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To Landmarks, January-March 1889, General Index

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CITY NOTES.

     The board of directors of the Farmers Alliance Exchange adjourned yesterday evening after a three days' session, and most of the members have left for their homes. It is said that a great deal of important business was transacted.
     Yesterday afternoon, some wag erected the effigy of a man, with fishing tackle in hand, on the brink of the apparently bottomless pond on Lamar street, near W. J. Betterton & Co's. warehouse, and opposite the figure was a board with the inscription: "No Fishing Allowed Here." It illustrates the wretched condition of that street.
     There will be a public installation of officers of Sam Houston lodge, A. O. U. W., next Tuesday night, the 15th inst., at their hall, No. 949 Elm street, over the Live Oak grocery store. A cordial invitation is extended the public to be present. There will be music and recitations by ladies and gentlemen and an address by Stillwell H. Russell, master of the lodge.

- January 11, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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[No Heading]

     Judge Watts and Judge Robertson leave for Austin to-night to represent the Dallas bar before the judiciary committee on the question of dividing Dallas county into two judicial districts.

- January 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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CITY NEWS.

     Lamar street, as far out as the factory, has, for some time, been dedicated to the city without cost. Why don't the city council improve it? As matter now stand, a stranger cannot be shown our factory at all in muddy weather. The retail merchants down town lose all the trade of that populous section by reason of the council failing to improve Lamar street. The street is natrually a sandy, gravelly one, and if put in condition, the factory would be in ten minutes' walk of Main street.

- January 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Horse Breeders Association.

     At a meeting held at the Windsor hotel yesterday, the Texas trotting and horse breeders association was organized. A board of directors was elected as follows: J. W. Bailey, Gainesville; A. Brownlee, W. M. C. Hill, Dallas; J. W. Mitten, Corsicana; A. H. Gee, Pilot Point; F. M. Hinchman, Waco; R. E. Maddox, Fort Worth; S. N. Pickens, Palestine; J. W. Wilhite, Sherman. The following officers were elected: W. M. C. Hill, president; J. W. Bailey, vice president; F. A. Ryan, secretary; A. Brownlee, treasurer.

- January 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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A Gray Wolf Killed

     Mr. J. J.[?] Ledbetter, living 9 miles southwest of the city, to-day brought the scalp of a large gray wolf into the county clerk's office. The county pays one dollar for each and every wolf scrap filed. They are getting scarce now and the large gray species has nearly become extinct in this section of the state.

- January 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3-4.
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Freight Receipts and Shipments.

     The following is a statement of the receipts and shipments of freight in car load lots at and from Dallas over the various railroads entering the city, for January 22: The receipts were: Oats 1; other grain 3; lumber 6; agricultural implements 1; machinery 1; oil 2; wood 18; coal 1; iron produce 2; groceries 8; miscellaneous 15; hay 26; total 85. The shipments were: Grain 5; machinery 1; nails 3; miscellaneous 23; total 33.

- January 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
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Electric Power.

     Messrs. Clower & Harris, electricians, have just put in a six-horse power Baxter electric motor for the Windsor Hotel, which is now supplying the motive power for their heavy pump and elevator. The electric power is supplied by the Queen City Electric Co. (the new plant), which only yesterday, completed its wires for a day current especially for power. The Queen City having now prepared to supply power, the TIMES-HERALD will yet be able to utilize its Baxter motor. This motor is one which has been extensively used in New York and other eastern cities, with great success. One in Baltimore was used incessantly for year and found to be then in perfect condition and doing full service.      Clower & Harris have orders for quite a number which have been waiting on the completion of the Queen City's power line, and they will now be put in as fast as possible.
     The city of Dallas has long needed some new and cheaper and nicer power, and the Queen City Light and Power Co. proposes to supply the want. Messrs. Clower & Harris represent the leading motor company in the United States (the Baxter), and in addition to this standard motor of one-horse power up, Messrs. Clower & Harris are operating smaller motors for fans, sewing machines and other light machinery requiring less than one-horse power.

- January 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
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CITY NEWS.

     The Dallas Land and Loan Company have donated 8 acres as a site on which to erect a Catholic Orphanage, school and chapel.
     ...Plans and specifications have been adopted for an addition to the Ursuline Convent, which will have two stories and a basement; the ground plan to cover 50 x 125 feet.
     The following have been elected officers of the bricklayers union: Dick Richards, president; Wm. H. Wallace, vice president; Will Cloyd, financial secretary; George Mathews, corresponding secretary; D. B. Sheeley, recording secretary; W. J. Bull, treasurer; James Thurman, sergeant-at-arms; John Wilkerson, conductor. Trustees--E. Terwilliger, chairman, eighteen months; Chas. Smith, Will Hall, one year; Frank Ruth, Jordon Colgeri, six months.

- January 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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Extending North.

     The Dallas Consolidated Street Railway Company is securing right-of-way with a view of extending their McKinney avenue line out to Hall street beyond Trinity cemetery.

- January 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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CITY NOTES.

     City Attorney Johnson left for Austin last night with the new charter. He was accompanied by Aldermen Smith, Harris and Cole, who are to assist in engineering the instrument through both branches of the legislature simultaneously.

- January 24, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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WHITE CAPS IN DALLAS.
_______

THEY SERVE NOTICES ON AN AN-
ARCHIST.

_________

And Two Colored People, Telling
Them to Leave the City.

     John Langdon, a colored wood chopper and a resident of Stringtown, was enquirng around this morning for information concerning the White Caps. In answer to the question why he wanted to know, he said he had received a notice yesterday signed White Caps, telling him to leave the city. He further related that the notice was written on the back of a large piece of paper which contained an advertisement on the opposite side, with a red pencil, and in corner, in black pencil marks, were the regulation skull and cross-bones. Little notice was given the matter, with the thought that someone had endeavored to frighten Langdon, but when the reporter reached the city hall, he overheard a gentleman remark to his friend: "Did you know the White Caps are in Dallas?" The speaker then stated that he had just seen a notice a friend of his received through the postoffice, telling him to leave the city and signed, "White Caps." Being pressed to give the name of the party, it was finally divulged to be George Beach. The reporter at once repaired to Mr. Beach and requested to see the notice. Mr. Beach drew from his inside coat pocket a soiled enveloped containing the document:

     DALLAS, Jan. 21, 1889:
     G
EO. BEACH: You must leave Dallas before February 1st. No anarchists allowed here. We mean what we say.

WHITE CAPS

     The paper containing the writing bore the words in water mark, "Old Flax" and the cut of a loom. The notice was written in a legible, but seemingly disguised, back hand. It contained no skull and cross bone. While it was dated the 21st, it was postmarked the 23rd, and Mr. Beach states that it was delivered at the place where he formerly boarded yesterday, being directed to the number, 1114 Elm street.
     George Beach is a printer, well known in Dallas, and has been an exponent of socialistic theories and an advocate of the principles of anarchy the past 9 years, having at one time conducted and edited a paper, the tenor of which, strongly smacked of these ideas of so called reform. He says he is an anarchist, but not of the bomb throwing kind. But, the fact of being an anarchist, he says, will not cause him to leave the country, as his sect are not violent, but believe in the propagation of their ideas through education and mild agitation, and therefore, he will pay no attention to the notice, preferring to exercise his peaceful rights as any other citizen. A detective proposed to find the writer for him in thirty minutes, but he would not give 10 cents to know the author.
Branching off on his favorite theme of anarchy, in which Mr. Beach seems very earnest and well posted, he said there not less than three groups of internationalists in Dallas at present, and within the past four years, he has known of the existence of as many as five groups at one time. While they have no stated time for holding their meetings, they meet quite often. Being asked to approximate the number of this creed in Dallas, he said he would prefer not. He classes the American anarchists as simply agitators, those in England as revolutionists and, in Russia, where oppression is greatest, they are regular terrorists.
     However, Mr. Beach proposes to stand his ground with the White Caps.
     Later, it was learned that two masked men, last night, visited the house of a low negro woman in the vicinity of Gas Hill and represented themselves to be white caps and gave her ten days in which to mend her ways, or take her departure from the community. She is badly frightened.
     Langdon, the negro man, is reputed to an industrious person, and ordinarily peaceable, though he sometimes engages in fisticuffs. The only difficulty he recalls which would be likely to bring out the notice, was with a white man recently whom he abused because he refused to pay for a load of wood.

- January 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5; p. 8, col. 1.
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CITY NEWS.

     A petition is being circulated asking that Judge A. L. Lathrop be appointed judge of the new judicial district in case it is created.
Ernenwein the painter has opened a shop for himself on Main street.
The new North Texas National bank building will be ready for occupancy in a month, and will be the handsomest and best appointed bank in Texas.

- January 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Hamlet To-Night.

     Creston Clarke, a nephew of Edwin Booth, and who has studied his art under the tutelage of that illustrious Thespian, will appear in "Hamlet" at the opera house to-night. Mr. Clarke has received the encomiums of the press and public wherever he has appeared, and in the play of "Hamlet," his genius is well marked.

- January 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Organization of the Electricians.

     Some twenty-five or thirty attended the meeting held last night to organize an electricians' association. All were agreed that the movement was timely and proceeded to temporary organization by electing Mr. R. K. Saunders of the Western Union president and Mr. C. O. Harris temporary secretary. Committees were appointed as follows:
     Constitution and By-Laws--W. P. Davis, J. M. Oram and F. M. Henshaw.
     Permanent Organization--Henry Garrett, D. M. Clower and C. O. Harris.
     The meeting then adjourned until next Thursday night.

- January 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
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Saloon Robbed.

     Thieves entered Miller's saloon on East Elm street in front of Carter's stock yards last night and robbed the cash till of seven or eight dollars. They broke a glass out of the front door and then had little trouble in unlocking it.

- January 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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WHITE CAPS AGAIN.
_______

A NOTICE SERVED ON THE COUNTY
JAIL.

_______

It is Elaborately Illustrated and
Announces a Visit on Feb-
ruary 5th.

     The air has been filled with rumors of White Cap notices and threats, but the most startling sensation in the White Cap line was brought to light this morning, when a letter was received at the county jail giving notice of a visit to be made on February 5. The notice was written on ordinary linen paper, which was enclosed in an ordinary envelope and sent through the Dallas postoffice directed to a prisoner in the county jail, but addressed to several of the inmates. The illustrations at the head of the sheet were of the most elaborate kind. They were drawn with a pen dipped in red kink to indicate their meaning of blood and murder. In the upper left hand corner was the skull and cross bones trimmed in black; just beneath these was a cat'o-nine-tails, which was represented as bathed in blood; a little further towards the right-hand corner of the page were two large daggers crossed, and blood represented as streaming from each; then came the drawing of a human heart pierced with daggers; next was the graceful figure of a revolver and the significant cartridge; then, with its far-reaching branches, was a tree from a bough of which, was suspended a rope and the drawing of a man who had paid the death penalty, dangling at the end; then was the bust figure of a supposed White Cap in mask holding aloft a blazing torch, the whole concluding with an ugly coffin, on which the artists seemed to have put in his poorest strokes.
     The letter was written in a plain, legible hand, which betrays no disguise. It simply announced a visit to the parties named to be made on the night of the 5 of February, and stated that the order is well organized and ready for business. It was signed, "White Caps of Texas."
     Citizens have been inclined to treat the subject of White Caps as a great hoax, but it is stated that the organization does really exist in Dallas county, and that it was completed in the county several weeks before it was attempted in the city.
     They may give some trouble at the start, but that sentiment does not exist in the city our county that will tolerate or submit to such high-handed outrages as the history of the White Caps shows they have committed. In short, if such is attempted, the mass of people will be ready to aid the officers in ferreting out and putting it down.
     The county jail will be a good subject for them to initiate their work on in Texas. They had as well tackle a garrison, for such it amounts to now, and the men are behind the guns, too, who will use them with the same telling effect that they were brought to bear on the Birmingham mob if it becomes necessary in protecting the prisoners from mob violence.

- January 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
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THE WHITE CAPS.
______

They are Here, Or Else a Cruel
Joke is Being Perpetrated.

     The receipt of warnings to leave the city by three persons a few days ago, purporting to have been sent by White Caps, has been followed up by a number of similar notices to various persons emanating from the same source. The persons receiving these notices are both white and colored, and the latter are especially agitated over the matter. The incident has created as much consternation among them as would an exploding bombshell. The common greeting among the blacks is, "Has you got a notice from the White Caps yit," and they are both alarmed and perplexed. The White Caps are to the darkies both a revelation and a mystery, and they are naturally inquiring what manner of man or thing a White Cap is. Among the people, generally, there are various theories as to the origin and purpose of the notices served on different persons to leave the city. The majority are incredulous, and are inclined to attribute the incident to the joking propensities of some person or persons whose object is amusement. Others again, there are, who consider it a serious matter, and don't hesitate to say that the authorities should take some action in the premises. This opinion seems to be strengthened by the fact that these warnings to leave the city are being received almost daily. Whatever may be the origin of the affair, it is generally denounced, and should there be a visitation of the White Caps in this city, they will find a public sentiment here so pronounced against them, that it will be extremely unsafe to practice their unlawful methods here.

- January 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4-5.
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CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The committee on streets and bridges recommended that the city attorney be instructed to draw an ordinance to put into effect, the city engineer's plan for numbering houses. Adopted.

- January 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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CITY NEWS.

     A "White Cap" notice has been served on Sid Le Gros, a printer.
     The fixtures and inside furnishings are being placed in the North Texas National Bank building, which will soon be completed and is the first six-story building erected in Dallas.
     If their threats mean anything, it is presumed the White Caps will put something tangible before the public about February 1. Rumor has it that they are distributing their notices quite liberally, in each instance fixing that date on which to begin active operations.

- January 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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[No Heading]

     The down town section of the fire department was called yesterday to put an incipient blaze resulting from a defective stove pipe in a house near the Waters-Pierce Oil Co's. tank on the river.

- January 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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POLICE PROTECTION.
__________

DEMAND FOR AN ELECTRIC ALARM
SYSTEM.

