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(Updated June 14, 2004)

 
1880
Insane on a Tender Subject.

     Felix Chenault, son of Judge Chenault, a well-known resident of this county, was, on yesterday, removed from his home in the White Rock neighborhood, to the insane asylum. This sad step was rendered necessary by the increasing mental aberration of the young man, who, two years ago, at thirty-one years of age, had formed an attachment for one of the fair sex, that, from some cause, proved too intense a strain for his mind to bear. Since the first manifestation of his insanity, Mr. Chenault has grown gradually worse, and his condition finally became so painful that his closer confinement became necessary.

- April 1, 1880, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

1886
[No Heading]

     Mrs. Fromleth turns up again with a charge of assault and battery against Frank Peterman. Why don't the authorities send the woman to the lunatic asylum? A jury has decided her to be insane, and she has, on an average, a case a week in some one of the courts.

- November 13, 1886, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

No Heading.

     Peter Johnson, who was adjudged insane a short time since, was taken to the asylum yesterday.

- December 15, 1886, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -


1887
A Sad Case of Insanity.

     J. F. Merryfield, conveyed to Terrell. One of Dallas county's good citizens; real and personal property worth $10,000.

- January 28, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

County Court.
     Wm. Whitney was adjudged insane to-day.

February 19, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8
- o o o -

County Court.

     George Berry, living about two miles from Haught's Store this county, is in custody at the instance of his wife, charged with insanity. The case will be tried Saturday.

- February 24, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8
- o o o -

Insanity Case.

     George Berry insanity case dismissed...jury rendered a verdict of harmless insanity and the judge discharged him.

- February 26, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1
- o o o -

Gone Mad.

     G. W. Hayden was arrested, charged with being insane. He was tried by a jury this forenoon. The verdict was that it was not necessary to place him under restraint, and he was discharged.
     About 12 o'clock, he made a raid upon a fruit stand on East Main street, and was in the act of doing damage to a child when he was driven off by parties. A deputy sheriff and a policeman got on his trail and soon overtook him. He was cutting all kinds of capers and throwing kisses at every lady he met. The officers arrived in time to prevent any damage.
     Hayden's wife, in her testimony this morning, said he was out of humor last night and made some trouble, but she didn't think he was insane, and was not afraid of him, but there can be no doubt on the question now. Hayden is insane.
     He is the man who had the two dogs on exhibition minus their two fore legs.

- March 8, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1
- o o o -

The Courts.

In Which Divorces, Damages, Insanity and Debt Figure Quite Prominently. 

     There were one or two minor cases disposed of in the county court, besides the insane case of G. W. Haden, which is to be tried again this afternoon.

 - March 8, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 4
- o o o -

[No Heading?]

     Sheriff Lewis has taken Hayden, the man who was adjudged insane yesterday, to the asylum at Terrell.

- March 9, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 4
- o o o -

[No Heading?]

     C. B. Clark...aged man who came to Dallas about 3 months ago and has been stopping at W. Little's boarding house..he is from Paris, Texas, to this place...claims to have relatives in Missouri....fear of mob to hang him...tried to-day on the charge of insanity...adjudged insane and ordered to the asylum.

- March 22, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1
- o o o -

John King

was brought to Dallas Sunday evening by Deputy Sheriff Boyd on the charge of insanity. Mr. Sprague testified that the first time he saw King was Saturday last at Duck Creek. King imagined that a mob was after him to kill him; and bruised his head seriously against an engine. He was adjudged insane to-day.

- March 22, 1887, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     N. G. Freeney, esq., was appointed by Judge Bower this morning as guardian of the estate of C. B. Clark, adjudged insane and his bond fixed at $600.

- March 22, 1887, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Insane.

     J. Wiggington was adjudged insane yesterday. He is the young man who fired off his revolver several times from the Trinity river bridge a few days ago, making it lively for some workmen nearby dodging the bullets. when Wiggington was arrested, he was under the influence of liquor, but he was then a strange-appearing insane man, if such a thing can be said. His actions since then, while in jail, convinced his captors that he certainly was a better subject for the insane asylum than the county jail.

- March 24, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

[Editorial]

     ...within the past twelve months, fifty two [52] lunatics have been sent to the state asylum from Dallas county.

- March 24, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 4
- o o o -

Another Insane Man.

     Will Yandelff, about 30 years of age, adjudged insane...this is the fifth insane man that is now confined in the county jail awaiting to be transferred to Terrell. The insanity mania seems to be on the increase.

- March 24, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5
- o o o -

Taken in Charge by Relatives.

     Relatives of C. E. Clark, the man adjudged insane a few days ago, came from Paris yesterday evening and took charge. Clark left Paris to go to his children, living in California.

- March 26, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 5
- o o o -

Insane.

     Silas Wright, picked up by the police yesterday, was transferred to the county court to-day. Wright is supposed to be insane.

- April 11, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1
- o o o -

The Insane.

     Sheriff Lewis took John Linskie and W. Pemberton to the insane asylum today. Linskie was formerly a member of the fire department and was dropped from the rolls last spring. He got discouraged and a settled melancholy took possession of him and it has gradually become more marked, until the authorities took him in charge.

- May 11, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 3
- o o o -

A Well-dressed Lunatic.

     _____ Pemberton, required 3 suits in addition to the 3 suits required on his first trip to Terrell...

- May 12, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1
- o o o -

That Insane Woman.

     Ella, the negro woman taken in custody....has been released....she is an importation from some other country, and cannot tell where she came from, nor can she tell her name. She is about the worst case of harmless insanity that has struck Dallas for a good while, and something ought to be done with her.

- July 13, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Recorder's Court.

J. F. Overman, intoxication; dismissed, as the man is crazy.

- October 5, 1887, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -


1888
Charged with Lunacy.

     Mary Curtis, tried to hang herself...says she killed her own child and felt guilty.

- May 8, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Did She Escape?

     Officer Barnes arrested a demented woman yesterday, and with the assistance of Deputy Sheriff Darby, placed her in jail for safe keeping. She claims to be Julia Palmer from Washington county, Arkansas, but the inmates of the jail says she was there for one night about three weeks ago, on her way to the asylum at Terrell. The woman looks to be about twenty-five years old.

- July 18, 1888, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

The Demented Woman
She Escapes from Her Sister and
is Arrested by an Officer.

....Julia Palmer...from Bonham....taken back to Terrell...

- July 19, 1888, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE INSANE IN JAIL.
______

SUBJECTS FOR THE HUMANE
SOCIETY.

______

Some Pitiful Objects For Which the
State Has Failed to Provide.

     There are seven crazy persons in the county jail, and some of them have been there quite awhile. The jail is so much crowded that two of the unfortunate creatures have to occupy one small cell, and some of them are kept in with other prisoners. One young woman, who has been kept here several weeks because room could not be found for her at the asylum, was only slightly demented at first, but has grown worse and has probably lost all chance of restoration. A prominent physician says she could have been cured with proper care and treatment at the right time. These could be had only at the asylum. Certainly, a jail filled with criminals is not the place for the insane. The place is rendered much more objectionable when crowded as our jail is at present. The authorities of the asylum, and especially the commissioners who have in hand the enlargement of that institution, are censured by some of our citizens who know all the facts and conditions. Sheriff Lewis and his assistants have done all in their power to provide for these crazy prisoners and to secure a better place for them where they belong. Other citizens have been to the asylum or written the authorities in their behalf; but all to no purpose. The jails of the state have contained demented persons for twenty years past, and no adequate provision made for this unfortunate class. It is true the asylum at Terrell has been built and is to be enlarge, for which an appropriation has been made; also, that some improvement has been made on the Austin institution. But, far too little has been done. The jails of the state are still crowded with lunatics. It is a disgraceful condition of affairs, not at all creditable to the officials who have had authority to improve it.
     The demented persons in the Dallas jail are as follows:
     Fannie Curtis, a young woman found out in White Rock bottom, has been in since May 11th. It is believe she could have been cured if taken to the asylum and properly treated in time.
     John Montgomery, a white man 40 years of age, has been in since June 28. He was sent from this county to the penitentiary five years ago and served out his time, being utterly demented during the last year of his term of convict service. Still, he was held by the authorities of the penitentiary.
     Marie Ezil, colored, 35 years old--in since July 14.
     C. Wadsworth in since July 20.
     Wm. Keller is a white man found out on Cedar Hill. He was eating of the carcass of a dead cow when found, and had been wandering about a long time.
     _____ ____ never has given his name and never talks at all. Has been in since 3d instant.
     Julia Palmer, white, 25 years of age; in since July 17.
     All of the females are unmarried.
     Sheriff Lewis, Judge Bower and others have done everything possible for these unfortunates. The jail is full of criminals, and is certainly not a proper place for lunatics.
     Here is a bit of work for the humane society.

- July 24, 1888, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

A Demented Person.

     Officers Cowen and Desmond about 2 o'clock this morning, arrested and locked in Tom Calbreth on the charge of lunacy. He is about 26 years of age and hails from Farmer's Branch. When the officers captured him, he had on one boot only, and was making his way towards the river. He is harmless and said he had no objection to going to the calaboose, but insisted that the officers should first assist him in finding his other boot.

- October 31, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

Unfortunate People.

S. W. Smith arrested and charged with lunacy.
John Dougherty, living in the second ward...insane.

- December 8, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Mrs. Annie Lowes, who, with her two children, came to this city some time since from their Canadian home to visit her brother, started up her return the other day, and when as far as St. Louis, it was discovered that she was entirely insane. She was, at once, removed to the asylum, while the two children were sent to the White Cross Home, pending the arrival of the father from Canada.

- December 24, 1888, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

Adjudged Insane.

     The only business in the county court this morning was the finding of Capt. J. C. Bigger, guilty upon a writ de lunatico inquirendo. Capt. Bigger is well known to the people of North Texas, where, under the late Republican regime, he held the position of United States Attorney for the northern district of Texas. Subsequently, he came to Dallas and founded the Republican weekly newspaper of this city, which he, for a while, edited and managed. He was one of the Republican electors from Texas, chosen by that famous Republican state convention which met at Fort Worth; to the late Chicago convention.

- December 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS.

     The only business in the county court to-day was the lunacy case of J. C. Bigger, who was adjudged guilty.

- December 24, 1888, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -


1889
CITY NEWS.

     C. B. Bone has been adjudged insane.

- January 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

TOM FRAZIER MISSING.
_______

He Leaves Home at Night Without
Leaving a Trace Behind.

     Tom Frazier, a young man aged 26, who has been residing with his parents near the Cole fair grounds, disappeared from here very suddenly last Friday night and his relatives are unable to find any trace of him. He is a subject to insanity, and was recently released from the Terrell asylum. The first attack came on him at Galveston, where he was employed as an engineer in one of the railroad yards. He talks continuously about running an engine, but recently, it is said, he became possessed with the idea that he was starving to death. His disappearance was very sudden and mysterious and has caused his mother great anxiety.

- February 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

A NOBLE WORK.
_______

An Effort to Provide the Insane
With Reading Matter.

     Mr. Thos. Hall of Terrell, librarian for the insane, spent yesterday in the city and called at the TIMES-HERALD office. He is soliciting donations of literature for the unfortunate people who are incarcerated in the insane asylum and who derive great benefit frequently through access to reading matter. It helps divert their minds from channels of trouble. The state makes no appropriation for this purpose and the good work depends solely upon public charity.
     Dallas county has thirty-one insane people in the asylum and everyone should try and do something for them. He is assisted in the work by Tillman Wamsley. They went home last night, but will return on the same mission in a few days.

- February 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.

     A woman giving the name of Sallie Stewart has been taken in charge by Officer Ahern on the charge of insanity. She claims to have resided at Oak Cliff and says her hubsand is on the poor farm.

- July 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

COURT PROCEEDINGS.

     W. B. Jones, the wife slayer, is to be tried next Saturday, under a charge of lunacy made out in a complaint filed by Mrs. Camilla Jones.

- July 16, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.

    The county court refused to try W. B. Jones on the charge of insanity. The state wants to try him for murdering his wife a few years ago.

- July 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

WILD MAN IN THE WOODS.
________

He Carries a Double-Barreled Shot-
gun and the Community is in Ter-
ror.

     Several persons arrived in the city this morning from the White Rock neighborhood, which is several miles from here in a southeastern direction, to enlist the aid of officers in an effort to recapture Sam Roland, a demented white man who is loose in the woods of the vicinity and armed with a double-barreled gun, in the manipulation of which, he is said to be something of an expert.
     Roland, it is said, lives near the Kaufman county line, where he has a family. Some time ago, he became involved in a difficulty with a neighbor and shot him, for which offense he was put under an appearance bond. His dementia is said to be a subsequent development.
     Last night, Roland was at the house of his brother-in-law, Mr. John Witt, where special precautions had been taken to prevent his escape. He became obstreperous, and throwing off all restraint, made for the woods, and was last seen this morning at an early hour wandering aimlessly about.

- July 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Court Proceedings.

     Dr. Wm. Thomas, a local dentist of prominence, was to-day adjudged insane. His conversation in court was rambling and of a nature to leave no mistake of an unbalanced mind.

- July 27, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 1.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.
_______

NEWS OF INTEREST GATHERED FROM
ALL SOURCES.

    A party by the name of Richard Stevens was arrested by the police last night under the charge of lunacy.

- August 22, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

CRAZY MAN ESCAPED
________

From the Asylum at Terrell and
Came to Dallas.

     Capt. J. C. Arnold, chief of police, received notice this morning to look out for B. F. Moore, an escaped lunatic from the Terrell asylum. He was noticed on the 10th inst. at 1620 Main street. He has made several attempts, it is stated, to suicide by cutting his throat which bears scars of the desperate work. His head shakes continually, showing him to be affected with palsy. Any one seeing him should communicate with Capt. Arnold.

- September 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE CITY.


     B. F. Moore, the escaped lunatic of whom mention was made recently in the T
IMES-HERALD, was arrested at Meridian, Bosque county. While the officer was passing through here last night taking him to Austin, he escaped from the train.

- September 14, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

ARRESTED FOR LUNACY.
________

A Man Who Gives the Name of Geo.
Philips Detained on That Charge.

     This morning, officer Busbee arrested Geo. Philips, a white man, under the charge of lunacy. He has inhabited the cemetery a day or so, and in his wanderings outside, he frightened the ladies of the vicinity by his crazy talk and actions. When captured, he was surrounded by a crowd of boys whom he seemed to take great delight in amusing with his performances. He had a new suit of clothes, a return ticket from St. Louis to Austin and $22 in cash. He cannot tell where he is from.

- October 17, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY POLICE NOTES.
_________

A Miscellanoue Lot of Interesting
Items.

     [Officers Pegues and Alexander], last evening, captured J. W. Medlen, who passed by a hotel and walked off with a grip without the owner's consent. He boarded a herdic bound for the fair grounds, and having no money when the fare was demanded, he ripped the valise open and gave the driver a fine pair of kid gloves. He tired of the valise and left it no one knows where. This morning, the officers received a telegram from Terrel insane asylum stating that he had escaped from that insitution, and he was sent back on the first train.

- October 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
- o o o -
 
[No Heading]

     T. R. Holman, a deaf mute, has been arrested on the charge of lunacy.

- November 7, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. ?, col. ?.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     The police, a few days ago, arrested Sam Louie, a Hebrew, under the charge of lunacy. His father at Mobile, Ala., was notified and came to the city and, yesterday, his son was handed into his custody, but afterwards escaped. The police have recaptured him.

- November 12, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

COURT PROCEEDINGS.

     The county commissioners adjourned to meet next Saturday when they will open bridge approaches. Next Friday, they will visit the county poor farm to investigate the impending necessity for an insane hospital. Commissioner McAdams says the state is unable to provide accommodation for the insane of the county, and Dallas county will endeavor to take care of her unfortunates in this class by erecting a comfortable building for them.

- November 18, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     A. S. Pipkin will be tried before the county judge at 2 p. m. Monday, under the charge of lunacy. It is a love-sick type.

- November 23, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     J. W. Piper, a farmer living near Reilly station, was carried before the county court this afternoon, and on examination, was adjudged a lunatic.

- November 25, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Adjudged Insane.

     W. Castillo, a native of Kansas, aged 27 years, was adjudged insane yesterday. He possessed a mania for destroying everything in sight, and he would tear the clothing from his person.
     J. W. Piper, a young farmer living near Rylie Prairie, where he owns land, was sent to the asylum. He labored under the hallucination that he had committed murder and that officers were pursuing him. He became possessed with the idea, finally, that he had murdered all the officers in the county.
     A. S. Pipkin was another unfortunate who claimed to be desperately in love with a young lady. Pipkin was a carpenter and came from North Carolina.

- November 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

ABOUT THE METROPOLIS.

     F. R. Hollaman, a deaf and dumb mute, has been arrested under the charge of lunacy.

- November 26, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

Insane Man Arrested.

     One of Sheriff Lewis' deputies arrested an insane person named Hamerman last night and lodged him in the county jail for safe keeping. His insanity is of a violent form.

- November 28, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

     Lena Menasco, a haggard looking young woman who has figured rather conspiciuously of late in the city courts, was brough before Judge Brown this morning on a charge of lunacy. The evidence in the case went to prove that she had been, for some time, laboring under temporary insanity and a verdict was pronounced in accordance with the testimony. The prisoner will be held over until the authorities of the lunatic asylum are heard from.

- December 20, 1889, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 2.
- o o o -


1890
DALLAS IN BRIEF.

     A man who now lives on Caroline street was released from the asylum at Terrell about six weeks ago as "cured." He is now terrorizing the neighborhood by frightening women and children. Such "cures" are of small value to the community from which an insane person is sent and then returned.

- January 21, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

A Lunatic in the Toils.

     William P. Smith has been arrested for the third time within the past few weeks under the charge of luncay. Yesterday afternoon, he pursued a Chinaman down the street and accelerated his flight by threatening gestures with a carving knife.
     Smith was recently discharged from the lunatic asylum at Austin as restored to reason.

- February 26, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 4.
- o o o -

UNDER THE DOME.

JAMES MERNIN'S CASE.

     James Mernin, a lunatic, was given quarters in the county jail this morning. He came from San Francisco to Dallas and his wild talk and warlike actions created a great stir on the Texas & Pacific passenger train between this city and Fort Worth last night. The conductor telegraphed for an officer to meet him at the depot, and when the train arrived, Mernin fell into the hands of the blue-coats. A six-shooter was found upon his person, but not a cent of money. He is as crazy as a March hare and will have to be placed in the asylum. The man is about thirty years old, is attired in workingman's garb, and raves continually about his brother. The officers are of the opinion that the brother referred to is a resident of Dallas or Dallas county.

- March 3, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
-- o o o -

City Court.

     James Murnin and Henry Clamus charged with lunacy, were transferred to the county court.

- March 3, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Henry Claymas, a German aged 35 years, was confined in the city jail a week ago under the charge of lunacy. He pounded the iron bars to his cell until his hands were sore and bleeding and he contracted erysipelas. A ring on one of his fingers had to be filed off on account of the swelling in his hand. Dr. Carter took the patient in charge, and now he is confined in the city hospital.

- March 5, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

UNDER THE DOME.

     Judge Bower disposed of the following cases to-day:
     William Smith was declared to be of unsound mind by a jury and will be committed to the asylum.
     Thomas Rupin was declared to be a sane man and was discharged by order of the court.

- March 8, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1-2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     Emily B. Ferguson, who came here from Corsicana, was placed in the city hospital yesterday. She is thought to be insane.

- March 14, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 6.
- o o o -

UNDER THE DOME.
COUNTY COURT.

     Francisco Nelson, a married woman, 47 years of age, was declared to be of unsound mind by a jury, and the unfortunate woman will be taken to the asylum for the insane at Terrell for treatment.

- May 29, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     In the county court to-day, Judge Hayter presiding, Mrs. M. M. Lee and W. B. Brown were declared of unsound mind and ordered to the asylum at Terrell.

- July 5, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Court.

     This morning, the charge of lunacy, which was lodged against Jacob Ruslerholz was transferred to the county court.

- July 18, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     The police, yesterday, arrested Fred Bostora under the charge of lunacy.

- August 7, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     A negro named Jonas Benjamin is in the county jail awaiting examination on a charge of lunacy.

- August 23, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     In the county court this evening, N. T. Pace, of Garland, was adjudged insane.

- October 21, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

The Courts.
County Court.

     Miss Sarah Stuart was tried for insanity this morning. She was adjudged insane and will be sent to the North Texas Insane Asylum at Terrell.

- November 21, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Going to Mexico.

     Detective Phil Hogan and George Clark will leave to-night for Tampico, old Mexico, to escort the unfortunate Tom Donahue back to this city. He is now incarcerated in a Mexican prison, bereft of reason and penniless. His former friends in this city, among the railroad men, raised the money to defray the expenses of the trip. Donahue, who was at one time superintendent of the Trunk railroad, will be placed in the asylum for the insane at Terrell.

- November 21, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -


 

JACOB AND JOHANNA.
_______

Is He Anxious to Incarcerate
His Wife in Insane
Asylum?

________

Judge Bower Scores Jacob and
Appoints a Lawyer to Rep-
resent Mrs. Engers.

     Jacob Engers is a frugal German who conducts a grocery in South Dallas, and Jacob has a wife and several children. Jacob and his Johanna do not appear to be on friendly terms and he seems anxious to establish the fact that the wife of his bosom is insane and the proper place for her, an asylum for the unfortunates bereft of reason.
     Five years, or more, ago, it is alleged, he was instrumental in having his wife arraigned in the county court and endeavored to prove that she was of unsound mind. It is further alleged that Judge Bower imposed a heavy fine on Jacob on that memorable occasion, and the verdict was that Mrs. Engers was sane.
     Now, it seems that Jacob is convinced that Mrs. Engers is insane again, and he was instrumental in having [her] before the county court again to ascertain whether or not she is a sane woman. Deputy Frank Darby visited the Engers residence to-day and took charge of the Mrs. Engers. The women of the neighborhood gathered about him, and, with one voice, denounced Engers and asserted that the poor woman was in her right mind. The large-hearted officer assured them that Mrs. Engers would get a square deal and the excitement subsided.
     Judge Bower was wrathy when the case was called. He gave it out cold that if either of the two was insane, Engers bore off the honors, and intimated that Mrs. Engers, in his opinion, was the victim of a conspiracy. He set the case for 9 o'clock to-morrow morning and appointed Judge Stillwell H. Russell, attorney for Mrs. Engers, with instructions to sift the case to the bottom. It will be done.

- November 25, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

MRS. ENGERS NOT INSANE.
_______

A Jury Makes Short Work of
Her Case in the County
Court To-Day.

_______

The Evidence the Flimsiest Sort
and the Verdict Gratifying
to the Spectators.

     Mrs. Jacob Engers is not insane. A jury in Judge Bower's court decided that she is of sound mind in just fifteen seconds, after hearing the evidence to-day. Jacob Engers, her husband, his sister, and one or two others testified against the lady who shows no signs of insanity whatever. Her sister-in-law certified that Mrs. Engers did not act right because she did all her work on Saturday and slept Sunday. At one time, she bit and scratched Jacob, and called her little son a name not in use in polite circles. This witness testified that Mrs. Engers accused Mr. Engers of devoting much time to the chase of fair and frail women and also with beating her. Dr. McDermott swore that Mrs. Engers was of sound mind and the judge gave the case to the jury, who returned a verdict instantly. A few years ago, Judge Bower fined Engers $500 for beating his wife, and in 1888, Engers endeavored to prove in county court, that his spouse was of unsound mind. Frank Cosby was assistant prosecuting attorney at the time Engers and a certain physician swore that Mrs. Engers was of unsound mind. She was not in court and the jury returned a verdict declaring the poor woman to be a lunatic. The sheriff proceeded to her residence and informed her of the verdict of the jury. This was the first information she had that an effort was being made to send her to an asylum for the insane. She made a vigorous protest, aroused the neighborhood and created a great stir. Assistant Chief of Police Ed Cornwall and Detective Bud Kerby, who were familiar with the facts in the case, presented them to Mr. Cosby and Judge Bower set aside the verdict and granted Mrs. Engers another hearing. She attended court with a large number of her friends and neighbors and fairly swamped the state, Engers and his physicians.

     Mrs. Engers was overjoyed to-day when the verdict was announced. She thanked her attorney, Judge Russell, received the congratulations of the spectators and then departed for home, accompanied by her two children and a number of her lady friends.

- November 26, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

The Courts.

     Martha Richardson was tried for insanity this morning and adjudged insane.
     She will be removed to the asylum at once where she will receive the best medical attention.

- December 9, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

The Courts.
County Court.

     C. Sisler was tried for insanity and adjudged insane.

- December 18, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

[County Court]     

...in the county court to-day:
     In the estate of Stephenson Chenault, lunatic, report of sale of real estate consisting of an undivided one-half interest in one hundred acres of land on White Rock creek, examined and approved and guardian ordered to make title to purchaser upon compliance with terms of sale.

- December 23, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1 col. 6.
- o o o -

A GOOD MOVE.
_______

The Commissioners' Court Will
be Asked to Make Certain
Improvements.

     Dallas is a great county, yet she has not a decent building where sick, insane persons can be furnished accommodations if thrown on the charity of the people for their support. The hospital ward at the county jail is a small room, where male and female inmates must be thrown together, and the accommodations are, indeed, inadequate. This is no fault of the sheriff and jailer and county physician. These officials do the very best they can under the circumstances. It is now proposed to build an addition to the jail, which will furnish ample accommodations for patients. The cost will not go beyond $2000, and even if it be greater, the improvements should be ordered by the commissioners' court in the interest of humanity.

- December 27, 1890, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -


1891
Minor Matters.

     Lin [Lon?] Moore was brought in from the country and lodged in jail on a charge of lunacy. He is very wild and is considered dangerous.

- January 10, 1891, Dallas Morning News, p. 1, col. 7.
- o o o -

Local Notes.

     B. P. Page, a prominent citizen of Pleasant Valley, has been adjudged insane, and will be sent to the asylum at Terrell.

- January 26, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.

     A negro woman by the name of Annie Frazier was tried for insanity yesterday evening an adjudged insane.

- February 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

Insane Man Captured.

     This morning, Bishop Garrett telephoned the police authorities that a crazy man was roaming at large in the vicinity of the college. Officer Gates was dispatched to East Dallas and found the man, whose name is James McCoy. McCoy is violently insane and was lodged in the county jail by the police. He is a laborer and has lived in Dallas for several years.

- March 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
COUNTY COURTS.

     James McCoy was tried for insanity this morning, and adjudged insane. McCoy is a Frenchman and is 68 years old.

- March 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     J. W. Piper, a farmer about 38 years of age, was taken up last night by the police. The man's mind is badly deranged and it is reported that at one time, he was confined in the asylum for lunacy, but was pronounced cured and discharged.

- April 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Police Court.

     Wm. O'Brien, a lunatic, was transferred to the county court.

- April 16, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

Charge of Lunacy.

     Affidavit was made before County Attorney Williams this morning against Sallie Lytle, colored, charging her with lunacy. She lives on Mr. Samuel's farm near the city.

- April 18, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

[Editorial]

     The insanity dodge is dead in Dallas county. A jury has been found who believe in protecting society from the savage outbursts of passion of savage men. The killers should be legally strangled or incarcerated for life.

- April 27, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
- o o o -

Proceedings of the Courts.
COUNTY COURT.

     Mrs. Ruth Ann Green was tried for insanity this morning and adjudged insane. Mrs. Green's home is near Lancaster and her husband is a farmer.

- May 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Insane Man Jailed.

     Barney Morrison, a Federal prisoner, alleged to be of unsound mind, was placed in the county jail by a deputy United States marshal last evening.

- May 12, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

Playing Crazy.

     Barney Morrison, who was arrested by Federal authorities sometime ago, under charge of theft from the postoffice at Beaver, sent to the Terrell insane asylum and released from there as cured, was tried yesterday before Commissioner Lednum. He was held and his bond fixed at $500. Failing to give bond, he was committed to jail, where it was reported he had again resorted to his same old crazy tactics.

- May 13, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

BARNEY MORRISON'S FREAK
_______

A POSTOFFICE ROBBER WHO IS
A CONUNDRUM.

________

Pronounced Insane and De-
clared to be Sane--His
Beastly Conduct.

     Barney Morrison is a chap who is being entertained at the expense of the Federal government in the Dallas county jail.
     Barney Morrison is a giant in strength, a muscular man of, say, 24 years of age.
     Barney Morrison is the chap whom the jury pronounced insane and ordered to the asylum at Terrell, and who, four days after incarceration, was pronounced sane by the authorities of the asylum--the gentlemen who are experts in that line, and make diseases of the brain a study.
     Barney Morrison is a study but he is not poem on legs by any means. He is one of the most remarkable prisoners ever placed behind the bars of a prison. He is a puzzle, a human enigma, and the jailer and his assistants cannot find the key to their puzzle.
     Barney Morrison has a history, and that portion which refers to the cause, which led to his imprisonment, will bear reproduction.
     Barney Morrison's parents reside at Quanah and are respectable people. Some weeks ago, the postoffice at Beaver was robbed. Barney Morrison was the culprit and a couple of deputy United States marshals pounced upon him. Barney simulated insanity. In a crowded car, he tore his clothing to fritters and caused a stampeded of the passengers. A wagon cover was wrapped around him and he was finally overpowered. During the racket, he pinched the lobe off his right ear, as slick and as clean as a whistle, and bled like a stuck pig. He was placed in jail and amused himself and horrified the other inmates by catching files and eating them, tearing his clothing to ribbons and sipping his bread and meat in the refuse of his cell before devouring the same.
     A jury pronounced Barney as crazy as a bed bud and the federal authorities turned him over to the state. He was taken to Terrell and, after three confinements, was pronounced perfectly sane.
     Again, the Federal authorities nailed him and landed him in the Dallas jail after a hearing before Commissioner Lednum, who held Morrison for trial in bonds of $600.
     In the words of the officers, "Barney has raised h---l in jail." He refuses to wear clothing, acts like a savage brute in many respects and emits cries like a wounded tiger. He has been handcuffed to prevent certain vicious practices. It is said he twists the bracelets from his hands with ease. He is as strong as a mule, and lifts a 500 pound bale of cotton with as little effort as an ordinary man would a sack of flour.
     Last night, he "went on a tangent," and the hose was turned on him. A steady stream of ice-cold water brought him to his senses.
     "Let up," said he. "I can stand anything but that." And Barney acted like a rational being the balance of the night.
     The chances are that Morrison is really out of his mind, although this is disputed.
     He is a white elephant on the hands of the marshal and his assistants, and they, doubtless, have often wished that Barney was in Sheol or seaport far distant from the metropolis.

- May 20, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

Thinks He is a Preacher.

     Emil Metzler, a German cook at the Windsor hotel, was locked in the calaboose to-day by Policeman Waller under the charge of lunacy. He thinks he is a preacher and his persistent efforts to convert his associate cooks was more than they could stand. They became afraid of him and procured his arrest.

- May 23, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 3.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     A Dallas printer by the name of Andrew Liddell is said to have gone crazy in Obion, Tenn.

- June 19, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

Rowlett Local Notes.

Special to the Times-Herald.
     R
OWLETT, Dallas Co., Texas,. June 29.-- Berry Page was buried at the Mills grave yard Friday evening. He died at the insane asylum at Terrell, Texas, where he had been confined for some months. His loss is mourned by many friends and relatives.

- June 30, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
JUDGE BOWER'S COURT.

     This afternoon, Jake Oden, a negro charged with lunacy, was before the court and another lunacy case will come on late this evening.

- July 10, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 7, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

     State of Texas vs. John Bryant, lunatico inquirendo; jury verdict that defendant is of unsound mind and requires restraint.

- July 24, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

A Motley Array Before His
Honor, Judge Foree, This
Morning.

     Charles Russell was charged with lunacy. He was transferred.

- October 11, 1891, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 2.
- o o o -


1892
[No Heading]

     Eddie Chestnut, a boy, and J. M. Herndon, were examined under a charge of lunacy and ordered by Judge E. G. Bower to be sent to the asylum.

- January 26, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 6.
- o o o -

THE DAY IN THE COURTS
COUNTY COURT.

     Mrs. Venie Mabry was declared insane and ordered sent to Terrell.

- February 15, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

     No business was transacted in the county court to-day. Later yesterday afternoon, Mrs. Scott, a woman of 50 years, was ordered to the asylum by Judge Bower. She was found wandering about the streets.

- February 26, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Tim Sullivan, a stranger in Dallas, was declared to be of unsound mind by a jury in Judge Bower's court Saturday and ordered to the asylum at Terrell. He hails from Kansas City and religion is his hobby.

- March 14, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     A. Green, a demented brick-layer, is in charge of the police. Dr. Rosser says he will have to be sent to Terrell. His friends will find him at the police station.

- April 4, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE DAY IN THE COURTS.

     Arthur Stephens was adjudge insane, and ordered sent to the insane asylum at Terrell.

- April 9, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

     Edith Green, colored, was adjudged insane and ordered sent to the insane asylum at Terrell.

- April 12, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     Edith Green, colored, was sent up to the asylum at Terrell yesterday.

- April 14, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

     J. E. Erwin, was by the jury adjudged insane and ordered sent to the asylum at Terrell.
     Geo. T. Haswell, lunacy; adjudged insane and ordered sent to asylum at Terrell.

- April 16, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 1.
- o o o -

THE COURTS
PROBATE.

     Estate of J. F. Merrifield, lunatic; bond of Lee Cockrell, guardian, filed and approved.

- April 27, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
PROBATE.

     Minnie Steele, lunacy; verdict of jury that defendant is of unsound mind. Defendant ordered to be taken to the insane asylum.

- May 20, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 2.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
COUNTY COURT.

     Mahala Willis, colored, lunacy; ordered to be confined in the asylum for the insane.

- June 14, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 4.
- o o o -

In the City Court.

     Lucy Woods, a negress, was transferred on a charge of lunacy.

- August 6, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Court.

     Milas Jackson, charged with lunacy, was transferred.

- August 8, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

Insane Pauper.

     Mary Stuart, an insane pauper of Dallas county, died at the asylum at Terrell yesterday.

- August 11, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     B. W. Lewis, W. M. Orr and Willis Jackson, insane persons, were transferred to the Terrell asylum yesterday.

- August 15, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o

FUN FOR FITZY.
REGULAR DOCKET.

     Judge Bower took up his criminal docket in Judge Burke's court rooom this morning, when the folllowing cases were disposed of:

     M. E. Prewitt, a girl 14 years of age, was adjudged insane and ordered put under restraint.

- August 26, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
JUDGE BOWER'S COURT.

     A. Michaelosky was adjudged insane and ordered transferred to the asylum.

- September 30, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o

THE COURTS.
JUDGE BOWER'S COURT.

     Arthur Stephens is on trial for lunacy this afternoon.

- October 14, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

POOR BRADY.
________

He Will Be Returned to the
Asylum.

     Deputy Sheriff Sloan Lewis was called to the residence of Ex-Alderman W. J. Brady last night. Brady has recently been returned from the Terrell asylum as cured. Last night, he attacked his family. Lewis was sent for and had a terrible tussle with the demented man, who had a pair of shears in one hand with which he attempted to stab the officer. Two policemen rushed in and assisted in overpowering Brady. He was taken to the central station, placed under guard and will be returned to the asylum.

- November 4, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

City Notes.

     J. Marnell, charged with lunacy, was transferred to the county authorities.

- November 7, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 6.
- o o o -

A DAY IN THE COURTS.
JUDGE TUCKER'S COURT.

     Estate of Louisiana Obier, lunacy. Inventory and list of claims filed and sent to record.
     Estate of Mrs. Scott, lunacy. Additional inventory approved and sent to record.

- December 3, 1892, Dallas Daily Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

1893
CITY NOTES.

     Adam Bauer, a deranged youth who wandered away from his home in this city a few days ago, was found at Denton and will be returned to his home in this city.

- January 19, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 1, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     John S. Bentley, who says he stole keno chips two years ago from a Camp street joint, surrendered to the sheriff yesterday and said he wanted to do time. It has since transpired that the man is insane and was released very recently from the asylum at Terrell.

- February 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

CITY NOTES.

     W. W. Kingdon, at one time in the saloon business in this city, is in the hospital at Denton. He is insane.

- March 6, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
County Court.

     R. E. Roberts was tried for insanity, adjudged insane and ordered to be confined in the Terrell asylum.

- May 31, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 3.
- o o o -

THE COURTS.
County Court.

     Mary Jane Dawdy was tried for insanity and adjudged insane.

- June 27, 1893, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

1894
DALLAS HAD
ZERO WEATHER.

_______

Arctic Atmosphere and a Howl-
ing Norther Last Night.

________

FORTY MILES AN HOUR.
_______

THE POOR SUFFERED AND THE RICH
SHIVERED.

_______

Street Car Service Paralyzed and the
Fire Department Handicapped---In-
cidents of the First Sleet
Storm of the Winter.

     The ice wagon drove by the TIMES HERALD office this morning without stopping.
     The reason will appear plain to those who got out of bed to-day.
At about 5 o'clock last night, one of the worst specimens of a Texas winter day put in its appearance, first with a cold and beating rain, which soon developed into sleet, followed quickly by one of the coldest "northers" that ever gladdened the heart of a coal baron or a hog-killer.

      Officer D. David, who has the contract to carry insane persons to the Terrell asylum, called at the jail this morning to escort Sallie Little to that institution. Owing to the sleety condition of the ground, Mr. David concluded that he would not employ a vehicle, but walk the patient to the depot. The unfortunate woman weighs something over 200 pounds, and as might be inferred from her condition, she is not to be relied upon as being very sure of foot. The result was that before she got out of the jail yard, her feet flew up higher than her head and down she came flat on her back. Mr. David, with the assistance of Jailer Rhodes, managed to get her back into a place where there was no ice underfoot, and he then asked Mr. Rhodes to keep her until the weather moderated.
     The mercury in the thermometer at Eisenlohr's drug store reached zero last night. It went up ten degrees to-day, but is dropping back this afternoon.

- January 24, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3-4.
- o o o -

Convicted of Lunacy.

     J. B. Scott, a young countryman, was tried in the county court before Judge Nash this morning for lunacy. At times, he is perfectly rational, but he is subject to spells of violence. The jury's verdict was that he should be kept under restraint. He is now in jail, awaiting transfer to the Terrell asylum.

- March 20, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 7.
- o o o -

Added February 14, 2004:
McElroy Taken to Terrell.

     Lee McElroy, the young man from Grand Prairie, who was, the other day, adjudged insane, was taken to the Terrell asylum to-day by Deputy Sheriff Winfrey.

- May 25, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added February 14, 2004:
TWO INSANE MEN.
_______

Billy Trammell and Rush Bidell Taken in
Custody.

     Two men were admitted to the jail to-day on charges of insanity. Billy Trammell, living at the corner of Pearl and Cabell streets, is insane on the subject of religion. He says his religion was sent down from heaven in a parachute. Rush Bidell, the other unfortunate, lost his mind as a result of the morphine and cocaine habit.

- May 26, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

Added February 14, 2004:
ADJUDGED INSANE.
______

Three Unfortunates Who Will Go to the
State Asylum.

     In the county court, to-day, the following persons were adjudged insane: Emma Cooper, Billy Trammel and Oliver Letot.
     Letot is 23 years old and was married about three weeks ago, eloping with his bride.
     Billy Trammell talks about religion.
     Emma Cooper came from the northern part of the county. She was once before stricken with insanity. These patients are now in custody of the county authorities, but are to be sent to the State asylum at Terrell, as soon as practicable.

- May 30, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

TAKEN TO THE ASYLUM.
________

Ollie Letot Jumps Off the Train and Runs
Home, but is Recaptured.

     S. K. Williamson, yesterday morning, undertook to transfer his brother-in-law, Ollie Letot, who was adjudged insane last week, from the county jail to a private asylum at Cincinnati, O., taking the 6:30 a. m. eastbound Texas and Pacific train. Just as the train was puling out, the unfortunate young man, becoming suspicious of the surroundings, jumped out the window, and started in a fast run in the direction of his home at Letot Station, seven miles from the city. All efforts to overtake him failed.
     Deputy Sheriff Spurgeon went to Letot Station later in the day with Mr. Williamson and induced Letot, who lost his mind by constantly thinking about machinery, to go with them on the train to put in a pump for an imaginary person. In this way, Letot was decoyed aboard the Texas and Pacific train last night, and once on board, he was secured, and started on his journey to Cincinnati.
     Letot is only about 21 years old, and he was married about a week before he became insane.

- June 4, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2.
- o o o -

PATRICK JONES IS MISSING.
______

A Well-Known Negro of Dallas Wanders
Away While Mentally Weak.

     Patrick Jones, a negro 50 years old, left his home at No. 119 Cabell street Monday evening, about 7 o'clock, and has not been seen or heard from since, by his family or friends. He told his wife that he was going to walk over to the Cedars and would be back in a few moments.
     A man answering his description asked a policeman on San Jacinto street to give him 50 cents, saying he wished to go to McKinney.
     Jones had been sick for some time and had lately given signs of mental derangement. When he left home, he was wearing a brown-checked coat and vest and gray trousers.
     He is brown-skinned and heavy set and wore a moustache and side whiskers. He had no valuables, except a silver watch and 15 cents in change when he left home. He has lived in Dallas for twenty years.

- June 20, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

PAT JONES GOES CRAZY.
______

He Buys a Gun and Goes Shooting Through
the County.

     The TIMES HERALD, yesterday, stated that Pat Jones, an old negro man, left his home, 119 Cabell street, several days ago to be gone a few minutes, but had not returned, and that as he exhibited signs of mental derangement as a result of a recent spell of sickness, his wife was anxious about him.
     Yesterday evening, Pat appeared at Garland with a new pistol, which he was discharging as he walked along the road. He was arrested by Deputy Sheriff S__ber, who brought him to Dallas and placed him in jail. At first, a charge of carrying a gun was lodged against him, but it was soon discovered he was insane.

- June 21, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 3.
- o o o -

BILLIE TRAMMELL DEAD.
_____

He Was Confined in Jail on the Charge
of Insanity.

     Billie Trammell, a well-known tin-smith of early Dallas days, and later a saloon man, who has, for some time, been suffering with both mental and physical debility, died in the county jail yesterday, where he was confined on a charge of lunacy.

- June 25, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

LISBON OUSLEY
MAKES HIS ESCAPE.

________

AN INSANE MAN WHO BELIEVES HE
IS GOVERNOR.

______

J. W. Coleman Who is Drawing a Pension
is Adjudged Insane--It is a Hered-
itary Disease in His
Family.

     J. W. Coleman was tried in the County Court to-day for lunacy, and adjudged insane.
     Coleman, who is 54 years old, recently came to Dallas with his wife from Baltimore. He draws a pension of $12 per month, and gets a remittance of $40 per month from a wealthy mother, and this has been his only income since he came to Dallas.
     Mrs. Coleman testified that the father of her husband died in an insane asylum, and that the disease is hereditary.
     County Judge Nash this morning received a telegram from the superintendent at the Terrell asylum to the effect that Lisbon Ousley had escaped and to have the officers look out for and arrest him at once, as he is wild. Ousley is perfectly rational on most subjects, and is as wildly off on others. A few weeks ago, he convinced the physicians of the asylum that he was sane. But, he was no sooner liberated, than he wired Gov. Hogg that he was on his way to Austin to relieve him of the reins of government.

- July 30, 1894, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 7.
- o o o -

Added February 22, 2004:
On Trial for Lunacy.

     T. W. Cline is being tried by a jury in the County Court this afternoon on a charge of lunacy.

- September 14, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 3.
- o o o -

Added February 22, 2004:
SENT TO THE
INSANE ASYLUM.

_____

MISS ALICE MONKTON LOSES HER
REASON.

_______

Enemies Circulated Scandalous Reports
About Her and She Became a Raving
Maniac -- T. W. Cline Adjudged Insane
The Asylum at Terrell Crowded.

     Deputy Sheriff Davis, yesterday, took Miss Alice Monkton to the Terrell asylum for the insane.
     Two days ago, the young woman was before the County Court on a writ de lunatico enquerendo.
     It was given in testimony that some malicious persons circulated slanderous reports about her, and that when she heard them, she was so shocked and horrified, that she lost her reason, and was taken to the asylum a raving maniac.

_____

     T. W. Cline was yesterday afternoon adjudged insane by a jury in the county court.

_____

     Officer Davis says the Terrell asylum has 875 inmates, and that no more will be taken until the number is reduced.

- September 15, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added March 5, 2004:
MR. SILVER INSANE.

_______

The Popular Broker in a Pitiable
Condition.

     Dr. Armstrong, City Health Officer, to-day made affidavit in the County Court against Arthur Silver, the popular and well-known merchant broker, charging him with insanity.
     Mr. Silver was admitted to the hospital two days ago to be treated for a slight at____ [paper torn]. Last night, he became so vi[olent] that he had to be transferred to the county jail.

- November 8, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added March 7, 2004:
INSANITY AND
A SECRET.

_____

MR. WEBSTER OF NEW YORK.
______

He is a Distinguished Patient For Whom
James Gordon Bennett Would Vio-
late a Journalistic Principle -- in
the Dallas Hospital.

     Ed Webster, a young man from New York, was admitted to the City Hospital last Wednesday, suffering from insanity, to be cared for as a private patient. Young Webster was brought to Dallas from the ranch of Col. W. E. Hughes, in Childress county.
     T
IMES HERALD reporters who endeavored to learn the fact connected with Mr. Webster's misfortunes, were refused them by City Health Officer Armstrong, who is in charge of the city hospital.
     Dr. Armstrong stated that he could not give the facts desired without violating professional courtesy, as this is a private case, and not one of charity. He referred the reporters to the police department, but nothing could be learned there.
     Dr. Armstrong said the patient was a member of a distinguished New York family, and it would distress the members greatly if the facts were known.
     A woman who came with Webster presented a letter from James Gordon Bennett, proprietor of the new York Herald, asking that the man's affliction be kept out of the newspapers.

- November 17, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

Added March 8, 2004:
EDWARD WEBSTER
TAKEN AWAY.

______

Dr. Armstrong May Use Handcuffs on
Him.

     Edward Webster, the young man who has been in the city hospital several days for treatment of insanity, with which he was seized while on Col. W. E. Hughes' ranch in Childress county, was taken out of that institution by his mother this morning, who took the train with him for Washington, D. C. Dr. Armstrong, health officer, will accompany them as far as Louisville, Ky..
     Webster's insanity is, at times, of such a violent type, that Dr. Armstrong procured a pair of handcuffs from Chief of Police Arnold to use, in case of emergency.

- November 19, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6.
- o o o -

Added March 11, 2004:
INSANE A
SECOND TIME.

______

George McMurchie Suffers a Relapse of
His Mental Malady.

     George McMurchie, the well-known and popular St. Louis drummer, who became insane in this city several weeks ago, and who, on the advice of physicians, was taken to the Terrell asylum, rapidly recovered under the treatment he received in that institution, and was, a few days go, dismissed as entirely sound in mind. But last night, he appeared in Dallas, a raving maniac, and is now confined in the county jail.
     Mr. McMurchie lost his mind studying Henry George's single tax theory.

- December 8, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 2.
- o o o -

Added March 16, 2004:
BOB BEST
BROUGHT HOME.

______

THE YOUNG GROCER IS INSANE.
______

When His Pastor and Friends Found Him
In Fort Worth He Informed Them He
Was Practicing Law -- He Is
at Rev. Carroll's.

     Rev. C. L. Carroll, pastor of the Grand Avenue Congregational church, and Mr. Thomas Stevens, who went to Fort Worth yesterday at noon to look for Bob Best, the East Dallas grocer, who mysteriously disappeared on Thursday of last week, returned last night, bringing Bob with them.
     Mr. Carroll says Bob greeted them cordially when they met him in Fort worth, and told them that he was practicing law and doing well, and imparted much more equally wild information concerning himself. At first, he could not be induced to return to Dallas, but after much persuasion, he consented to come.
     Mr. Best was taken to the home of Rev. Mr. Carroll, where he will be kept for the present.

- December 18, 1894, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 1.
- o o o -

1895
Added March 17, 2004:
Adjudged Insane.

     Flora Armstrong, aged 18 years, was adjudged insane by a jury in the County Court to-day. The unfortunate woman, who appears to be Indian, white and negro mixed, came to Dallas two weeks ago, with her sister, Mrs. Mitchell, from Newbury, N. Y., where Mrs. Mitchell, who was a witness, says they have considerable property.

- January 3, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 6.
- o o o -

Added March 27, 2004:
ASYLUM FULL.
______

No Room For Any More Patients at
Terrell.

     County Clerk Hughes is in receipt of a letter from Dr. Preston, Superintendent of the Terrell Asylum, stating that he cannot receive W. W. Harrington at present for want of room. Harrington was a Cedar Hill farmer and lost his mind thinking on the plan of salvation.
There are four insane persons in the County Jail awaiting vacancies.

- January 29, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 6, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added March 29, 2004:
GEORGE TURNER
HAS GONE INSANE.

_____

He Imagines He Owns E. P. Turner's
Property.

     George Turner, of Oak Cliff, was adjudged insane by a jury in the County Court yesterday evening.
     One of his favorite hallucinations is that he owns E. P. Turner's home and other property, and that the latter is wrongfully depriving him of the use of it. Monday, arming himself with a dirk, he set out to right his wrongs.
     Turner is an Englishman. There is no room for him, at present, in the asylum at Terrell.

- February 12, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 1.
- o o o -

Added March 30, 2004:
CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Will Miers, as a result of a hard spell of sickness, was adjudged insane in the County Court yesterday afternoon and taken to the Terrell asylum to-day.

- February 16, 1895, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

1896
Added June 14, 2004:
THE LOCAL COURTS.
County Court.

     In the case of the state vs. Frank Fross, the jury found him of sound mind and ordered his release.
     Estate of Mrs. Sarah Izen, an insane person; K. Shields appointed guardian in bonds of $10,000. Appraisers, W. G. Curry, G. R. Scruggs and F. Hoya.

- January 12, 1896, The Dallas Morning News, p. 15, col. 4.
- o o o -

WITHOUT RELATIVES.
_____

Arthur Stevens, an Insane Patient at
Terrell, Died Yesterday.

     County Judge Nash received the following from Dr. C. M. Rosser yesterday:
     Hon. T. F. Nash, Dallas, Texas:
     Terrell, Tex., April 23--Dear Sir: The patient, Arthur Stephens, sent from your county, died this evening from consumption. He will be buried in the asylum cemetery. Please notify his friends.
     Yours truly,
                   C. M. R
OSSER,
                       Superintendent.
     No one here seems to know anything of Stephens' relatives. So far as is known, he has none in the city.

- April 25, 1896, Dallas Morning News, p. 12, col. 3.
- o o o -

LOCAL NOTES.

     Woodward Hadson, an insane man, was transferred to Terrell yesterday by Sheriff Cabell. He is a stranger and was picked up near Parkland hospital two weeks ago by Dr. V. P. Armstrong.

- April 28, 1896, Dallas Morning News, p. 8, col. 7.
- o o o -

FARMER PACE INSANE.
_________

The Poor Man Chops Down All His
Peach Trees.

     Mr. M. T. Pace, a substantial farmer living near Garland, was discovered to be insane yesterday, and steps taken to get him to the North Texas asylum.
     The first intimation his family had of his mental condition was when they found that he had been at work several hours chopping down the trees in a fine peach orchard on his place.

- December 13, 1896, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 13, col. 2.
- o o o -


1897
EVIDENTLY INSANE.

______

A German woman Troubled with a
Hallucination Locked Up.

     Monica Dessel, a middle-aged German woman, evidently insane, is locked up in the city calaboose preparatory to being turned over to the county authorities for investigation into her mental condition.
     She rushed into police headquarters Saturday forenoon and nearly gave Pat Mullin a case of nervous prostration by excitedly exclaiming, "Protect me from those men outside who are waiting to kill me."
     Pat endeavored to quiet her fears and offered to see her to the street, but the woman's fears could not be soothed so easily, for she absolutely refused to set foot outside the city hall.
     By dint of questioning, her name was learned, but nothing further in regard to herself, or where she lived, or how she came to be at the city hall. After all attempts to get any information from her respecting herself had proved in vain, she was locked up as a last resort and later taken down to the old calaboose.

- February 7, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 11, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Chauncey Allen, an old citizen, was conveyed to the Austin asylum for the insane yesterday.

- March 14, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

COUNTY COURT NOTES.
_________

A Young Farmer Declared Insane
Yesterday.

     Judge Foree spent most of Saturday considering his probate and civil motion dockets. Frank Greggor, a young farmer, living east of the city, was tried on a lunacy charge.
     The enquiry into his sanity resulted in the jury's recommending him to be kept under restraint. He will probably be sent to Terrell if that institution is not too crowded to take care of him.

- April 4, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 2, col. 5.
- o o o -

LOST HER MIND.
_______

Mrs. Nelson Attempts to Choke
Her Daughter-in-Law.

     Mrs. Nelson, an old lady living at 425 Wood street, lost her mental balance and attempted to choke her daughter-in-law Tuesday night.     
     Deputy Sheriffs Lewis, Work and Simpson went to arrest her. She started to go to jail with them, but before she got out of the yard, she asked permission to go back and change dresses. She was so long about making the change, that the officers went to look for her, to discovery that she had escaped. They finally located her under the house. She refused to come out and it became necessary to remove some of the planks of the floor to get her.

- June 24, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

[No Heading]

     C. Gonzales, a Mexican, was adjudged insane by a jury in the county court yesterday.

- July 4, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 9, col. 3.
- o o o -

[CITY NEWS NOTES]

     A man wildly cursing Abraham Lincoln was arrested yesterday afternoon on the coursthoue square and locked up.
     He was said to be Joseph Merrifield, living west of town, formerly an inmate of the asylum for the insane.

- July 4, 1897, The Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 10, col. 4.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     Frank McGregor, a well known auctioneer, was adjudged insane in the county court yesterday evening. He will be admitted to the North Texas asylum for the insane to-morrow.

- October 15, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 4-5.
- o o o -

BLIND AND INSANE.
_______

W. F. Prather, a Sadly Afflicted
Man Goes to Terrell.

     W. F. Prather, a blind man, was adjudged insane by a jury in the county court yesterday, and he will be admitted to the Terrell asylum to-morrow.
     Mr. Prather, who has been blind for some time, lost his mind speculating on the scheme of salvation. He will preach for hours at a time to the dumb walls of his cell, and then go off on the other extreme and cruse and swear in the most profane and blasphemous manner. The next moment, he will take a new text and proceed with another sermon.
     The unfortunate man has been to the asylum once.

- December 19, 1897, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 6.
- o o o -

1898
BRIEFS.

     O. H. Bowman was, to-day, arrested by Officer Stampley, and a charge of lunacy docketed against him at police headquarters. The man seemed to be crazy on the subject of religion. When arrested, he was delivering a religious discourse in a saloon, and had talked and gesticulated so energetically, that he was well nigh exhausted.

- February 15, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     O. H. Bowman, who was yesterday arrested by the city authorities on a charge of lunacy, was, to-day, transferred to the county. The unfortunate fellow kept up his demoniacal ravings nearly all night long, expostulating upon his favorite theme of religion. His condition is pitiable in the extreme.

- February 15, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 3.
- o o o -

CITY NEWS NOTES.

     A colored woman giving the name of Mary Johnson, was adjudged insane by a jury in the county court this morning. She was arrested by Officers Stampley and Fanning near the Union depot yesterday. She could give no account of herself and it is now known where her home is.

- July 25, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 8, col. 5.
- o o o -

BRIEFS.

     Thomas Hager was adjudged insane by a jury in the county court yesterday.

- July 31, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 5.
- o o o -

BRIEFS.

     In the county court, I. Suwalski was adjudged insane.

- August 14, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 1.
- o o o -

1899
County Court.

     Ross Finley was adjudged to be insane.

- June 5, 1899, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 5, col. 7.
- o o o -

County Court.

     The only business transacted in the county court yesterday was the disposition of two inquisitions in lunacy.
     T. Casey and Jane Cloud were each adjudged insane.

- October 4, 1899, Dallas Morning News, p. 12, col. 2.
- o o o -

1900
WOOD SMITH CASE.

________
Will be Called the Fifth Time
Monday Morning.

     The Wood E. Smith murder case will again be called in the criminal district court Monday morning. Smith is charged by indictment with having killed Abraham Spillers at Garland some time ago. The case has attracted a great deal of attention in the past and will doubtless prove no less a drawing card at this hearing. The defense is insanity. Four times before, this case has been called and gone to trial. In the first trial, defendant was seized with violent fits, during the progress of the trial, which was stopped and the jury discharged. The second trial was brought a close in the same way, but in the third hearing, the jury adjudged Smith insane and he was sent to the North Texas insane asylum at Terrell, where he remained until declared to be of sound mind. He was forthwith arrested and held to answer the charge of murder, which was still against him. The case came to trial and resulted in a hung jury. This is a brief history of the case up to the present time. Smith is represented by able counsel who are striving to give him his liberty.

- February 11, 1900, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 5.
- o o o -

NECROLOGICAL.

      Harriett Harris, colored, died this morning in the county jail, age 30 years. She was of unsound mind. Inquest was held by Justice Skelton.

- March 16, 1900, Dallas Morning News, p. 6, col. 4.
- o o o -

1901
LOCAL COURTS.

Criminal District Court.

L. F. Jernigan was adjudged insane.

- April 14, 1901, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 3, col. 2-3.
- o o o -