a German carpenter, who some ago, was arrested for misappropriating a piece of carpeting belonging to the First Baptist Church, deserted his wife and two little children and has not since been heard of. She left this morning to make her home with acquaintances at Rusk.
     Near the intersection of Lamar and Cochran streets this morning, Station Keeper Dean Arnold arrested George Wills, a white man, before whose wrath, a couple of half-nude women were flying. Their gowns had been partly torn from them. One of the women claimed to be Wills' wife.

- August 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Nannie Elliott filed application for divorce to-day from F. D. Elliott, alleging simple abandonment. The parties were married in Denison in 1883 and separated in 1887.

- August 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 4.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Bettie Sanders petitions the court to be divorced from Henry Sanders.

- August 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

In the Justice Court.

     August Barnard was arrested, charged with many serious threats towards his wife. He plead guilty.

- August 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

ANOTHER DIVORCE SUIT.

     Mollie C. Willett files suit for a divorce from her husband, Charles B. Willett. The plaintiff and defendant were married on October 22, 1878, in the state of Georgia. The plaintiff claims in her petition that she was a faithful wife. But, she alleges that the defendant neglected all his duties as a husband; that he was continually drunk; that he neglected the plaintiff and her children; that he abuse them as only a drunkard can, and that finally, in June, 1890, he deserted them. Since then, he has failed to contribute one cent to their support, and he knew that at the time of his desertion, they were in destitute circumstances.

- August 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

NOT CRAZY,
_______

Declares Mrs. Momand in Con-
tradiction to Reports.

     Mrs. C. F. Momand Ashley called at the TIMES-HERALD office this afternoon and said she desired to make a statement in regard to an article which appeared in the TIMES-HERALD last Tuesday, the 25th instant, in which it was stated that Mrs. Momand Ashley had been seized with a fit of temporary insanity and had been turned over to the officers.

MRS. MOMAND ASHLEY'S STATEMENT.

     "I am the divorced wife of Daniel W. Momand, a resident physician of this city. I was divorced from him eighteen years ago, since which time, I have successfully carried on a dress making establishment in Galveston, Texas, until the last three years, when I was compelled to leave that field of labor and enter that of legal lore, which I did with much reluctance and would have withheld from same, had it not have been a matter of absolute compulsion.
     I came to Dallas on Last Monday for the purpose of disclosing to my two youngest children, the way they had been robbed of the love of as true and good a woman as ever lived, notwithstanding they have been told much to the contrary. When I came to Dallas, I went to my old friends, Mr. and Mrs. William Slater, who live on Gaston avenue, where I am, at present, located.
     On Monday night, I called at the residence of Mrs. Bansar, where I understood my children were keeping house during the absence of Mrs. Bansar from the city. The house was dark, but I felt confident my children were there, so I walked around the house, and in the back, found one of the windows open, through which I went into the house, saying as I went, 'My darling, I shall find you now.' As all was dark on the inside, I struck a match and lit a swinging lamp. In a few moments, my children came in. They were very much surprised to see me and acted very peculiarly, and I knew that they had been prejudiced against me by libelous slanders, but was determined that they should know the facts of how I had been robbed.
     They said they wanted me to go with them to see their brother, Clarence, which I did. On the way back from said place, my youngest son called a policeman and asked him to take charge of me, saying I was crazy. I was placed in the jail, where I was kept for two days and then released, as no affidavit was sworn out against me.
     I have many influential friends in Galveston, who all know I am not crazy and never have been."

- August 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Sophia May Jane vs. J. P. Jane; divorce.

- August 28, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Eugenia Davis sues her husband, James Davis for a divorce on the grounds that he is in the penitentiary and states that she does not desire to remain the wife of a felon.

- August 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Lula Thomas sues her husband, Stephen Thomas, for a divorce.
Henry C. Shelby sues his wife, Mary Shelby, for a divorce.

- September 29, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

A CEDAR HILL SENSATION.
_______

AFFIDAVIT MADE AGAINST A
HUSBAND

_______

For Alleged Slander, by a Re-
ative of His Wife.

______

The Facts in the Case as Out-
lined By the Affidavit
Filed To-Day.

     The TIMES-HERALD, a few days since, stated that Cedar Hill was all torn up over a small sized sensation, which had come to the surface, and that wild talk was being indulged in by the partisans of the hero and heroine to the domestic drama. There was blood on the moon, it was stated, and several of the belligerents were indulging in threats and asking permission to carry pistols for self-protection and perhaps puncture the hides of their enemies with leaden missiles.
     The item became sufficiently ripe this morning to pluck, and a T
IMES-HERALD scribe knocked it from the bush.
     W. W. Harrington, a knight of St. Crispin, resides at Cedar Hill. He mends soles and is a star artist, it is said, at his business. On the 9th of August last, the jolly shoemaker married a buxom widow, who had previously won his heart and forty-year-old affections. The middle-aged couple went to housekeeping, but ere the sweets of the honeymoon had been sipped, the angle of discord entered the household and drove out the angel of love. On September 16, a little more than a month after the marriage vows had been spoken, Mr. and Mrs. Harrington separated. The husband, it is alleged, said he sent her home to her people; the wife denied the soft impeachment and stated that the inordinate jealousy and cruel suspicions of her husband compelled her to seek a refuge with her friends.
     Last evening, J. S. A. Carroll, a kinsman of Mrs. Harrington, came to the city and visited the office of the prosecuting attorney. He had a mission and he made it known in a few words. He wanted a warrant for the arrest of Harrington for alleged slander, Mrs. Harrington being the party slandered. Carroll made affidavit that Harrington had informed one Poney Wilson that his wife, Mrs. Tennessee J. Harrington, was enceinte when he married her, that she had been in that interesting condition for four months. He gave this as a reason for the separation. A warrant was issued for the arrest of Harrington and placed in the hands of Sheriff Lewis, who sent a deputy to Cedar Hill to-day to serve the papers.
     Mr. Carroll is the son of 'Squire Carroll, a well known citizen of the neighborhood. Interesting developments are expected when the case is called for trial.
     Mrs. Harrington denies that she is in the condition described by her erstwhile lord and master, and the lady is certainly qualified to speak in the premises. She says that the gay and festive shoemaker is as jealous as Bluebeard, Jr.; that when she would speak to a male acquaintance, he would chide her savagely, and when she would refuse to speak, he would impugn her motives and say that she kept silent to keep off suspicion.

WANTS A DIVORCE.

     Tennessee J. Harrington files suit for a divorce from her husband William W. Harrington.
     The plaintiff states that she and the defendant were married on August 1, 1891, in Dallas county; that she did all in her power to make the defendant happy, but that he was cruel to her and charged her with being on terms of criminal intimacy with various parties after and before their marriage. The plaintiff says she fled from the defendant's house on the 16th of September, fearing that he would kill her.
     She further alleged that since the 16th of September, the defendant has talked about her to numerous parties in and around Cedar Hill and has, in various ways, sought to blacken her character. Among his charges, she says the worst was that he positively avers that she was in a condition to become a mother.
     The plaintiff asks to be resorted to her maiden name, Tennessee J. Grimes.

- October 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

TO GET OUT OF TROUBLE.
______

The Accused Jumps From the
Frying Pan Into the Fire.

     This afternoon, in the sheriff's office, Judge Tucker united in marriage, Charlie Lott and Polly Pollard, two negroes. Lott stood charged in Judge Tucker's court with seduction, complaint having been filed by Polly. To get out of the trouble, he married her and Judge Tucker, for the first time in his life, performed the marriage ceremony.

- October 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

Divorced.

     Bayless Johnson was divorced from L. E. Johnson by Judge Burke yesterday. The plaintiff paid the costs.

- October 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

DELLA'S TRIP.
_______

It was One of a Matrimonial
Nature--She is Happy.

Associated Press.
     N
EW YORK, Oct. 19.--Miss Della Downing, whose home is in Dallas, Tex., who has been spending most of her time since graduating at Ward's female college, Nashville, Tenn., a year ago, in New York city, slipped away from her friends in the metropolis Saturday morning on an urgent telegram received the day before from the south and purchased tickets for Memphis, Tenn. The anxiety of her friends was relieved Monday night by the receipt of the following telegram from her, dated Memphis, Monday afternoon:
     Married to-day at 3:30.
                    D
ELLA DOWNING-KAISER.
     The happy groom is Mr. Henry Kaiser, a graduate of Princeton. He is an attaché of the superintendent's office of the Missouri Pacific at Little Rock, Ark. He is well known in St. Louis, where, at one time, he was connected with the Southern Hotel. He also traveled for a St. Louis house through the southwest. His mother and her family reside at Jefferson City, Mo. Till recently, Mr. Kaiser was chief clerk at the Grand Windsor Hotel at Dallas, Tex., where he first met his bride. During the summer just closed, Mrs. Kaiser made quite an impression at the seaside and mountain resorts in the vicinity of New York, where her beauty and accomplishments gained her great popularity.

- October 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Georgia Jackson sues Tom W. Jackson for a divorce.
     T. S. Donalson sues Frankie Donalson for a divorce.

- October 31, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     Mrs. Mary Ramsey vs. John L. Ramsey; divorce.

- November 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

MARRIAGE A FAILURE.
________

A Couple Tried Marriage One
Short Month.

     Lizzie Reeb sues Jake Reeb for divorce. Lizzie says in her petition that she married Jake on September 15 and he deserted her October 15 and is now living with a notorious woman of the town. She wants a decree of divorce and the privilege of changing her name to Lizzie Gibson.

- November 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

 Proceedings of the Courts.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     Annie Oliver vs. John W. Oliver; divorce granted as prayed for.

JUDGE BURKE'S COURT.

     Joseph Mustochia vs. Ada Mustochia; divorce granted the plaintiff as prayed for and costs taxed against the plaintiff.

- November 7, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -
 

Suits Filed.

     John R. Worsham sues his wife, I. D. L. Worsham, for divorce. Abandonment is alleged.

- November 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -
 

Suits Filed.

     Ada Barkley sues her husband, Charles Barkley, for a divorce. Cruel treatment is alleged.

- November 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -
 

THE DAY IN THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

     Judge Burke of the Fourteenth judicial district court spent the entire morning on the divorce suit of Augusta Welch vs. Cy. Welch. The parties to the suit elected to go to trial by jury. After hearing all the evidence, Judge Burke instructed the jury to return a verdict for the plaintiff, and Mrs. Welch is no longer encumbered with a husband.

- November 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     J. W. Vaughn has applied for a divorce from Eliza Vaughn. In his application, the husband alleges cruel treatment. He represents his wife as a very violent woman who abused him every day, and who, on several occasions, threatened to rip him open with a knife. The couple were married only last month.

- November 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     At Shreveport, yesterday, Paris Q. Rockett and Minnie Murphy, and Morton F. Rockett and Helen Stokes, all of Dallas, were married.

- November 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Suits Filed.

     J. C. Patton, attorney filed two suits for divorce--Josie Grigsby vs. Charles Grigsby and Nettie S. Baldwin vs. John W. Baldwin.

- November 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -
 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE COURTS.
NEW SUITS FILED.

     Nance McCullough vs. Obediah McCullough; divorce.
     Millie W. Roper vs. J. R. Roper; divorce. The parties were married in Fannin county in April, 1879. Mrs. Roper says in her petition, that two children have been the fruits of the union; that the defendant brutally treated her for years, left her without food; cursed her and finally, she was compelled to seek quarters in the city hospital. She asks for the custody of her children, Charlie and Myrtle, and a decree of divorce from her alleged brutal husband.

- November 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -
 

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Henry Shelly vs. Mary Shelly; divorce.

- December 3, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -
 

THE COURTS.
______

Cases Called and Disposed of
To-Day.

     Mattie Webb vs. Jack Webb; divorce granted.

NEW SUITS FILED.

     O. H. Worch against Maggie Worch, divorce.
     Ben F. Williamson against Lucy Williamson, divorce.
     Fannie Brown against Lawrence Brown, divorce.

- December 4, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -
 

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Annie C. McGowan vs. James McGowan; divorce.
     Amanda Smith vs. Gilbert Smith; divorce.

- December 8, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2-3.
- o o o -
 

THE COURTS.
SUITS FILED.

     Jerry Morrison vs. Florence Morrison; divorce.

- December 17, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -
 

HILDRETH-HIGBEE.
_______

A Dallas Young Man Weds a Fair
Daughter of the Fort.

Fort Worth Mail.
     Yesterday afternoon, at 4:30 o'clock, Miss Birdie Higbee was married to Mr. V. O. Hildreth, at the home of her mother on Burnett and Fourth streets, Rev. R. M. Tinnon officiating.
     The affair was an exceedingly brilliant one, over a hundred invited guests being present.
     After the ceremony, the dining room was thrown open and the guests served with an elegant luncheon.
     At 6 o'clock, the bride and groom departed on their wedding tour for New Orleans and other points. After their return, they will make their home in Dallas.
     The bride, Miss C. B. Higbee, or as she is generally known among her hosts of friends, Miss Birdie Higbee, is a beautiful young lady, and has been quite a leader in society circles in this city.
     Mr. Hildreth is an attorney in Dallas, well known and popular at home.
     The happy couple have the best wishes of an army of friends for their future well being.

- December 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Granted a Divorce.

     Mrs. Susan King secured a divorce from George King, in Judge Burke's court to-day. Mrs. King, a very pretty woman with a two-year-old boy in her arms, stated that her husband abandoned her sixteen days after marriage.

- December 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -