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1880
MATTERS BY MAIL.

______

NEWS FROM OUR NEAR NEIGHBORS.
LANCASTER.

Correspondence of the Herald
                                            L
ANCASTER, March 31, 1880.
     Last week, Captain Tuttle, who claimed to be a sea captain, lectured in regard to the open polar sea, magnetic pole, etc., both of which he claims to have seen. After he finished, we concluded that he had run his head against the said pole, and that an electric spark from the same had well nigh deprived him of his wits.-- A literary association called the Lancaster Lyceum has been organized by the young men of our town.-- The Odd Fellows think of celebrating, in some way, the 26th of April, their sixty-first anniversary in the United States.-- No exciting news in regard to the municipal election. Candidates are "as thick as locusts in Egypt." -- Two prominent gentlemen from Kansas are here on business.

- April 2, 1880, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
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1889
LANCASTER'S LOSS.

______

A $75,000 INCENDIARY BLAZE THIS
MORNING AT 4 O'CLOCK.

_______

A List of the Sufferers and the Ex-
tent of Their Loss and Insurance.

     This morning about 4 o'clock, the once flourishing little town of Lancaster in Dallas county, situated about fifteen miles south of this city on the Missouri Pacific railroad, was visited by a very destructive conflagration, involving a loss, according to the best of the TIMES-HERALD's information, of about $75,000.  The fire originated in the office of R. P. Harris, who had an office in the store of Gibson, Lyon & Co., and the time and the circumstances seem to justify the conclusion of our informant that the calamity was the work of an incendiary.  The flames communicated thence to the following store houses and had obtained such an impetus when discovered, as to make extinguishment out of the question until the enormous loss named above had been inflicted by the devouring element.  The following is a list of the sufferers, the amount of their damage and insurance, and making all allowance for errors that may have occurred in transmission by telephone, it is believed to be approximately correct:
     Gibson, Lyon & Co., loss on stock, $12,000; insurance $5000.
     Mrs. Lou White, loss on building occupied by Gibson, Lyon & Co., $2500, partly insured.
     S. T. Barber & Co., loss on stock, $11,000; insurance $2000.
     E. Blakely, loss on building occupied by S. T. Barber & Co., $2500; no insurance.
     Will A. Strain, loss on stock of drugs, $2500; insured.
     C. M. Lyon, loss on building occupied by W. A. Strain; amount not stated.
     W. P. Johnson, grocery, loss $1000, sustained in moving.
     The building occupied by Johnson's grocery was a total loss, amounting to $1500. The hall was used as a lodge for the Odd Fellows and Knights and Ladies of Honor and both societies lost their entire paraphernalia and other effects.
     George & Trigg, butchers, lost about $200 in money.
     W. R. Carter, grocery, loss $250, cause by moving goods.
     Ben Green, loss on building occupied by Carter, $1000.
     Joe Fromlett, shoe shop, loss $150.
     J. P. O'Shannon, confectionery, loss $250.
     Two barber shops, both of which sustained slight losses.
     The roller mills were damaged slightly. No insurance.
     Gibson, Lyon & Co., who were the heaviest losers by the fire, on Friday last, made an assignment for the benefit of creditors.
     While the origin of the fire is unknown, it is believed to be incendiary.
     The particulars as yet received are not sufficient to warrant an estimate of the damage, but the T
IMES-HERALD's informant places the figure at $75,000, which may not be excessive.

- January 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

1890
Real Estate Transfers.

     The following deeds have been filed for record with the county clerk of Dallas county, Aug. 2:

     D. W. Bass and wife to J. H. Hamon, 1-2 block 4, town of Lancaster, $1300.

- August 4, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Real Estate Transfers.

     R. S. Ellis to C. C. Fisher, land near Lancaster, $2870.
     H. C. Rawlins and P. M. Rawlins to C. C. Fisher, land on Ten Mile creek, $160.

- November 1, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Gin Burned.

     Lowry's cotton gin, three miles east of Lancaster, was destroyed by fire last night. No cotton was burned, as the gin had closed down for the season. Fully covered by insurance.

- December 5, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

1891
A WIDE AWAKE TOWN

[Editorial]

     Lancaster is one of the best towns in Dallas county. It is situated in the midst of a beautiful and fertile prairie, and her people are as determined, enterprising and deserving as any in the land. About eighteen years ago, the Central railroad came into north Texas, and, leaving Lancaster just a few miles to the west, started out to build up a new town, Hutchins. Such moves on the part of railroads usually result advantageously for the new town, though disastrously for the old. But, this instance was an exception. The pioneers who settled at Lancaster did so because it was a desirable spot for homes, and they were not to be moved or intimidated. The town stood the growth of Hutchins on the east, Cedar Hill on the northwest and Midlothian on the southwest, itself all the while growing steadily and prospering. A year or so ago, Central Mahomet, after so many years waiting for Mt. Lancaster to come to the railroad, got up and went to the mountain, and Lancaster was connected with the outside world by railroad by telegraph. Later, the Missouri, Kansas and Texas built from Dallas to Lancaster, and on to Waco. So now, Lancaster has two railways, and is improving rapidly.
     Crops are very fine all about the town. Cotton and corn prospect is as good as can be expected, even in so rich a county. Wheat is being harvested and is yielding 18 to 30 bushels per acre. Oats is equally as good.
     Lancaster has formed a school district under the state law, and in addition to its apportionment of the state-free[?] school fund of about $750, the Lancaster school district collects a special school tax of 209 cents on the $100 of taxable property, thus raising their school fund to about $1500--quite sufficient to pay three good teachers for a term of seven and a half months. Each community in Dallas county could follow the example of Lancaster in this respect with advantage to their schools. The old trustees, L. B. Howell, J. H. Moffett and J. H. Ellis, were, on Saturday, re-elected for the next year.
     John W. George, who recently resigned the school trusteeship of the Dallas Tenth ward to return to Lancaster, has bought a half interest in the Lancaster Herald with Mr. Green. Prof. Lyon will be associated with the paper and represent Mr. George, while that gentleman will continue to practice law in Dallas. The two railways have made a low rate for parties doing business in Dallas and desiring to live in Lancaster, and now George goes to his law office on the Missouri, Kansas and Texas at 7:10 in the morning and returns at 7 in the evening, or desiring to come or go between the two places at noon, the Houston and Texas Central accommodates him.
     The Democratic club is increasing in membership and will be in good trim to do efficient service in the county, state and national contest the coming year. Col. J. W. Daniel, a veteran Democrat and former member of the legislature, is president of the club, and has able co-workers in County-Committeeman Miller, L. B. Howell and a score, or so, of other staunch Democrats.

- June 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

PICNIC AT LANCASTER.
_______

By the Young Men of That Town
on Friday Next.

     The young men of Lancaster will have a picnic and barbecue at the picnic grounds north of the town on Friday next. Of course, there will be young ladies present, lots of 'em and fair ones, and elderly ones. But, the speaking will be confined to the young men, and from the selection made by the committee of young men managing, the TIMES-HERALD feels authorized to promise those who accept the invitation to be present, a most interesting and enjoyable day.
     The speakers are Mr. Jno. W. George, W. H. Atwell and J. R. Oeland. The public generally are invited.

- July 22, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

PICNIC AT LANCASTER.
__________

A Most Enjoyable Day--
Speeches and Tour-
nament.

     Yesterday, there was a picnic at Lancaster, under the auspices of the young men of the town. Like about everything else put on foot and engineered by our vigorous young bloods, this festival occasion was a blooming success.
     The picnic was held in the beautiful Ellis Grove, southeast of town, a very appropriate spot---as breezy and pleasant is it was picturesque.
     Mr. Jno. W. George, the popular young lawyer of Lancaster, and ex-school director of the tenth ward, this city, called the gay assemblage to order and in an appropriate speech, bid all enjoy themselves, then introduced Judge E. D. Marshall, who made an interesting talk on a variety of kindred subjects, principally the constitutional amendments, which he hoped would all be adopted next month. Lawyer R. N. Clark, of Dallas, who, by the way, was school teacher in Lancaster ten years ago, was next called, and responded in a pleasant and appropriate speech.
     Dinner was then announced, and a sumptuous repast was spread and partaken of with a zest which was a true indication of hearty appreciation of the skill of Lancaster's good housewives. It was a splendid dinner, and served with genuine hospitality.
     About two o'clock, the tournament took place in an adjacent field, and the skill in horsemanship and handling of the lance there displayed were frequently applauded by the lookers-on.
     Nearby, at the same time, a baseball game was in progress between picked nines from Hutchins and Lancaster, and as the games closed, cheers were sent up for the Hutchins youths.
     Returning to the grove, Mr. Will Attwell, one of the orators of the day, who had just arrived, delivered an appropriate, interesting and really beautiful address. His delivery was excellent, and reference to America and Americans was an intellectual treat and eloquently delivered. Mr. Attwell is a young member of the Dallas bar; he was raised at Hutchins, where his father is yet a prominent merchant, and has but recently graduated in the law at the State University. He has a bright future before him.

- July 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 4.
- o o o -

LANCASTER GROWS.
_______

New Gin--New Brick Building
and Public Hall--Per-
sonal Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     L
ANCASTER, Aug. 5.--Lancaster is determined not to be behind the procession of progress that is being kept up by the cities of prosperous north Texas.
     Moffatt & Brady have completed their gin and are prepared to gin forty bales a day. They have all of the improved appliances, and as they are old gin men, they will do an immense business this fall.
     Mrs. White and her son, Will L., will build immediately, a large two-story brick on the square, the lower floor to be used for mercantile purposes, and the upper floor will be seated and used as a hall for public purposes.
     J. B. Lowery, an old and highly-respected citizen of Dallas county, is lying very low, and gave fears are entertained of his death.
     Mr. H. Taylor, the gentlemanly cashier of the Henry Bank, has returned from a month's visit to Tennessee, greatly improved in health.
     A party of young people, composed of the Misses Moffett, Graham, Nicholson and Green and Messrs. Lindsey and Lavender, visited friends in Hutchins Monday and stayed till Tuesday evening. They report a pleasant time. R
EGULAR.

- August 5, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

POINTS ABOUT LANCASTER.
________

Her Business, Enterprise, Men
and Things Generally.

[By Our Special Traveling Correspondent.]
     The columns of the T
IMES-HERALD have ever been open to anything that would prove an advantage to the cities that are in the swaddling clothes of their commercial growth.
     Lancaster, a solid little city just fourteen miles south of the metropolis, was visited by a T
IMES-HERALD correspondent, with a view of nothing the improvements that were being made, and seeing the genuine growth assumed, thinks it not amiss to give a brief sketch of Lancaster's enterprises, her improvements, and the men who are making them.
     Lancaster has two railroads, giving her competition in freight and passenger traffic, and the time of arrival and departure of trains on both roads makes it convenient for the people there to spend the day in Dallas and the day at home. Being entirely free from malaria, mosquitos and other drawbacks that make life nearly unbearable in a great city, Lancaster is for the people who are too busy to go to the famed watering places, an ideal summer retreat. The citizens of Dallas have shown their appreciation of these advantages by a number of them moving their families down for the summer.
     Pure water in unlimited quantities is found at a depth of from twenty to twenty-five feet, and with the cheapness of property and rents, Lancaster, as a manufacturing center, can hardly be surpassed in north Texas. A number of wealthy farmers are being attracted to Lancaster by the school advantages she will shortly offer. A contract having been let for the erection of a $4000 female institute, the curriculum to embrace music, art and the higher branches. The school site is two acres of a sloping sward near the M., K. & T. railroad, donated by Mrs. Lou White, and the imposing two-story schoolhouse will be a standing advertisement to the city. The board of directors are F. M. White, F. M. Hammond, R. P. Henry, A. H. Rawlins, S. L. Randlett, S. H. Atteberry and W. T. Lavender, with the first three gentlemen as president, secretary and treasurer, respectively. Mrs. White will subdivide her property around the school in lots to be known as the White addition to Lancaster, and a number of the business men of Dallas have signified their intention of moving their families here to live permanently. Each of the orthodox faith have a building, and Lancaster is truly a "city of churches."
     Among the leading enterprises of Lancaster might be mentioned.

THE LANCASTER MILL COMPANY,

of which Mrs. Lou F. White, John S. Beckley and John S. Ellis are the members. The original plant was not a mill, but a carding machine, which was built in 1879, and did a business for a territory seventy-five miles square. It was made a mill during the war and was enlarged and changed to a roller system in 1885. The mill has 150 barrels capacity and is valued at $25,000. With anything like a yield of wheat, the mill runs all the year and pays the stockholders handsome dividends.
     The well known firm of ginners, Moffett & Brady, have just completed a gin with all of the improved appliances. The cost of the entire plant being $10,000. They have a spur of the Central track running near their seed house and have excellent facilities for handling and shipping cotton and seed.
     F. G. Bledsoe of Hutchins, whose father laid out the town site of Lancaster, has a large improved gin plant, and as he is well known to the people of the surrounding country, he will have his share of the patronage.
     First among a city's enterprises, and the meter by which the business and ability of her citizens is gauged, is her newspaper. And, the advertising patronage of the Lancaster Herald speaks volumes for the enterprising merchants whose names are seen weekly in its columns. The Herald was established in the early part of 1873, it being the second county paper published outside of Dallas. Under the management of Messrs. Green and Lyon, the people of Lancaster and vicinity have a paper of which they may well feel proud. One of Lancaster's leading citizens is found in the person of S. L. Randlett, who, though but two years in the place, has, by fair dealing, built up an immense trade. He carries a $10,000 stock of hardware, furniture and undertakers goods, having bought out the Beckley stock on Dallas street. His present quarters are too small, and in the event of the White building being erected, will occupy the entire lower floor.
     S. H. Atteberry was raised three miles west of Lancaster. Has been in business four years. He carries a large stock of groceries, boots, shoes and farming implements. Is a young man of business qualities, and has a large trade.
     J. H. Moffett has been in business for twenty-five years and is the nestor of business men in Lancaster. Has a large stock of general merchandise and is too well known for further comment.
     F. M. Hammond came to Lancaster two years ago, and by persistent advertisement and business tact, has built up a large trade. He carries a stock valued at from fifteen to twenty thousand dollars.
     N. B. Johnson is another one of the leading merchants of Lancaster. He carries a heavy stock of dry goods and groceries and has a large patronage.
     Coolidge Bros. have been in this city fifteen years, eight years of which, they have been in business. Carry an assorted stock consisting of dry goods, groceries, hardware, implements, saddles, harness and buggies, valued at about $12,000.
     J. B. Fitzpatrick has the only exclusive grocery house in Lancaster. Has been here five years, and has a good trade.
     H. F. Hood bought out Shannon Bros. ten months ago. He has a new stock of groceries, queensware and implements, and is doing well.
     E. T. King, the jeweler, has been with the people of Lancaster for seventeen years. He served as mayor three terms, and is deservedly popular. Has a paying business.
     Joe Fromlet, the shoemaker, has occupied the stool in Lancaster for fifteen years.
     A. L. Curry, the postmaster, has a fruit and stationery store in the same building with the office. He came here in 1885 and is doing well.
     There are two saloons in Lancaster that are conducted in a quiet, orderly way. They are owned by Mr. J. Brock and E. M. Curry.
     L. B. Howell is the saddle and harness repairer of the town. Is well known and well patronized.
     Waters and Parks have a clean, well appointed meat market, where the fattest meats are always kept.
     E. A. Dean, the village smith, has been shoeing and repairing in Lancaster for 21 years. He keeps two assistants and they are always busy.
     C. M. Murphy, the genial "Frenchman," walked to Lancaster ten years ago from the west. He is all right now and has all he can do.
     Mrs. Gregory and Miss Taylor have a large millinery establishment. They are always busy, and have a paying business.
     D. L. Groghnor, the "marble man," has been in Lancaster two years and supplies the surrounding country with his goods.
     R. P. Henry, the banker, came to this county in 1855 with his parents, who were members of the French colony, who settled up the river from Dallas. They came from Houston in an ox wagon and were thirty days making the trip.
     He now owns several black land farms, and with his bank at Lancaster, his stock in the leading Dallas bank and the business property he owns in the latter place, he is not affected materially by the hard times.
     The livery stable business is well represented in Lancaster. Peacock & Guy owning a large, well kept stable with a number of fine teams and buggies.
     Strain Bros. have a nice drug store which they started in 1884. They have a large, clean stock, are popular and well patronized.
     W. P. Johnson has the other drug store. He is an old residenter, having formerly been in the grocery business. Has a large and assorted stock and a good trade.
     B. F. Johnson has a large stock of stoves and tinware. Eight years in Lancaster has built him up a good trade.
     H. Brundage has a fancy grocery, confectionery, book and news stand. He was raised near Lancaster and has been in business in the city six years.
     In the way of hotels, Lancaster is above the average town, having three well kept, airy hotels. The Lott House, the Carnes House and the select boarding house kept by Mrs. Head. Lancaster has her quota of competent physicians, who practice over a large territory.
     A number of residences are being improved and A. H. Rawlins is building a dwelling house, to cost $3000.
     Lancaster is blessed with law-abiding citizens, who, just now, have combined their energies for the general upbuilding of their town. With select society and the various advantages mentioned in the preceding lines, Lancaster is one of the most desirable little cities in all North Texas in which to live.

- August 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

A Golden Wedding.

     Uncle Charlie Barnard, who lives near Lancaster, will celebrate his golden wedding next Saturday night. He came to Dallas county in 1847, and settled on the place where he now lives. His children and grand children have grown up around him there and the old pioneer is young and spry yet.

- September 1, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

Real Estate Transfers.

     Mrs. Lou F. White to Lancaster Female Institute, all of Mrs. Lou F. White's addition to the town of Lancaster, $10.

- September 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE "DRYS" WIN.
________

Result of the Election at Lan-
caster.

     The local option election in Lancaster yesterday went off very quietly.
     There were 131 votes cast, 83 for and 48 against local option.
     The edict has gone forth that the Lancaster boys must go elsewhere for their firewater and bartenders must seek fields anew.

- September 9, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

CONDENSED TELEGRAMS.

     The gin of Brady & Moffett at Lancaster, was destroyed by fire last night. Loss, $16,000. One hundred and thirty tons of seed cotton were destroyed. R. S. Henry lost 100 bales of cotton.

- September 25, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Lancaster Items.
[From the Weekly Herald.]

     W. P. White's gin at Wilmer had, at 4 o'clock last Saturday evening, ginned 469 bales of cotton this season.
     W. F. Ellis has sold his interest in the old home place, the T. M. Ellis farm, to his sister, Mrs. Lou F. White.
     Jerry White has sold his interest in the Jodie White farm, two and one-half miles north from Lancaster, to J. R. Rodgers, for $2250. Mr. White thinks of moving to Western Texas.
     Mr. Couch, who lives at Couch Springs, near Red Oak, is remodeling the old Couch house that was built 38 years ago. He finds the sleepers in good condition.
     T. A. Murphy informs us that he will raise five more bales of cotton than he expected two months ago. Would that all our farmers could be so agreeably disappointed.
     There was a good audience at the temperance meeting at Duncanville last Saturday night, and about fifty persons signed the pledge and joined the R. L. B.
     Miss Maggie Davis has returned from an extended visit to Clarendon, in the Panhandle. She expresses herself as delighted with her trip and with the country.
     J. M. Peterson of Bear creek is still ahead on fine potatos. He, up to date, carried the blue ribbon. He has, this week, presented the Herald office with two specimens which, together, weight seven pounds. Can our East Texas correspondent beat this?
     Robert Nix, the 14-year-old son of R. E. Nix, recently picked 330 pounds of cotton in one day. On the same day, his brother, Henry, who is 15 years old, picked 410 pounds. A pretty good showing for boys.
     A. B. Rawlins and family, late of Hutchins, are now residents of our city. They are occupying the residence recently occupied by A. H. Rawlins, and which, we learn, Mr. A. B. Rawlins has purchased. We give the newcomers a cordial welcome into our little city. We have room for scores more of such excellent citizens.
     We add the following names and amounts to our cotton-picking list: John Smith, 422 pounds; Quint Hall, 200 pounds with one hand, the other being crippled; Frank Bell, an 8-year-old boy, picked 200 pounds and threw at every bird that flew over the cotton patch; Albert Bell, an 8-year-old boy, picked 125 pounds. These amounts represent one day's work.

- October 2, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

LANCASTER AND LOCALITY
_______

Gossip Gleanings From the
Lively Herald.

     Ex-Sheriff Pat Garrett, who killed the noted "Billy the Kid," in New Mexico, is the guest of Lancaster friends.
     Miss Laura Perry has gone to Indianapolis for medical treatment.
     Rev. R. L. Kirkland was severely stung by honey bees recently.
     A row at the Curry saloon between Bob and "Babe" Austin and Sherman Hoops, resulted disastrous to the latter.
     Mrs. Jane Whisand[?] died suddenly early in the week, leaving a husband and several children and large circle of friends to mourn her loss.
     Thieves entered the residence of Oloof Anderson during absence of inmates and secured $20.
     G. R. Claycom, while superintending a gin, had the thumb of his right hand severely crushed. Caught in a cog.
     Prof. J. V. George, of Dallas, is teaching dancing lessons to the young society people.
     Mrs. Emma Reynolds, of Vicksburg, Miss., and Miss Lizzie Reynolds, of Dallas, visited Mr. and Mrs. James A. Boyd, their relatives, last week.

- November 14, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p.5, col. 4.
- o o o -

1892
THE COURTS.

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     Lucy J. Everts to L. A. Wrsery, lot in Lancaster, $39.
     L. A. Wrsery to E. D. Brooks, lot in Lancaster, $150.
     B. W. Owens to Area A. Brooks, property near Lancaster, $500.

- May 4, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

[Editorial]

     LANCASTER, while taking an active interest in politics, is progressive in other respects. Last fall, several handsome brick buildings, including a spacious public hall, well furnished and seated, were erected, and now, there are other two-story brick buildings and a fine gin, with a number of new residences going up. Evidences of prosperity abound there on every hand.

- May 5, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Prof. Lyon of Waxahachie, formerly of the Lancaster Herald, is in the city to-day.

- August 20, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

LOVE'S YOUNG DREAM.
______

A Lancaster Couple Quietly Slip
Away.

     Mr. James Batcheler of Lancaster was in the city to-day. Mr. Batcheler has a beautiful 17-year-old daughter. John Winniford, a popular young gentleman of Lancaster, has been paying attention to Miss Batcheler and won her heart and also her hand. Last night, they boarded the south-bound train at Lancaster, and ere this have been made man and wife by some obliging man of God or a good-natured squire. Mr. Batcheler came to Dallas to ascertain if the elopers had come to this city, but was informed by a friend that they had gone in another direction. The lovers are popular young people in Lancaster society.

- November 25, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

LANCASTER DEMOCRATS.
________

Celebrated the Election in
Grand Style.

                                               LANCASTER, Tex., Nov. 16.
     T
O THE TIMES-HERALD: -- The Democrats of Lancaster celebrated the election of Grover Cleveland in great style last night.
     The exercises began with a grand torchlight procession in which were first two wagons loaded with ladies dressed in white, representing the Democratic states, next, two wagons with ladies dressed black, representing the Republican states, and these followed by an old wagon with representatives of the four Third party states. Then, a long procession of horse and footmen. The procession stopped in the public square where floated at the top of a new seventy-five foot pole, a brand new United States flag, made yesterday by the ladies of the town.
     The whole town and surrounding country turned out and had a most excellent time. Music was furnished by the Lancaster band. Everything passed off pleasantly, and the best of good feeling prevailed.

- November 16, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Lancaster News.
[From the Herald.]

     Mrs. S. A. Dow, aged 86 years, mother of Mrs. Sarah Parsons, met with a very serious accident last Monday evening about 7 o'clock. While walking on the front porch, she made a misstep and fell, breaking her right thigh. Dr. McCurdy is waiting on her. The porch is not a foot above the ground, but Mrs. Dow being a large woman, and her extreme age, caused the bone to break. She was resting some easier yesterday.
     Mr. N. B. Johnson has shipped, since our last report from him, 265 bales of cotton.
     Lancaster's gins had turned out, up to early Wednesday morning, 3572 bales of cotton. Shipments, 3763.

- November 25, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

LOVE'S YOUNG DREAM.
______

A Lancaster Couple Quietly Slip
Away.

     Mr. James Batcheler of Lancaster was in the city to-day. Mr. Batcheler has a beautiful 17-year-old daughter. John Winniford, a popular young gentleman of Lancaster, has been paying attention to Miss Batcheler and won her heart and also her hand. Last night, they boarded the south-bound train at Lancaster, and ere this have been made man and wife by some obliging man of God or a good-natured squire. Mr. Batcheler came to Dallas to ascertain if the elopers had come to this city, but was informed by a friend that they had gone in another direction. The lovers are popular young people in Lancaster society.

- November 25, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Personal.

     Editor Joe Green of the Lancaster Herald, is an applicant for the post office at that place.

- November 28, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

1893
Added February 10, 2004:
CITY NOTES.

     The Dallas Wheel Club made a run to Lancaster yesterday afternoon, making the run there and back in three hours and seventeen minutes. The roads are in a deplorable condition in spots.

- January 16, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added February 9, 2004:
PERSONAL.

     Will Perry of Lancaster, who has just recovered from a two month's siege of sickness, is in the city.

- January 20, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     Solomon Brundage's residence, two miles west of Lancaster, was burned yesterday morning. Friends arrived in time to save most of the furniture. The family were not at home. The fire originated in the smokehouse, where they were smoking meat.

- February 21, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

Real Estate Transfers.

     A. M. Halter and wife to J. M. Griffith, lot 2, block 14, Lancaster, $550.

- February 24, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Added February 14, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

The following real estate transfers were recorded to-day:

     J. H. Peacock to W. P. and J. W. Cootidge [Coolidge?], release of vendor's lien, lot 1, block 1, in Lancaster.

- May 28, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 5.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     J. A. Boyd has taken charge of the Lancaster postoffice.

- June 5, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

PERSONAL.

     A. H. Curry, who recently retired from the postmastership at Lancaster, after a most acceptable reign, is in the city to-day. Mr. Curry did not want to be removed. On the 4th day of last March, he resigned.

- June 12, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added February 8, 2004:
Real Estate Transfers.

     Lon F. White, John S. Beckley and J. T. Ellis to Lancaster Roller Mills Company, lots 1,2,3 and 4, block 16, consideration, 197 shares in the mills.

- July 1, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

ARRESTED AT LANCASTER.
_______

J. H. Daniels Held on a Serious Ac-
cusation.

     The Fort Worth Gazette of this date has the following: "Yesterday, Deputy Sheriff Young went to Lancaster, where he arrested a young man named J. H. Daniels on a charge of seduction. From all that can be learned about the case, it appears that he became acquainted with a young woman named Mina McKill, who was employed in one of the stores of the city as a clerk, and that he pressed his suit ardently, finally seducing her under the promise of marriage. Believing in his fidelity, she yielded her virtue, and in due course of time, became a mother. Some letters of Daniels allude to the promise of marriage he had made. It is said, however, that since the birth of the child, she has been known in Dallas as Daniels' wife. Daniels is in jail."

- August 22, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Added January 26, 2004:
Real Estate Transfers.

     S. J. Beaver et al. to E. S. Guy, lot in Lancaster, $60.

- September 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

COLD WATER PEOPLE.
_______

A Local Option Election Ordered at
Lancaster.

     The local option people in the county are in the saddle and pushing things. They have carried several elections of late, and yesterday afternoon, secured an order from the commissioners' court for an election in Lancaster on November 4.

- October 12, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

1894
Added January 19, 2004:
Dallas Horse Interests.

     The matter of standard bred horses seems to have taken a deep hold on many of the progressive men of Dallas. The initiative steps taken by Henry Exall, at Lomo Alto Farm, have been productive of much good. Dallas is now heard from on the turf in a very commendable manner, and it will be only a short time until we will hear from Lena Hill, Judge Hurt and Nannie E., the famous horses in the string of Col. W. M. C. Hill. Then, Col. Morrow, the well-known attorney, has a side issue in the shape of a magnificent stock farm near Lancaster, in this county, which holds some of the finest bred horses in the country. It will be only a short time until winter racing in Dallas will be inaugurated by those who carry on that business in the North, but who find all the advantages of a mild and genial climate here.

- June 5, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

LANCASTER NOTES.

Special to the Times Herald.
     L
ANCASTER, July 31. -- F. M. Hammon and family have moved into their new home.
     The new brick business house of Johnson & Howell is complete.
     Work is progressing nicely on Coolidge Bros.' brick building.
     Peacock & Guy have sold their livery stable to Fox Taylor, of Henrietta, who will make Lancaster his home.
     The people of Lancaster are making preparation for a grand time at the Old Settlers' reunion.
     The protracted meeting at the Christian church, conducted by the Rev. Sanders, is well attended.

- July 31, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     R. R. Henry and wife to J. E. Ellis and wife, July 29, 1893, part of block 4, of Lancaster, Texas, $1,000.

- August 15, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

Real Estate Transfers.

     L. B. Howell and wife to H. O. Rawlins et al., July 19, 1893, part of R. Rawlin's survey in Lancaster, $500.

- August 22, 1894, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added February 21, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     M. E. Hammond to F. M. Hammond, April 22, 1894, 90x100 feet in town of Lancaster, $135.

- September 14, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

GOT INTO A HOT BOX.
______

Arrested at San Antonio and Now in
the County Jail.

     A. H. Curry, ex-postmaster at Lancaster, Tex., indicted by the Grand Jury, was brought to Dallas from San Antonio and placed in jail last Saturday, where he still remains, as he has not been able to furnish bond. The indictment charges Curry with having disposed of consigned goods, which were consigned to him sometime in 1893.
     "The consignment law," said a Dallas merchant, "is a good thing for honest merchants and other men who mean well, as it protects the manufacturer, jobber and retailer, but it is serious with the consignee if he fails to account for the goods or their proceeds. It is one of the best laws on the Texas statute books, and several other States have adopted laws modeled after it."

- October 3, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added February 29, 2004:
FIRE AT LANCASTER.

_____

Several Business Houses Burned with
No Insurance.

     A fire at Lancaster Wednesday night, destroyed Parks' saddle shop, Will Boman's barber ship and Mrs. Anna Moffat's frame building, in which there was a tin ship, grocery and millinery store.
     Most of the contents of the buildings were saved by the heroic efforts of citizens. There was no insurance on any of the property involved.

- October 19, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 5.
- o o o -

Added March 6, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     J. R. Evans to A. M. George, November 6, 1893, 2 acres in the town of Lancaster, $150.

- November 13, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added March 10, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     H. F. Hood and wife to F. M. Hammond, Oct. 31, 1894[?], lots 3 and 4, block 20, of Lancaster, $795[?].

- November 30, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added March 11, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Releases.

     R. P. Henry to Thomas White, Dec. 4, 1894, 3 acres of land on Lancaster road.

- December 6, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

LANCASTER'S LODGE.
________

Twenty-four K. of P.'s in that
City.

     About seventy members of Columbian Lodge No. 160, K. of P., went to Lancaster Saturday night as visitors at the institution of Equity lodges No. 218 in that city. There were also about 100 visitors present from Palmer and Waxahachie.
     After the lodge had been duly instituted, a wine supper was partaken of. This lasted until 8 a. m.

- December 17, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Added March 16, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Releases.

     F. M. White to T. G. Judah, June 18, 1894, lot 7, block 1, of Lancaster.

- December 21, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1-2.
- o o o -



1895
Added March 17, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     T. J. Beasley and wife to J. G. Moore, May 28, 1887, part of block 13[?] of Lancaster, $150.
     W. E. Clark to J. E. Moore, June 26, 1893, lot 3[?], block 1 of Lancaster, $150.[?]

Releases.

     W. E. Clark to J. E. Moore, October 27, 1894, South 1/2 of lot 3, block 1, of Lancaster.

- January 1, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2-3.
- o o o -

Added March 20, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     J. H. Moffett and wife to B. W. and J. T. McCarty, October 13, 1894, lot in Lancaster, $800.
     J. D. Scott and wife to B. W. and J. T. McCarty, December 4, 1894, part of block 1, of Lancaster, $200.

- January 15, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Added March 27, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Releases.

     W. I. Addison to McCarty Bros., January 25, 1895, lot in town of Lancaster.

- January 30, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 6.
- o o o -

Added March 31, 2004:
CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Dave Waters was tried in the County Court to-day for violating the local option law at Lancaster, and acquitted. Richard Shultzer is on trial this afternoon for selling liquor to a minor in Dallas.

- February 20, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6.
- o o o -

Added April 10, 2004:
Case of Smallpox Near Lancaster.

     LANCASTER, Tex., March 5. -- There was considerable excitement here when the report came in that there was a case of smallpox near here. A doctor was called to see Frank Ayee, who lives four miles southwest of Lancaster, and he, at once, pronounced it smallpox.

- March 5, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added April 12, 2004:
CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Mrs. Agee, wife of the smallpox patient, who has been under quarantine near Lancaster, has varioloid, according to County Health Officer Newsom.

- March 16, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Added April 13, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Releases.

     N. B. Daily to George W. Owens, March 20, 1895, lot in town of Lancaster.

- March 22, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added April 18, 2004:
CITY NEWS NOTES.

     It was the wife of a Lancaster merchant, instead of that of an Oak Cliff merchant, who ran way with a gasolene stove man from Dallas yesterday morning. They were overtaken in Oak Cliff.

- March 28, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6-7.
- o o o -

Added April 18, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     G. A. Nance et al. to J. B. Cathy, Dec. 17, 1894, part of C. Park's survey.
     A. L. Perry et al. to W. A. Strain, May 25, 1893, part of J. McMillan and T. M. Ellis survey.
     Mary A. Green et al. to W. A. Strain, January 17, 1893, part of J. McMillan and T. M. Ellis survey, $293.
     P. Knight et al. to W. A. Strain, August 22, 1894, part of T. M. Ellis survey, $500.
     F. F. Foust et al. to P. King et al., October 21, 1890, part of T. M. Ellis survey, $500.
     Lou F. White to W. A. Strain, March 27, 1895, part of T. M. Ellis survey, $2691.
     J. T. Ellis to W. A. Strain, June 6, 1893, part of J. McMillan and T. M. Ellis survey, $2375.

Trust Deeds.

     W. A. Strain and wife to B. W. Owens, March 26, 1895, lot in Lancaster, $1000.

Releases.

     J. T. Ellis to W. A. Strain, March 26, 1895, part of J. McMillan and T. M. Ellis survey.
     J. Herring to E. W. Shepherd, March 18, 1895, part of D. C. Herring survey.
     J. J. Chastain to G. A. Nance, February 24, 1893, part of C. Parks survey.

- March 28, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1-3.
- o o o -

Added April 19, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     Anna Moffatt et al. to W. G. Howell, March 18, 1895, lotsin Lancaster, $1000.

- April 2, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

Added April 22, 2004:
LANCASTER BORES
FOR ARTESIAN WATER.

_____

A Clear Water Contest Between That
Town and Ferris.

     Joe Green, editor of the Lancaster Herald, is in the city to get orators for a public meeting to be held in his town Wednesday night.
     Lancaster is trying to raise $10,000, with which to bore an artesian well and build water works. So far, $1500 has been subscribed and Mr. Green believes there is no doubt, but the rest will be subscribed.
     Ferris, the rival of Lancaster, has an artesian well and water works and supplies the people with water at $1 per month.
     Mr. Green says Lancaster does double the business that Ferris does, and that the town will go broke or get a better water supply than Ferris has.

- April 9, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 3.
- o o o -

Added May 5, 2004:
LANCASTER WISHES
WATER AND ICE.

______

A Rattling Good Little Town in Dal-
las County.

     W. T. Lavender, of Lancaster, is in the city to-day. He says a mass meeting was held in his town last Wednesday night for the purpose of raising money to bore an artesian well and put in waterworks and an ice factory.
     The people at the meeting subscribed something over $5000, and adjourned to meet one night next week, when it will be definitely settled whether or not they can raise the $10,000 or $12,000 required.
     Lancaster was incorporated several years ago under the 1000 population law. Since then, there have been several hundred additions to the population.
     Last season, Lancaster received over 13,000 bales of cotton.

- April 13, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

Added May 7, 2004:
LANCASTER ON
A JUMBO BOOM.

______

To Have Artesian Water, a Cotton Com-
press and a New Newspaper.

     Joe Green, of the Lancaster Herald, says subscriptions to the artesian well and waterworks stocks now foot up $6500, and that a mass meeting will be held to-morrow night to raise the remaining $500 and to advertise for bids to bore the well and construct the waterworks.
     Mr. Green says a Galveston firm is about to begin work at Lancaster on a gin-compress to cost between $20,000 and $30,000, and also on an oil mill.
     But, the best evidence of the prosperity of Lancaster, Mr. Green believes, is visible in the fact that another newspaper is to be started by Messrs. Curtis & Dun, the former, a school teacher and the latter, a young farmer. It is to be called the Advance.

- April 24, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added May 12, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Deeds.

     George W. Owens & Co. to E. H. Pardee, April 17, 1895, lot in Lancaster, $10.

- May 1, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added May 23, 2004:
CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Mr. J. R. Lancaster and wife celebrated their golden wedding yesterday at the home of Rev. R. H. H. Burnett, in Oak Cliff. Four children and sixteen grandchildren were present, besides a large number of relatives and friends. Mr. and Mrs. Lancaster were married in Shelby county, Kentucky, May 15, 1845, and came to Texas in 1860 from Missouri. An unusual feature of the occasion was the presence of two half sisters of Mrs. Lancaster, and a cousin, who were present at the wedding fifty years ago. The town of Lancaster, in this county, was named for Mr. Lancaster.

- May 16, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

LANCASTER'S WELL.
_______

That Enterprising Town Going After
Hot Water.

     The city of Lancaster has struck a copious flow of artesian water at a depth of 800 feet, but will stop this flow and go after the warm water that Waco and Marlin have struck.
     Mr. W. E. Parry, commenting on the pluck of Lancaster, said:
     "If small towns like Marlin and Lancaster muster up the enterprise to bring to the surface this hot water for the healing of the people, it does appear that some individual or firm in Dallas would bore a well as a business enterprise. I am told that this hot water has all the medicinal and healing properties of the waters of the famous Arkansas springs, and a bath house in Dallas supplied with this hot water from the middle kettle could readily sell all the baths it could furnish at 50 cents or $1 per bath."

- August 8, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

FIRST BALES.
_______

Lancaster and Mesquite Both Beat Gar-
land.

     R. S. Kimbrough of Mesquite, who is in the city to-day, says the first bale of cotton was received in that town last Monday. It was raised by Chas. Boschardt, a few miles south of Mesquite and bought by S. M. McKane at 7 cents. It was strict middling and the bale weighed 425 pounds. Mr. Borchardt received a premium of $20 in addition to the regular market price of his cotton.

_____

     Last Saturday, Lancaster received the first bale, which was raised by J. L. Oliver on W. T. Lavendar's farm. The bale weighed 1756 pounds in the seed. It was bought by Johnson & Weatherbys at 8 1/2 cents. Mr. Oliver also received a premium of $7.50.

- August 23, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added August 6, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     Mrs. Anderson Gregory Barbour to N. B. Dailey, part of lot 4, block 4, Lancaster; $1800.

- October 9, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

1896
Added June 16, 2004:
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

     The following real estate conveyances were recorded yesterday:
E. S. Guy to R. P. Henry, 396 acres out of Arthur Eldridge survey, $833.

- January 3, 1896, The Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added June 14, 2004:
Real Estate Transfers.

     The following real estate transfers were recorded yesterday:

     J. W. Bogar and wife to Phil G. Deane, 92x170 feet, block 6, Lancaster, $140.

- January 10, 1896, The Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 7.
- o o o -

Added June 14, 2004:
Real Estate Transfers.

     The following real estate transfers were recorded yesterday:

     E. Beckley and wife to Mrs. L. F. White, lots 7 and 8, block 4, Lancaster, $800.

- January 11, 1896, The Dallas Morning News, p. 12, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added June 14, 2004:
Real Estate Transfers.

     The following real estate transfers were recorded yesterday:

     R. P. Henry to W. W. Mitchell, lot 2, block 2, Coolidge addition to Lancaster, $825.

- January 12, 1896, The Dallas Morning News, p. 20, col. 4.
- o o o -

Added June 16, 2004:
A SUICIDE.
______

New Year Pranks -- The Status of the Cotton
Yield.

     Lancaster, Tex., Jan. 3. -- This evening at 5 o'clock, M. J. Moore, better known as Long Moore, was found dead in bed at Bartholome's restaurant with a two-ounce empty bottle on a table beside him, which had contained laudanum. He was a carpenter by trade and had a family. He had been drinking for several days, and yesterday evening, he went to the restaurant and asked for a bed. He was called for dinner, but remarked that he did not want any. About 7 [4?] o'clock this evening, he was breathing hard, but no notice was taken of it, and at 5 o'clock, he was dead. Mayor E. T. King held an inquest with a jury and returned a verdict of suicide.
     New Year's eve, while the boys were shooting anvils and ringing the bells for the New Yera, some one threw a stick of dynamite in front of the postoffice, tearing up the porch and the front glass, and damaging two or three other buildings by breaking glass doors and windows.
     Cotton is about all ginned. Total shipments this seasion, 3645 bales, last season, 11,800. There is none in the hands of farmers or merchants to amount to anything.

- January 3, 1896, The Dallas Morning News, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     A. D. Dean to B. Howell, lot 3, block 1, town of Lancaster, $215.75.

-October 8, 1896, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

Real estate transfers recorded at the close of the office Saturday:
F. G. Bledsoe and wife to F. G. Ham, land in town of Lancaster, formerly occupied by the gin house of W. T. Nance; $250.

- December 27, 1896, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 13, col. 7.
- o o o -

1897
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

Realty transaction recorded to date:

     W. F. Hearn and wife to F. E. Watts, a part of Busley's addition to town of Lancaster, $512.50.

- April 27, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

CATTLE THEFT.
______

Shep Hall Arrested on Three
Counts of Stealing.

     Deputy Sheriff Lon Ledbetter, last night, arrested Shep Hall of Lancaster, on three cases of cattle theft, and lodged him in jail. Mrs. Hall is there to-day, endeavoring to make bond for her husband.
     Hall made several attempts to do a retail liquor business in Lancaster after that town had voted local option. Several indictments were returned against him and he was convicted and confined a long time in jail.

- June 23, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

1898
CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Joe Green, editor of the Lancaster Herald, was in the city to-day. He reports that ground has been broken for the Randolph college buildings, which are to be ready for occupancy by September 1. Four building will be required; a college building, a home for the boys, a home for the girls and a home for teachers and professors. The total cost will be $14,000.

April 11, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

[LOCAL NOTES]

     Joe Green, of Lancaster, says this paper misquoted him yesterday in saying ground had been broken for the college, what he said was that ground had been staked off. Instead of a fourth building for teachers, he said the teachers would build "residences."

- April 13, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 6.
- o o o -


1911
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     C. N. Watts and wife to R. P. Henry, part block 18, Beesley addition, Lancaster; $800.

- October 5, 1911, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.

     J. H. Peacock to Anthony and Albert Haley, part block 61, Lancaster, $1000.

- November 4, 1911, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 12, col. 4.
- o o o -

1914
Odd Fellows Plan
Big Joint Picnic

     The Odd Fellows of Dallas and Rockwall counties will hold their annual picnic this year at Rawlins grove, Lancaster, Tuesday, Aug. 25. The occasion is of special interest this year, inasmuch as it celebrates the thirty-ninth anniversary of the institution of Odd Fellows' lodge at Lancaster. Facilities will be provided to entertain all Odd Fellows and their families who can make it possible to attend. The boys' band and the girls' orchestra from the Odd Fellows' orphan home Corsicana will be the guests of the Lancaster lodge, and the Dallas and Rockwall Counties association, which will hold its annual session in connection with this meeting.
     This is the first time that this musical organization from the home has been the guests of the county association, and the Odd Fellows are planning to show in a special way their appreciation of their visit. Grand Master Francis of Fort Worth and the Honorable Barry Miller of Dallas will make addresses. The program follows:
     Invocation, Chaplain J. M. Wallace.
     Music, boys' band, orphans' home.
     Welcome address, S. L. Randlett.
     Response, J. D. Cochran, president district association.
     Music, girls' orchestra, orphans' home.
     Address, W. R. Francis, grand master.
     Address, president Rebekeh [Rebekah] assembly.
     Music, boys' band.
     Address, Hon. Barry Miller.
     Music, girls' orchestra.

- August 19, 1914, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 5.
- o o o -

1930
Fire Destroys Bridge

     A bridge over Ten-Mile creek, a short distance south of Lancaster cemetery, was destroyed by fire Monday night, it was reported at the courthouse Saturday by Sam Pulliam, road building contractor. Mr. Pulliam said the wooden portion of the bridge was entirely consumed by the blaze and that the steel framework collapsed and fell into the creek. Origin of the fire was not learned.

- August 2, 1930, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

1937
Old-Time School
To Be Revived in
Lancaster Play

     Lancaster, Tex., Mary 26 (Special). -- Mrs. S. N. Parks will portray an old-fashioned school at the auditorium on Friday night, April 9, using as a background, the first school in Lancaster, taught by Miss Virginia Bledsoe in 1846. The older citizens of the town will be the characters. In connection, Mrs. Parks will give a word lecture on education in Texas, from the time of the opening of the first school, to the present.
     In contrast, the present-day school will be depicted by pupils of the grammar school, some of the these grandchildren of those appearing in the old-fashioned school scene.
     Music for the evening will be furnished by the Lancaster and Wilmer-Hutchins school bands.

- March 26, 1937, Dallas Daily Times Herald,
Sec. II, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

1956
Added June 11, 2004:
Filgo Ranch Home
Damaged by Blaze

     The roof and interior of the 14-room frame home of Mrs. Ruby Filgo, on the Filgo Ranch, 1 1/2 miles west of Lancaster, was damaged by fire Monday.
     Deputy Sheriff J. R. Phemister said the fire apparently started from inside the attic around the chimney of a wood-burning fireplace. Damage to the interior was mostly from water.
     Two engines from the Lancaster Fire Department answered the alarm. No immediate monetary loss estimate was available.

- January 10, 1956, The Dallas Morning News, Sec. I, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -