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1945
Century-Old Honey Springs
Bitten by Improvement Bug

B
Y WILLIAM A. WARD

     Century-old Honey Springs has awakened.
     On this site in 1844, a train of covered wagons stopped one autumn evening. To the road-weary travelers, the place seemed a good one to settle in . In the group was William Perry Overton, a young Virginian. He was destined to become one of the builders of Dallas.
     Overton erected a log cabin near a spring. The Durhams built another one at another spring nearby. In an oak thicket, the Hurt family put up their home of logs.
     Friendly Indians told the settlers about hollow trees in the neighborhood, the abode of bees and abounding in honey. The two springs and the plentiful supply of honey from the trees gave the settlement its name -- Honey Springs. Tradition has it that the early denizens of the locality made buffalo meat and honey two important staples of their diet.
     Now, more than 100 years later, Mayor James Richardson has announced a bond election to build a town hall will be held in late August. He said everybody in the community is tired of having the council meet in a garage--they want a city hall.
     Mayor Richardson said the new town hall will be a $10,000 brick building erected near Overton and Bonnie View Roads. Plans are being drawn for the structure, which will be on the general style of the Fruitdale community house about a mile south on Vandervoort Road near Linfield Road.
     Fruitdale and Honey Springs are sister cities, both having been incorporated in 1937.
     Among the early settlers was Judge R. M. Hurt, for many years a member of the Court of Criminal Appeals of Texas. His grandson, E. D. Hurt, Dallas attorney, 626
1/2 East Tenth, attended a one-room school in Honey Springs more than forty years ago.
     New homes are planned for Honey Springs. Some already are being built. The newly elected City Council, in office but a few weeks, is outlining a program of civic improvement for the next two years.

- May 22, 1945, Dallas Morning News, Sec. I, p. 11, col. 1-2.
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