_______

And An Increased Mounted Force to
Better Protect Residences.

     A new feature has been proposed to be added to the city police department, which is popularly known as the hoodlum box and alarm system. It is in vogue in all the larger cities, and Dallas stands badly in need of it to fill a vacuum in her metropolitan dimensions. The system is fashioned after that of the present fire alarm and is operated on the same principle. Strongly constructed iron cages are erected at convenient intervals throughout the city. They are provided with a spring lock and inside is an electric button which the officers springs when cages his prisoner. This registers the number of the box and location at headquarters and the patrol wagon is on the spot in the twinkling of an eye. The advantages are that an officer is not compelled to watch his prisoner while he hunts up a telephone, and under the new system, when a citizen catches a burglar on this premises, if not provided with a key, he calls on his neighbor, who has one and incarcerates his man and sends for the patrol wagon without much inconvenience. The new system will work well in Dallas and might possibly increase the number of burglar arrests, since under the present regime, a citizen hates to tackle a burglar, knowing that if he catches him, he will possibly have to trudge a great distance over dark and muddy streets with all the chances in favor of his prisoner [escaping] while conveying him to jail, or telephoning for the patrol wagon.
     There is also a pressing demand for extended police service and perhaps this demand will receive some consideration during the coming fiscal year. It is to be hoped so, anyway. At present, the resident portion of the city is almost entirely without protection, for the reason that the force, after being cut in two for night and day service, is to small to go around. It is suggested that with an increased force, the number of mounted men be enlarged and placed on duty at night in the resident portion of the city. Each residence ward should have at least two mounted men on duty at night, and they should be armed with orders to halt every suspicious character prowling around after eleven o'clock. Any honest citizen out after that hour could give a satisfactory explanation on the spot when requested to do so. The expense of keeping the ponies for this purpose would not necessarily be great. The city has to employ one hostler now who could as well take care of six or eight horses as two.
     It is very evident that in the near future, some plan will have to be adopted to meet this urgent demand to give more police protection.

- January 31, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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Freight Receipts and Shipments.

     The following is a statement of the receipts and shipments of freight in car load lots, at and from, the various railroad depots of Dallas, for January 30: Cotton 2, horses and mules 3, hogs 1, lumber 13, agricultural implements 2, wood 5, coal 10, dry goods 3, household goods 1, miscellaneous 20, hay 7. Total 66. Shipments, miscellaneous 22. Total 22.

- January 31, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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The Judgeship.

     The question as to who will be judge of the new district court of Dallas county, in the event another judicial district should be erected by the legislature, is just now one of interest to the legal fraternity of the city. The name of Judge Latham and Chas. Fred Tucker are mentioned by their friends for the position, and if the new office is created, they will urge their respective favorite upon the governor. both gentlemen are able lawyers and either would fulfill the duties of the Judgeship satisfactorily.

- January 31, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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CITY NEWS.

     The North Texas National Bank have moved into their handsome six-story building on Main street.

- January 31, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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DANGER IN WIRES.
_______

A FEW POINTERS ON ELECTRIC WIRES.
_______

Danger Resulting From Crosses
and Touching Them in Wet
Weather--A Wire Inspector.

     It is a well-known fact that great danger lurks in electric wires, especially in wet weather. The constantly increasing number of these wires in Dallas makes them a subject of public concern. Sometimes the wires get crossed and tangled and the result is a burning out of telephone and telegraph instruments and much damage in other quarters.
     The trouble is that the insulating material around the big copper electric light wires loses its effect when it becomes wet, and when the wires are crossed in wet weather, the electric light wire communicates to the telephone or telegraph wire as much of the current as it will carry. If the wire so touched, is big enough, it will carry enough of the current to kill.      
     Fortunately, the telephone wires will not carry enough for that. The larger sizes of telegraph wire, however, will carry enough of the current to destroy life, and the telegraph office is compelled to provide for such emergencies, which is often accomplished through the construction of a "plush arrester," a small instrument through which the current is made to pass over a brass trigger into the office. If a powerful current like that of the electric light or lightning [occurs], a magnet trips the trigger from its connection and the wire is practically cut in two.
     It is death to touch an electric light wire in wet weather while the current is on. This cannot too strongly be impressed on the minds of people. Some time ago, a negro boy, in passing down Elm street one damp morning, slipped, and in falling, he caught at a post on which an electric ground wire was fastened. He touched the wire and the result was that he was shocked senseless and came near losing his life.
     An electrician, in speaking of crossed wires, this morning said:      "When the wires cross in wet weather, the current is readily transmitted from the electric light wire to the telephone wire, but only so much of the current as the small wire will take. When No. 14 steel wire is used in telephone systems, there is not sufficient current transmitted to kill a person or set fire to a house. A current strong enough to set fire to a house would melt a small wire like that and cause a disconnection before any damage resulted. Larger wires cost a little more and last twice as long, but it is better to use smaller wires and avoid great danger.
     "How about a telegraph wire?"
     "Why, a good sized telegraph wire has a resistance of only about eight or ten ohms per mile and would carry enough of the current to kill."
     "What do you think about electric light wires when insulated?"
     "That don't work when it is wet, I would not touch one when it is wet for a million dollars. It would kill me certain. I would not even touch one when it is dry. Probably touching a dry wire would not kill me, but I would not stand the shock it would give me for $10,000.
     "Of course, it must be said that people face death every day in many ways. To fall under a railroad train, or under a heavy express wagon would kill you---"
     "But the people all know that, and they don't all know about the wires."
     "Yes, there is the trouble. They don't realize the danger in the electric light wires. You cannot too strongly impress on them the importance of being particular to keep away from them when they are let down in the street, or in avoiding contact with them anywhere."
     A gentleman who is accustomed to deal with electricity said that for the safety of the city, there should be a competent inspector in the employ of the city and under its direction, whether the fees were paid by individuals or not, whose duty it should be to inspect every connection and see that all wires were properly insulated and separated by the proper distance. Such inspectors, he said, were employed by insurance companies in some cities.

- February 1, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The health officer recommended the erection of a care-taker's building on the pest-house site, and he further recommended a general vaccination with bovine virus. Referred.

- February 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4-5.
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CITY NEWS.

     West Dallas people are still hopeful of securing a street railway.
The farm implement and machine factory located at the Cole fair grounds is turning out a fine lot of goods in its line.

- February 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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CITY NEWS.

     Dallas people are learning to rely on bois' d'arc as the only reliable street paving material.

- February 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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JUDGE BOWER'S OPPOSITION.
_______

Getting Signatures and Views of
Citizens to Protest.

     Judge Bower is collecting the views of citizens on the subject of the new city charter. It is intended that these should be written beneath a printed protest, but the protesting party (it happens these are the views collected) sometimes covers several pages of legal cab in setting forth his reasons for opposing the charter. The instrument is attacked on the point given appointing power to the mayor and council, extending jurisdiction of the city court and compelling property owners to pay for street paving at the dictation of the council.
     "If the council wants the power to retire an incapacitated officer," remarked a citizen, "I would suggest instead of robbing the people the right of their right to elect officers, that the council be granted the power to enable them to discharge the officer upon a two-thirds vote of the entire board. Then, they can order an election to fill the vacancy after declaring the ejected officer ineligible for that office." The opposition is doing beaver work on a quiet plan.

- February 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
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Freight Receipts and Shipments.

     The following is a statement of the receipts and shipments of freight in car load lots at and from the various railroad depots of Dallas for February 6:
     Receipts--Cotton 1, lumber 1, agriculture implements 3, wood 4, posts 13, coal 24, building material 5, groceries 5, miscellaneous 11, hay 2. Total 72.
     Shipments--Flour 1; grain 3, lumber 2; coal 1, brick 1, miscellaneous 18. Total 26.

- February 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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HUMANE SOCIETY MOVEMENTS.
_______

Visiting Stables and Petitioning
For Drinking Fountains.

     Mr. O. H. Mercer, the authorized agent and representatve of the Dallas Humane Society, is visiting the various livery stables in the city to-day and inspecting the horse to see that none are in service with sore backs and shoulders. the directors of the movement have resolved to enforce the penalty on all who violate the provisions of the ordinance.
     The society will petition the council at its next session to erect public drinking fountains at convenient points, the management of which, will be relegated to the society.
     Col. Ernenwein states that the dog pound where the surplus canine will be scientifically disposed of, is only a forerunner of a horse pound, where diseased animals will be collected and dispatched through some humane plan, the modus operandi of which, is yet to be adopted.

- February 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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CITY NEWS.

     At a citizen's meeting held recently, Rev. W. H. Hughes and Capt. W. White were authorized to tender Bishop Galloway of Brookhaven, Miss., a residence at Oak Cliff, adjoining the Methodist female college, which is to be built.

- February 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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CITY NEWS.

     Within a few days, Commerce street will be graded, paved and guttered from the court house to the Texas Central railroad. Then, with the completion of the work on Preston street, Dallas will be lifted out of the mud within the business district, bounded by Commerce and Elm streets, and from Jefferson street to the railroad track.

- February 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Oak Cliff Items.

     A four-story hotel will be commenced soon near Park street station, so we are informed by Mr. Marsalis.

- February 8, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
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Lighting the New City Hall.

     The award to Messrs. Clower & Harris of the contract for furnishing the new hall with electric light chandeliers, brackets, etc., was quite a victory for home talent and enterprise. Representatives of two New York houses and one St. Louis firm were on the ground competing with the several city firms for this contract. The St. Louis man had a large shipment of samples, with extravagant illustrations, etc., to aid him in tempting the council committee to believe his offer was the best. Messrs. Clower & Harris spent two days picking such chandeliers, brackets and hanging lamps as they thought necessary and suitable for each room and corner of the large building, and fixing their prices submitted them to the committee. After examining the specimens of fixtures and descriptions with each bid, the contract was awarded to Clower & Harris--at about $1900. The large hall has a large chandelier at $150, and four small ones costing about $38 each. The council chamber has a magnificent chandelier at $285, two small ones for galleries at $78, and two bracket lamps for the mayor's stand at $15. Other rooms are furnished at from $35 down.

- February 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
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Commissioners Court.

     The February term of this body began on Monday with a full attendance of members. A very large number of bills have been passed upon and allowed and a number of orders made and petitions heard.
     Yesterday, an order was passed prohibiting any vehicle loaded with filth, garbage or dead animals from crossing the Trinity bridge at the west end of Commerce street and depositing same in the bottoms and affixing a penalty for violating the order.
     An order was made to prevent the hitching of horses and other animals within the chains surrounding the court house fence and providing a penalty for each infraction of the same.

- February 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Police Photographed.

     The police force of the city turned out in a body to-day, and in their Sunday's best, had their handsome forms and features imprinted on photographer's cards. The members of the force, to the number of about thirty, have their likenesses produced separately and these will be grouped in a frame 3x4 feet, which will hang up in the new city hall.

- February 13, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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NORTH DALLAS IMPROVEMENTS.
_______

Big Real Estate Deal--Steam Street
Cars Will Be Running Soon.

     Over $10,000 worth of property changed hands in North Dallas yesterday and, in each sale made, the purchaser is bound to erect within a reasonable time, a good residence.
     Maple avenue is being macadamized, which work is being followed up by good cement sidewalks.
     Messrs. G. A. and J. A. Knight are having plans prepared for the erection of fine residences.
     One and a half miles of track has been laid on the North Dallas circuit railway, and it is intended to have the road in operation by the first of March. The engines and cars have been shipped and are expected any day. Baldwin steam street cars will be used and the advantage they have over the ordinary rapid transit lies in the fact that they will stop anywhere on the line to take passengers aboard. Hard coal will be used for fuel and passengers will not have to suffer the annoyance occasioned by coal dust and flying cinders.

- February 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     There is considerable complaint at failure of the electric lamps on public duty to render service all night.
     The new waterworks pump is a facsimile of the one in operation in Buffalo, N. Y.

- February 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Rev. R. T. Hanks and Messrs. E. P. Marshall and Will A. Watkins went over to Fort Worth yesterday to inspect the Baptist Church building over there with a view of arranging plans for a house of worship in this city.

- February 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

NEW BUILDINGS.
_______

Ground Broken For a Five-Story
Structure on Main Street.

     Ground was broken this morning for a five-story building to be erected by Mrs. S. H. Cockrell on the vacant lot on the north side of Main street, between Murphy and Sycamore streets. It will be a modern structure with a brown stone front.
     Plans are being prepared for two five-story bank buildings on which work will begin about the 1st of May.

- February 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

ELECTRIC RAILWAYS.
______

Comparative Cost and Advantages
Over Steam and Horse Power.

     The last issue of the Electrical News contains the information that there are, at present, in the United States, fifty-eight electrical railways in successful operation and twenty-eight are under contract and are being built. The highest estimate of the expense of running an electric car per day is 90 cents and they are a success in every particular. The estimated cost of propelling a street car in this city is $1.30 a day, which, compared with the expense of running an electric car, shows that it offers economical advantages over the street car. The electric system of street railway requires no burdensome outlay for stable grounds and their attendant expense.
     A gentleman who is well posted on each system, remarked this morning that in view of the advantages and economy of the electric over the old style steam and horse power systems, he could not understand why Dallas has not adopted electricity for her street railway system.

- February 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

COMMISSIONERS COURT.

     An order was adopted this morning which provides for the erection of a new jail on the county poor farm which will be fitted out with new iron cages.

- February 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

COMMISSIONERS COURT.
_______

Presiding Election Officers' Ap-
pointed--A Lengthy Session.

     The county commissioners have been in session since last Monday. The bulk of their business has been made up of road changes and ordering new roads. It is thought the session will close this afternoon.
     This morning, the court appointed the following presiding officers of election precincts for the year 1889-90:

THE CITY OF DALLAS.

     First ward, N. D. Turney; second ward, O. P. Fee; third ward, W. J. Caven; fourth ward, C. S. Mitchell; fifth ward, Robert Gibson; sixth ward, J. F. Metcalf; seventh ward, D. L. Stuart; eighth ward, J. M. Howell; ninth ward, Wm. Burr.

EAST DALLAS.

     First ward, N. G. Putman; second ward, T. G. T. Kendall; third ward, B. N. Bryan; fourth ward, C. E. Byrd.

COUNTY.

     Smith Hall, Wm. P. Cochran; Farmers Branch, T. C. Marsh; Carrollton, Tom McKamy; Trinity Mills, John Jackson; Starks Schoolhouse, O. T. Scott; Richardson, A. R. White; Hughes Schoolhouse, John Fields; Jewella, E. M. McCommas; Lagow Schoolhouse, James Greer; Calhoun, R. H. Fisher; Scyene, J. T. Durett; Mesquite (including Bennett's schoolhouse), J. S. Frost; Haught's Store, Wm. Humphreys; Seagoville, Jas. Sewell; Kleburg, J. R. Hawpe; Rylie Prairie, J. R. Montgomery; North Mesquite, S. G. Lackey; Bayles' Schoolhouse, A. P. Rales; Rose Hill, W. M. Anderson; Pleasant Valley, T. C. Brown; Garland, J. M. James; New Hope, T. P. Tinsley; Long creek, Ed Pache; Desoto, Tom Stuart; Hutcheson, Sam Ayres; Wilmer, Will Perry; Baker's Schoolhouse, Geo. Williams; Patrick's Schoolhouse, Jordan Patrick; Wheatland, Thomas Uhl; Duncanville, R. N. Donell; Cedar Hill, John Runesy; Lisbon, E. H. Whitaker; Five Mile, G. W. Neely; Mount Airy, W. R. Fisher; Eagle Ford, J. B. Archie; Grand Prairie, J. K. P. Jordan; Somers, B. F. Milican; Spring Chappel, W. O. Harrison; Hackberry, R. R. Stewart; Union Bower, W. M. Smith; Oak Cliff, Henry Atterberry.

- February 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     Plans are being prepared for the erection of a seven-story block of buildings in this city by an eastern life insurance company.

- February 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

A GARBAGE CREMATORY.
_______

Dallas Will Invest in One---Some-
thing About Their Expense.

     Dallas is now paying special attention to the water supply system and the next enterprise she proposes to set on foot with the beginning of the new fiscal year is a garbage furnace. This question was introduced into the city council and all that remains for it to be a reality, is the purchase of the furnace and grounds to locate it upon. A committee has been appointed on the last feature and when they report having made a suitable selection, the furnace will be purchased and put in operation.
     The crematory is being generally adopted as the most sanitary method of disposing of putrefactive matter, and it is in successful operation in England, Canada and many of the principal cities of this country.
     Regarding the cost of operating a crematory may be cited the investigations of Dr. Samuel S. Kilvington, president of the board of health of Minneapolis, Minn., read before the American Public Health association at its sixteenth annual meeting in Milwaukee, last November, in which he shows that the crematory of Montreal, Canada, is operated at an expense of but 25 cents per ton of miscellaneous refuse, and 75 cents per ton of night soil.
     He gives the following facts and figures of the expense of operating the crematory in Minneapolis for five days, during which the furnace was worked by three men entirely new to the task, two of whom were on duty by day and one by night. His report says:
     "Thirty-three horses, 50 dogs, 103 barrels of hotel and commission house refuse, 12 loads market offal, 70 loads manure, weighing, in all, over 200 tons.
     "Total cost of labor and fuel for this period $38.25 or $7.65 per day, the entire weight of refuse being destroyed at a cost of 19 cents per ton. The ash deposited in the course on the consumption of this material is exceedingly small in quantity, weighing less than 200 pounds per day, 15 to 20 cents per ton.
     "This estimate, eminently satisfactory, as it is, is not altogether a fair one. The men employed were wholly inexperienced. The furnace at the beginning of these first days was cold, and it required several hours to superheat it. The fuel used was simply lath edgings and coal screenings, or 'breeze.' The glut of horses was unusual, and crowded out the ordinary supply of garbage. It is safe to say that upon an average run, over an extended period, 15 to 20 cents per ton of refuse would pay for the labor employed and the fuel consumed."

- February 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

A New Opera House.

     Plans are being placed on foot looking to the erection in the near future of a new opera house to cost in the neighborhood of $50,000. It is stated that it will be a finer building than the present one, and its location will be more central and desirable.

- February 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     Under the call of officers' reports, Geo. Williams, the engineer of the patrol wagon, submitted his report showing that he had hauled, during the month of January, 284 persons to the calaboose, courts and hospital.
     Committees were reached and the committee on municipal affairs reported favorably on the proposition of the brewing company to lease a piece of ground which belongs to the city and lies near the brewery. Adopted.
     The committee on fire department reported favorably on the petition of the Waters-Pierce Oil Company for permission to move their warehouse to the foot of Jefferson street. Adopted.
     Haralson & Sharp were awarded the contract to move the old Cumberland Hill school building for $218.
     Mr. Louckx called up without result, the report of a committee favoring Rock ford as the location of a new bridge across the Trinity river. The idea seemed to prevail that the city is not ready to build the bridge.
The contract for building a sidewalk around Monument square on east Elm street was awarded to Harrell & Co. at 13 cents per square foot.
Under the head of new business, an ordinance was passed permitting the T. & P. Railway company to place a switch across Griffin street.

- February 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     Mr. Hugh Blakeney has bought property costing $18,000 on which he will soon commence the erection of a building and establish a bed spring, cushion and mattress factory which will afford employment to 100 operators. He proposes to have it in operation in June.
     The athletic association has 100 members and will commence building soon a new building near the postoffice, where they will have the advantages of artesian water.

- February 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Remember.

     The masquerade carnival and ball at Skating Academy Saturday, Feb. 23d. Prizes for best ladies costume, silver medal; for gents, season ticket. Dancing at 10 o'clock. Admission 50¢, skating 25¢. Ladies free.

- February 21, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Freight Receipts and Shipments.

     The following is a statement of the receipts and shipments of freight in car load lots at, and from, the various railroad depots of Dallas for February 22:
     Receipts -- Oats 1, lumber 8, agricultural implements 1, machinery 1, wood 8, coal 6, dry goods 1, miscellaneous 22; total 48.
     Shipments -- Miscellaneous 26.

- February 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     Elm street in East Dallas is being paved with bois d'arc.
     A force will begin Monday lowering the water pipe on the public square in advance of placing the bois d'arc pavement, grading for which, will begin next week.
     The Dallas German Ladies' Aid Society, capital stock $5000, have filed a charter with the secretary of state. The incorporators are Mrs. D. Nussbaumer, Mrs. F. L. Bayer and Mary A. Bohne.

- February 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

WEEKLY STATEMENT
______

Of the Receipts and Shipments of
Freight At and From Dallas.

     The following is a statement of the receipts and shipments from the several railroad depots in the city of Dallas for the week ending February 23, 1889, as compiled by Mr. R. Walton Jacobs, secretary of the Merchants' Exchange.
     Receipts--Corn 5, oats 3, other grain 4, cattle 6, horses and mules 2, hogs 1, sheep 1, lumber 45, agricultural implements 3, machinery 1, can goods 2, furniture 1, wood 81, posts 45, rolled iron 1, other iron produce 8, lime 1, stone 39, dry goods 20, groceries 25, household goods 4, miscellaneous 131, hay 11, ice 1, beer 2; total 443.
     Shipments--Flour 2, bran 1, corn 4, oats 2, cotton 2, horses and mules 1, dry goods 5, groceries 4, household goods 1, miscellaneous 153; total 175.

- February 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

The Dual Court Bill.

     The bill providing for a new judicial district in Dallas county south of the T. & P. railway (leaving the north half of the court house and the block north of the court house between it and the T. & P. in the northern district) has passed both houses and goes to the governor. The emergency clause could not get the necessary two-third vote and the bill will not become a law until ninety days after passage.
     The people generally do not understand that the two districts are only two districts so far as voting for judges. A suit brought in the southern district may be tried before the judge of the northern district and a resident of the northern district who votes for the judge in that district may be tried in the court of the southern district, the docket of the county being divided between the two judges by the district clerk regardless of residence of accused or litigants...

- February 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     Mr. Garrison--Authorizing the water commissioners to make the best possible disposition of the old tool shop located on Harwood street near the engine house and instructing the city engineer to prepare plans for the erection of a brick building in its place. Action deferred.

- February 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE DALLAS AND PACIFIC.
_______

The West Enthused Over the Pro-
ject--Contractors to the Front.

     The people of northwest [Texas] have received with evident enthusiasm, the announcement of Dallas' intention to build a railroad through that section. At Graham last Thursday night, a meeting was held and a right-of-way committee appointed with the additional duty imposed of conferring with the officers of the Dallas, Pacific & Southeastern to find out what would be expected in the way of a bonus in order to secure the building of the road through that town.
     Capt. Sherman, chief engineer of the road, is in Aurora looking over an old survey that was made to that place a year or so ago. The surveying corps is expected to be at Aurora in a few days to locate the line from a point near that place to Grapevine.
     Burkett & Murphy and Burnes & Peters, wealthy contractors, are getting their outfits in shape to begin work soon.

- February 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     The Baptists of North Dallas are moving in the direction of building a house of worship.

- February 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

WHAT AN EDITOR WROTE
_______

About Dallas, After He Had Visited
the City and Mingled With Her
People.

     The editor of the Montevideo Leader, published in Montevideo, Chippena county, Minnesota, after returning to his home from a long jaunt South with the National Editorial Association, penned the following lines about Dallas.:
     We retire early and our train covers fully 300 miles in the night and brings us to Dallas early in the morning. Here we are met by a delegation of citizens and taken in carriages to the best hotel, where comfortable rooms are assigned us. After breakfast, we visit the principal business streets and fine here the most distinctively Northern city we have seen in all our travels. Dallas is a rustling, bustling city of 50,000 inhabitants, which is five times as many as she had a decade ago. The business houses are solid, well-built structures, largely of brick and the stocks of merchandise are unusually large and complete. The public buildings are also fine and many of the banks, hotels and other buildings would do honor to any city of ten times its size. The principal business streets are solidly built up and occupied for a distance of nearly two miles and in the resident portion of the town are many elegant homes.      Our party was taken out into the suburban districts on the Rapid Transit Railroad Co.'s line, and given a view of the Fair and Exposition grounds with their large and well-arranged buildings. Also, to Oak Cliff, another beautiful suburb, where a substantial lunch was served. We also visited the fine new cotton factory and saw hundreds of looms at work making up the principal product of that region of country. We learned that these great factories, with numerous other manufacturing establishments, were built chiefly by the business men and capitalists of Dallas, and that it is their intention to make that point the principal manufacturing town, as it is the principal trade center of Northern Texas. For a hundred miles in every direction, there is an exceedingly rich and productive soil and a population within that territory of fully one million, while but a minor portion of these rich lands are cultivated as yet. It is a great cotton market as well as an important railroad center, and is the great distributing point of Northern Texas. The system of public works is excellent and complete, and we noticed that much attention is given to paving the principal streets, the material used, being a kind of very hard wood common in that region, which "lasts like iron," it is said. Returning from our ride, we are treated to an elegant reception and banquet at 4 o'clock, many of the leading citizens being present with their ladies, and after a couple of hours of feasting and speech making, the committee on resolutions read their final report, which is adopted, and the president announces that the meeting of the National Editorial Association for 1888 has come to a close.

- February 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

A CITY OF HOMES.
________

ONE SECRET OF DALLAS' UNPRECE-
DENTED GROWTH.

_______

The Boom is On and Only One or
Two Little Things Needed to Keep
It Going.

     Dallas is becoming a city of homes. A few months ago, when she began to make such rapid strides as a city, she was cramped to furnish homes for the thousands who flocked here to assist in raising her to the proportions she has attained. There was a pressing demand for more territory to be occupied in building homes for those who were risking their fortunes here. The only transportation was the street railway, which extended its service only to meet demands, and never in advance of them. Realizing the impediment existing in the way of further and rapid growth, several enterprising citizens opened up and threw upon the market, the beautiful suburb of Oak cliff a little over a year ago. The plat was laid off in large, roomy lots, with sufficient alleyways and broad avenues and streets. They were carved out of the prairie and bluffs on the west side to fill the bill of pleasant, healthy homes above the noise and rush of the busy commercial city. The enterprising projectors spent large sums of money in this work. But, they foresaw the results and knew it was a profitable investment. They built a railway to supply the demand for transportation and then returns of their output began to roll in. Oak Cliff is now dotted with beautiful residences which furnish homes for nearly one thousand people, and she has reached this point in eighteen months.
     Noting the success of this enterprise, Kansas City capital began at once to lay plans for just such a venture on the east side of the river. Large tracts of land were purchased in such shape as to form a half circle around the city. The heart of this was pierced with a rapid transit railway of the dummy pattern and the plot was cut up into desirable building lots which were placed upon the market within easy reach of all who wanted a home. The great demand gobbled the property in a hurry, and if the purchaser was unable to build, the company would build for him after plans of his own selection and fix the payments so that he could meet them in small monthly installments. Four miles of ride half around the city over the rapid transit will show what this enterprise has done for Dallas in enabling her to offer inducements to those intending to locate.
     And, now comes North Dallas with her stream street railway, a beautiful park of one hundred acres, which will be one of the most picturesque in the South, and her thousands of acres laid out to be covered with residences. There are smooth macadamized streets, wide, shady drives and broad cement sidewalks, all included in a wise provision for more pleasant homes for the toilers in the city.
     West Dallas, too, has caught the spirit of enterprise and capitalists are constructing a suburban railway to open up a beautiful section in that direction. Dallas will furnish homes for all who located in her borders, be they rich or poor, high or low. And this fact is one secrete of her unprecedented growth. Not a day passes that she does not coin new citizens, and with cheap fuel and removal of the disabilities complained of by manufacturers, she is the coming giant of the southwest. The former will be obtained by building the new road into the northwest and the latter will be set aright by the railroads and the legislature of the state.

- February 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

THE NEW RAILWAY.
_______

Work Delayed Because the Subsidy
Is Not Ready.

     The railroad committee is working like beavers to raise the balance of the $50,000 subsidy necessary to build the Dallas, Pacific & Southeastern. The balance required amounts to only a few thousand. Work will begin just as soon as the subsidy is secured and not until then. The local railway committee assured the projectors that Dallas would raise the $50,000, and it remains for her citizens to redeem their pledge in abiding any agreement entered into by those who have been placed in front to represent the city's interests in railway enterprises.
     Albuquerque is the proposed destination of the new line in the northwest and New Orleans in the southeast. The territory this route will cover is as desirable as any in the United States. It is rich in agricultural products, minerals, live stock and lumber and its value to Dallas can hardly be estimated.
     Exact location of the route is yet indefinite, but enough will be decided upon to commence work as soon as the subsidy is raised. Decatur has a delegation of citizens in the city to place her claims before the committee.

- February 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

    An entire block of brick business houses has recently been erected on Live Oak street near the Texas Central R.R., sixteen in number.

- March 1, 1889, Dallas Morning News, p. 8.
- o o o -

North Dallas.

     The Suburban Railway to the city's northern suburb has infused new life into that hitherto staid corner of the metropolis, and real estate is active.
     Col. J. N. Simpson will build a handsome home on his recent purchase adjoining Mr. E. P. Cowan on Maple.
     Mrs. Patton's contractor has laid the foundation for her seven-thousand-dollar residence on Cedar Springs road near the school house.
     Royal A. Ferris has bought a lot on Maple street for four thousand dollars and will build. Who the fortunate fair one is to be, remains for a future report.
     The railway is completed from Cole Fair grounds, near the Cockrell Fairview addition to Camp street, and will be completed to Elm as soon as the paving contractors finish with Camp.

- March 2, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     The city hall building is rapidly nearing completion. It will be one of the most substantial and imposing structures of the kind in the country.
     A special committee of citizens went out this morning to assess the benefits and damages resulting from the extension of Flora street north of Ross avenue.
     The Texas & Pacific Trinity bridge and trestle work on the western approach afford the denizens of West Dallas a means of communication with the city during high water. Supplies are transported in skiffs.
     The management of Greenwall's opera house are entitled to the thanks of the theatre-going public for the high class of entertainments this season. Some of the brightest stars in the theatrical and operatic firmament have appeared in Dallas this winter, and they have been well patronized and appreciated.

- March 4, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

CITY COUNCIL MEETING.

     The hospital report submitted by the health officer showed 23 patients admitted during February, 2 died during the month and 20 remained on hand the last day.
     The city marshal reported that 544 electric lights failed to come to time during February.
     A petition was read from the Santa Fe Railway Company asking permission to use brick instead of cement for depot platform, which was referred.
     The question of a garbage furnace then came up. The committee on the location of the furnace reported having selected a site at the foot of Jackson street, between the jail and the river.
     Mr. Louckx would not entertain the proposition to set the furnace up in his ward.
     Mr. Kivlen was in favor of retaining the old dumping grounds and the old way of hauling dead animals and refuse from the city to decompose under the nostrils of the eighth warders and to sweeten the Trinity fluid.
Mr. Cole threatened legal proceedings unless the dumping grounds were discontinued and the whole discussion wound up by discharging the old committee and deciding to appoint a new one.

- March 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

DR. ROBT. H. BLAIR.

     Who has been associated with Dr. Storey in the practice of Dentistry during the past four years, has fitted up elegant rooms in the North Texas National Bank building where he will be pleased to see all his friends and former patrons. Room 301, third floor.

- March 5, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

MONTHLY STATEMENT.
_______

Of the Freight Business Done in
Dallas.

     The following is a statement of the receipts and shipments of freights in carload lots at and from the several railroad depots in the city of Dallas for the month of February, 1889, as compiled by Mr. R. Walton Jacobs, secretary of the Merchants' Exchange:
     Receipts---Wheat 18, flour 3, bran 1, corn 24, oats 23, other grain 18, cotton 66, cotton seed 1, oil cake and cotton seed meal 2, cattle 19, horses and mules 17, hogs 3, sheep 1, lumber and shingles 281, agricultural implements 31, machinery 12, syrups and sugars 9, can goods 2, furniture 6, oil 1, wood 294, posts 49, coal 302, rolled iron 4, other iron produce 34, cement and lime 6, pottery 2, stone 125, miscellaneous building material 31, dry goods 86, groceries 97, household goods 26, miscellaneous 709, hay 74, ice 11, beer 7; total cars 2395.
     Shipments---Flour 17, bran 2, corn 12, oats 4, other grain 10, cotton 43, cotton seed 10, oil cake and cotton seed meal 1, cattle 4, horses and mules 4, hogs 1, lumber and shingles 8, agricultural implements 7, machinery 3, coal 2, brick 2, dry goods 31, groceries 56, household goods 17, miscellaneous 747, ice 2, beer 1; total cars 997.

- March 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE MASTER BUILDERS' EXCHANGE.
_______

The Organization Perfected and a
Constitution Adopted.

     Pursuant to appointment, the master builders of the city met in S. Nelson's office at 700 Main street yesterday afternoon for the purpose of completing the work of organization begun some time ago. A constitution and by-laws, modeled after that of the Philadelphia exchange, was adopted. The exchange proposes to embrace in its membership, builders and contractors and employes of laborers of whatever degree and description. A committee on membership was appointed, and also a committee to secure a suitable hall for the meetings of the exchange. The first named committee will hold a meeting at Mr. Nelson's office this afternoon at 5 o'clock to report progress and for conference.
     One of the prime objects of the exchange, as learned by a reporter to-day in an interview with Mr. Nelson, is an effective combination of the employers of the city against the demands of labor. The labor element of the city is thoroughly organized and the employers perceive the necessity of meeting organization with organization to resist any unjust demands that might be made upon them. At present, employers and employees are in perfect harmony, and the outlook for a continuance of this era of good feeling is good. It was to be prepared for future emergencies that, in part, prompted the formation of the exchange.

- March 6, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

A BOTTOMLESS HOLE.
_______

An Object For the Street Committee
to Gaze Upon.

     A mud hole exists near the intersection of Harwood and San Jacinto. Several parties have examined it and report their belief that the bottom has dropped out of it. Yesterday, a gentleman uninitiated into the ways of the street, drove his buggy into it. The horse went down almost out of sight. The buggy followed with a sudden kerchug, leaving the hind wheels sticking up in the air and its occupant paddling about to keep from sinking into oblivion. The horse waded out dragging the shafts of the vehicle and the gentleman managed to save himself by clinging to fragments of the wreck.
     The placing of a danger signal has been suggested until Alderman Loeb can reach the hole with his street force.

- March 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

NEW ERA FOR NORTH DALLAS.
_______

New Life, New Improvements and
Some of Its Advantages as a Place
of Residence.

     It is desired to be shown to the interesting and home-seeking public, the reasons why the northern portion of the city is the best in which to purchase, viz:
     1. Its natural elevation being greater than that of any other portion of the city, gives every place splendid drainage without artificial means.
     2. From its elevation, one gets commanding views of the city and surrounding country, and for the same reason, one gets a delightful breeze the entire summer.
     3. It lies on the opposite side of the city from the factories, is far removed from all R. R. shops and wagon yards, and is therefore free from dust, smoke, noise of trains, unwholesome odors, usually pertaining to wagon yards, and furthermore, is not encumbered with the class of population that usually settles around such places.
     4. It has a rapid transit line, which makes every portion very accessible and within five or eight minutes' ride of the business portion of the city; besides, the two best pikes in Dallas county lead from the heart of the city northward through this property.
     [5]. It lies between a portion of the city already filled with elegant homes and inhabited by many of our wealthiest and most prosperous citizens, and the North Side Park, a rugged, wooded tract lying on the bluffs north of the city, soon to be improved, as our council have wisely made an appropriation for that purpose. It is easily seen that the intervening property along the avenues leading to the park will be lined with beautiful residences and inhabited by a substantial class of citizens.
     [6]. The approach to this portion of our city is along well paved and popular streets, such as McKinney avenue, Masten, Harwood and Pearl streets, there being no dangerous and offensive places to cut one off from home and from business. There is no heavy mud to render visiting or walking unpleasant, almost impossible in winter, no deep sand, the bane of equestrians, gardeners and housekeepers.

- March 9, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

ATTENTION CONTRACTORS!

     Bids will be received for the moving of the Y. M. H. A. Hall, corner of Jackson and Ervay streets, to the adjoining lot on Jackson street until Friday, March 15. Plans and specifications to be seen at the office of Albert Ullrich, architect.

- March 15, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Court Proceedings.

     Albert Ullrich, architect, filed suit in district court against the Farmers' Alliance Exchange of Texas for foreclosure of laborers lien and to collect $460.19, balance due for services expended in erecting the Alliance exchange building.

- March 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
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Extending San Jacinto.

     Col. Simpson has suspended operations on his new buildings on Sycamore street pending condemnation proceedings involved in the extension of San Jacinto street through to Sycamore. This extension will be sixty feet in length by forty feet wide.

- March 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
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DESTRUCTIVE FIRES.
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A RESIDENCE AND A HOTEL BURNED.
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Narrow Escape of Inmates in Each
Instance---Exciting Times.

     This morning about 2 o'clock, neighbors discovered the two-story, six-room residence of Mr. J. H. York on Polk street almost enveloped in flames. A very high wind was blowing at the time, and the rapidity with which the flames lapped up the dry wooden material with which the building was constructed, was frightful to behold. Mr. York and his family were yet sleeping, .....The watchman at the Howard Oil Mills sent in a general alarm from box 241, calling out the entire fire department....
     The greatest excitement occurred at the fire yesterday morning at 4:30 o'clock which consumed the City Hotel, once a famous bon ton hostelry. N. D. Kyle, the chief cook, who slept in the kitchen, awoke about that hour and his sign met the red glare of the flashing fire fiend, which was rapidly enveloping his sleeping apartments. He proceeded immediately to alarm the guests of whom there were thirty-three in the hotel. A deaf mute was suddenly made aware of an awful impending fate and he was forced to leap from a second story window. While the flames were reaping, roaring and snapping, the crowd below was struck with horror to see Mrs. Bergsland, a lady guest, and her three children, Clarence, Leslie and Sophie, aged respectively, 7, 4 and 2 years, standing on the balcony of the second story crying pitifully for assistance. Obeying commands, the lady gathered her children one by one and dropped them to the ground where they were caught in stout arms outstretched to receive them. At this moment, the hook and ladder company arrive and the lady was carried down in the arms of a brave fireman. These were the last to escape from the burning structure. The fire department went to work at once and soon had the flames under control, saving a portion of the building. Numbers of the guests lost their personal effects, but a large per cent of the hotel furniture was carried out and save. The loss is estimated at $3000, covered by insurance.

- March 17, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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Personal.

     Mrs. W. M. Foute, the brilliant editor of the "Ladies Messenger," a southern woman's journal published in Houston, Texas, is in the city for the purpose of writing it up socially and financially, also to solicit subscribers to her able paper. On the strength of Dallas' hospitable reputation, she is promised a kind welcome.

- March 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
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CITY NEWS.

     Prof. Riek will give a concert on the 11th of April for the benefit of the G. A. R. cemetery, in which it is proposed to erect a handsome monument.

- March 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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A Magazine Enterprise.

     That reflects credit upon the ladies of Dallas, will be brought before the public in a few days. We refer to the magazine about to be launched upon its career by the Woman's Exchange. The untiring Mrs. Grove will be editor in chief, and among the list of contributors will be found names well and favorably known to the reading public. Mrs. Grove, for sometime past, has been "doing" the book review for the Dallas News, for which able service, the New York Sun complimented her last week. All the ladies of the exchange have been very active in soliciting advertisements for their magazine, and their labor has met with great reward, they only ask a continuance of the same kindness from the generous people of Dallas. The magazine will be purely literary in the exclusive sense of that word, containing no housekeeping, nor fashion, departments. It will generally advocate woman as workers in the field of literature, as authors, teachers and journalists.

- March 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
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CITY NEWS.

     It is a noticeable fact that the change in the postoffice location has shifted twice as many pedestrians over on to Main street as traversed this thoroughfare formerly. It is intersting to watch the ever-moving crowds that now file along Main street from the court house to the city limits eastward.

- March 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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East Dallas News.

     Several fine residences are in course of erection on College Hill, near the Episcopal school.
     The stone curbing is being laid in front and west of the public school building on Gaston avenue preparatory to laying the cement pavement. The street west of the school will be a perfect boulevard, the walks being lined with cottonwood, elm and box trees. Col. S. B. Hopkins proposes to have the walks around his residence laid out by the same pattern as those around the school building--that is, in boulevards.

- March 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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ANNEXATION NEWS.
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Senator Kimbrough Introduces a
Bill to Annex East Dallas

     Senator Kimbrough has introduced a bill in the senate annexing East Dallas to the city. The announcement, sudden and unexpected as it was, is somewhat of a surprise, and to none more than to the citizens of East Dallas, many of whom favor annexation. Under the terms of the bill, which was drafted by a prominent citizen of Dallas and an equally representative citizen of East Dallas, the city of Dallas will absorb that burg on the first of next January, obligations, bonds, improvements and all.
     It is doubtful if a more satisfactory plan of annexation could be found in another direction, although the idea of being forced in by the legislature is repulsive to some of the East Dallas people.

- March 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
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[EDITORIAL]

     The TIMES-HERALD approves of the suggestion to name the present city park in honor of that Dallas pioneer who, public-spirited in every enterprise for the good of Dallas, donated the ten acres for the city's first park. Eakins' Park would thus be easily distinguished from the several other new parks now being improved around the city and in contemplation. This---the first one of Dallas' parks---is small, but it is in the heart of the city and its natural beauty and limited area renders it susceptible to a very high state of cultivation. The smallest, it should, by cultivation, be made as beautiful a park garden [as] can be made by skill and art.

- March 29, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
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