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Beeman Memorial Cemetery grave marker photos
Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey

Descendants of John Beeman

Generation No. 1/Lot 1.1

1. JOHN3 BEEMAN (JAMES2, JOHN1 BEAMAN)1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11
was born 20 October 1799 in Murfreesboro, Hertford County, North
Carolina
12,13,14, and died 12 March 1856 in Dallas, Dallas County,
Texas
15,16. He married EMILY MANLY HUNNICUTT17,18,19,20,21,22,
23,24,25,26
19 June 1823 in Greene County, Illinois 27,28,29,
daughter of HARTWELL HUNNICUTT and MARGARET CUNNINGHAM.
She was born 19 February 1806 in Greenville County, South Carolina
30, and died 03 May 1892 in Dallas, Dallas County, Texas (Home of daughter, Mrs. Isaac Fisher)31.

Notes for JOHN BEEMAN:
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SEELY'S MILL

One of the oldest mills in the County is Seely Mill, which stands on Section 1, Township 10, Range 13. It lately belonged to Judge A. S. Seeley. It is about 40 by 50 feet in ground area, and two and a half stories in height.

It is equipped with two sets of buhrs, one for flour and one for corn, and is run by water power, furnished by Apple Creek. The dam is 130 feet wide, and has a fall of 6 feet. The mill is furnished with the picturesque, but clumsy, old-fashion tub wheel. The wheat that J. H. Jones, the miller, can grind in a day, will average about 60 bushels. All the work is custom. The mill was built by John and James BEEMAN, about the year 1821. At first they put up a crude saw-mill, with which they sawed out the lumber for the grist mill. They were the first to run the mill, and did a good business.

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The following information is from "The WPA Dallas Guide and History" pp. 39-40, published by the Dallas Public Library and the Unviersity of North Texas Press, 1992.

BEGINNINGS OF SETTLEMENT

On April 8, 1842, John BEEMAN, an earlier immigrant from Illinois, came with his family from Bird's Fort, settling eight miles to the southeast on White Rock Creek. Here a half-brother, James BEEMAN, joined him in that year. The BEEMANs planted the first corn in present-day Dallas County. Captain Mabel Gilbert, a former Mississippi River steamboat operator whom BRYAN had known before coming to Texas, brought his family down river in canoes and located south of BRYAN's cabin on the west side of the Trinity. Tom Keenan, a former Texas Ranger from Bird's Fort, and Isaac B. Webb, an immigrant from Green County, Missouri, established themsleves on Mustang Branch, north of BRYAN's place in the same year. These men and their families were, with BRYAN, the founders of the city and county of Dallas.

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"John Beeman migrated to the Peters Colony as a family man prior to 1 Jul 1844. He was issued a land certificate and patented 640 acres in Dallas County (Nacogdoches Third Class No. 522) according to the colony agent's report for 1844. He was living on White Rock Creek in old Nacogdoches County. He is listed on the Census of 1850 (Dallas County, Family No. 65) as a 32-year-old farmer, born in Illinois, with five children."

THE PRECEEDING NOTE is from p. 186, "The Peters Colony of Texas," by Connor, Seymour V. 976.4 c752p, found in the Genealogy Section of the Dallas Public Library.

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The BEEMAN Family; John, James J., & nephew, John S. [Brother, Samuel came to Texas somewhat later in 1846 with his family from IL] first met John Neely BRYAN about 1840 in Bowie County, TX. BRYAN was passing through on one of his trips to Arkansas & Tennessee. He [BRYAN] was in the habit of stopping enroute at the settlement in Cass County, called "Bryan's Mill", established by a relative - nephew or uncle - named William O. BRYAN [i]. Before arriving at Bryan's Mill, BRYAN stopped off to pass the time of day with the BEEMAN brothers, John and James, recently arrived in TX. BRYAN discussed with them his plans for a trading post in the Cross Timbers, at the Three Forks of the Trinity River. He drew a map of the country for them which they would used later to scout the area. BRYAN at that time had not selected a name for his proposed trading post. He soon went on his way after bidding the BEEMANs "Goodbye." They would not meet again for two years.

During those two years many changes took place. For one thing, the country was somewhat safer for the colonists since Bird's Fort had been built and established about twenty-two miles west of John Neely BRYAN's camp-site. One day in January of 1842, BRYAN rode over to Bird's Fort to invite the colonists to come over to his camp-site and join with him in establishing his settlement. Much to his pleasant surprise he found the BEEMAN family living at the fort. What pleased him most was the sight of John BEEMAN's second daughter, Sixteen-year-old, Margaret BEEMAN, who not too much later became
his bride.

. . . . . But it was John, James J., and nephew, John S., who
welcomed BRYAN to the fort that January day and learned that he now called his little trading post-settlement by the name of "Dallas", and that he had named it for this "friend, Dallas" (not identified) in 1840, just after meeting the BEEMANs two years previously.

. . . . . .to continue our story, the settlement of Dallas a reality,
the men of the district around the settlement, chose John BEEMAN, Now father-in-law of John Neely BRYAN, as their first representative to the first legislature after their annexation to the United States. They sent BEEMAN off to Austin with the petition for the creation of their County, however, the legislature refused to seat him because there was no such county as he was there to represent. At that time the settlement was still part of old Nacogdoches and Robertson Counties.
BEEMAN found himself treated as an impostor!

Fortunately, he was soon befriended by the representative from Robertson County, Dr. Wilds K. Cooke. But finding there was little a "man without a county" could do, John BEEMAN went home in disgust. In due course, though, after the Legislative session was over, Dr. Cooke presented John BEEMAN's petition for the creation of the new county. The name selected was "Polk", but that name had
already been given to another new county, in southeast Texas. As John BEEMAN was from the settlement of Dallas, that name was hurriedly substituted and passed without comment.

After the Legislature adjourned, John BEEMAN, in ill health himself, sent his son, William H. BEEMAN, on the trip to Franklin, the county seat of Robertson County, to pick up a copy of the Statute of Authorization from Dr. Cooke, a proof that the Legislature had authorized the creation of Dallas County on March 30, 1846.

The son, William went alone, riding a fleet Mustang pony. He slept out on the bald prairie one night going and coming, and later, acknowledged that it was a scary experience. (The open country he went through was not exactly the safest place in the world to be in those times!) But he made the journey safely and successfully.

The father, John BEEMAN, after his part in the creation and recognition of Dallas County, wanted no further part of politics, nor did his son, William. John died March 12, 1856, only 56 years old. William H. died January 14, 1905, of pneumonia.

Previous PARAGRAPHS from Ruth Cooper in her conversation with her grandmother, Sonoma BEEMAN MYERS.

[i] Mrs. H. C. (Elma) Fulcher, Sr., private Correspondence, 1930.

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John and his half-brother, James Jackson, were the first BEEMANs to come to the future Dallas Community from Greene County, IL. They first settled at Bird's Fort (north of Arlington, TX) on the north bank of the Trinity River. Title problems arose regarding the land because General Sam Houston had also promised it to another land developer. At this point John Neely BRYAN persuaded the BEEMANs to move to Dallas. The brothers drove the first wagons into the future Dallas area and named Turtle Creek (an exclusive area of today's Dallas). James hunted buffalo around the White Rock Lake and the Love Field areas. James became a Texas Ranger, an Indian fighter, an explorer, and a farmer. He evidently was a roamer, a pilgrim, and a pioneer!

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He came into Bowie County, TX (Old Cross Roads Camp Ground, near Dalby Springs, Old Boston), on 6 Dec 1840 (rented land on the Stearling Smith farm about 3 miles east of Dalby Springs), and then on to Dallas County in 1842. Their ninth child, John Scott Winfield BEEMAN was born at Cross Roads Camp on May 23, 1841. When Scott BEEMAN was 6 weeks old they moved to their claim in Nacogdoches County (later becoming Dallas County) on White Rock Creek. He settled on White Rock Creek and built the only "block house" in the county (built for protection from potential raiding Indians).

Shortly after John BEEMAN settled in Dallas County (1842), he set aside about seven acres of the most beautiful part of his farm for the family cemetery. This site was located in the South part of the John BEEMAN Survey, on a high bluff, inside of what was later the Caroline BEEMAN FISHER Tract: "five chains East of the Clarissa B. Walker (50 acre) Tract, and just South of the Spencer Tract" as recorded in Book 280, pages 446-448, offices of Dallas County Clerk, Dallas, TX. It is presently located (Mapsco 47N) just south of Haskell, off Dolphin Road, at the end of Osage Street, off Mingo on Gault, north of the Jewish (Shearith Israel Park) Cemetery.

John BEEMAN's first grandchild, Holland Coffee BRYAN, born 6 Aug 1844, died 18 Jul 1845, was buried in this Beeman Family Cemetery. (First born child of Margaret BEEMAN and John Neely BRYAN). However, before 1845, tradition has it that several children of transients and perhaps several slaves had been buried in this cemetery. John BEEMAN died 12 Mar 1856 and was buried in his
cemetery in what is now designated as Lot #1.

Many of the BEEMAN grand-children are buried in the cemetery in nameless graves as their markers are gone.

Over the years, trespassers have had no respect for the old cemetery. In the 1930's, a construction company had a warehouse nearby and used the old cemetery as a pasture for their stock. It was reported that even that warehouse had been built over graves. Gravestones have been stolen, broken and otherwise desecrated and destroyed. Heavy iron fences that once surrounded the individual
family lots have been stolen until only three or four remain. It has also been reported that several Negro houses near-by are built over many of the graves. The encroachments have continued. The size of the cemetery has been considerably diminished. This old cemetery is often referred to as the "Old White Rock Cemetery", being so near the West bank of White Rock Creek.

In 1939 several of the heirs tried to do something about this desecration. Finally in 1945, two grandsons of John BEEMAN; L. C. (Buddy), son of Wm. H., and Ira, son of Scott BEEMAN, together with other heirs, went on the grounds, measured the connections, lines and locations of the remaining gravestones and made a plat.
They then numbered the lots and took down the names of more than 100 interments. This plat of the Beeman Family Cemetery was then filed with the Dallas County Clerk as provided by Article 922 of Title 26, of the Revised Statutes of the State of Texas. A Charter was granted 3 Apr 1946 (50 years existence) - #86432 - Beeman Memorial
Cemetery Corp.

The map (cemetery plat is in the Dallas Library, 7th Floor) is as they hoped to improve this cemetery with a new entrance on "Pepper St". This, however, has never been accomplished. This old cemetery is located in back of the 4600 block of Dolphin Road, located south of Haskell Ave., east on Mingo St., then south on Gault St., and parallel the fence of the old Jewish Cemetery (Shearith Israel Park Cemetery) on to the entrance to the grounds of the Beeman Cemetery, often referred to as the "Old White Rock Cemetery".

The leaders of the Beeman Family Cemetery Corp. have all died:

L. C. (Buddy) BEEMAN died 12 May 1947 - buried Grove Hill Cemetery

Lillian BEEMAN GRAHAM died 1 Jun 1946 - buried W. W. Glover Family Cemetery

James F. CUMBY died 25 Dec 1948 - buried Mesquite Cemetery

Ira BEEMAN died 21 Apr 1954 - buried Beeman Family Cemetery

There is no "complete" list of interments in the Beeman Family Cemetery.

John and Emily are buried in the Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, TX. John's headstone is the oldest in the cemetery. John BEEMAN has a "Citizen of the Republic of Texas" Plaque on his tombstone.

There is a grave of the old slave, Jack, who came to Texas from Illinois with the John BEEMANs. John died in 1856 and Jack not long after. ?Grave marked by a large flat rock?

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BEEMAN MEMORIAL CEMETERY
Texas Historical Commission Marker
inside cemetery

John (1799-1856) and Emily Hunnicutt (1806-1892) Beeman brought their family to Texas during its days as a Republic. About 1842 they gained clear title to 640 acres of land, on which they established this family cemetery. One of its first known burials, that of Holland Cofee Bryan, eleven month old son of their daughter, Margaret and her husband, John Neely Bryan, took place in 1845. John and Emily are buried here, as are other family members and early neighbors. An important link in Dallas' history, the Beeman Memorial Cemetery contains more than 100 graves. (1984)

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BEEMANS . . . . OF DALLAS, TEXAS

"John Beeman, James J. Beeman and Samuel Beeman were brothers. Prior to the year 1813 the Beeman's lived in North Carolina --- thence moved to Illinois. From 1813 to early 1840, the Beeman and Hunnicutt records can be found in Calhoun, Scott, Greene, and Pike Counties, Illinois."

PREVIOUS NOTE from "The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949" Dallas Public Library Genealogy

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1830 FEDERAL CENSUS OF GREENE COUNTY, IL
Census_Year 1830
Microfilm # M19-24
State IL
County Greene
District Greene County
Enumerator Richard Rattan
Submitted November 27, 1830

Pg# Ln# Last Name First Name Filename

32 9 BEEMAN James pg00031
46 8 BEEMAN Orman pg00041
2 19 BEEMAN Samuel pg00001
32 10 BEEMAN John pg00031

Head of Household White Males White Females Male Slaves Female Slaves Free Male Colored Free Female Colored White Deaf & Dumb Aliens Black Deaf & Dumb

 

2 19 BEEMAN Samuel 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 000019

32 9 BEEMAN James 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 000790

32 10 BEEMAN John 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 000791

46 8 BEEMAN Orman 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 001161
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Greene County, IL 1840 Federal Census - INDEX

Census_Year 1840
Microfilm #M104-60
State IL
County Greene
District
Enumerator Andrew J. Witt
Reference about Dec.,1840

THIS IS AN INDEX SORTED BY NAME.
FOR COMPLETE CENSUS INFORMATION OPEN THE FILE IN THE FILENAME COLUMN.

Pg# Ln# Last Name First Name Filename

129 30 BEEMAN Samuel pg127.txt (Apple Creek Precinct)

129 30 BEEMAN Samuel 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 signed 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
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Dated 2 Dec 1843, TX State Archives, Box 6, Ltr #73

To the Honorable Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives
of the Republic of Texas:

The undersigned petitioners, Citizens of the Republic, do respectfully
represent to your honourable body that a mere handful of enterprising pioneers
settled at the Three Forks of the Trinity River about two years since and
have that time up to this period managed to sustain themselves al-
though in the heart of Indian Country and remote from any settlements
where they might look for succor or subsistence in case of need. That they
have underwent extreme privation, hardship and suffering, having battled the
wild beats and Indians and have been subjected to great losses of Horses
and Cattle as well as some lives. That they were induced to go to this
country by proffers of the Government. Some expected to hold land under
the Military Road act. Some expecting to find a fair country entirely vacant
and being ignorant of the laws expected to hold their land by occupants and
others depended upon locating their previously acquired headrights - - With
these different views they assembled at this point opened farms and erected
buildings not doubting that they should hold quiet and secure possession but
that they now ascertain that much of the land upon which they were located
was previously surveyed, that the Military Road act is rendered inoperative
by subsequent Congressional acts, and that occupants were not respected.
Under these circumstances undersigned petition your honourable body to
grant a tract of land by way of relief to each of these individuals such as
you in your wisdom may think proper and your petitioners will ever pray, etc.
The names of the individuals alluded to above are

John Beeman & family Samuel Beeman, single
William K. Beeman, single James J. Beeman, single
James H. Mais, single Wilson Gilbert & family
Henson Walker, single Henderson Walker, single
Landon Walker & family Crawford Brown & family
K. S. Custer, single Samuel Moss, single
James F. Redden, single John H. Cox, single
Thomas P. Rattan, single George Lamston
J. B. Moore, single Mary Rattan, Widow - Husband
George Cox, single killed here by Indians
John N. Bryan & family Alexander M. Webb & family

The foregoing list embraces those who are entitled to the sympathies of
undersigned and such relief as suffering borderers might justly expect of a
generous and magnanimous nature.
________________________________

William T. Sadler, Executor.
To - - Deed
John Beeman. Whereas, Thomas Lagow, of the County of Houston, now Anderson,
in the Republic, now State of Texas, in his lifetime, to-wit:

On the 21st day of Oct. 1844, made, executed and delivered to John Beeman
of Nacogdoches, now Dallas County, and State aforesaid, an agreement amounting
to a bond for a deed to 640 acres of land to be taken from a survey of 26 labors of
land for said Thomas Lagow on the waters of the Trinity River, known as White Rock
in the County of Dallas, and State aforesaid;

And whereas, afterwards, to-wit: On the 11th day if Jan. 1845, Thomas Lagow
departed this life tetstate, leaving Wm T. Sadler of the County of Anderson and State
of Texas, the sole Executor of his last will and testament, and afterwards, to-wit: On
the 20th day of March, 1845, said Wm. T. Sadler took upon himself the burden of the
trust committed to him by said last will and testament, and was by the County Court
of said County of Houston clothed and invested with full power and authority to carry
out the intentions of said testator as therein specified.

Now In tender consideration of the above facts, and by virtue of the authority
and power vested in said Wm. T. Sadler so as aforesaid, this indenture witnesseth:
That the said Wm. T. Sadler, Executor of the last will and testament of the said Thomas Lagow, deceased, of the County of Anderson, and State of Texas, for and in behalf of said Testator, etc., for and in consideration of the sum of $640.00 to him in hand paid, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, has this day granted, bargained and sold, and does by the presents grant, bargain, sell and convey and confirm unto John Beeman of the County of Dallas, and State of Texas, his heirs and assigns forever, the following described lot, tract or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the County of Dallas, and State of Texas, and meted and bounded as follows, to-wit: Beginning at a stake 40 chains W of the SE corner of Section B in Township One S of the first Base line and in range two E of the first or principal meridian of the surveys made in Peters Colony; Thence N at 3 chains prairie, at 30.50 chains, National Road and at 77.45 chains, the NE line of the Lagow League a stake in line; Thence N 45 W 4 chains to a stake in line; Thence W at 6 chains, White Rock Creek at 55 chains, prairie, at 80 chains a stake on High prairie; Thence S at 69 chains, timber, at 80 chains, a stake; Thence E at 75.40 chains White Rock Creek and at 80 chains a stake the place of beginning, containing by estimation 639.97 acres.

To have and to hold the aforesaid described tract or parcel of land, together with the improvements thereon and the appurtenances thereunto belonging unto the said John Beeman, his heirs and assigns forever. And the said Wm. T. Sadler, as Executor aforesaid further covenants and agrees with said John Beeman, his heirs or assigns that he will as such executor as aforesaid warrant and forever defend the title to the aforesaid described premises and improvements unto the said John Beeman, his heirs or assigns against the claim or claims of any and all persons whomsoever lawfully claiming or to claim the same or any part thereof by, through or under the said Thomas Lagow, his heirs or assigns.

In testimony whereof, the said Wm. T. Sadler, Executor of the last will and
testament of Thomas Lagow, deceased, has hereunto set his hand, and scrawl, by
way of seal, this 5th day of November A. D. 1850.

Wm. T. Sadler, (Seal)
Executor of the Last Will and
Testament of Thomas Lagow, deceased

The certificate of acknowledgement is in compliance with statute:
Acknowledgement taken by A. Harwood, C.C.C.D.C.T. Nov. 5th, 1850.
Filed: Feb. 25th, 1851, and recorded in Book B, page 452 in the office of the County
Clerk of Dallas County, Texas.

Previous typed abstract by M. C. Toyer
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http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/tx/dallas/census/1850/dalfc50a.txt

1850 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX

p. 100B 406 421

John BEEMAN 50 m Farmer $2600 IL
Emily 44 f SC
William H 23 m Farmer IL
Samuel H 21 m Farmer IL
Isaac H 18 m Farmer IL
James H 17 m Farmer IL
Clarissa 14 f IL
Nancy 11 f IL
John W 9 m TX
Sarah A 6 f TX
Caroline 4 f TX
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1850 Dallas Co, TX, Agriculture Census

John BEEMAN: 40 improved acres; 600 unimproved acres; $1000 Cash value of
farm; $66 Value of farming impliments; 4 horses; 20 Milch cows; 6 working
oxens; 20 Other cattle; 9 Sheep; 20 Swine; $830 Value of livestock; 280 bushels
Indian corn; 20 bushels of Oats; 2 pounds Butter; 9 tons Hay; 35 lbs. of Honey;
$20 Value of homemade manufactures; $60 Value of animals slaughtered.

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John BEEMAN's Land Records can be found in Deed Records of Dallas
County, TX, Book 363, Page 506; Book "J", Page 320; and Book "B", Page 452.

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1870 Dallas County, TX, Agriculture Census

John BEEMAN: 9 acres of improved land; 38 acres woodland; 35 acres unimproved
land; $900 Value of farm; $12 Value of equipment; 7 Horses; 6 Milch cows; 6 Other
cows; $314 Value of all livestock; 300 bushels Indian corn; $30 Value of slaughtered
animals; $180 Value of all farm production.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON MARGARET BEEMAN BRYAN, Wife of John Neely BRYAN

The following is from the Dallas Morning News, 2 Jan 1902,
transcribed & edited by M. C. Toyer.

Mrs. Margaret BRYAN is now about 78 years of age and is the widow of John Neely BRYAN above referred to as Father of Dallas.  She was married to Mr. BRYAN on Feb. 26, 1843, when a part of Dallas County east of the Trinity was a part of Nacogdoches. This was the first marriage of white people within bounds of what is now Dallas County, and John BRYAN, Mrs. Margaret BRYAN's first born, was the first white child of Dallas. He was born Jan. 9, 1846.

Editor's Note: The honor of Dallas' firstborn white child actually goes to Morris
Gilbert, the ninth child of Captain Mabel Gilbert and his wife Charity, who was born soon
after their arrival in early 1842. John and Margaret BRYAN's first child, Holland Coffee
BRYAN was born August 26, 1844, but died July 18, 1845. There were probably other
births preceeding John Neely BRYAN, Jr. but none were actually recorded until Dallas
County was formed in March 1846.

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More About JOHN BEEMAN:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
32,33,34 Lot 1.1
Died at: Bowie County, TX
35
Occupation: Farmer (1850 Census)
Residence: Bet. October 1799 - 1813, Murfreesboro, Hertford County, NC
Residence(s): Bet. 1813 - 1840, Calhoun, Scott, Greene, and Pike County, IL
Residence(ss): 1817, John had land just south of James' farm & next to the
Smelzer's in Madison County, IL
Residence(sss): 1825, John purchased land next to James in Greene County, IL
Residence(ssss): Bet. December 1840 - November 1841, Cross Roads Campground,
Bowie County, TX, near Dalby Springs, Old Boston
Residence(sssss): Bet. November 1841 - April 1842, Temporary lodging at Bird's Fort
until 8 Apr 1842
Residence(ssssss): 08 April 1842, Settled on White Rock Creek, East portion of later
Dallas, TX
Residence(t): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
36
Residence, Last: Bet. 1842 - March 1856, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Spelling: Beeman, Beaman (Family Bible, WFT#2:390)

Notes for EMILY MANLY HUNNICUTT:

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WFT source for Emily Manly's birthdate showed June 19, 1806 in South Carolina.
Her grave stone in the Beeman Family Cemetery shows 13 Feb 1806.
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An article by Helen J. Sullivan of Dallas, Texas, in "Proud Heritage, Pioneer
Families of Dallas County" (1985), pp 46,47 indicates her birthdate as 19 Feb, 1806.
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In the "Citizens of the Republic of Texas" by the Texas Genealogical Society,
1977, pp 95,96, Emily's date of birth is shown as 19 Feb 1806, in Anderson County,
S. C.
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William C. HUNNICUTT and Patience HUNNICUTT, twin brother and sister, were
the first children of Hartwell and Margaret HUNNICUTT, born in Illinois. Their mother
was not physically able to rear these twin babies so Emily took charge of William,
while Ann took care of Patience. They "spoon-fed" and reared them. Patience was
raised in the home of her sister, Ann and Mr. Moore. William was raised in the home
of Emily and John BEEMAN.
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Emily (HUNNICUTT) BEEMAN (52) is in the 1860 Census, Dallas P.O., Dallas
County, TX, Precinct #1, along with her children, James (27), Scott (19), Sarah A.
(16), and Caroline (14).

1167 1166 Emily (Hunnicutt) Beeman 52F Farmer 6500 1000 SC
James 27M Farmer 800 1440 IL
Scott 19M TX
Sarah A. 16F TX
Caroline 14F TX
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1860 Dallas County, TX, Agriculture Census

Emily BEEMAN: 60 Improved acres; 580 Unimproved acres; $6400 Cash value of farm;
$25 Value of farming impliments; 5 horses; 10 milch cows; 15 Other cattle; 10 swine;
$675 Value of livestock; 423 bushels Wheat; 40 bushels Indian corn; 520 bushels
Oats; 300 pounds of Butter; $90 Value of animals slaughtered.

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Emily is in the 1870 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, along with C. A. FUGATE
(8) f w TX, Isaac FISHER (27) Farmer $435 MO Can't write, his wife, Caroline (25) TX,
and their infant son, John (
1/12) TX, born in May. Also in the household is Muncy
GILFORD (12) TX, Attends school.

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Emily is in the 1880 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, living with her son,
Scott BEEMAN and wife, Bettie, and 4 of their children: "Annie", "Emma", "Lizzie",
& Scott. Margaret BRYAN, sister to Scott, is also living with Scott.

________________________________________________

Emily BEEMAN, Dallas County, is listed in "Confederate Indigent
Families Lists of Texas 1863- 1865"

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City Notes.

     There died at the residence of Mrs. Isaac FISHER, ten miles southwest of Dallas, on last Tuesday, Mrs. Emily BEEMAN, one of the mothers of Dallas county, she having come to where Dallas now stands just fifty years ago. Mrs. BEEMAN was born in South Carolina in 1805, hence was 87 years of age. She married in Illinois and came to Bowie county, Texas, in 1840, and to Dallas early in April , 1842, when the only resident was John Neely BRYAN, who afterward married her daughter, Margaret. Three sons and three daughters are left to mourn her loss.

- May 6, 1892, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p. 4, col. 5.
- o o o -

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Emily and her husband, John, are buried in the BEEMAN Family Cemetery,
Dallas, TX. On the back of a large gravestone of Scott BEEMAN, reads, "Mrs. Emily
BEEMAN holding her son, Scott, and guarding against Indians in Dallas County in
1841".

 

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ADDITIONAL NOTES FOR JOHN BEEMAN

The following is from an article in the Dallas Morning News, 2 Jan 1902.
Edited & Transcribed by M. C. Toyer.

In the latter part of the year 1840, Major John Bird of Bowie County, acting
upon authority from the Republic of Texas, raised a company of three months rangers in eastern Texas and proceeded to a point on the north side of the Trinity River, about 22 miles northwesterly from Dallas, and there built a fort. This defense was erected for protection against the Wichita and other roving tribes of Indians, and to form a nucleus for a colony. John BEEMAN was a member of this company (which consisted of about 30 men) but on the way out his arm was broken by accident. He remained, however, until Bird's Fort was finished, and then returned to Bowie County for his family. The following autumn (1841) he and his brother James moved their families out to Bird's Fort, together with Hamp RATTON and family.

As an inducement to settlers, the Republic of Texas promised to feed them all the first year, or until a crop could be gathered. In this, however, the Government failed utterly, and the pioneers had to rely on their own resources. On the way out the immigrants stopped at Fort English (the present site of Bonham) where they met Major Bird who advised them to take out some corn and beef steers. "As the boys at the Fort are pretty short of rations," he said. Major Bird negotiated with Mr. Bailey English (who was general trader) for five beef steers and a lot of corn, giving his note of $100 for the same. John BEEMAN and Hampton RATTON endorsed the note and RATTON getting killed by Indians, BEEMAN afterwards had it to pay in full.

When the party of immigrants arrived at Bird's Fort they found the garrison entirely destitute of provisions having had nothing to eat for a week. One of the Rangers, Riley Cole, had a few days before, picked up the feet of a calf that had been lying out on the prairie for six weeks (the calf having been butchered and eaten at the time) and he boiled these dry and discarded bones into a sort of soup or jelly. This was greedily devoured by the starving garrison and was the last morsel they had until the BEEMANs and their company arrived.

Some small attempts at farming were begun at Bird's Fort, but on account of the malarial conditions in the vicinity, caused by a stagnant lake, the pioneers decided to quit the locality and hunt for a more salubrious spot.

Editor's Note: Under the Military Road Act of 1840, Jonathan Bird and the other settlers at Bird's Fort were entitled to land in the vicinity of the fort but conflicts with additional land granted to the Texas Land and Immigration Company (Peters Colony) caused Sam Houston to deny the Bird's Fort settlers' claims. Many returned to the settlements in East Texas and a few to what later became Collin County. Only a handful made the move to John Neely BRYAN's outpost in the future city of Dallas.

 

A short time prior to the immigration of the BEEMANs and their friends, Hamp RATTON and Captain Mabel Gilbert to Fort Bird, a sturdy frontiersman named John Neely BRYAN had pitched his tent upon the banks of the Trinity, about the foot of what is now Main Street of the present City of Dallas. BRYAN, the Father of Dallas, went to Bird's Fort early in the year 1842 and invited the newly arrived settlers to pay his camp a visit, with the view of locating in that vicinity. Here is the account of the late Texas Historian Major John Henry Brown, of this incident:

"Late in November, 1841, John Neely BRYAN, a Tennesseean who had spent some time in the settlements on Red River, camped alone and erected a tent on the banks of the Trinity, near the site of the courthouse, and remained alone until the succeeding spring, except when visited by persons looking at the country. In the spring of 1842, several other families having arrived at Bird's Fort, abandoned the fort and moved to Dallas. Therefore, began in the spring of 1842, when the first cabin was erected and the families of John BEEMAN and Captain Gilbert being the first to arrive and relieve the loneliness of the adventurous and true avant coureur, John Neely BRYAN. Mrs. Gilbert the first American lady in Dallas County and Mrs. John BEEMAN
the next."

Mr. BEEMAN (John, the pioneer father of Wm. H. BEEMAN) asked BRYAN to give his camp a name, so that the new settlement could be designated, BRYAN being a great admirer of George M. Dallas, named the place in his honor.

Editor's Note: Descendants of William H. BEEMAN dispute this account of the naming of Dallas,
claiming this version was fostered by John Henry Brown and planted within this article by
George Dealey. There are several contenders for the honor of the City of Dallas' namesake,
a controversy that survives to this day. The only clue John Neely BRYAN left was his comment
to Alex Cockrell that he named the settlement, "for my friend, Dallas."

 

After a two or three day visit, BRYAN's guests decided to settle in his vicinity and returned to Bird's Fort for their families. Captain Mabel Gilbert, who had moved to the fort about two months after the BEEMANs, set to work and made two large dugouts from cottonwood trees and into these he loaded his family and household affects, making the trip to Dallas by water. He was formerly a Mississippi River steamboat captain and for this reason he probably preferred travel by water to an overland trip in an ox wagon. The distance from Bird's Fort to Dallas by water is 50 or 60 miles and on account of low water heavy drifts, "the fleet" of Captain Gilbert was ten days enroute.

The BEEMANs did not move down until April 1842. Under the laws of the Republic of Texas a section of land (640 acres) was given to the head of a family. Captain Gilbert located his claim two miles west of BRYAN's camp (now Dallas), and John BEEMAN settled on the east side of White Rock Creek, six or seven miles east of BRYAN's place on a tract of land afterwards known as the Lagow League.

Editor's Note: Unknown to John BEEMAN, the Lagow League had already been surveyed by
Warren A Ferris and patented to Thomas Lagow, a veteran of the Texas War for Independence.
John BEEMAN later purchased this tract from Thomas Lagow and located his headright claim
further east of White Rock Creek. James Jackson BEEMAN and John S. BEEMAN also located
their headright claims east of White Rock Creek. On his death in 1856, the original 640-acre
tract was divided among John BEEMAN's surviving children and several of them made their
homes there.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Besides John and James J. BEEMAN, Hamp RATTON, Capt. Gilbert, and Alex W. Webb, who with their families came to Dallas from Bird's Fort in 1842, there were others who settled in the county during that year. They were Thomas Keenan, and family; Preston and Pleasant Witt, twin brothers; and John and Eli Witt and family; John H. Cox and wife, and George Cox from Illinois; Solomon and William Caldwell and their families and their brother, Timothy, from Illinois; Dr. Calder who was killed the following year, by Indians; Wm. W. HOBBS and Wm. Larner and wife from Illinois.

___________________________________________

 

More About EMILY MANLY HUNNICUTT:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
37,38,39 Lot 1.2
Known as: Emily Beeman (1870, 1880 Census)
Residence: February 1806, Greenville County, SC
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas , Dallas County, TX
40
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Dallas County, TX, Dallas P. O.
Residence(sss): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, Precinct 1
41
Residence(ssss): 1880, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence, Last: May 1892, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Spelling: Manly, Manley (Brenda Beaman Parker, Kandy Beaver)
Spelling(s): Hunnicutt, Honeycutt

Marriage Notes for JOHN BEEMAN and EMILY HUNNICUTT:

________________________________________

WFT and "The Beeman Family 1841-1949" shows marriage date as 18 Jun 1823 in Calhoun County, IL (Greene County, per Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763 - 1900). Calhoun County was formed 1 Jan 1825. Calhoun was just west of Greene County, between the Mississippi and Illinois Rivers. Madison County was formed 14 Sep 1812 and consisted of everything north of St. Louis. Greene County was formed 20 Jan 1821 and consisted of later counties Macoupin, Morgan & Scott Counties. Alton became the County Seat of Madison County. The marriage date in the Beeman Family Bible is 19 Jun 1823.

________________________________________

More About JOHN BEEMAN and EMILY HUNNICUTT:
Marriage 1: 19 June 1823, Greene County, Illinois
42,43,44
Marriage 2: 19 June 1822
45
Marriage 3: 18 June 1823, Calhoun County, Illinois
46,47,48
Marriage 4: 19 June 1823, Alton, Madison County, Illinois
49
Marriage 5: 19 June 1823, Calhoun County, Illinois
50
Marriage 6: 19 June 1823, Madison County, Illinois
51,52,53
Marriage 7: 18 June 1824, Calhoun County, Illinois
54

Children of JOHN BEEMAN and EMILY HUNNICUTT are: Lots 1.1, 1.2, 8.1
i.   ELIZABETH
4 BEEMAN55,56,57,58,59,60,61,62,63, b. 22 July 1824, Greene County, Illinois64,65,66; d. 08 May 1886, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas67; m. (1) HENRY HARTER68,69,70,71, 15 August 1844, Bonham, Fannin County, Texas72; b. Abt. 1824, Canton, Stark County, Ohio73; d. Aft. 1846, At sea; m. (2) JAMES BRACKEN BRYAN, SR.74,75,76,77,78, 18 February 1849, Dallas County, Texas79,80; b. 1805, Pendleton District, Anderson County, South Carolina81; d. 1904, Stockton, San Joaquin County, California82; m. (3) WILLIAM CUMBY83,84,85,86,87,88, 17 August 1854, Winchester, Scott County, Illinois89,90; b. 10 August 1820, Virginia91; d. 21 December 1888, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.

Notes for ELIZABETH BEEMAN:

__________________________________________

It is believed that Elizabeth was the 3rd wife of James B. BRYAN, brother of John Neely BRYAN.

__________________________________________

Elizabeth's first husband was Henry HARTER. She was widowed when they lived in the Murphree Community of Dallas County.

__________________________________________

E. CUMBY is listed as Executor for Wm. CUMBY in Case #1240, Dallas County, TX.

__________________________________________

"Old Cemeteries of Dallas County", compiled by Willie Flowers Carlisle (Mrs. George F.), Dallas 1948, shows Elizabeth's birth date as 24 July 1824. Her gravestone shows 22 Jul 1824. She and her husband, William CUMBY are buried next to each other in the Beeman Family Cemetery, Dallas, TX. Her marker indicates her age as 61 yrs, 9 mos, 16 dys.

__________________________________________

More About ELIZABETH BEEMAN:
Burial: May 1886, Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
92,93 Lot 8.1
Residence: July 1824, Greene County, IL
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
94
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Montezuma, Pike County, IL
Residence(sss): 1880, Census, Montezuma, Pike County, IL
Residence, Last: May 1886, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Spelling: Elizabeth (1880 Census, gravemarker), Elisabeth (Beeman Family Bible)
Spelling(s): Beeman, Beaman

Notes for HENRY HARTER:

____________________________________________

Henry was the first husband of Elizabeth Beeman.

____________________________________________

Sometime in 1846, the Dallas Tavern opened under the management of Henry Harter. This was the first hotel or inn in the new town of Dallas. William Beeman operated it for several years. James B. Bryan, brother of John Neely Bryan, came to Dallas in 1846, and he is mentioned as running "the inn."

___________________________________________

Henry & Elizabeth lived at one time in the Murphree (Murphee) Community of Dallas County.

___________________________________________

Harry died on a sea voyage, and was buried at sea.

From WFT#2:390 Beeman

___________________________________________

More About HENRY HARTER:
Burial: At sea
95
Cause of Death: drowning?
Died at: On a sea voyage
96
Spelling: Harter, Hartor

Marriage Notes for ELIZABETH BEEMAN and HENRY HARTER:
_______________________________________

Pam Hooser shows Elizabeth and Harry married in Dallas County, TX.
_______________________________________

More About HENRY HARTER and ELIZABETH BEEMAN:
Marriage 1: 15 August 1844, Bonham, Fannin County, Texas
97
Marriage 2: 11 August 1844, Bonham, Fannin County, Texas
98
Marriage 3: 15 August 1844, Fort Inalisk (now Paris), Texas
98
Marriage 4: 16 August 1844, Bonham, Fannin County, Texas
99,100

Notes for JAMES BRACKEN BRYAN, SR.:

____________________________________________

"James was a native of Tennessee and a brother of John Neely BRYAN."

____________________________________________

James Bracken BRYAN'S middle name may be Booker since John Neely
BRYAN, Jr., named his son, James Booker BRYAN.

NOTE from David Krebeil (Wife is a descendant of JNB)

____________________________________________

"The Beeman Family 1841-1949" indicates James B. was born at Pendleton, SC.
Also it says that he was a pioneer of Harrison County, TX."

____________________________________________

Before meeting Margaret BEEMAN, John Neely BRYAN, James' younger brother,
used James' home in Harrison County, TX as his headquarters and scouted from there.

From Ruth Cooper's NOTES

____________________________________________

"James B. came to Dallas County in 1846 where he opened the first hotel in the small village of Dallas. He lived here eight years and then went to California, where he died. He was a native of Tennessee and a brother of John Neely BRYAN, who built the first cabin where the city of Dallas now stands."

NOTE from "Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County" p. 692.

____________________________________________

James was appointed Dallas County Treasurer in July 1846 for a 2-year term. He drew the first city map of Dallas.

From Ruth Cooper's NOTES
____________________________________________

James B. was the 2nd husband of Elizabeth BEEMAN.

____________________________________________

"James B. helped his brother, John Neely, with the founding of the town of Dallas, TX. He was County Treasurer in 1847. He was a dentist, mechanic, contractor, and builder and had a mercantile business that burned."

"California was offering flattering inducements to emigrants, so after his divorce from Elizabeth Beeman in 1853, he went to California where he married for a third time and had several children. Little was heard from James B. from California. Two reports: One that he died in 1863; the other that he lived to be a very old man, dying in 1904."

NOTE: This information was taken from the "McCubbin" files, Salisbury, Rowan County, NC. Pam Hooser obtained this info from the Bryan Family file on the 7th floor, Dallas Public Library.
____________________________________________

1850 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX

p, 101A 414 429 James B BRYAN 37 m Dentist TN
Elizabeth 25 f $200 IL
William 14 m AL
Louisa 11 f TX
Henrietta 9 f TX
James 7 m TX
Istmus
1/12 m TX

Page 101B
Louisiana HARTER 5 f $400 TX

____________________________________________

J. B. BRYAN is listed as executor for Leonora A. BRYAN in Case #954, Dallas County, TX.

____________________________________________

The Lusty Texans of Dallas indicate James went to California to be in the gold rush of 1850 and was never heard from again.

____________________________________________

May 1854

James B. BRYAN vs A. C. HAUGHT, et al. Debt.

The plaintiff's attorney declares that he will no longer prosecute this suit; defendants are to recover costs from the plaintiff, James B. BRYAN.

H. R. Morris vs J. R. Fondron. Trespass on the Case.

A rule having been entered at a former term of this court requiring said plaintiff to give security and it not being received; it is also decreed by the court that the said defendant should recover of the plaintiff all costs, for which let execution be issued.

James B. BRYAN vs John N. BRYAN & Samuel B. Pryor. Debt.

The plaintiff by his attorney says he will no longer prosecute this suit and it is ordered by the court that the defendants recover from plaintiff, James B. BRYAN, all costs.

____________________________________________



More About JAMES BRACKEN BRYAN, SR.:
Burial: Stockton, San Joaquin County, California
101
Occupation: Dentist (1850 Census)
Residence: 1805, TN
Residence(s): 1846, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ss): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
102
Residence, Last: CA

Marriage Notes for ELIZABETH BEEMAN and JAMES BRYAN:

_______________________________________

Elizabeth BRYAN vs James B. BRYAN. Motion for Alimony.

John C. McCoy is appointed receiver. The defendant, James B. BRYAN is ordered to deliver to the receiver the notes on the liability of Jonathan E. Jenkins for the rent of the hotel in the town of Dallas for the present year amounting to $300. The said McCoy is to collect the rents and distribute them in the following proportion; Elizabeth BRYAN-$200., James B. BRYAN-$75.00, the said Jenkins-$25. for improvements. When present term of renting expires, McCoy shall rent out the hotel at the best rate and continue to do so from year to year until the suit for divorce between these parties now pending shall be determined. Said receiver shall be allowed 10% on all amounts received and paid out.
_______________________________________

More About JAMES BRYAN and ELIZABETH BEEMAN:
Divorce 1: May 1853, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas
Divorce 2: Bet. 09 November - 08 December 1852, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas
103
Divorce 3: 14 November 1853, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas
104
Marriage: 18 February 1849, Dallas County, Texas
105,106
Married by: 18 February 1849, W. H. Hord, C.J.

Notes for WILLIAM CUMBY:
___________________________________________

William was the 3rd husband of Elizabeth BEEMAN.
___________________________________________

William's gravestone shows Wm. CUMBY, and birth date of 10 Aug 1820; Aged 68 y'rs, 4 mo's, 11 d'ys. He and Elizabeth are buried in the Beeman Family Cemetery, Dallas, TX.
___________________________________________

Samuel Harter BRYAN was raised by William CUMBY. "Sam" never knew he was not adopted.
___________________________________________

Wm. CUMBY, deceased; E. CUMBY, Guardian; Case #1240, Dallas County, TX
___________________________________________

More About WILLIAM CUMBY:
Burial: December 1888, Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, TX
107,108 Lot 8.2
Residence: August 1820, VA
Residence(s): 1860, Census, Montezuma, Pike County, IL
Residence(ss): 1880, Census, Montezuma, Pike County, IL
Residence, Last: December 1888, Dallas, Dallas County, TX

Marriage Notes for ELIZABETH BEEMAN and WILLIAM CUMBY:
______________________________________

Elizabeth's marriage to William CUMBY was in Scott County, IL (Winchester).
______________________________________

More About WILLIAM CUMBY and ELIZABETH BEEMAN: Lots 8.2, 8.1
Marriage: 17 August 1854, Winchester, Scott County, Illinois
109,110

ii. MARGARET BEEMAN111,112,113,114,115,116,117,118, 119,120,121,122,123,124,125,126,127, b. 29 September 1825, Calhoun County, Illinois128; d. 06 September 1919, Charlie, Clay County, Texas129,130; m. JOHN NEELY BRYAN131,132,133,134,135, 136,137,138,139,140,141,142, 26 February 1843, Pin Hook (now Paris, Lamar County), Texas143; b. 24 December 1810, Coon Creek, Fayetteville, Lincoln County, Tennessee144; d. 08 September 1877, Austin State Hospital, Austin, Travis County, Texas145.

Notes for MARGARET BEEMAN:
__________________________________________

Margaret BEEMAN source of information.

"Memorial and Biographical History, Dallas County, Texas,"
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago (1892), p. 153.
__________________________________________

"The actual settlement of Dallas County began in the spring of 1842, when the first cabin was erected and the families of John Beeman and Captain Gilbert were the first to arrive and relieve the lonliness of the adventurous and true-hearted John Neely Bryan, who had for five or six months been 'Monarch of all he surveyed,' provided, he neither surveyed red men of the forest nor the raging Trinity on one of its periodic 'spreads.' He entertained them with the best he had - chiefly bear meat and honey - perhaps without recalling the adage about 'entertaining angels unawares.' Yet was verified in this case, for, ere a great while, the lonely son of Tennessee gave his heart and hand to a comely and pure-hearted daughter of Illinois, in the person of Margaret, a daughter of Mr. John Beeman."

Transcribed from: "Memorial Biographical History of Dallas County".
__________________________________________

"Margaret & Neely were married in a simple civil ceremony at Fort Bonham on 26 Feb 1843, and returned to their log cabin home in Dallas on horseback."

Previous information from Ruth Cooper's notes.
__________________________________________

Margaret had to be a strong woman in these early days of Dallas, to say the least.
__________________________________________

After Bird's Fort was abandoned by the Republic of Texas, some
of the families gathered there, including the BEEMANs and the Capt.
Mabel Gilberts, moved down the river to join John Neely BRYAN in
his newly established town of Dallas. One of the BEEMAN girls, Mar-
garet, became BRYAN's bride. Bird himself moved westward, at least
into the adjoining county of Tarrant, where he established Birdville,
the first county seat on the formation of Tarrant County.

Previous information from Sam Acheson's "Dallas Yesterday", p. 63.
____________________________________________

There are several articles written by Margaret Beeman about life in early Dallas. They may be in the The Dallas Morning News or The Dallas Times Herald archives.

AGED WRITER RECALLS EARLY
DAYS OF DALLAS

FIRST WHITE WOMAN CITIZEN
OF CITY STILL LIVES

JOHN NEELY BRYAN CULTIVATED CORN
CROP WHERE DALLAS COUNTY COURT
HOUSE NOW STANDS

To the News:

Reading in the Dallas News of the death of Sister Knight reminds me that I will soon have to travel that road from which no traveler ever returns. It also reminds me of the days of long ago - the coming of the Knight family to Dallas. I am an old citizen of that city, my father's family came there in 1841. I was married there in 1843 to John Neely BRYAN, Sr., the father and founder of Dallas.

From reading the News I see there has been many great changes; for instance, the great viaduct that spans the Trinity River, which in early days my husband and I crossed so many times in our little canoe, dug out of a cottonwood tree, and your magnificent buildings that have taken the place of our little rude log cabin, with clapboard roof and puncheon floor. I can't comprehend the change and expect could hardly believe my own eyes. It doesn't matter how long I live, I shall always call Dallas my home. My husband and I lived happily in that lonely log hut, for we had plenty of buffalo, deer and turkey for meat with wild honey for sweets. We ground our meal on a steel mill, raised our corn on the ground where your fine courthouse now stands. We had one Indian pony and a wooden plough, made of the fork of a Bois d'arc tree and the harness was made of buffalo skins. In this way we blasted out the path for the prosperity of the thousands that now enjoy the pleasure of living in that great city. The reason I haven't visited Dallas is that I live with my son, John Neely Bryan, Jr., and have made my home with him and his good wife for over thirty years. He is now almost blind and can't see to read or write, much less travel with his old mother, so I suppose we will remain here for the remainder of our time. Now, Mr. Editor, I will enclose one of my photos so that the people of Dallas can see that the first white woman that ever walked the streets of Dallas still lives and enjoys reasonable health, for one of her age.

All kindest regards to the Dallas News and the City and County of Dallas. I remain ever yours,

Mrs. John Neely BRYAN, Sr.
Charlie, Texas.
April 12, 1914

-------------------------------

Margaret BEEMAN BRYAN
(Mrs. John Neely BRYAN)
Born Sept. 29, 1825
Died Sept. 6, 1919
Buried in Charlie, moved to Wichita Falls, Texas

(This is an article written by Mrs. John Neely BRYAN and published in the Dallas News.)

Margaret (BEEMAN) BRYAN (1825-1919) was the daughter of John and Emily (HUNNICUTT) BEEMAN, and was age 80 years at the time of this interview. This interview was taken from the Dallas Genealogical Society Quarterly, December 1988, p. 234, where it was reproduced.

 

Times Herald, August 3, 1905

Mrs. John Neely BRYAN

Mrs. BRYAN Talks at Dallas County Pioneer Reunion

"The most interesting character at the Old Settlers Reunion at Oaklawn Park is Mrs. BRYAN, widow of John Neely BRYAN, the founder of Dallas. Nine years ago Mrs. BRYAN removed with her son, John Neely BRYAN, Jr., from Dallas County to Clay County, and resides on Red River near Thornbury, in Clay County.

Her old friends knowing she would be at the reunion came in greater numbers than usual just to meet her again and be for two days more with their dear friend, who, with them in "the used to be" was young when Dallas County was young, before Dallas County was, indeed, for when the first settler came it was a part of Nacogdoches County. Talking to "Times Herald" reporter, Mrs. BRYAN said: "I came with my people, the BEEMANs, from Illinois to Texas in 1840, when I was a slip of a girl of fifteen. We lived at a block house, for that stood where Birdville, in Tarrant County, now stands and where a few families had gathered and built this block house for protection from the Indians who were plentiful those days, almost as the buffalo that roamed at will in great herds over the prairies around where Dallas now stands, and even grazing grass right where the streets of Dallas are now laid off.

In 1843, when I was eighteen, I married John Neely BRYAN. There was a man who rode the mail, horseback, from Bonham down into the cross timbers settlements and further on, who was also a justice of the peace, and he married us. His precinct as justice of the peace ran from Red River on down this way, taking in all this section, and I don't know how much farther west. I cannot remember his name, but he was a very handy man in the community, as he could settle legal disputes most anywhere, under a tree or in a house, when there happened to be any around, or he could marry a couple with ease, grace and great willingness, and he distributed the mail through the settlements, and letters were scarce those days, but always welcome visitor, bringing news from the kin folks and friends back in the states.

Yes, times were what folks would now call hard, but we didn't mind them. We always had plenty of meat and bread, and most of the time coffee and those who wanted it had milk, too. Mr. BRYAN was a great hand to have plenty of meat in the house, and it was powerful easy to get it. As I said, the buffaloes went in great droves all around us, never out of sight, and deer and turkey were as plentiful as the beeves are out West now. The rivers and creeks had plenty of fish in them, too, and in winter we had the Northern wild fowl and prairie chickens would almost come into the house. Mr. BRYAN always said he would rather eat my bread, my cornbread, than any other sort of bread ever made.

Mr. BRYAN founded Dallas by building the first house ever built in the town, a log house close to the river, where the Commerce Street Bridge is now. There was a ferry there in those days when the river was up and a ford in low water. This was just a natural ford, the road up and down the banks first being beaten out, I suppose, by Indians and buffalo crossing back and forth.

Yes, Mr. BRYAN was the first settler in what is now Dallas County, and the Overtons were the second family to come. I remember the first time I ever saw Alex COCKRELL's father. He came to our house with some Indians, was dressed like the Indians, and could talk the Indian language. I asked Mr. BRYAN who he was and he told me his name. He stopped in the settlement, that back in the forties, and took up land on Mountain Creek, a headright. I suppose Mr. HORTON lived on Mountain Creek and Mr. COCKRELL married Sarah HORTON. He made quite a fortune and was for some time before his death engaged in milling business.

Yes, I know all the first settlers, and when a new family came into the community it was like a nine day wonder; everybody was so glad to get another neighbor and that much more help in case of hostilities from the Indians, which we were always in dread of. In those days everybody knew everybody here and was welcome in everybody else's house. We all neighbored and we all loved one another. People didn't stare at strangers like they were wild animals, but gave them a cordial greeting and welcome, and divided whatever they had with them, helping them along until they could get settled and fixed up. In those early days our house was a general stopping place for people going to and fro through this section. Some of the men who were big in those days in the affairs of the country and some who have become big since, have often been to our house and stayed with us. People didn't charge travelers for staying all night with them in those old times, but were always glad to have them. People didn't lock up their doors and bar their windows to keep thieves out, for there were no thieves or burglars in the country. We slept with our windows up and doors open in the warm weather and never thought of losing anything, and we didn't lose anything unless prowling Indians slipped in and stole a few horses or killed a beef or two on the prairie. Those were good old times, the happiest and best days of all my life.

The first great sorrow of my married life was when my first baby died, the first child born in Dallas County, and my son, John Neely, Jr., was the next, the first born in the county to live. The people were all honest, all kind and good hearted, sympathizing with those in distress, helping freely and gladly those in need. If anybody was sick all the community went to help nurse, and when a death occurred everybody physically able, went to the funeral, weeping with the grief-stricken relatives and offering every comfort and sympathy that tender and loving hearts could give. People got closer together in the pioneer days, out on the borders than they do when civilization fills up the country. It may bring its finer churches and school houses and dwellings, its multiplied conveniences and varied needful utilities and its greater wealth of this world's goods, but there seems to come with it fearful dearth of God's love in the hearts of men and sad luck of human kindliness and gentleness.

This bois d'arc rocking chair you see there on the platform, my son and I brought down with us, that the people in the great Dallas of today might see the kind of rocking chairs we had in the early days. I do not suppose any of your fine furniture stores or manufacturers would let that old chair have standing room in their establishments but it is dear as life to me. My husband cut the bois d'arc tree and made that chair with his own dear hands in 1844, sixty-one years ago, and bottomed it with buffalo hide, tanned by himself, and taken from the body of a buffalo he had himself slain. He had no turning lathe to turn the legs and rounds, but he made a bowstring (all workmen know what a bowstring is) and turned them with that. It was a fine chair when it was first made, because there were none finer in all this country, but it looks very uncouth and rustic and common beside the artistic productions of machinery and skilled workmen of these times; but do you reckon any of these artistic and elegant rockers of high price would stand the wear and tear and rough usage of sixty-one years as this plain bois d'arc chair, made by unskilled hands, has stood.
******
__________________________________________

In the 1880 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, Margaret is living with her brother, Scott and his wife, Bettie, along with Scott and Bettie's family of 4 children: "Annie", "Emma", "Lizzie", & Scott, and Scott's mother, Emily.

Transcribed from "The Forgotten History of the Four Cabins Built by John Neely Bryan", Written by Barrot Steven Sanders, Library #976.42812.S21FF.
__________________________________________

The following is a poem written to the wife of John Neely BRYAN, Margaret BEEMAN BRYAN, written to her by her cousin, Rowell HUNNICUTT.

 

THE OLD LOG CABIN

My mind wanders back to my childhood days,
When my friends and neighbors had such different ways.
It was long about the fifties and sixty sevens,
When we had the best neighbors; ever lived under heaven.
They were ready to assist you at a beckon or call,
When we lived in log cabins with holes in the wall.

Then we had horses, hogs, cattle, and all,
Though we lived in log cabins with holes in the wall.
But now they live in houses so spacious and tall,
They haven't time to see you or ever call.
So please give me those old times when we lived
In log cabins with holes in the wall.

It is true I lived in a house that had brick for its walls,
And if I should appear stuck up, my friends, I hope me will call,
For I am the same humble sinner that was raised, or rather, born
In a log cabin with holes in the wall.
I had four sisters and six brothers, which made eleven in all,
And, except two, we were all born in a log cabin with holes in the wall.

Some of those neighbor's names I will endeavor to recall,
Of course, it is impossible to name them all,
Though most of them lived in houses that had logs for their walls.
These were Kemp, Long, Glover, Lanham, Beeman's, Bruton's, and Moore's,Uncle Charley Johnson, Tom and Bob Pemberton, Badgely, Motley's and all.
There were Nesbaumer, Mayfield's, old Uncle Alex Webb, and one Henry Ball.

And most of them lived in houses that had logs for their walls,
And, yes, there was Cousin Margaret, and John Neely Bryan
Which is the last I will call.
They owned most of Dallas - but then Dallas was small,
And they lived in a double log cabin
Which had a ten or twelve foot hall.

I would love to see a monument erected in memory of them all,
And I would want to see it tower above the tallest of them all.
You may read the history of all nations
And the brave of every land,
But there is nothing found to equal at the Alamo,
Colonel Travis and his band.

Rowell Hunnicutt

From Mrs. W. M. SIMM's scrapbook.
__________________________________________

Note: Margaret smoked a pipe and Annie Marie LANHAM SEIDENBERG had possession of it until Annie's death. Don't know where it is at the present time. I personally saw the pipe just prior to Annie Marie's death; A. C. Morgan.

==================================================

The founder of Dallas, John Neely BRYAN, was a Tennesse-born
lawyer and trading post merchant who never put on a soldier's uni-
form until his extreme old age when, during the Civil War, he served
briefly in a home-guard military capacity. Fort Worth, on the other
hand, was started by the Unites States Army, which established a
frontier post there in 1849 on a bluff overlooking the Trinity River
and named it for Gen. William Jenkins Worth of Mexican War fame.

Previous information from Sam Acheson's "Dallas Yesterday" , p. 60.
___________________________________________

The following are added NOTES for husband, John Neely.

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~lpproots/Neeley/john_neely_bryan.htm

Debrett's Texas Peerage page 300:

Bryan had the distinction of being the first settler in Dallas TX. From his cabin there he plowed the land in his buckskin suit with a bois d'arc fork & crossed the river in a cottonwood dugout. His home was the first post office & courtroom in Dallas, TX. He became a lawyer & served as a Dallas alderman. Born in Fayetteville, TN, in 1810. Married MARGARET BEEMAN, one of the first settlers in Dallas, where he had a famliy. Died in Austin in 1877.

20th century descendents include the families of Alexander Lut(h)er BRYAN, Robert Alexander WARNER, Ross Willard BROWN, Minor Lafayette WOOLLEY, Samuel Gayle Deatherage, Jasper Clark BOX.
[DRT nos, 5464, 5581, 5758.]

 

History:

French traders had contact with the Anadarko people in the area around Dallas in the 1700s. In 1841 John Neely BRYAN founded a trading post on the east bank of the Trinity River, near the junction of two Native American trails. BRYAN was unaware that he had settled on land granted by the Texas republic to an immigration company, but he eventually legalized his claim. The extensive promotion efforts of the company brought settlers to the area, and in 1844 a town site was laid out. The town was incorporated in 1856, and in the late 1850s, the collapse of a nearby cooperative community, La Réunion, augmented the population and added skilled European craftspeople to the workforce.

In March 1861 Texas seceded from the Union and joined the Confederate States of America. During the American Civil War (1861-1865), Dallas served as a supply and storage post for the state. After the war ended, freed slaves flocked to Texas and founded a freedmen's town on the outskirts of Dallas.

By 1870, the year Texas was readmitted to the Union, Dallas had a population of about 3000. Dallas grew steadily for the next 30 years. The successful lobbying for two railroads, the Houston and Texas Central in 1872 and the Texas and Pacific in 1873, initiated this growth. As a rail crossroads, Dallas became a regional transport center for products headed to Northern and Eastern manufacturing centers.

Cotton became the principal source of income, but the city also attracted merchants and banking and insurance companies eager to exploit available transportation and communication facilities. Throughout this period, business and political leaders forged close ties, thus shaping the character of the city and guiding its economic direction.

By 1890 Dallas had 38,067 residents and was the largest city in the state.

The Panic of 1893, a national economic crisis, slowed the city's business development. Dallas recovered with the increase in agricultural prices in the early 20th century, and doubled its size with the annexation of Oak Cliff and other areas.

In the century's second decade, Dallas began implementing an urban design plan created by George Kessler, a city engineer. The Kessler Plan connected Oak Cliff and Dallas, established greenbelts, and attempted to chart and direct urban growth.

Control of the Trinity River also took a high priority. The city built levees and steel viaducts, and in a massive engineering project, the river channel was moved, straightened, and confined for flood control.

The Great Depression of the 1930s had a severe impact on Dallas, but the crisis was partially alleviated by the discovery of the East Texas oil fields, which made Dallas a center of the petroleum business. Oil and the booming defense industry during World War II (1939-1945) stimulated growth and helped Dallas to diversify its economy.

Dallas won a reputation as a politically ultraconservative city in the 1950s. The assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dealey Plaza was a shock to the residents of Dallas and moderated somewhat the city's politics. Nevertheless segregation continued in the city, and the flight of white residents from the inner city intensified racial animosities.

The city prospered economically with the rising oil prices of the 1970s and the resulting construction boom. The collapse of oil prices in the 1980s, the failure of many local savings and loan institutions, and the resulting collapse in real estate prices caused the city to tumble into an economic depression. Dallas civic leaders launched an economic program that included renovating part of the downtown area and attracting new industries. The city leadership also worked hard at smoothing racial tensions, which remained despite sizable growth in minority populations and improved sensitivity on the part of white leaders. Although Dallas was one of the last major cities to recover from Texas's mid-1980s economic collapse, the strength of its basic economy, its geographic location, and the recovery of the state economy ultimately combined to slow the economic decline in the Dallas region.

Contributed By: Robert A. Calvert
____________________________________________

"John Neely BRYAN opened his trading post along the Trinity River in 1841, five years after the Republic of Texas was born. He talked the John BEEMAN family into moving to (what is now) Dallas (to a spot near White Rock Creek) and married their daughter, Margaret."

Previous NOTE from "The Dallas Morning News", Sunday, June 21, 1998.
____________________________________________

"John Neely BRYAN founded Dallas, Texas, in 1841. Called Uncle Neely by the family. I was always told that he had a drinking problem, died in an Austin State Hospital & was buried in an ummarked grave there in Austin. He has a Memorial Monument in Pioneer Cemetery in Dallas. John Neely always operated a ferry, mostly free to get settlers, but was officially licensed.....1845, along with William Baker who operated it, although Adam HAUGHT operated the ferry for a little while. Alexander COCKRELL bought Dallas and the ferry rights in April 1853 for $7000.

In 1855, when John Neely BRYAN thought he had killed a man, he ran away and spent some time with his friend, Jess Chisholm in the Creek Nation. Then he went on to California, where he saw his brother, James B. BRYAN, at Stockton. John N. BRYAN returned home in 1861."

NOTES from Ruth Cooper
_____________________________________________

Letter to Mr. A. Cockrell from John Neely Bryan

Creek Nation February 25th 1856

Mr. A. Cockrell

Sir I receivd your letter of December the 4th a few days since and I was very glad to get it. I have rec - one from my wife only I am living with Jesse Chisholm in the Creek Nation about 40 miles North of Fort Arbuckle Chisholm is a half Breed Cheroke and an old friend of mine I have don nothing yet to make a living I hav been out on the Plains 3 times to look for the gold mines but did not find them and I think I shall set out again soon but will return hear again I some times think it would be best for me to go into the western part of Texas and make me a new home for I want to see my Family and shall not be satisfied until I am again with them I wish you to write to me and advise me in regard to this course and let me know if it would be safe for me to do so or not I was in a storm some time since and a tree blowed down on my horse and broke him down in the time since which time I have had to borrow

I am surprised at Cal Stone and other Atorneys of Dallas for turning against me and I shall meet them yet when they may lest expect it and then I will know the reason why they do so. If I have any friends among the people of Dallas I want you to write who they are

Give my love to my wife and children and say I will be with them as soon as I can I shall depend upon you to act for me as well as you can and I hope to live to work and pay you for it

Give my Respects to your Lady

I remain your
Friend_____
J N Bryan

Write soon and Direct
Fort Arbuckle
Chickasaw Nation

(This was written with the same spelling and punctuation as the original letter. From "Dallas News" 5-29-32. The horse which was killed was Neshoba, JNB's horse that carried him to Texas to found the city of Dallas.)
___________________________________________

Letter to Mr. Abr. Cockrell from John Neely Bryan

Jamestown Col; January 2nd 1858
To
Mr. Abr. Cockrell

Sir I received a letter from you which was written in June last and I answerd it at the time of reseption but I have not heard from you since I receivd one from my wife at the same time and have not receivd any since what can be the cause is a mistry to me But I continu to write to my by every mail I hope you will write to me and let me know the cause if any I do not write to any one at Dallas ecept you for I cannot place confidence in any the rest

I am not able to come home yet but as soon as I can I shall start home on the mail Roit from hear to El Passo I have worked harder than I ever did in my life but it takes all I can make to pay my Expences and every one hear that I am acquainted with is in the same situation I some times get out of Heart and conclude I will not be able to see my wife and children again The gold mines is worked out so much that men can make but little now and still a mans expinces is the same they wore before the mines foild I am mining now but the watter freeses up and I can make nothing You could not believe that their was in this country and hundreds of them that were almost on the starve but such is the case and their is but few but what eates up at night what he maks in the day it is the hardes country I think on earth

I shall be on the way as soon as I can make the money I shall not remain hear one day longer than I can help for I want to see my wife and children when I mention that is the cause for my coming home you know I am in Ernest I want you to see my wife tell her what I have written and say to her that it is not my fault I do not come home

Give my love to my wife and children My Respect to Mrs. Cockrell and any others that you know to be my friends if I have any about

I remain your friend
John N. Bryan

PS If you write direct your letter thus

Col John N. Bryan
Jamistown
California

If letters come hear after I leave I have friends hear that will send them too me whearever I go I do not want any more sent to Stocton for their is to minny their that knows me J.B. Bryan was their not long ago
JNB
___________________________________________

RODE A HORSE FROM SPRINGFIELD TO DALLAS is from an article
about John David Herndon, written by W. S. Adair and published
in the Dallas Morning News in 1927:

It is about J. D. HERNDON (wife Josephine HOBBS) son in law
of Wm. and Nancy BEEMAN HOBBS. It is faded and hard to read
but it says that HERNDON, in 1874, went back to Missouri and
made a crop on the old home plantation in Stone and Christian
Counties. He was accompanied by John Neely BRYAN, his son,
Ned BRYAN, and Sam CUMBY. John Neely BRYAN was then old
and much broken in health, left us in Missouri and went to
Illinois to visit his daughter. Illinois was his native state. (This
is not true. John Neely BRYAN was born and raised in
Fayetteville, Tennessee. He never lived in Illinois.) We took
three wagons and were sixteen days on the trip. It says he
(HERNDON) returned to Dallas in 1874.

Previous NOTE on the article is from Eulene WILKERSON.

_____________________________________________

There is a Memorial Monument in honor of JNB in the
Pioneer Cemetery in downtown Dallas, beside the Dallas
Convention Center. It was erected by the Daughters of
the Republic of Texas in 1954.

_____________________________________________

There has been much discussion about how Dallas got
its name. It is said that JNB named it after a friend. Someone
seemed to think it was VP Dallas. However, there is no
indication that JNB knew hem. It is more probable that he
named Dallas for Joseph Dallas who came as a pioneer from
Arkansas in 1843. This is the theory given in "One DCPA, Two
Beginnings, Three Centuries" - A History of the Dallas County
Pioneer Association, p. 20.

_____________________________________________

Austin State Hospital gives the death date of JNB as
8 Sep 1877. However the Family Bible gives the date as
14 Sep 1877. The descrepancy may be because, apparently,
the family was not notified of his death.

_____________________________________________

There are articles about JNB on microfilm and/or book form
at the Galveston Public Library. The Daily News. "Father of Dallas",
April 2, 1891; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Beeman", January 21, 1902; and
"Sketch of John Neely Bryan", May 11, 1902.

_____________________________________________

 

More About MARGARET BEEMAN:
Burial: September 1919, Thornberry Cemetery, Clay County, TX
146
Burial(s): 29 December 1926, Riverside Cemetery (Lot #369), Wichita Falls, Clay County, TX
Church Affiliation: Baptist
Residence: September 1825, Calhoun County, IL
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas County, TX
147
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Dallas County, TX
148
Residence(sss): 1870, Census, Dallas County, TX
149
Residence(ssss): 1880, Census, Precinct 4, Dallas County, TX
Residence, Last: September 1919, Charlie, Clay County, TX
Spelling: Margaret (1880 Census), Margareet, Margret
Spelling(s): Beeman, Beaman

Notes for JOHN NEELY BRYAN:
____________________________________________

By 1840 American explorers had begun to enter the area. The first to remain was John Neely BRYAN, who arrived in November 1841 with his dog and a Cherokee friend, Ned.

Settlers in the area had difficulties with Indians, . . . and many had settled for protection at Fort Bird or Bird's Fort, located near the site of present-day Euless.

Previous NOTE from Dallas County Historical Commission, Dallas County.
____________________________________________

The following information is from an "Interview of John Neely BRYAN, Jr.", written by W. S. Adair.

"My father, who was of Irish descent, was born in Lincoln County, Tennessee, December 24, 1810," Mr. BRYAN continued. "At that time Tennessee may be supposed to be something of a wilderness, but to the frontiersman it had become effete. My father crossed to Arkansas in 1837. He knew the language of several of the Indian tribes, and this knowledge and a wide acquaintance with the Indians enabled him to get into the Government service in connection with the Government trading post at Preston, on Red River, now in Grayson County."

"The Indians brought to Preston the most glowing accounts of the region lying south of Red River which filled my father with a desire to explore it. It seems that he was unable to find a white man to accompany him into an unknown region, inhabited by hostile tribes. He found many who were interested and who expressed a wish to invade it, but when the time came it invariably turned out that they had exaggerated their readiness for the plunge. Finally, in 1839, my father entered Texas with a single Cherokee companion. He explored the country for a considerable distance west and south, but selected the forks of the Trinity for the site of his projected settlement."
____________________________________________

The following information is from "The WPA Dallas Guide and History", pp. 38-39, published by the Dallas Public Library and the University of North Texas Press, 1992.

"It was in the autumn of 1840 that a young Tennessee-bred lawyer and frontier adventurer from Arkansas, John Neely BRYAN, accompanied by a Cherokee Indian guide and a bear dog, pitched camp on the east bank of the Trinity River, where the city of Dallas stands today. Born of Scotch-Irish stock at Fayetteville, Tennessee, December 24, 1810, John Neely BRYAN was one of the restless, enterprising, and frequently well-educated sons of the Old South who in the pioneer annals of the Southwest are the equivalents of the "voyageurs" and "coureurs de bois" of early frontier history in the North, and of the hunters and scouts who played such a prominent role in the later winning of the West. He had apparently read law in Tennessee in the approved fashion of the day, but when still very young crossed over into Arkansas to recover from the debilitating effects of an attack of the cholera; he lived with the Indians and adopted their mode of life. Little is known of his movements in the years immediately following except that he acquired an extensive acquaintance with languages and customs."

A PIONEER PITCHES CAMP

"Entering Texas in 1839 from Van Buren, Arkansas, where he had substantial interests--including a share in a coal mine -- BRYAN had been attracted to the Dallas region by visions of profitable trading with the Indians and white settlers who would traverse a projected military highway from Austin to the Red River. This would cross the Trinity River "at or near its three forks." After his preliminary survey in 1840 of the possibilities of a trading post on the Trinity, BRYAN returned to Van Buren, disposed of his holdings there and came again, this time alone, to the Texas site he had chosen, arriving later in November, 1841. He built a rude shelter against the bluff that formed the eastern bank of the river. Around the site of this habitation grew first the village, then the town, and finally the city of Dallas."

"Survey of the military road northward had been begun September 14, 1840, by Colonel W. C. Cooke of the Texas army. His party, after great hardships, in mid-October compelted the route to the mouth of the Kiamichi on Red River, crossing the Trinity River near the western end of the present Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe railway bridge in Dallas. This road was staked through the prairies and blazed through the timber. The southern section wa was opened in 1843, and in this year the "citizens at and near the three forks of the Trinity," including BRYAN, petitioned the congress of the Republic for the completion of the road. As a result the northern leg--designated as the Texas Central National Highway, authorize February 5, 1844 -- was opened in 1845, following the Cooke survey from the Trinity to the Red River."

"The territory east of the Trinity River was then a part of Nacogdoches County, that on the west Robertson County. As a settler BRYAN received a grant of 640 acres in the former county, comprising a strip along the Trinity River, and adjoining on the east a 4,605-acre tract previously granted to John Grigsby of Houston County. Owing to complications arising out of the proximity of the two grants, BRYAN's title was not finally confirmed by the State of Texas until February 16, 1854, while litigation over the Grigsby grant occupied the courts of the state for many years."

"While BRYAN was absent on his return trip to Arkansas, Rangers sent into North Texas by President Lamar to drive out the Indians had largely completed their task. When BRYAN again arrived on the banks of the Trinity, the redskins on whom he had counted as customers had departed."

"Consequently, he abandoned his original idea of a trading post in favor of establishing a permanent settlement. He learned from friendly Indians remaining in the vicinity that there were a number of white people twenty-two miles to the northwest at Bird's Fort (near the present Birdville in Tarrant County), survivors of a military camp established in 1840. BRYAN invited these pioneers to join him on the lower river."
______________________________________________

In 1925, W. N. Peacock wrote that it seemed "impossible that a city could grow from one log cabin to a great metropolis in less that a century." It would indeed be difficult to list all the players who acted to build Dallas County as we know it.

The region was originally home to the Caddo Indians. It wasn't until February 1841 that the Republic of Texas contracted with W.S. Peters and Associates of Kentucky and Ohio to introduce settlers to the area. In November 1841, before Peters colonists arrived, a young Tennessee lawyer and frontier adventurer named John Neely Bryan, established himself at a crossing of the Trinity River, at what is now near the Old Red Courthouse, downtown Dallas, TX.

BRYAN, who had spent the previous few years recovering from cholera, had discovered the location in 1840 while traveling with his dog, "Tubby", and a Cherokee friend and guide named "Ned".
______________________________________________

FOLLOWING NOTE from "Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County".

"The actual settlement of Dallas County began in the Spring of 1842, when the first cabin was erected and the families of John BEEMAN and Captain Mabel GILBERT were the first to arrive and relieve the loneliness of the adventurous and true-hearted, John Neely BRYAN, who had for five or six months been 'Monarch of all he surveyed', provided , he neither surveyed red men of the forest nor the raging Trinity on one of its periodic, 'spreads'. He entertained them with the best he had - chiefly bear meat and honey - perhaps without recalling the adage about 'entertaining angels unawares'. Yet was verified in this case, for err a great while, the lonely son of Tennessee gave his heart and hand to a comely and pure-hearted daughter of Illinois, in the person of Margaret, a daughter of Mr. John BEEMAN."
______________________________________________

According to some sources, he and a partner laid out the town of Van Buren, AR. JNB made his first trip to the future site of Dallas, TX, in 1839. He returned to Van Buren, AR for a while to settle his personal affairs. In November 1841 he was back in Texas. He settled on the east bank of the Trinity River, not far from present downtown Dallas (near the present day Old Red Courthouse).

In the Spring of 1842 he persuaded several families (one being BEEMAN) who had previously settled at Bird's Fort (north of Arlington, Texas) on the north bank of the Trinity River, to join him. John BEEMAN and his half-brother, James Jackson BEEMAN, were the first BEEMANs to come to the future Dallas Community from Greene County, IL. Title problems arose regarding the land because General Sam HOUSTON had also promised it to another land developer. At this point, John Neely BRYAN persuaded the BEEMAN's to move to Dallas. The BEEMAN brothers drove the first wagons into the future Dallas area and named Turtle Creek (an exclusive area of today's Dallas). James BEEMAN hunted buffalo around what is now the White Rock Lake and Love Field areas. James became a Texas Ranger, an Indian fighter, an explorer, and a farmer. He evidently was a roamer, a pilgrim, and a pioneer!

JNB married Margaret BEEMAN on 26 February 1843, who was a daughter of John BEEMAN. John & Margaret had 5 children.

One story has JNB as the founder of Dallas and that he named it after "his friend, Dallas."
______________________________________________

The following information is from "The WPA Dallas Guide and History", pp. 42-43, published by the Dallas Public Library and the University of North Texas Press, 1992.

TOWNSITE CALLED DALLAS

"Confirmation of the naming of the settlement as Dallas by 1843 is also found in the diary of Edward W. Parkinson, who in the summer of that year was a member of the party accompanying President Sam Houston from Washington-on-the Brazos to Bird's Fort, where Houston expected to make a treaty with the Indians. Parkinson wrote:"

"I then went on (after leaving the Houston party) to another settler's cabin on the banks of the Trinity River, the projected site for a town called Dallas, inhabited by a man named BRYAN, who had settled in the wilderness previous to its being chartered for a colony, and who seemed to anticipate some trouble from the heads of the colony wishing to asume his lands, a choice spot on the Elm Fork, which he had located previous to the colonial grant by virture of his headright. He was a hardy backwoodsman and a sensible, industrious, ingenious, and hospitable man. He as well as others complained bitterly of the colonial management, there being no agents or surveyors there to attend to the immigrants when they arrived or point out the lands available for them. He informed me there were only about thirty families spread over a space of as many miles in length and breadth."
______________________________________________

Mr. PERRY OVERTON was Here Before Dallas Was

Mr. Perry Overton, who has 100 acres of cotton
on his farm a few miles southwest of the city, was
in town yesterday. He says his cotton will make
from a half to three-quarters of a bale to the acre,
and that everything he has planted this year is a
success.
Mr. Overton came to Dallas in 1844, when there was
but one house here. It was a cabin at the foot of
what is now Commerce street. Mr. John Nealy Bryant
[sic] lived in it.

- September 11, 1898, Dallas Daily Times Herald, p.
8, col. 5.
_____________________________________________

The following information is from "The WPA Dallas Guide and History", pp. 40-41, published by the Dallas Public Library and the University of North Texas Press, 1992.

"When John BEEMAN joined BRYAN at Dallas he brought his wife and ten children, including two daughters, Elizabeth and Margaret, in a covered wagon, the first wheeled vehicle the village knew. BEEMAN's impedimenta proved a double attraction for the bachelor pioneer, BRYAN, who first borrowed his wagon and oxen to go to Preston on the Red River for merchandise, and later paid court to his younger daughter, Margaret. On his trip to Preston, BRYAN followed the route, later the old Preston Road (now State Highway 14), which he had blazed along the western edge of the Cross Timbers on his first trip to and from the site of Dallas. On February 26, 1843, he married Margaret BEEMAN. The couple tilled the land about a second and better habitation the young husband had erected for his bride, using his Indian pony and a rude bois d'arc plow. Harness for the horse was made from buffalo hide, and when necessary, the couple crossed the river in a canoe hewn from a cottonwood tree. This second cabin was washed away in a great Trinity River foood in the spring of 1844, which threatened to destroy the village, and BRYAN and his wife lived in a tent made of wagon sheets until a new and larger log house could be erected."
_____________________________________________

Following is Excerpts of William Wald Glover Interview, first published in 1925; copied from a hand written document from the estate of Frances Ida Beeman Cutchinm, granddaughter of W. W. Glover and Julia Lanham and a great granddaughter of John Beeman and Emily Hunnicutt; transcribed by M. C. Toyer.

"I have heard it said that the only people in Dallas down to 1846, when the county was organized, were John Neely Bryan, J. W. Smith, Adam Haught, J. M. Patterson, and Colonel John C. McCoy and their families. Col. McCoy told me when he arrived in 1845, he found John Neely Bryan clad in a buckskin suit with moccasin shoes, the whole suit and man topped by a coonskin cap."
_____________________________________________

BRYAN served as postmaster in the Republic of Texas and operated a ferry across the Trinity River where Commerce Street crosses the Trinity River today.

In 1844 he persuaded J. P. DUMAS to survey and plat out the site of Dallas and probably helped him with the survey work.

Bryan organized Dallas County, in 1846, and was instrumental in choosing Dallas as its County Seat in August 1850. JNB donated the land for the courthouse (present-day Old Red Courthouse).

JNB was a lawyer and Justice of the Peace in Dallas, Dallas County, TX.
_______________________________________________

The following is transcribed from: "A Place Called Dallas, The Pioneering Years of a Continuing Metropolis", by A. C. Greene, pp. 1-4.

"In November 1841, a bachelor lawyer from Tennessee, by way of Arkansas, named John Neely Bryan, arrived at a small bluff, above a ford on the Trinity River and built a dugout. His companions were a Cherokee Indian called Ned, a pony named, "Neshoba Tenva", which was an Indian word meaning "Walking Wolf", and a big, 'bear' dog named "Tubby". He probably moved down out of Fort Smith, Arkansas, along the "Texas Road" via Pecan Point and Jonesboro on the Red River."

"Bryan had visited the country once before and had come back. He said, to set up a trading post with the Indians who had been pushed out of the Three Forks Area and Bryan found no customers. But his choice of locations was too good to waste; not only was he above high water on the Trinity; he was beside the shallowest, narrowest ford to be found for miles up or down the stream, and already the Texas Republic was surveying two grandly-titled national highways, both of which would pass by his site. So, finding the Indians gone, he turned his promotional talents to city making, and he promptly sat down and sketched off a town, designating a courthouse square and some 20 streets around it. It was the beginning of Dallas."

"Bryan was a real promoter. He offered a free town lot to any newlyweds who would join him, and he kept a keg of whiskey for men who would stop and look over the site. He pledged the courthouse square free to the county if there was ever a new county created with Dallas as its seat. He offered free ferry service across the Trinity if Dallas was so designated."

"Actually Bryan was doubly lucky; the Republic did build its national highways, and they brought hundreds of newcomers past his town, and about the same time Bryan came to the Three Forks, a more ambitious scheme had gone into effect; a colonizing effort by a Louisville, Kentucky, group which named itself the Texas Agricultural, Commercial, and Manufacturing Company. Because its President and promoter was W. S. Peters, the Company soon became known, and was universally called, The Peter's Colony."
____________________________________________

He joined the gold rush to California in 1849 but returned to Dallas within a year. (Rose Marie Rumbley, in her "The Unauthorized History of Dallas, Texas", says he went to California at least three times and returned every time, penniless.)

In 1853 he was a delegate to the state Democratic Convention.

On May 6, 1855, Bryan had to escape to Indian Territory (the Creek Nation) because he had shot a man at Haught's Saloon, who had insulted his wife, Margaret, while John was drunk!! The man recovered. However, John did not return to his family in Dallas until January 1859. He personally signed a deed for property in Dallas on January 10, 1859. He evidently traveled on to Colorado and then back to California, apparently looking for gold again.

John joined Col. Nicholas H. Darnell's Eighteenth Texas Cavalry Regiment in the winter of 1861 and served with that unit until late 1862, when he was discharged because of his age and poor health. When he returned to Dallas in 1862, he became active again in community affairs.

In 1863 he was a trustee for Dallas Male and Female Academy.

In 1866 he was prominent in efforts to aid victims of the 1866 flood.

He chaired a citizens' meeting that pressed for the completion of the Houston and Texas Central Railway and presided at a rally seeking full political rights for all ex-Confederates.

Between 1871 and 1872 JNB was one of the directors of the Dallas Bridge Company that built the first iron bridge across the Trinity.

He was getting frail at this time, however he was on the platform at the welcoming ceremonies for the Houston and Texas Central train when it pulled into town in mid-July 1872.

In 1874 JNB's mind was clearly impaired. He was admitted to the State Lunatic Asylum (later the Austin State Hospital) in February 1877.
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The following is from "The Handbook of Texas Online" It is a joint project of The General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin and the Texas State Historical Association.

BRYAN, JOHN NEELY (1810-1877). John Neely Bryan, Indian trader, farmer, lawyer, and founder of Dallas, son of James and Elizabeth (Neely) Bryan, was born on December 24, 1810, in Fayetteville, Tennessee. He attended Fayetteville Military Academy and after reading law was admitted to the Tennessee bar. Around 1833, he moved to Arkansas, where he became an Indian trader. According to some sources, he and a partner laid out the town of Van Buren, Arkansas. Bryan made his first trip to the future site of Dallas, Texas, in 1839. He returned to Van Buren temporarily to settle his affairs, and in November 1841 he was back in Texas. He settled on the east bank of the Trinity River, not far from the present location of downtown Dallas. In the spring of 1842 he persuaded several families who had settled at Bird's Fort to join him. On February 26, 1843, Bryan married Margaret Beeman, a daughter of one of these families. The couple had five children. Bryan served as postmaster in the Republic of Texasqv and operated a ferry across the Trinity where Commerce Street crosses the river today. In 1844 he persuaded J. P. Dumas to survey and plat the site of Dallas and possibly helped him with the work. Bryan was instrumental in the organizing of Dallas County in 1846 and in the choosing of Dallas as its county seat in August 1850. When Dallas became the county seat, Bryan donated the land for the courthouse.

He joined the California gold rush in 1849 but returned to Dallas within a year. In January 1853 he was a delegate to the state Democratic convention. In 1855, after shooting a man who had insulted his wife, Bryan fled to the Creek Nation. The man recovered, but although Bryan was surely informed of that fact within months of his flight, he did not return to his family in Dallas for about six years. He traveled to Colorado and California, apparently looking for gold, and returned to Dallas in 1860 or early 1861. He joined Col. Nicholas H. Darnell'sqv Eighteenth Texas Cavalry regiment in the winter of 1861 and served with that unit until late 1862, when he was discharged because of his age and poor health. When he returned to Dallas in 1862, he became active once more in community affairs. In 1863 he was a trustee for Dallas Male and Female Academy. In 1866 he was prominent in efforts to aid victims of the flood that occurred that year. He also chaired a citizens' meeting that pressed for the completion of the Houston and Texas Central Railway and presided at a rally seeking full political rights for all ex-Confederates. In 1871-72 he was one of the directors of the Dallas Bridge Company, the company that built the first iron bridge across the Trinity. He was also on the platform at the welcoming ceremonies for the Houston and Texas Central train when it pulled into town in mid-July 1872.

By 1874 Bryan's mind was clearly impaired. He was admitted to the State Lunatic Asylum (later the Austin State Hospital qv) in February 1877, and he died there on September 8 of that year. He was a Presbyterian.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: John William Rogers, The Lusty Texans of Dallas (New York: Dutton, 1951; enlarged ed. 1960; expanded ed., Dallas: Cokesbury Book Store, 1965). Lucy C. Trent, John Neely Bryan (Dallas: Tardy, 1936).

Cecil Harper, Jr.
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FIRST DEED

The first deed recorded in Dallas County was from John Neely Bryan and wife to Henry Horter (HARTER), dated October 7, 1846, authenticated before William B. Ochiltree, District Judge, November 12, 1846, conveying Lots #5 and #6 in Block #3, in the town of Dallas, for a consideration of $160. It was recorded on the 28th day of November, 1846.
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When the war between the States opened, he returned to Dallas, a broken man. Enlisting for service, he saw action with General Ben McCullough in North Arkansas, at the battle of Pea Ridge. In a year or two he was mustered out, disabled.

Previous NOTE from Lucy Trent's "JNB: Founder of Dallas".
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1860 Census, Dallas County, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, p. 311B, 1295, 1300
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1870 Dallas County, TX, Agriculture Census

John BRYAN: 10 acres of improved land; 150 acres of woodland; $600 Value of farm; $12 Value of equipment; 3 Horses; 2 Working oxen; 4 Milch cows; 50 lbs. Butter; 12 Swine; $232 Value of all livestock; 100 bushels Indian corn; $60 Value of slaughtered animals; $54 Value of all farm production.

NOTE: In the 1870 Agriculture Census, it is not known for sure which is John Neely & which is John Neely, Jr.
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Capt. John BRYAN is listed in the 1870 list of Subscribers, Stockholders - Dallas Female College. Shares of stock - 6; amount of stock, $300-paid 1870, $225.

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"Many researchers and historians believe that the downtown John Neely BRYAN cabin is an imposter and that at best, it contains only fragments of the original cabin. In any event, the cabin has become a downtown Dallas landmark, known as the John Neely BRYAN cabin. It should be named the Margaret BEEMAN BRYAN cabin, for she did more living in it and in their subsequent homes, than her husband ever did."

NOTE from Vivian Castleberry's "Daughters of Dallas", p. 6.
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"John Neely BRYAN was many things, but a homebody he was not. He left home many times throughout his marriage to Margaret. Fortunately, Margaret had her family and friends, Sarah and Alexander COCKRELL, to help where needed. In the 1850's, BRYAN began to drink heavily. BRYAN was forced to sell Dallas to Alexander COCKRELL for $7,000, due to heavy debt. If John Neely BRYAN had been able to hold on to his interests, you can only imagine what wealth the family would have had."

Comment by Teresa Jordan, Dallas History Message Board, Thur, 30 Nov 2000, at 11:07 p.m.
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"Frank COCKRELL, Alexander and Sarah's son, in a history he wrote of early Dallas, described BRYAN in the early 1850's as "gloomy". He added that BRYAN drank heavily, lost his mental alertness and showed only sporadic interest in the town he had founded. Several times he was arrested and brought into court on minor charges".

NOTE from Vivian Castleberry's "Daughters of Dallas", p. 7.
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JNB Cabin

http://www.savvycenter.com/explorer/roadside/dallascabin.htm

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WHAT REALLY HAPPENED TO JNB's LOG CABIN?

"The little log cabin built by Col. Jno. Neeley Bryan, at his own expense, in which the first courts were held; and the old hat in which Col. McCoy once carried the records of this county, while acting as its district clerk, have both gone to decay. Where the little cabin stood, the finest and most substantial public building in the State has been erected, at a cost to the County of Dallas of nearly $100,000. The little log court house met with a sad fate at the hands of those who had grown weary of its unprepossessing appearance, and who took occasion to conclude a Christmas spree in 1854, by tearing it down and committing its timber to their bonfires. Judge Good was the leader of this festive party, which by the way, have redeemed every species of vandalism involved in the reckless destruction of the old building, by contributing their means and their influence in the erection of the magnificent structure that adorns our public square, and in which blind justice has been duly and formally installed."

Previous article from "Directory of the City of Dallas", 1875, by Butterrfield & Rundlett.
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"After the Civil War, JNB built a new house for the family on land "at Big Springs" on White Rock Creek.

In 1872 he made a trip to Milton, IL, with two of his sons to visit his daughter, Lizzie.

Then he started drinking heavily and went to live with JNB, Jr. on a ranch near Llano, TX. His wife, Margaret, left him and went to live with one of their children.

JNB, Jr. sent JNB back to Dallas and one of the younger sons tried to take care of him, but by 1877, he was getting violent and refused to sleep in a house."

NOTE from "Tolbert's Texas", Doubleday, Garden City, NY, 1983, pp 89-92.
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Transcribed from Dallas Court Case #721, the following: "LUNACY for John Neely Bryan"

"Edward T. Bryan went to court on 1 Feb 1877 to have his father, John Neely Bryan, committed to the State Lunatic Asylum. The jury agreed: We the jury find, John Neely Bryan, unsound in mind - incapable of caring for himself and destitute of means of support and recommend that he be placed in the State Lunatic Asylum."

He was committed 20 Feb 1877. The building is now used for offices & archives in a complex now called the State Dept. of Mental Retardation.
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He died in the Central Building of the State Lunatic Asylum (State Hospital for Nervous Diseases) on 8 (18?) September 1877. He was buried in a nameless grave in Austin, Travis County,TX (The Austin State Hospital Cemetery). JNB, Jr. later wrote the death happened on 14 Sep 1877.

There is no record of anyone claiming the body. The asylum cemetery is located between North Loop Blvd. & the 100 block of East 51st Street. The asylum archives show JNB died 18 Sep 1877 of "intemperance".

There is no mention of JNB's death in any 1877 edition of Dallas newspapers, nor in the Sep 1877 issues of one Austin paper.
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More About JOHN NEELY BRYAN:
Burial: Dedication marker, Austin State Hospital Cemetery, 200 West 51st Street, Austin, Travis County, TX
Church Affiliation: Presbyterian
Died at: State Insane Asylum, Austin, Travis County, TX
Education: Fayetteville Military Academy
Military service: Bet. 1861 - 1863, Col. Nicolas H. Darnell's 18th Texas Cavalry Regiment, Discharged after 2 years of service
Occupation(s): Farmer
Occupation(ss): Bet. 1833 - 1841, Indian Trader (Arkansas/Texas)
Occupation(sss): Lawyer (Tennessee Bar, Texas 1850 Census)
Occupation(ssss): 22 May 1846, Postmaster, Republic of Texas (Nacogdoches, Dallas)
Occupation(sssss): Bet. 1849 - 1850, California Gold Rush
Occupation(ssssss): Justice of the Peace, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Occupation(t): Alderman, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence: December 1810, Fayetteville, Lincoln County, TN
Residence(s): Memphis, TN (began his law practice)
Residence(ss): Bet. 1833 - 1841, Van Buren, Crawford County, AR
Residence(sss): Bet. 1839 - 1840, ( First trip) Dallas, Dallas County, TX (To explore the Three Forks region of North Texas)
Residence(ssss): 1840, Census, Van Buren, Crawford County, AR
Residence(sssss): November 1841, (Second trip) Built his first log hut on the bluff overlooking the Trinity River near present day Old Red Courthouse, Dallas, TX (Site of present day Dealey Plaza)
150
Residence(ssssss): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
151
Residence(t): 07 August 1852, Sold his residence, along with other possessions, to Alexander Cockrell & moved to Mountain Creek (the old Cockrell home)
152
Residence(tt): Bet. 1855 - 1859, Indian Territory, Colorado, California, & back to Dallas, TX, by Aug 1860. He had thought he had killed a man in a gunfight in Dallas
Residence(ttt): 1860, Census, Dallas , Dallas County, TX
153
Residence(tttt): 1870, Census, Dallas , Dallas County, TX
154
Residence(ttttt): 20 February 1877, Texas State Lunatic Asylum, Austin, Travis County, TX
Residence, Last: 08 September 1877, Texas State Lunatic Asylum, Austin, Travis County, TX
Spelling: Neely, Neeley (Pauline Phelps)

Marriage Notes for MARGARET BEEMAN and JOHN BRYAN:
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"Citizens of the Republic of Texas" by the Texas Genealogical Society, in 1977, shows Margaret's marriage date to John Neely BRYAN as 26 Feb 1843. "The Beemans of Texas", Vol. 1, p. 68 indicate the same marriage date.

Someone stated this was the first marriage in Dallas County. (Check this out!!) They could have gone up toward Fort Inglish (Bonham), TX. Supposedly they posted cash bond with Agent Hensley, a Peters Colony agent, but where was he located? Nacogdoches?
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Here is the historical lowdown on the BRYAN love story. We have good reasons to suspect that BRYAN wanted to get married so he could claim a full grant (640 acres) from the Peters Colony, rather than settle for 320 acres, a single person's claim. Of course, he was handsome, and Margaret was pretty - but Neely had gone a good many years without wanting a wife, years in the wilderness, living with Indians, and acting like a free, irresponsible male. If love was overpowering, why didn't he marry Margaret quicker? Alone in his bachelor tent, even after she moved nearby, he waited a year to pop the question - mighty slow, by frontier standards. Could it have been that BRYAN, believing he had land secured under the Military Road Act, did not start thinking marriage until he realized he needed a Peters Colony patent if he was to have his town?

But regardless of motives, the most interesting aspect of the love story is this: Neely and Margaret, it appears, were never officially married. Margaret, August 3, 1905, told the 'Dallas Times Herald': "In 1843, when I was eighteen, I married John Neely BRYAN. There was a man who rode the mail horseback from Bonham down into the Cross Timbers settlements. . . who was also a justice of the peace, who married us. . ."

The legality of their informal marriage bothered Neely, and for years the two were said to have a bond marriage - a system on the frontier where a couple gave bond that they would make a legal connection as soon as an authorized official reached their locality. At least two Dallas pioneers, when they arrived on the scene (W. P. Overton in 1844 and John W. "Uncle Jack" Smith in 1845), noted that BRYAN and wife were living under bond to marry.

Where does this leave the BRYAN family records that say Margaret and Neely BRYAN were united in marriage February 26, 1843, in Pin Hook (now Paris, Texas) and John William Rogers' "Lusty Texans of Dallas," which states the marriage took place at Fort Inglish on February 23? Well, there can be several conjectures on the disparity of dates and places. First, if Neely BRYAN and Margaret were married as she says, by the mail rider out of Bonham, then the later assumption might be made that, since the mail rider was from Bonham (Fort Inglish), the rites were held there.

According to the late Mrs. Maude Rhodes, historian of the Beeman Memorial Association (and a granddaughter of Neely and Margaret BRYAN), in 1941, the BRYAN family papers burned after she had copied the BRYAN family tree. She may have misread Pin Hook as the place of marriage. "Uncle Jack" Smith, at age 83, told 'The Dallas News' yet another version:

"A fellow named (Charles) Hensley was agent for Peters Colony, and he being the only officer in these parts, was called in to perform the marriage ceremony, but after it was over BRYAN got frightened that the proceeding was not valid and began to look about for a magistrate to do it over again. He went all the way to Bonham to get him." Of course, Uncle Jack wasn't in Dallas at the time Neely and Margaret say they married (1843); he arrived in 1845. And so did agent Hensley, for that matter. Confusion!!!, confusion!

But we have an even stronger indication the marriage was never formalized. In 1854, John Neely BRYAN and Margaret were divorced, and all that was required was a formal Separation Agreement. Why? Because they had never been legally married, so there was no license or other record of the marriage to refer to. In case there are doubters about this sad turn that truelove took for the Mother and Father of Dallas, the document is in Dallas County Deed Record Book "D", pages 398-399. The document never says they were united in holy bonds of matrimony, but only that they had been living together "in the relation as husband and wife." The romantics among us - count me one - will be relieved that despite the final tone of the document, Margaret and Neely eventually made up.

Previous article from "The Real Dallas Past" by A. C. Greene

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More About JOHN BRYAN and MARGARET BEEMAN:
Bond: February 1843, Posted cash bond w/ Hensley, the Peters Colony agent
155
Divorce: 1854, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas
156
Marriage 1: 26 February 1843, Pin Hook (now Paris, Lamar County), Texas
157
Marriage 2: 26 February 1843, ?Dallas, Dallas County, Texas
158,159,160,161
Marriage 3: 26 February 1843, ?Nacagdoches, Texas
162
Marriage 4: 26 February 1843, Fort Bonham, Texas
162,163
Marriage 5: 28 February 1843, ?Fort Inglish, Texas (now Bonham, Texas)
164,165

iii. WILLIAM HUNNICUTT BEEMAN166,167,168,169,170,171,172,173,174,175,176,177,178, b. 11 May 1827, Greene County, Illinois179,180; d. 14 January 1905, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas181; m. MARTHA EUNICE DYE182,183,184,185,186,187,188,189, 25 September 1851, Dallas County, Texas190,191,192,193; b. 30 April 1825, Oldham County, Kentucky194; d. 22 May 1912, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.

Notes for WILLIAM HUNNICUTT BEEMAN: Lot 2.1
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Dallas, Texas, Jan. 2 (Special correspondence). Three and one-half miles east of the news office, standing in a pretty grove of post oaks, about 30 paces from the track of the Texas and Pacific Railroad, stands the modest home of the two oldest living pioneer settlers of Dallas county ( Mr. and Mrs. William H. BEEMAN. These venerable settlers of the then western wilds of Texas date their residence here from a period prior to the organization of Dallas County, prior to the settlement of Peter's colony, prior to the annexation of the Republic of Texas to the Federal Union.

William H. BEEMAN was born in Greene[e] County, Ill. on May 11, 1827. His father John BEEMAN, was a farmer, who moved from Illinois to what is now Bowie County, Texas, in 1840, stopping for a year near Dalby Springs. He was accompanied by his brother James J. BEEMAN and family, and some five years later another brother, Samuel moved to Texas. Including the children born in Dallas County, the total offspring of the three pioneers numbered 24 sons and daughters.

Previous portion of article from the Dallas Morning News, 2 Jan 1902.

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Mr. and Mrs. William H. BEEMAN
The First Citizens of This Section of Dallas

(Edited and submitted by M C Toyer)

Biographical Note: William Hunnicutt BEEMAN was the first son of Dallas pioneer settlers John and Emily Hunnicutt BEEMAN. William was born in Illinois in 1827, and came to Texas with his family in 1840, settling first in Red River County. In the spring and summer of 1841, John BEEMAN and his half-brother James Jackson BEEMAN participated in the militia campaigns to clear hostile Indians from the Three Forks area of North Texas. Later that year, Jonathan Bird and other militia members and pioneer families, including John BEEMAN's nephew John S. BEEMAN, constructed and occupied Bird's Fort near the present day Arlington. In early 1842, they were invited by John Neely BRYAN to join him in his new settlement in what soon became Dallas.

Margaret BEEMAN, sister of William, married John Neely BRYAN in 1843.

William BEEMAN married Martha DYE in 1851; their union produced 12 children. They lived on the original John BEEMAN land claim on White Rock Creek. William died in 1905 and Martha died in 1912. They are buried in the BEEMAN Family Cemetery near their home, and next to the graves of John and Emily BEEMAN.

When the decision was made to form a county in 1846, John BEEMAN traveled to Austin to present the petition to the State Legislature. Because the county was not yet established, the settlement of Dallas still within Nacogdoches County, the Legislature refused to recognize the petitioner from Dallas. The representative of Robertson County, west of the Trinity River, agreed to present the petition and when it was later ratified William BEEMAN, still a teenager, traveled alone 170 miles to Franklin to retrieve the certificate.

The original name choice for the county was Polk in honor of then President James K Polk, but that had already been taken. The name Dallas was then selected by the Legislature in honor of Vice President George M Dallas. Dallas County and the City of Dallas share that common name, but most likely were each named for different individuals.

This article posted on Jim Wheat's Web Site:

http://freepages.history.rootsweb.com/~jwheat/beemanint02.html

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Information source on William Hunnicutt BEEMAN

"Memorial and Biographical History, Dallas County, Texas," The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago (1892), Dallas Public Library, p. 856.
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#5583: Memorial & Biographical History of Dallas County, Texas, 1892.

WILLIAM H. BEEMAN, a pioneer of Dallas county, Texas, was born in Greene County, Illinois, in May, 1827, the third in a family of 10 children born to John and Emily (HONEYCUTT) BEEMAN, natives of Georgia and South Carolina respectively. The father moved to Illinois in an early day, settling near Alton, where he was subsequently married. He was a farmer and millwright by trade, and also ran a ferry and wood yard in Illinois. He emigrated to Texas with horse teams in 1840, having bought 640 acres before starting, of a frontier trader, and located 80 miles from any settlement. The first six months he lived in a fort, and afterward located on land that is now within the city limits. He always made this county his home, and his death occurred in 1850; the mother is still living, residing on Ten Mile creek, Dallas County. William H. BEEMAN was reared and educated in Illinois, and at the age of 14 years came to Texas and aided in opening up the home farm. He commenced life for himself in Dallas, in the carriage and wagon makers' trade, and in 1851 commenced business for himself on Elm Street, which he continued about 15 years. Mr. BEEMAN cleared the land where his three-story brick building now stands, known as Deering Block, on Elm Street. After the war broke out Mr. BEEMAN moved to his farm, where he has 77 acres in a good state of cultivation, having given most of his land to his children. He was married in Dallas County, in 1851, to Martha DYE, a native of Virginia, and a daughter of Benjamin and Sarah DYE, also natives of Virginia. The parents settled in Kentucky in an early day, and in 1847, came to Dallas, where the father died in 1852, and the mother, a few years later.

Mr. and Mrs. BEEMAN have had 10 children. The living are: 1. J. E., in East Dallas, 2. Nevada, 3. Addie, wife of Benjamin Say(g)e, of Dallas County, 4. Holly, of East Dallas, 5. L. O., at home, 6. Roxie, also at home.

Mr. BEEMAN has seen the complete development of Dallas County, and rode in the first wagon that ever came into Dallas. Politically, he is a Democrat, has always taken an interest in everything for the good of the county, and aids materially in all public enterprises. He assisted in the organization of the county, having ridden 140 miles on horseback to see the judge and get an order to organize.
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"William H. BEEMAN migrated to the Peters Colony as a single man prior to 1 Jul 1848. He was issued a land certificate by Thomas William Ward in 1850, which he sold unlocated. It was later patented in Dallas County (Robertson Third Class Certificate No. 1726). He is listed on the Census of 1850 (Dallas County, Family No. 421) as a 23-year-old farmer, born in Illinois."

PRECEEDING NOTE is from page 187, "The Peters Colony of Texas" by Connor, Seymour V. 976.4 c752p, found in the Genealogy section of the Dallas Public Library.
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THE FOLLOWING NOTES are transcribed from the "Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County", Page #178.

Mr. W.(illiam) H.(unnicutt) BEEMAN, while a quiet and retired old gentleman, was one of the most interesting of the old pioneers attending the reunion at Garland. He came to Texas from Illinois with his father (John Beeman) in 1840, and settled in what is now Dallas County in 1842.

Mr. (John) Beeman was the first to break the sod for agricultural pursuits in the county in the spring of 1842. It was a plat of 7 or 8 acres about 4 miles east of the City of Dallas.

At the same time he erected the second house built in Dallas County, the first being a log structure put up by John Neely BRYAN, the founder of Dallas, a few weeks before, whose cabin stood, Mr. BEEMAN says at the foot of Main Street.

Speaking of early life in Dallas County, Mr. BEEMAN said to a news reporter, "We lived very hard at first. We had wild meats and bread. I dressed the buckskins and made my moccasins and clothes, except shirts, for 3 years. We finger picked cotton, which the women used in weaving clothes and shirts for the men. For 2 years we beat our meal for bread on a mortar or ground it in a hand mill. We had to buy corn in Fannin County."

"I rode in the first wagon and cut the road as we went into Dallas. We came in after cedar timber, which we cut to build a fence around Ham(pton) (Wade) RATTAN's grave. Rattan, who was a brother-in-law of Governor Throckmorton, was killed by the Indians on Elm Fork while he was out bear hunting (on 25 December 1841). He was buried 20 miles west of Dallas at Bird's Fort, but nobody knows to-day where his grave is."

Although Mr. (William) BEEMAN was one of the most active participants in the organization of the County and has been a constant resident of the County, he has never held and never sought office. "When the County was organized in 1846," he said, "I went and got the order from the county seat of Robertson County at Franklin. I rode a mustang and went alone. It was Indian Territory then, and the trip was attended with considerable risk. I camped out each night. When I was returning home one night, on the other side of Richland Creek, I saw a herd of buffaloes gathered in a great herd, which became wild with fright, and I could not tell the roar of the storm from the sound of the moving buffaloes. I sought protection in a skirt of timber close by.

"I assisted in building the first ferryboat that was ever put in the Trinity at Dallas. We took two large cottonwood logs, and after digging them out like canoes, we fastened them together with puncheon. This was the floor. We had no rope; buffalo rawhide stretched so that we could not use it, so we took buffalo hair and twisted it into a rope with which we towed the boat. The boat was located at what is now the foot of Commerce Street bridge, and we carried across the river in it all the early settlers of the County."

"The Indians used to give us a great deal of trouble. When we came to Dallas County, we left our team of horses at Honey Grove, fearing the Indians would get them if we brought them farther. We drove oxen from Honey Grove to Dallas. Once the Indians made a raid just across the river from Dallas and stole about 18 head of horses. A party of 19 of us followed them to Wise County, and there we lost track of them among the friendly Indians. When we started home, we ran out of provisions and bought some meat from the Indians. It was said to be horse meat, but it tasted good to a half-starved man."

"We traveled the next day without anything to eat, and that night I shot a wild turkey on Denton Creek. Nineteen men fed on it and we got up hungry. When we struck Elm Fork, I killed a deer, which we roasted and ate without salt or bread; but fortunately for us, we reached home the next night."

"We lived peaceably and enjoyed ourselves those days. We had no trouble. Everybody was honest. I remember the first case of stealing that I ever heard of in the County. A young man was driving sheep down Elm fork to Dallas. On the way down he entered a place and stole a butcher knife and a comb and some other articles. He was overtaken and the parties gave him his choice between a certain number of lashes and prosecution in the courts at Dallas. He said that he would take the lashes, but he wished a thousand rails that he had not committed the theft. That was a common expression of regret those days. To split a thousand rails was a big task. I believe if more of that kind of punishment was inflicted today we would have less stealing."

"I remember the burning of Dallas in 1860. I was not in town that day. The fire started on the west side of the square at Wallace Peak's drug store. While the people were at work trying to check it at that point, it broke out on the east side, and then they told me it broke out here and there so fast that they could not keep up with it."

"There is no doubt but the negroes fired the town. They said they did, and the two white preachers, whom they said had put them up to it, were whipped and set out of the country."

"Just before the fire, Alex. Cockrell had built a 3-story brick tavern. The building was 50 x 100 feet and it was the largest and finest building in all north Texas. It burned. A brick wareroom on the north side of Commerce Street covers the spot where this tavern was built. I kept the first tavern in Dallas in a small house on the north side of the square. Old man Tom Crutchfield rented it, and finally he built the old Crutchfield house on the northwest corner of the square, which was burned several times."

"But speaking of the hanging of the 3 negroes for setting fire to Dallas in 1860, when excavations were being made for the Texas & Pacific Railway bridge across the Trinity at Dallas, their bones were unearthed. They were buried there after they were hanged."

"I remember the first legal hanging in the County. It was the first trial for murder, and the negro woman, who had split a man's head open with an axe, while he was asleep, was hanged."

"I remember when steamboats were on the Trinity. I made the trip on the "Sallie Haynie" from Magnolia to the mouth of East Fork. I am a firm believer in the navigation of the Trinity to Dallas. I think it can be done with the expenditure of a little money in cleaning out drifts and cutting overhanging timber, and I believe that boats can be run here 6 to 9 months each year."

"We were subject to many privations and many hardships in the early days. When we left home we did not know but that on our return we would find our families butchered by the Indians or that we ourselves would be shot and killed. A part of the time we were in constant dread and fear and we invited immigration. We welcomed the newcomer and divided what we had with him. We wanted to increase our numbers and help keep back the foe."

Mr. (William) BEEMAN married Miss Martha E.(unice) DYE, near what is now the town of Garland, TX, in 1851. They have 8 (living) children and a number of grandchildren. His sister Margaret, who is yet living, was the wife of John Neely BRYAN.
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In the Dallas Morning News, Sunday January 26, 1902

Mr. & Mrs. William Hunnicutt Beeman, Incidents of the Early Days in Texas -- The First Citizens of This Section of the State : (This was an interview)

"...Indian depredations continued in this section for several years after the advent of the Beemans. In 1843, after a vain attempt of President Houston to assemble a council of chiefs of the various tribes then in this section at Grape Vine Springs (near present town of Grape Vine), he had to return to his official duties at the capital, and left Gen. E. H. Tarrant and Geo. W. Terrill, with John H. Reagan as pilot and Col. Thos. L. Smith, commander of the escort, to effect a treaty of peace. This was finally accomplished at Johnson's Station, a point three miles south of the present town of Arlington. Since that time Dallas County has been exempt from Indian raids, though for many years afterwards counties to the west suffered great annoyance. Up to about 1841 Indians made raids as far east as English's Fort (Bonham now). Wm. H. Beeman says that when his father and family arrived there on their way out to Bird's Fort in the latter part of that year, he saw an Indian scalp nailed upon the gable of the trading-house. The redskin had been killed in the recent raid into that section..."

In 1960, an attorney from Weatherford, Fred R. Cotten, wrote to Ruth & included a sketch he had written on James J. Beeman, Jr. In this is only one sentence having to do with the treaty:

"...President Sam Houston was eager for a treaty with the Indians, and Beeman was present at the meeting near Bird's Fort on Sept. 29, 1843 when General Edward H. Tarrant and George W. Terrell concluded their treaty..."
__________________________________________

William set up residence on White Rock Creek in 1842. Later he moved east of Fair Park, Dallas County, TX.
__________________________________________

1860 Census, Dallas County, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1

1324 1330 W. H. Beeman 34M Waggon wright 1800 600 IL
Martha (Dye) 34 F KY
Joseph E. 7 M TX
Nevada 6 F TX
Ada 5 F TX
Sonoma 4 F TX
Sarah 2 F TX
Infant (William Francis)
4/12 M TX

 

Page 314B
Adelaide Dye 18F KY
Benj Dye 32M Farmer KY
George Dye 21M Farmer KY
____________________________________________

1870 Dallas County, TX, Agriculture Census

William H. BEEMAN: 20 acres of land, improved; 60 acres woodland; 10 acres unimproved land; $2600 Value of farm; $26 Value of equipment; 4 Horses; 1 Mule; 2 Working oxen; 12 Milch cows; 15 Other cows; 50 Swine; $635 Value of all livestock; 300 bushels Indian corn; 20 bushels winter wheat; 2 Cotton bales; 15 bushels Sweet potatoes; $100 Value of slaughtered animals; $347 Value of all farm production.
_____________________________________________

http://www.dallasgenealogy.org/witness/witnessbebi.htm

District Court Civil Case Papers
1846-1900

Witness ID: 3492
Name of Witness: Beeman, W. H.
Residence: Dallas Co, TX
Plaintiff: Young, W. C.
Defendant: Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Ry.
Date of Test: Jan 1893
Notes: Trial witness
Film #: 2078898
Case #: 7918(1889)


Witness ID: 832
Name of Witness: Beeman, William
Plaintiff: Lagow, Margaret A. S. (Mrs)
Defendant: Jones, R. H. & S. F. (wife)
Date of Test: Dec 1879
Notes: Trial witness
Film #: 2057456
Case #: 3282(1876)

Witness ID: 948
Name of Witness: Beeman, William
Residence: Dallas Co, TX
Plaintiff: Lygo, James B.
Defendant: Amazon Insurance Co.
Date of Test: 1881
Notes: Trial witness
Film #: 2057673
Case #: 3513(1877)

Witness ID: 981
Name of Witness: Beeman, William
Residence: Dallas Co, TX
Plaintiff: Lygo, James B.
Defendant: Fire Association of Philadelphia
Date of Test: 1881
Notes: Trial witness
Film #: 2057673
Case #: 3515(1877)

Witness ID: 436
Name of Witness: Beeman, William H.
Plaintiff: Bryan, E. P. et al
Defendant: Shirley, Thomas et al
Date of Test: 1877
Notes: Trial witness. 49 y/o
Film #: 2056571
Case #: 2150(1874)

Witness ID: 2700
Name of Witness: Beemar, William
Residence: Dallas Co, TX
Plaintiff: Tuggle, Mary E. et al
Defendant: Hughes, W. E.
Date of Test: 1891
Notes: Trial witness
Film #: 2071027
Case #: 6785(1888)

Witness ID: 1524
Name of Witness: Beeman, Mr. (NOTE: This could be W. H. Beeman)
Plaintiff: Cullen, Frederick
Defendant: Missouri Pacific Ry. Co.
Date of Test: 1885
Notes: Trial witness
Film #: 2069442
Case #: 4725(1883)

Witness ID: 947
Name of Witness: Beeman, Mrs. (NOTE: Not sure which Mrs. Beeman)
Residence: Dallas Co, TX
Plaintiff: Lygo, James B.
Defendant: Amazon Insurance Co.
Date of Test: 1881
Notes: Trial witness
Film #: 2057673
Case #: 3513(1877)
___________________________________________

"Memorial and Biographical History, Dallas County, Texas," The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago (1892), Dallas Public Library, p. 856.

"Mr. and Mrs. Beeman have had ten children. The living are: J. E., in East Dallas; Nevada; Addie, wife of Benjamin Saye (Sage), of Dallas county; Holly, of East Dallas; L. O., at home; and Roxie, also at home." p. 747.
_____________________________________________

W. H. is buried in the Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX.



 

More About WILLIAM HUNNICUTT BEEMAN:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
195,196,197 Lot 2.1
Cause of Death: Pneumonia
Died of: Pneumonia
Known as: William Beeman (1870, 1900 Census)
Occupation: Farmer (1850 Census)
Occupation(s): Bet. 1851 - 1866, Wagonwright (1860, 1870 Census), Wheelwright, Deering & Elm Street, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Occupation(ss): Landlord (1900 Census)
Political Affiliation: Democrat
Residence: May 1827, Greene County, IL
Residence(s): 1840, IL
Residence(ss): 1842, Settled on White Rock Creek, East portion of later Dallas, TX
Residence(sss): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
198
Residence(ssss): 1860, Census, Dallas County, TX, Dallas P. O.
199
Residence(sssss): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, Precinct 1
200
Residence(ssssss): 1880, Census, Dallas County, TX, ED 59
Residence(t): 13 June 1900, Census, Oasis, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX
Residence(tt): 1903, Rural Route #3, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ttt): 1904, Rural Route #3, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence, Last: January 1905, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Spelling: Beeman (1900 Census), Beaman

Notes for MARTHA EUNICE DYE: Lot 2.2
_____________________________________________

Mrs. W. H. BEEMAN, whose maiden name was Martha DYE, was born in Oldham County, Kentucky, April 30, 1825. She came with her father Benjamin DYE to Texas in 1842, settling upon Whiterock Creek near the present town of Garland, where her father died a few years later. She was married to William H. BEEMAN in 1851. Twelve children were born to this union, six of whom are now living in Dallas County. Both Mr. and Mrs. BEEMAN though "up in years" are living in the enjoyment of good health and seem contented and happy. They are proud of the distinction of being the oldest living pioneers of the great County of Dallas, and they love to talk over their early days of strenuous yet pleasant pioneer life. They related many interesting incidents of Dallas, and recalled with affectionate regard the names of a number of pioneer friends who have "crossed over the river to rest in the shade of the trees."

Previous portion of an article in the Dallas Morning News, 2 Jan 1902.
_____________________________________________

The 1850 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, shows Eunice M. (23) born in VA.
_____________________________________________

The 1860 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, shows Martha (34) born in KY.
_____________________________________________

The 1870 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, shows Martha E. (45) born in KY.
_____________________________________________

The 1880 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, shows Eunice M. (55) born in VA.
_____________________________________________

The 1910 Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, shows Eunice M. (84) widow, born in VA, living with son, Joseph E.
_____________________________________________

Martha E. BEEMAN is listed as Executor for Wm. H. BEEMAN (deceased) in Case #2720, Dallas County, TX.
_____________________________________________

More About MARTHA EUNICE DYE:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
201,202 Lot 2.2
Cause of Death: Stroke
Died of: Stroke
Known as: Martha E. Beeman (1900 Census)
Known as(a): Eunice M. Beeman (1910 Census)
Name(s): Eunice Martha Dye (1850, 1880 Census, Ruth Cooper)
Occupation: Tailor
Residence: April 1825, Oldham County, Kentucky
203
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
204
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
205
Residence(sss): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, Precinct 1
206
Residence(ssss): 1880, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(sssss): 13 June 1900, Census, Oasis, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ssssss): 19 April 1910, Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX
Residence, Last: May 1912, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Spelling: Eunice (1880, 1910 Census), Eunis (1850 Census, Inez Criddle)

More About WILLIAM BEEMAN and MARTHA DYE:
Marriage: 25 September 1851, Dallas County, Texas
207,208,209,210
Married by: Jas. A. Smith, M. G.

iv. SAMUEL HUNNICUTT BEEMAN211,212,213,214,215,216,217,218,219, b. 29 May 1829, Alton, Madison County, Illinois219; d. 20 January 1877, Kingsland, Llano County, Texas219; m. MARY ANN WEATHERFORD220,221,222, 223,224,225, 29 August 1860, Dallas County, Texas226,227,228,229, 230; b. 13 September 1844, Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas231; d. 15 January 1934, Kingsland, Llano County, Texas232.

Notes for SAMUEL HUNNICUTT BEEMAN:
___________________________________________

"Samuel H. Beeman migrated to the Peters Colony as a single man prior to 1 Jul 1848, and settled in present Dallas County. He reported to Thomas William Ward in 1850 that he had made no selection of his land. He was issued Robertson Third Class Certificate No. 1627 for 320 acres, which he sold unlocated. It was later patented in Dallas County. He is listed on the 1850 census (Dallas County, family No. 421) as a 21-year-old farmer, born in Illinois."

PRECEEDING NOTE is from page 187, "The Peters Colony of Texas" by Connor, Seymour V. 976.4 c752p, located in the Genealogy Section of the Dallas Public Library.
___________________________________________

"The Beeman Family of Texas 1841-1949" indicates Samuel and Mary had two sons.
___________________________________________

Samuel (41) Farmer, born in Illinois, is in the 1870 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, along with his wife, Mary (26) MO, and their children: Henderson (9) TX, Nancy (7) TX, William (4) TX, Clemma (2) TX, and John (3?12) TX, born in TX.
___________________________________________

Honey Creek Cemetery is in Llano County, TX, near the Click Community. It is located on the Click Road, about one mile from the Honey Creek Schoolhouse. Click Road is located about 12 miles from Llano and intersects Highway 71. Take Hwy 71 out of Llano toward Austin, TX, about 12 miles. When you see the Click Road sign, there is also a sign with Honey Creek Cemetery on it. Take a right, and it is about a mile off Highway 71.
___________________________________________

 

More About SAMUEL HUNNICUTT BEEMAN:
Burial: Honey Creek Cemetery, near Click Community, Llano County, TX
Known as: "Sam" Beeman
Military service: Burford's Reg., 19th TX Cav., Co. B, C.S.A.
Mustered In: 24 June 1862
Occupation: Farmer (1850 Census)
Residence: May 1829, Alton, Madison County, IL
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
233
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
234
Residence(sss): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
235
Residence, Last: Bet. 1870 - January 1877, Bluffton, Llano County, TX
Spelling: Beeman, Beaman

More About MARY ANN WEATHERFORD:
Known as: Mary Weatherford
Residence: September 1844, Little Rock, Pulaski County, AR
Residence(s): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
236
Residence, Last: January 1934, Kingsland, Llano County, TX

More About SAMUEL BEEMAN and MARY WEATHERFORD:
Marriage: 29 August 1860, Dallas County, Texas
237,238,239,240,241
Married by: John Scurlock, J. P.

v.   ISAAC HUNNICUTT BEEMAN242,243,244,245,246,247, b. 27 September 1831, Calhoun County, Illinois247; d. 28 July 1852, California248.

Notes for ISAAC HUNNICUTT BEEMAN:
___________________________________________

Isaac never married and died in California, at the age of 21 years.

NOTE from WFT#2:390
___________________________________________

More About ISAAC HUNNICUTT BEEMAN:
Burial: CA
Known as: Isaac Hunnicutt
Occupation: Farmer (1850 Census)
Residence: September 1831, Calhoun County, IL
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
249
Residence, Last: July 1852, CA
Spelling: Beeman, Beaman

vi.  JAMES HUNNICUTT BEEMAN250,251,252,253,254,255,256,257,258,259,260,261,262,263, b. 20 March 1833, Calhoun County, Illinois; d. 20 June 1905, Bluffton, Llano County, Texas; m. (1) MARY FRANCES NIXON264,265, Bef. 1860; b. 1830, Mississippi; d. 08 October 1882; m. (2) MARY ANN HAMMONS266,267,268,269,270,271,272, 22 August 1861, Dallas County, Texas273,274,275,276; b. 15 October 1840, Alabama277; d. 02 December 1877, Texas; m. (3) MARTHA E. ALLEN278,279,280,281, 26 March 1885, Burnet, Burnet County, Texas282,283; b. 23 November 1846, Georgia; d. 17 December 1919.

Notes for JAMES HUNNICUTT BEEMAN:
___________________________________________

"The Beeman Family of Texas 1841-1949" indicates James and Mary had one daughter, "Haidee", and one son "Forest".
___________________________________________

The dates of birth are from his Bible which was in the possession of Estelle BEEMAN BLUMER, General Delivery, Young, AZ 85554, via Linda HAUGHT ORTEGA, Rt. 1, Box 35F, Globe, AZ 85501 who is descended through James H. BEEMAN & Mary HAMMONS.

Previous NOTE from Phyllis Bauer.
___________________________________________

http://www.dallasgenealogy.org/witness/witnessbebi.htm

District Court Civil Case Papers
1846-1900

Witness ID: 1231
Name of Witness: Beeman, James H.
Residence: Burnet Co, TX
Plaintiff: Lagow, William et al
Defendant: Glover, George W. et al
Date of Test: 1Sept1883
Notes: 53 y/o
Film #: 2069204
Case #: 4119(1880)

Witness ID: 1232
Name of Witness: Beeman, James H.
Residence: Burnett or Llano Co, TX
Plaintiff: Lagow, William et al
Defendant: Glover, George W. et al
Date of Test: 28May1886
Notes: Case #5474. 53 y/o
Film #: 2069204
Case #: 4119(1880)

__________________________________________

More About JAMES HUNNICUTT BEEMAN:
Burial: March 1833, Old Bluffton Cemetery, Llano, Llano County, TX
Burial(s): 1936, New Bluffton Cemetery, Llano, Llano County, TX
284
Cause of Death: Chronic cyotis /prostitis
Known as: James Beeman
Military service: 19th TX Cav, Co. B, C.S.A.
Mustered In: 31 March 1862, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, Age 29, Height 6', Eyes black, Hair black
Occupation: Farmer (1850 Census)
Residence: March 1833, Calhoun County, IL
Residence(s): 1846, Dallas County Tax List
285
Residence(ss): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
286
Residence(sss): 1860, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ssss): 1870, Census, Burnet County, TX, Precinct 1
Residence, Last: Bet. 1860 - June 1905, Bluffton, Llano County, TX
Spelling: Beeman, Beaman

Notes for MARY FRANCES NIXON:
Martha was James' second wife according to "The Beeman Family of Texas".

More About MARY FRANCES NIXON:
Residence: TX

More About JAMES BEEMAN and MARY NIXON:
Marriage: Bef. 1860

Notes for MARY ANN HAMMONS:
___________________________________________

Mary Hammond was the first wife of James Beeman, according to "The Beeman Family of Texas 1841-1949".
___________________________________________

More About MARY ANN HAMMONS:
Burial: ?Mason County, TX
Known as: Mary Beeman (1870 Census)
Residence: October 1840, AL
Residence, Last: December 1877, TX
Spelling: Hammond (WFT#2:390 Beeman), Hammons (J. H. Beeman Family Bible, E. Wilkerson, Bethel Bennett), Hammox (Early Mar. Rec., Dallas Co., TX)

Marriage Notes for JAMES BEEMAN and MARY HAMMONS:
________________________________________

The Dallas County Marriage Records Book shows Mary's name spelled HAMMOX.
________________________________________

More About JAMES BEEMAN and MARY HAMMONS:
Marriage 1: 22 August 1861, Dallas County, Texas
287,288,289,290
Marriage 2: 23 August 1861, Dallas County, Texas
291
Married by: John Scurlock, J. P.

More About MARTHA E. ALLEN:
Known as: "Minnie" Allen (B. G. Reavis)
Widow's Pension App: #29123 App. Confederate Widows Pension, Houston, TX

More About JAMES BEEMAN and MARTHA ALLEN:
Marriage 1: 26 March 1885, Burnet, Burnet County, Texas
292,293
Marriage 2: 26 March 1884, Burnet County, Texas
294
Married by: A. A. Baxter, Minister

vii. CLARISSA BEEMAN295,296,297,298,299,300,301,302, b. 25 March 1836, Calhoun County, Illinois303; d. 1877, Unknown location304; m. (1) COLONEL DANIEL N. MASON305,306,307, 01 May 1860, Dallas County, Texas308,309,310; b. Abt. 1823, Ohio; m. (2) JAMES M. WALKER311,312,313,314, 03 October 1867, Dallas County, Texas315,316,317; b. Abt. 1826, South Carolina; d. Bet. 1852 - 1925.

Notes for CLARISSA BEEMAN:
__________________________________________

Spelling: Clarissa (Early Marriage Records, Dallas county, TX, Marriage Book C, Part VII), (Clarisa in the John Beeman Family Bible) (Clarisa in "Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E 1846-1877," p.17).
__________________________________________

1860 Census, Dallas County, Precinct #1

1166 1165 Danl Mason 37 m Farmer 775 370 OH
Clarissa (Beeman) 24 f IL
__________________________________________

Clarissa (34), IL, is living with her husband J. M. WALKER (43), SC, in the 1870 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, along with Jonathan (MASON) WALKER (9), son by previous marriage to Daniel MASON, & James & Clarissa's daughter, Orrilla (11/12), b. July TX.
__________________________________________

One source shows her death as 1877.
__________________________________________

The burial of Clarissa is a mystery. Llano & Burnet Counties and the Texas State Library at Austin have been researched and she has not been found. She is not at Bluffton Cemetery nor any where else in this country unless it is an unknown marker. None of the local historians know of an Indian Burial Cemetery. It just does not exist. My grandfather, Jim (James L. MAXWELL, who was married to Nancy E. BEEMAN) was in charge of moving the graves from Old Bluffton Cemetery to New Bluffton when the lake was put in. He kept meticulous records. I am positive he would have known about his wife's aunt (Clarissa) if she died here. Still looking.

Previous NOTE from Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson, 3 Aug 2001 emaxwell@tstar.net
___________________________________________

More About CLARISSA BEEMAN:
Burial: Unknown location
Known as: "Kit" Beeman
Residence: March 1836, Calhoun County, IL
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
318
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Dallas County, TX, Dallas P. O.
Residence(sss): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, Precinct 3
Residence, Last: 1880, ?Bluffton, Llano County, TX
Spelling: Clarissa (Beeman Family Bible, 1850, 1870 Census), Clarisa (Marriages, Dallas Co.)
Spelling(s): Beeman, Beaman

Notes for COLONEL DANIEL N. MASON:
____________________________________________

"The Beemans of Texas" shows Daniel N. Mason.
____________________________________________

John Daniel was Clarissa's first husband. He is listed as Col. Daniel MASON in "Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, TX, Marriage Book C, Part VII".
____________________________________________

More About COLONEL DANIEL N. MASON:
Known as: Daniel Mason
Residence: 1823, OH
Residence(s): 1860, Census, Dallas County, TX, Dallas P. O.

More About DANIEL MASON and CLARISSA BEEMAN:
Marriage: 01 May 1860, Dallas County, Texas
319,320,321

Notes for JAMES M. WALKER:
___________________________________________

James was Clarissa's second husband.
___________________________________________

James had only one arm. Don't know the details.

NOTE from Ben Reavis
___________________________________________

More About JAMES M. WALKER:
Known as: J. M. Walker (1870 Census)
Occupation: School teacher @ Grapevine Prairie, TX

More About JAMES WALKER and CLARISSA BEEMAN:
Marriage: 03 October 1867, Dallas County, Texas
322,323,324

viii. NANCY ELIZABETH BEEMAN325,326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333, b. 26 March 1839, Calhoun County, Illinois334; d. 21 February 1907, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas335; m. WILLIAM W. HOBBS336,337,338,339,340,341, 342, 27 March 1856, Dallas County, Texas343,344,345,346,347; b. 17 July 1833, Alabama; d. 29 November 1918, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas348.

Notes for NANCY ELIZABETH BEEMAN:
___________________________________________

The U. S. Census,1850 & 1880, Dallas County, TX, shows Nancy as being born in Illinois.

WFT#2:390 indicates Nancy being born at (Cross Roads Camp) Bowie County, TX. (Don't think so, as John & Family came to Texas in 1842 to settle on lower White Rock Creek - A. C. Morgan)
___________________________________________

More About NANCY ELIZABETH BEEMAN:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
349,350 Lot 7.2
Known as: "Nant" Beeman
Residence: March 1839, Calhoun County, IL
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
351
Residence, Last: February 1907, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Spelling: Beeman, Beaman

Notes for WILLIAM W. HOBBS:
___________________________________________

"The Beeman Family of Texas 1841-1949" shows 4 daughters and 1 son; Josephine (Josie), Helen, Florence, Lennie, and Gaston.
___________________________________________

Coye Hawpe's Cemetery Survey, Jun 1974, shows W. W.'s death date as 27 Nov 1918. Gravemarker shows 29 Nov 1918.
___________________________________________

More About WILLIAM W. HOBBS:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
352,353 Lot 7.1
Known as: "Billie" Hobbs
Known as(a): William W. Hobbs (1870 Census)
Occupation: Farmer (1870 Census)
Occupation(s): Farmer (6
1/2 mi east, 1891-92 Dallas City Directory)
Residence: July 1833, AL
Residence(s): 27 September 1870, Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ss): 1880, Census, Dallas, Precinct #3, Dallas County, TX
Residence(sss): 1903, Rural Route #3, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ssss): 1904, Rural Route #3, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence, Last: November 1918, Dallas, Dallas County, TX

More About WILLIAM HOBBS and NANCY BEEMAN:
Marriage: 27 March 1856, Dallas County, Texas
354,355,356,357,358
Married by: A. Beard, J. P.

ix. JOHN SCOTT WINFIELD BEEMAN359,360,361,362,363,364,365,366,367,368,369,370,371, b. 18 May 1841, Cross Roads Camp, Bowie County, Texas372; d. 18 January 1930, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas; m. ELIZABETH BOONE MERRIFIELD373,374,375,376,377,378,379,380,381,382, 03 August 1865, Dallas County, Texas383,384,385,386; b. 22 January 1849, Nelson County, Kentucky; d. 13 April 1923, Cedar Hill, Dallas County, Texas387.

Notes for JOHN SCOTT WINFIELD BEEMAN:

____________________________________________

The only living relatives of William H. BEEMAN who were here in Dallas County in 1842, are his brother, J. W. Scott BEEMAN living one mile north of his (Wm. H.'s) residence; James H. BEEMAN, another brother, now living in Burnett County, and sisters Margaret BRYAN and Nancy HOBBS; the former living with her son, John BRYAN, on Red River, sixteen miles north of Wichita Falls, and the latter at Orphans Home, near Dallas. Scott BEEMAN was born in Bowie County, Texas in 1841, being now 61 years old, an unusually old native Texan. He was not a year old when the family moved to Bird's Fort. Hence his life has been spent mostly in Dallas County.

Previous portion of article edited & transcribed by M. C. Toyer, from an article in the Dallas Morning News, 2 Jan 1902.


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County, 1892

By John Henry Brown

Submitted by Dorman Holub to Jim Wheat's
"Dallas County (Texas) Archives" website

     SCOTT BEEMAN, a farmer and stockraiser of Precinct No. 1, was born in Bowie County, Texas, May 23, 1841, the 10th in a family of 12 children born to John and Emily (HUNNICUTT) BEEMAN, natives of South Carolina. The father emigrated from his native State to Calhoun county, Illinois, and thence to Bowie county, Texas, in 1829. In 1841 he came to Dallas county, and took up 360 acres of land, and was the first man to cultivate any soil in this county. His death occurred here in 1856, and his wife still survives, living near DeSoto, at the advanced age of 86 years.

     Scott BEEMAN was reared to farm life, and educated in the subscription schools of this county. He aided his father in opening up and improving the home farm and afterward began farming on his own account.  In 1862 he enlisted in Captain Beard's Company, and
was in the battle of Yellow Bayou, in a number of raids under General Marmaduke, and was in the Red River expedition, where he fought for 32 days. He was also in cavalry service, and at the close of the war Mr. BEEMAN returned to Dallas county, and later removed to the farm of 150 acres which he now owns, and which is in a good state of cultivation. He was married in this country, in 1865, to Betty MERRIFIELD, a native of Kentucky, and daughter of Milton and Margaret Ann (SINGLETON) MERRIFIELD, also natives of Kentucky. The
parents moved to Dallas county in 1849, settling in what is now West Dallas, where the father bought and improved a farm. His death occurred in November 1886, and the mother now resides near Cedar Hill. Mr. and Mrs. BEEMAN have seven children:

1. Annie, wife of Richard LAGOW of Precinct 4

2. Emma

3. Lizzie

4. Milton

5. Katie

6. Grover

7. Ira

     Politically, Mr. BEEMAN is a member of the Democratic Party, and socially of the Farmer's Alliance.

- Memorial & Biographical History of
Dallas County, Texas, 1892, pp. 355-356.
- o o o -

________________________________________________

For 84 Years Scott BEEMAN
Has Lived Here

________

Daddy of 'Em All, He
Came to Dallas in
June, 1841.

_______

Oldest Inhabitant
_______

Lived in Blockhouse, the
Only One Ever Built
in City.

BY W. S. ADAIR.

     J. S. W. (Scott) BEEMAN, 5433 St. Charles street, Owenwood, has been a resident of the territory now embraced in Dallas County since June, 1841, and is the oldest inhabitant. He is a son of John BEEMAN,
head of the first family to join John Neely BRYAN, the solitary pioneer, who undertook to establish a settlement at the forks of the Trinity.
"My parents, leaving the original seat of our tribe in Illinois in 1840, reached Bowie County, Texas, a few months later and there pitched a crop, near the town of Old Boston, and there I was born May 18 of
the same year," said Mr. BEEMAN. "The following years, father accepted an invitation from John Neely BRYAN to come to the forks of the Trinity, and we arrived here in June, 1841.

Saw Indians Every Day.

     "We went into camp at what is now known as the BEEMAN Cemetery, adjoining the Jewish White Rock Cemetery, on the south side of the Texas & Pacific Railroad, about a mile east of the State fair grounds.  For some time, we lived in our tents, and for three years, kept a guard day and night to keep the Indians from rushing us unawares. It was said that Indians would never attack a settlement that had a sentinel. Every day, Indians would appear on the
ridge north of us and survey our camp, but they never molested us.
     "Our party consisted of my parents, four brothers older than I, my sister, Margaret; James BEEMAN, half brother of my father, and his wife, Mr. SILKWOOD and his wife and Alex Webb, a bachelor. I have
forgotten Mr. SILKWOOD's initials. My brothers were all old enough to shoot, and my mother was as good a marksman as the settlement could boast. Thus, with nine crack riflemen to defend it, our settlement was in little danger from Indians, who always looked before they leaped. Mother took time about with the men standing guard. With me on her left arm, and a rifle held cross her shoulder with her right hand, she paced the beat.

Builds Blockhouse.

     "In time, father built a little log cabin, but later erected what was known on the frontier as a blockhouse, which was a two-story log cabin, with the second story projecting over the first all round,
so that the besieged could pour bullets and scalding water down on attacking Indians who came up to set fire to the house. While our stronghold was never put to the test, who knows but it saved us from
massacre? As far as I know, this was the only blockhouse that was ever built in Dallas County.  William Cochran came to the county a year or two after we did, but I never heard that he built a blockhouse. Our blockhouse stood for ten or twelve years after the Indians had retired, and when it began to fall in from decay, we pulled it down and
made firewood of the timbers.

. . . . . "I remember when John Neely BRYAN's cabin was not only the only house in Dallas, but the only house in the county. John Neely BRYAN and my sister, Margaret, were married in 1843, and went to live in the cabin. I often visited my sister in her home. The cabin, which is still preserved within the walls of a larger building at the Buckner Orphans' Home, was exhibited at the State Fair of Texas a few years ago, along with the rocking chair which BRYAN carved with his pocket knife. My sister, Margaret, [?Caroline?] died in 1893 [Margaret died 1919, A. C. Morgan].

. . . . "I served three years in the Civil War. I was a member of Company B, Nineteenth Cavalry, Parson's Brigade. Our command went forward to stop Gen. Banks, who undertook to invade Texas through
Louisiana. After twenty-nine days of continuous fighting, we drove him out of Louisiana. We turned him back at the battle of Mansfield, and followed him to Yellow Bayou, where he received 30,000 re-inforcements, and where he made a desperate stand, but was again forced to resume his retreat. His army would have been captured or annihilated if the gunboats had not covered his passage of the Mississippi River. Mansfield was, no doubt, the decisive battle of this campaign, but the fighting at Yellow Bayou was even fiercer than at Mansfield. Many of the Yankees killed at Mansfield had on their
caps, the printed words: 'To Texas or hell.' It is certain they did not reach the Texas destination.

Pays Double Price for Choice Land.

     "When father picked a place to settle at BEEMAN's Cemetery, he was not aware that he had planted himself right in the center of the Thomas Lagow league. As soon as he made this discovery, he wrote to Mr. Lagow, offering to buy a section of the land. Mr. Lagow replied that if he wanted a section in the middle of the league, he would charge him $1 an acre for it, but if he would take it on the edge of the league, he might have it for 50¢ an acre.  But, father insisted on taking the land he hadalready occupied, and he accordingly had to pay $640 for the section.

Eighty-Four Years in Dallas.

     "When I married, in 1865, I built a log house a few yards north of the site of my present residence. A few years later, I substituted a frame house, getting part of the lumber from the White Rock mill, and
part from East Texas. When Owenwood addition was opened three years ago, it was necessary to set my house back in order to make room for St. Charles street. Some of the pine lumber used in my first
frame house was used in the building of the house I now occupy. I have been living practically in the same place since 1865. I have four children living:
Cleve and Ira BEEMAN and Mrs. Katie HERRIN of Dallas, and Melton BEEMAN of Arkansas."

Previous Article from Jim Wheat's Web Site
(11 Oct 1925, Dallas Morning News, Sec. 5, p. 12, col. 1-5)

________________________________________________

In the "Citizens of the Republic of Texas", by the Texas Genealogical Society, 1977, page 95, John's name is written, "John Scott W. (Winfield) BEEMAN".
________________________________________________

1850 Dallas County, TX, Agriculture Census

Jno S. BEEMAN: 13 acres imp(roved); 627 acres unimp(roved); valued at $640; $10 farm implements; 3 horses; 2 milch cows; 3 other cattle; 20 swing; $155 live stock; 4 bus(hels) wheat; 200 bus(hels) corn; 20 bus(hels) sweet potatoes; 150 lbs. butter; 3 tons hay; 50 lbs. beeswax & honey; $20 home made manufacture; $25 value of animals slaughtered.
________________________________________________

1880 Dallas County, TX, Agriculture Census

Scott BEEMAN: 68 acres of improved land; 68 acres of woodland; $2500 Value of farm; $200 Value of implements; $450 Value of livestock; $100 Farm wages paid in 1879; 32 Weeks of hired labor; 8 Horses; 6 Milch cows; 9 Other cows; 300 lbs. Butter; 6 Swine; 16 acres Indian corn; 150 bushels Indian corn; 9 acres Oats; 360 bushels Oats; 15 acres Wheat; 150 bushels Wheat; 6 acres Cotton; 3 bales Cotton; 100 Cords of wood cut in 1879.
_______________________________________________

NOTE: there are 3 graves on the J. S. W. BEEMAN Cemetery Lot #6 with concrete stones - no names or dates. (This Note is from Coye Hawpe's cemetery survey, Jun 1974)

Following this note is a paragraph: The dimensions of this lot on Ira Beeman's map are shown as being 43 feet, 6 inches wide and 71 feet on the south side, 74 feet on the north side. There is a chain link fence which encloses the part of this lot which has gravestones on it; this fence encloses the full width of the lot, but only about fifty feet of the length. there is approximately twenty or so feet on the west end which is not enclosed. this area of the cemetery is that which has been so abominably desecrated; it is possible that many of the graves listed on this lot at one time had stones. (The chain link fence is of recent times as are many of the above stones which are listed.)

_______________________________________________

 

More About JOHN SCOTT WINFIELD BEEMAN:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
388,389 Lot 6.1
Known as: Scott Beeman (1880 Census)
Known as(a): John Beeman (1900 Census)
Known as(b): J. S. W. Beeman (1910 Census)
Known as(c): John W. S. Beeman (1920 Census)
Medical Information: Gray Eyes, Light Hair, 20 years old at muster time into Burford's Regiment, 19th Texas Cavalry CSA, Weatherford, Parker County, TX He was 20 yrs old at muster.
Military service: 19th TX Cav, Co. B, C.S.A.
Mustered In: Weatherford, Parker County, TX
Occupation: Farmer (1870, 1880, 1900, 1910 Census)
Residence: May 1841, Bowie County, TX
Residence(s): June 1841, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ss): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
390
Residence(sss): 1860, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ssss): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, Precinct 1391
Residence(sssss): 1880, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, ED 59
Residence(ssssss): 06 June 1900, Census, Dallas, Precinct #1 (Oasis), Dallas County, TX
Residence(t): 1903, Rural Route #3, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(tt): 1904, Rural Route #3, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ttt): 19 April 1910, Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX
Residence(tttt): 02 January 1920, Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX (Orphans Home Road)
Residence, Last: January 1930, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas
Spelling: Beeman (1870, 1880, 1900, 1910 Census), Beemon (Beeman Family Bible), Beaman

Notes for ELIZABETH BOONE MERRIFIELD:

_________________________________________

Spelling of "Bettie" (1880 Census), "Betty" (1860 & 1870 Census, Dallas County).

_________________________________________

"The Beeman's of Texas", Vol. 1, p. 69, has Betty Boone MERRIFIELD.

_________________________________________

Certificate No. 155

Name of Deceased: Mrs. Elizabeth B. BEEMAN
Place of Death/Local Address: Orphans Home Rd.
Gender: Female
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Name of Father: Milton MERRIFIELD
Maiden name of Mother: Marguerite SINGLETON
Date of Death: 13 Apr 1923
Cause of Death: Myo-carditis
Name/Address of Physician: Chas. W. Bayinton, Wilson Bldg.
Place of Burial: BEEMAN Cemetery
Date of Burial: 15 Apr 1923
Name/Address of Undertaker: poss. Chas. F. Weiland Und. Co., Dallas

_________________________________________

 

More About ELIZABETH BOONE MERRIFIELD:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
392,393 Lot 6.2
Cause of Death: Myo-carditis
Known as: "Bettie" Beeman (1880, 1900 Census)
Known as(a): Elizabeth Beeman (1910 Census)
Known as(b): Elizabeth B.M. Beeman (1920 Census)
Residence: January 1849, Nelson County, KY
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas County, TX
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Dallas County, TX, Cedar Hill P. O.
394
Residence(sss): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX, Precinct 1
395
Residence(ssss): 1880, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence(sssss): 06 June 1900, Census, Dallas, Precinct #1 (Oasis), Dallas County, TX
Residence(ssssss): 19 April 1910, Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX
Residence(t): 02 January 1920, Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX (Orphans Home Road)
Residence, Last: April 1923, Dallas, Orphans Home Road, Dallas County, TX
Spelling: Betty (1860, 1870 Census, The Beemans of Texas, Karen Gassett), Bettie (1880, 1900 Census)
Spelling(s): Merrifield (1860 Census), Merryfield

Marriage Notes for JOHN BEEMAN and ELIZABETH MERRIFIELD:
In the Marriage Records of Dallas County, Texas, it shows Elizabeth B. as Bettie B.

More About JOHN BEEMAN and ELIZABETH MERRIFIELD:
Marriage: 03 August 1865, Dallas County, Texas
396,397,398,399
Married by: H. H. Ware, M. G.

x.  SARAH ANN BEEMAN400,401,402,403,404,405,406,407, b. 21 October 1843, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas408; d. 17 April 1867, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas408; m. JOHN M. FUGATE408,409,410,411, 19 December 1860, Dallas County, Texas412,413,414,415,416; b. Abt. 1832, Kentucky.

Notes for SARAH ANN BEEMAN:
_________________________________

In WFT#2:390 Hunnicutt, it shows Ann Beeman FUGATE, daughter of Ann BEEMAN, who married Harvey LANDERS, b. Pike County, IL, and had no children.

_________________________________

Sarah Anne and Infant Daughter (Anne Beeman FUGATE) are buried in Lot #48, the BEEMAN Family Cemetery, Dallas, Texas. "The Beeman Family of Texas 1841-1949", p. 8, says they are buried SE of her parents' graves in the old part of the cemetery. Did not find gravemarkers in the Cemetery Survey in May 1998. (A. C. Morgan, Dallas, TX). However, there are 4 pipes in the ground at this Lot #1 location. Lot #48 is in an overgrown portion of the cemetery located SE of the Thompson/Sypert Lot.

_________________________________

 

More About SARAH ANN BEEMAN:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX (marker not located in A. C. Morgan, May Survey 1998)417 Lot 48
Cause of Death: Childbirth
Known as: Ann Beeman (gravemarker)
Residence: October 1843, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
418
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Residence, Last: April 1867, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
Spelling: Beeman (Beemon in the Beeman Family Bible), Beaman
Spelling(s): Ann (gravemarker), Anne

More About JOHN M. FUGATE:
Residence: 1832, KY

More About JOHN FUGATE and SARAH BEEMAN:
Marriage: 19 December 1860, Dallas County, Texas
419,420,421,422,423
Married by: John Scurlock, J. P.

xi.  CAROLINE BEEMAN424,425,426,427,428,429,430,431, b. 19 May 1846, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas432; d. September 1892, DeSoto, Dallas County, Texas433; m. JAMES ISAAC FISHER434,435, 436, 28 November 1867, Dallas County, Texas437,438,439,440; b. Abt. 1843, Missouri; d. 02 February 1910, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.

Notes for CAROLINE BEEMAN:

__________________________________________

The John Beeman Family Bible has Caroline's birthdate as 19 May 1846. "The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949" has birthdate as 11 May 1845 in Dallas, Dallas County, TX. If her age was correct on her marker as 47 years old, her birthdate would best be the Beeman Bible & "The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949" birthdate of 11 May 1845.

__________________________________________

Caroline is living in the household of Emily BEEMAN, along with her husband, Isaac FISHER, in the 1870 Census, Dallas County, TX.

__________________________________________

Caroline is buried in the Beeman Family Cemetery, Dallas, Texas. NOTE: The tombstone death date is wrong (3 May 1892). She attended the funeral of her Mother on 3 May 1892 and then died of tuberculosis shortly after the birth of her first grandson, Ernest FISHER, about Sep 1892.

__________________________________________

More About CAROLINE BEEMAN:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
441,442,443 Lot 10.1
Cause of Death: Tuberculosis
Residence: May 1846, Dallas County, TX
Residence(s): 1850, Census, Dallas County, TX
444
Residence(ss): 1860, Census, Dallas County, TX
Residence(sss): 1870, Census, Dallas County, TX, (John born)
445
Residence(ssss): 1880, Census, Precinct 3, Dallas County, TX
Residence, Last: September 1892, DeSoto, Dallas County, TX

Notes for JAMES ISAAC FISHER:

____________________________________________

In the 1870 Census, Dallas County, Texas, Isaac is shown living in the household (#1744) of Emily BEEMAN, age 63, born in South Carolina. Also, wife, Caroline ELAM FISHER is shown living there with a son, John, age one month, born in May 1870.

____________________________________________

1870 Dallas County, TX, Agriculture Census

Issac FISHER: 16 acres of improved land; $15 Value of equipment; 4 horses; 3 Milch cows; 5 Other cows; 10 Swine; $235 Value of all livestock; 200 bushels Indian corn; $60 Value of slaughtered animals; $160 Value of all farm production.

____________________________________________

J. I. FISHER is listed as Executor for Emily BEEMAN (deceased) in Probate Case #2132, Dallas County, TX.

____________________________________________

More About JAMES ISAAC FISHER:
Burial: Beeman Memorial Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
446
Known as: Isaac "Ike" Fisher
Known as(a): Isaac Fisher (1870 Census)
Known as(b): James I. Fisher (1850 Census)
Occupation: Farmer (1870, 1880 Census)
Residence: Abt. 1843, MO
Residence(s): 22 October 1850, Census, Polk County, MO
Residence(ss): 1870, Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX
447
Residence(sss): 1880, Census, Precinct 3, Dallas County, TX
Residence, Last: Dallas, Dallas County, TX

More About JAMES FISHER and CAROLINE BEEMAN:
Marriage: 28 November 1867, Dallas County, Texas
448,449,450,451
Married by: H. C. Sweet, J. P.



Endnotes

1. U. S. Census, 1850, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, Microfilm Roll 910, Part 1, p. 200, p. 100B, 406, 421, Line #20, BEEMAN, John 50 m Farmer $2600 b. NC;
BEEMAN, Emily 44 f b. SC;
BEEMAN, William H. 23 m Farmer b. IL;
BEEMAN, Samuel H. 21 m Farmer b. IL Attends School;
BEEMAN, Isaac H. 18 m Farmer b. IL Attends School;
BEEMAN, James H. 17 m Farmer b. IL Attends School;
BEEMAN, Clarissa 14 f b. IL Attends School;
BEEMAN, Nancy 11 f b. IL Attends School;
BEEMAN, John W. S. 9 m b. TX Attends School;
BEEMAN, Sarah A. 6 f b. TX Attends School;
BEEMAN, Caroline 4 f b. TX.
2. Citizens of the Republic of Texas, 1977, The Texas Genealogical Society, p. 95,
John BEEMAN and family.
3. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
John BEAMAN was born October 20th day 1799.
4. John Beeman Family Bible, Deaths,
John BEEMAN departed this life the 12th of March 1856.
5. LDS Ancestral File, AFN:M5SZ-FP,
John BEEMAN, b. 20 Oct 1799, Murfreesboro, Hertford County, NC; Father:
James BEEMAN;
Mother: Nancy MOORE.
6. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
7. Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson emaxwell@tstar.net.
8. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Block #1,
John BEEMAN, Born 20 Oct 1799; Died 12 Mar 1856.
9. WFT #3:4108, BEEMAN,
John BEEMAN, b. 20 Oct 1799.
10. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
John BEEMAN, b. 20 Oct 1799, NC; d. 1856.
11. BEEMAN Memorial Cemetery Corp. Letter, 25 Nov 1949, W. T. White, Supt. Dallas Independent School District, John BEEMAN, b. 20 Oct 1799, NC;
(His older brother Sam was born in NC in 1795).
12. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
John BEEMAN, b. 20 Oct 1799, Murfreesboro, Hertford Co, NC.
13. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
14. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 68,
John BEEMAN, b. 20 Oct 1799, Murfreesboro, Hertford County, NC.
15. Ben G. REAVIS bgreavis@prodigy.net.
16. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
John BEEMAN, d. 12 Mar 1856, Bowie Co, TX.
17. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, Dallas P. O., M653_1292, p. 301B, p. 166, 1167, 1166, Precinct #1, Enumerated 19 Sep 1860,
BEEMAN, Emily 52 f Farmer $6500 $1000 SC;
BEEMAN, James 27 m Farmer $800 $1440 IL;
BEEMAN, Scott 19 m TX;
BEEMAN, Sarah A. 16 f TX Attends school;
BEEMAN, Caroline 14 f TX Attends school.
18. Citizens of the Republic of Texas, 1977, The Texas Genealogical Society, pp 95,96,
Emily Manly HUNNICUTT and family.
19. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, p. 450A, 1744, 1737, Line 23, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
BEEMAN, Emily 63 f w Keeps House SC;
FUGATE, C. A. 8 f w TX;
FISHER, Isaac 27 m w Farmer MO Can't Write;
FISHER, Caroline 25 f w Keeps House TX;
FISHER, John
1/12 m w b. May TX;
MUNCY, Gilford 12 m w TX Attends school.
20. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, Microfilm Roll 910, Part 1, p. 200, p. 100B, 406, 421, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850, BEEMAN, Emily 44 f SC.
21. LDS Ancestral File, AFN:Q6JJ-Z1,
Emily Nanly (Manly) HUNNICUTT, 19 Feb 1806, of GA; d. 8 May 1892;
bur. Beeman Cemetery, Near Dallas, TX;
Father: Hartwell Taylor HUNNICUT;
Mother: Margaret CUNNINGHAM.
22. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
23. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, T9_1299, p. 145A, p. 33, 286, 303, Supv. Dist. #3, ED 59, Enumerated 1 Jun 1880,
BEEMAN, Emily w f 73 Mother single b. SC father b. VA mother b. SC
(Emily is living with her son, Scott & wife, Bettie & family, and Scott's sister, Margaret BRYAN, widow of John Neely BRYAN).
24. Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson emaxwell@tstar.net.
25. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Block #1,
Emily BEEMAN, Born 19 Feb 1806; Died 3 May 1892.
26. WFT#2:390
BEEMAN, Emily Manly HUNNICUTT, b. 19 Jun 1806, SC; d. WFT Est. 1847-1901.
27. John Beeman Family Bible, Marriages,
John BEEMAN and Emily HUNNICUTT was maried June 19th 1823.
28. Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763 - 1900, Vol 1, p. 3, License #72,
BEEMAN, John married HUNNICUTT, Emily Manley in Greene Co, IL, 19 Jun 1823.
29. Illinois Marriage Records, Greene County,
BEEMAN, John, mar. Emily Manley HUNNICUTT, 19 Jun 1823.
30. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
Emily Manley HUNNICUTT, b. 19 Feb 1806, Greenville, SC.
31. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Emily BEEMAN, b. 19 Feb 1806, d. 3 May 1892.
32. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998.
33. Early Dallas County Cemetery Records by Willie Flowers Carlisle (Mrs. George F.), p. 11,
BEEMAN, John, 20 Oct 1799 - 12 Mar 1856.
34. Coye Hawpe Beeman Cemetery Interment List from Ruth Cooper, Jun 1974, p. 1,
John BEEMAN Lot #1, John BEEMAN (stone), 20 Oct 1799 - 12 Mar 1856;
Emily HUNNICUTT BEEMAN (stone), 19 Feb 1806 - 3 May 1892, (beside);
Two children buried at the foot of these graves.
(It was impossible to determine if these graves had stones because of the overgrown condition of the lot.).
35. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
James BEEMAN died at Bowie Co, TX.
36. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, 406, 421, Line 20, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
John BEEMAN 50 m Farmer $2600 NC.
37. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998.
38. Early Dallas County Cemetery Records by Willie Flowers Carlisle (Mrs. George F.), p. 11,
BEEMAN, Emily, 19 Feb 1806 - 3 May 1892.
39. Coye Hawpe Beeman Cemetery Interment List from Ruth Cooper, Jun 1974, p. 1,
Emily HUNNICUTT BEEMAN (stone), 19 Feb 1806 - 3 May 1892;
John BEEMAN (stone), 29 Oct 1799 - 12 Mar 1856, (beside);
Two children buried at the foot of these graves.
(It was impossible to determine if these graves had stones because of the overgrown condition of the lot.).
40. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, #406, #421, Line 21, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
Emily BEEMAN 44 f SC.
41. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, 450A, #1744, #1737, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
BEEMAN, Emily 63 f w Keeps House SC.
42. John Beeman Family Bible, Marriages,
John BEEMAN and Emily HUNNICUTT was maried June 19th 1823.
43. Illinois Statewide Marriage Index 1763 - 1900, Vol 1, p. 3, License #72,
BEEMAN, John married HUNNICUTT, Emily Manley in Greene Co, IL, 19 Jun 1823.
44. Illinois Marriage Records, Greene County,
BEEMAN, John, mar. Emily Manley HUNNICUTT, 19 Jun 1823.
45. Kandy Beaver 3Arrow@maxinet.com.
46. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
John BEEMAN mar. Emily Manly HUNNICUTT, 18 Jun 1823, Calhoun County, ILL;
daughter of Hartwell HUNNICUTT & Margaret.
47. WFT#2:390 HUNNICUTT,
John BEEMAN, mar. Emily Manly HUNNICUTT, 18 Jun 1823, Calhoun County, IL.
48. BEEMAN Memorial Cemetery Corp. Letter, 25 Nov 1949, W. T. White, Supt. Dallas Independent School District, John BEEMAN mar. Emily Manly HUNNICUTT, 18 Jun 1823, Calhoun County, IL.
49. Inez Criddle i,
John BEAMAN mar. Emily Manly HUNNICUTT, 19 Jun 1823, Alton, IL.
50. Inez Criddle i,
John BEAMAN mar. Emily Manly HUNNICUTT, 19 Jun 1823, Calhoun, IL.
51. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
John BEEMAN mar. Emily HUNNICUTT, 19 Jun 1823, Madison Co, IL.
52. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 68,
John BEEMAN md. 19 Jun 1823, Emily Manly HUNNICUTT.
53. LDS Ancestral File, AFN:M5SZ-FP,
mar. 19 Jun 1823, Alton, IL.
54. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949,
John BEEMAN, b. in NC, 20 Oct 1799, m. Emily Manly HUNNICUTT in Calhoun County, IL on 18 Jun 1824.
55. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Elizabeth (BEEMAN HARTER BRYAN) CUMBY 22 Jul 1824 - 8 May 1886 Aged 61 Years, 9 Mo's, 16 D'ys.
56. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Elizabeth BEEMAN was Bornd July the 22nd in the year of our Lord 1824.
57. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Elizabeth, b. 22 Jul 1824, in IL, d. Dallas County, TX, 8 May 1886.
58. The Beemans of Texas.
59. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 201, p. 101B, 414, 429, Line 37, Enumerated 17 Dec 1850,
BRYAN, Elizabeth 25 f $200 IL.
60. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 5,
Wm. CUMBY, Elizabeth, their daughter, Kate and Elizabeth's son, Sam, and Kate's 1st husband, L. L. THOMPSON, are buried in BEEMAN Memorial Cemetery.
61. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
Elizabeth BEEMAN, b. 22 Jul 1824.
62. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Miscellaneous Grave Sites,
Elizabeth CUMBY, Born 22 Jul 1824; Died 8 May 1886, Aged 61 yr's 9 mon's 16 d'ys (Dau. of John & Emily).
63. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Elizabeth BEEMAN, b. 22 Jul 1824, IL; d. 8 May 1886, Dallas County, TX.
64. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM.
65. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
66. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Elizabeth CUMBY, b. 22 Jul 1824, d. 8 May 1886, age 61 yrs, 9 mos, 16 dys.
67. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
68. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
Henry HARTER. b. abt. 1824.
69. The Beemans of Texas,
Elizabeth BEEMAN, md. (1) Henry HARTOR,
(2) J. B. BRYAN,
(3) William CUMBY.
70. Dallas County, TX, Tax List Index, 1840-1849, Dallas County, p. NPN, No Township Listed.
71. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Harry HARTER, b. WFT Est. 1807-1827, Canton, OH; d. WFT Est. 1852-1913 at sea.
72. John Beeman Family Bible,
Henry HARTER and Elisabeth BEEMAN was married August the 15th 1844.
73. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
74. The Beemans of Texas.
75. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 101B, 414, 429, Line 36, Enumerated 17 Dec 1850,
BRYAN, James B. 37 m Dentist TN;
BRYAN, Elizabeth 25 f $200 IL;
BRYAN, William 14 m AL Attends school;
BRYAN, Louisa 11 f TX Attends school ;
BRYAN, Henrietta 9 f TX Attends school ;
BRYAN, James 7 m TX Attends school ;
BRYAN, Isthmus
1/12 m TX ;
HARTER, Louisanna 5 f $400 TX Attends school .
76. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
James B. BRYAN, 1805, Pendleton, SC; d. WFT Est. 1855-1897.
77. Casteel-Six Family c,
James B. BRYAN, b. 1805, Pendleton, SC.
78. BEEMAN Memorial Cemetery Corp. Letter, 25 Nov 1949, Letter to W. T. White, Supt. Dallas Independent School District,
James B. BRYAN, b. 1805, Pendleton, SC.
79. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, 2, BRYAN,
James B. & HARTER, Elizabeth 18 Feb 1849 in Dallas County, TX.
80. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, p. 1,
James B. BRYAN mar. Elizabeth HARTER, 18 Feb 1849, by W. H. Hord, C. J.
81. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949,
Elizabeth's 2nd husband, James B. BRYAN, born at Pendleton, South Carolina, in 1805.
82. Charlotte Sprengel j,
James Bracken BRYAN, d. 1904.
83. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Wm. CUMBY 10 Aug 1820 - 21 Dec 1888 Aged 68 y'rs 4 mo's 11 dy's.
84. The Beemans of Texas.
85. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 5,
Wm. CUMBY, Elizabeth, their daughter, Kate and Elizabeth's son, Sam, and Kate's 1st husband, L. L. Thompson, are buried in Beeman Memorial Cemetery.
86. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Miscellaneous Grave Sites,
Wm. CUMBY, Born 10 Aug 1820; Died 21 Dec 1888, 68 y'rs 4 mo's 11 d'ys (Husband of Elizabeth).
87. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
William CUMBY.
88. 1880 Census, Montezuma, Pike County, IL, T9_243, p. 549C, 180, 181, FH Film 1254243, ED 190, Image 0059, William CUMBY w m 59 mar. Farmer VA VA VA;
Elizabeth CUMBY w f 56 Wife mar. Keeping house IL NC NC;
Catherine CUMBY w f 13 Daughter single Scholar IL IL VA;
Eustace CUMBY w m 12 Son mar. Farmer IL VA IL;
Amanda CUMBY w f 22 Daughter-in-law mar. At home OH OH VA.
89. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Elizabeth BEEMAN md. (1) Henry HARTOR,
(2) J. B. BRYAN,
(3) William CUMBY.
90. Linda Warrenburg,
William CUMBY mar. Elizabeth BEEMAN, 17 Aug 1854, Winchester, IL.
91. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Wm CUMBY, b. 10 Aug 1820; d. 21 Dec 1888, Aged 68 yrs, 4 mo's, 11 d'ys.
92. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Elizabeth CUMBY, b. 22 Jul 1824, d. 8 May 1886, Aged 61 yrs, 9 mos, 16 dys.
93. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Elizabeth BEEMAN is buried in Beeman Memorial Cemetery.
94. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 201, 101A, #414, #429, Line27, Enumerated 17 Dec 1850,
Elizabeth BRYAN w f 25 $200 IL.
95. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949,
Henry Harter died on a sea voyage; was buried at sea.
96. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949,
Henry HARTER died on a sea voyage; was buried at sea.
97. John Beeman Family Bible,
Henry HARTER and Elisabeth BEEMAN was maried August the 15th 1844.
98. Linda Warrenburg.
99. Brenda Beaman Parker brenda@dhospitality.com.
100. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
Henry HARTER mar. Elizabeth BEEMAN, 16 Aug 1844.
101. John Beeman Family Bible, Marriages,
Henry HARTER and Elisabeth BEEMAN was married August 16th (? date illegible) 1844.
102. Linda Warrenburg, James Bracken BRYAN bur. Stockton, CA.
103. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 201, 101A, #414, #429, Line 28, Enumerated 17 Dec 1850,
James B. BRYAN 37 m Dentist TN.
104. B. G. Reavis bgreavis@prodigy.net.
105. Linda Warrenburg.
106. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, 2,
BRYAN, James B. & HARTER, Elizabeth 18 Feb 1849 in Dallas County, TX.
107. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, p. 1,
James B. BRYAN mar. Elizabeth HARTER, 18 Feb 1849, by W. H. Hord, C. J.
108. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Wm CUMBY, b. 10 Aug 1820; d. 21 Dec 1888, Aged 68 yr's, 4 mo's, 11 d'ys.
109. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
William CUMBY is buried in Beeman Memorial Cemetery.
110. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Elizabeth BEEMAN md. (1) Henry HARTOR,
(2) J.B. BRYAN,
(3) William CUMBY.
111. Linda Warrenburg,
William CUMBY mar. Elizabeth BEEMAN, 17 Aug 1854, Winchester, IL.
112. Citizens of the Republic of Texas, 1977, The Texas Genealogical Society, p. 96,
Margaret BEEMAN and family.
113. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 273, p. 451A, 1760, 1753, Line #29, Precinct #5, Enumerated 3 Oct 1870,
BRYAN, Margaret 44 f w IL.
114. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 201, p. 101A, 410, 425, Line #13, Enumerated 17 Dec 1850,
BEEMAN, Margaret 25 f IL.
115. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 186, p. 311B, 1295, 1300, Precinct #1, Dallas P. O., Enumerated 26 Sep 1860,
BEEMAN, Margaret 35 f b. IL.
116. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
Margaret BEEMAN, b. 29 Sep 1825.
117. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Margaret BEEMAN was Bornd September the 29 in the year of our Lord 1825.
118. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Margaret, b. 29 Sep 1825; d. Clay County, TX, 6 Sep 1919.
119. RootsWeb World Connect, ID: 12806, 12807.
120. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, T9_1299, p. 145A, 296, 303, p. 33, Supv. Dist. #3, ED 59, Enumerated 1 Jun 1880,
BRYAN, Margaret w f 54 Sister widowed b. IL father b. NC mother b. SC
(living with her brother, Scott BEEMAN & wife, Bettie & family, & Scott's mother, Emily).
121. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 68,
Margaret BEEMAN, b. 29 Sep 1825.
122. LDS Ancestral File, AFN:Q6JQ-JR,
Margaret BEEMAN, b. 19 Sep 1825, IL; d. 1919, TX.
123. WFT#2:390 Bryan,
Margaret BEEMAN, b. 29 Sep 1825, IL; d. 6 Sep 1919, Clay County, TX (Wichita Falls).
124. WFT#2:390
BEEMAN, Margaret BEEMAN, b. 29 Sep 1825, IL; d. 6 Sep 1919, Clay County, TX (Wichita Falls).
125. 1880 Census, Dallas County, Precinct #6, T9_1299, p. 259D, FHL Film #1255299,
Margaret BRYAN Mother Widow 50 f w Keeping House IL IL IL.
126. History of Dallas County from 1837 to 1887.
127. The Lusty Texans of Dallas.
128. Beeman Newsletter, Nov 1977, p. 68, 78.
129. Charlotte Sprengel j,
Margaret BEEMAN, b. 29 Sep 1825, Calhoun County, IL.
130. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
131. Ruth Kerr Hurst newton@jas.net.
132. U. S. Census, 1850, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, p. 201, 101A, 410, 425, Line #12, Enumerated 17 Dec 1850, BRYAN, John N. 39, m, Lawyer, TN;
BRYAN, Margaret, 25, f, IL;
BRYAN, John, 5, m, TX;
BRYAN, Frances C. (E.), 3, f, TX;
BRYAN, Edward T., 1, m, TX;
HAUGHT, Adam C. 34 m Ferryman TN;
HAUGHT, Lydia 5 f IL;
McCOY, John C. 30 m Lawyer IA;
BROOKS, Henestice 18 m Printer AL;
SPAIN, Mansel D. 15 m AL;
BEEMAN, Mary D. 10 f TX Attends school;
BEEMAN, Emily 8 f TX Attends school;
BEEMAN, Frances M. 5 m TX Attends school;
BEEMAN, Anis 3 f TX.
133. Citizens of the Republic of Texas, 1977, The Texas Genealogical Society, p. 96,
John Neely BRYAN and family.
134. The Dallas Journal D. G. S. Dec 1995, Voter Registration 1867-1869, Dallas County, Tx,
J. N. BRYAN, Precinct 1, State 26 yr, County 26 yr, Precinct 26 yr, Native-TN.
135. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 273, 451A, 1760, 1753, Precinct #5, Enumerated 3 Oct 1870 by Isaac Jones,
BRYAN, John N. 59 m w Farmer $600 $480 TN;
BRYAN, Margaret 44 f w Keeps house IL;
BRYAN, Elizabeth 22 f w TX;
BRYAN, Alexander 16 m w TX Can't Write.
136. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 186, 311B, 1295, 1300, Precinct #1, Dallas P. O., Enumerated 26 Sep 1860, BRYAN, J. N. 40 m Lawyer b. TN $5000 $1000;
BRYAN, Margaret 35 f GA;
BRYAN, Jn. (John Neely, Jr.) 14 m TX Attends school;
BRYAN, Edwd T. 10 m TX Attends school;
BRYAN, Elizabeth F. 12 f TX Attends school;
BRYAN, Alexn. 5 m TX Attends school.
137. Sandra Steele jssteele@pldi.net.
138. RootsWeb World Connect, ID: 12806.
139. LDS Ancestral File, AFN:Q6J6-JL,
John Neely BRYAN, b. 10 Dec 1810, TN; d. 1879, TX.
140. WFT#2:390 Bryan,
John Neely BRYAN, b. 24 Dec 1810, Fayetteville, TN; d. WFT Est. 1862-1902, TX.
141. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
John Neely BRYAN, b. 24 Dec 1810, Fayetteville, TN; d. WFT Est. 1862-1902, TX.
142. 1840 Census, Van Buren, Crawford County, AR.
143. BEEMAN Memorial Cemetery Corp. Letter, 25 Nov 1949, W. T. White, Supt. Dallas Independent School District,
John Neely BRYAN, b. 24 Dec 1810, Coon Creek, Fayetteville, TN.
144. A. C. GREENE, Bryan Family records indicate their marriage at Pin Hook (now Paris), TX.
145. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
146. Pioneer Cemetery, Dallas, Dallas County, TX,
BRYAN, John Neely, d. 8 Sep 1877.
147. Linda Warrenburg,
Margaret BEEMAN died in Charlie, Clay County, TX, and was buried in Thornberry Cemetery. In 1927, her remains were moved to Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls, TX, and placed on one side of her son, John."
148. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 201, 101A, #410, #425, Line 13, Enumerated 17 Dec 1850,
Margaret BEEMAN 25 f IL.
149. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 186, 311B, #1295, #1300, Precinct #1, Dallas P. O., Enumerated 26 Sep 1860,
Margaret BRYAN 35 f IL.
150. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 273, 451A, #1760, #1753, Precinct #5, Enumerated 3 Oct 1870,
BRYAN, Margaret 44 f w Keeps House IL.
151. Footprints of James J. Beeman 1816 - 1888.
152. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 201, 101A, #410, #425, Line 12, Enumerated 17 Dec 1850,
John N. BRYAN 39 m Lawyer $10,000 TN.
153. The WPA Dallas Guide and History, p. 338, On August 7, 1852,
Bryan sold his residence along with other possessions to Alexander Cockrell and moved to Mountain Creek, where in the old Cockrell home was born his fifth child, Alexander L., on October 30, 1854.
154. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 186, 311B, #1295, #1300, Precinct #1, Dallas P. O., Enumerated 26 Sep 1860,
J. N. BRYAN 49 m Lawyer $5000 $1000 TN.
155. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 273, 451A, #1760, #1753, Precinct #5, Enumerated 3 Oct 1870,
BRYAN, John N. 59 m w Farmer $600 $480 TN.
156. Forgotten History of the Four Cabins by Barrot Steven Sanders, p. 3,
John Neely BRYAN was a real ladies man and one of the very few eligible bachelors in Dallas. He soon captured the heart of Margaret BEEMAN, John BEEMAN's handsome daughter, and in February of 1843 posted cash bond with Hensley, the Peters Colony Agent, to marry her. Rather than cutting new trees and going through the ordeal of shaping new logs with which to build his honeymoon cottage, Bryan simply dismantled his old cabin and moved it to higher ground. It was reassembled on what is today known as the "Old Courthouse Square". The young couple lived happily here, planting a small garden and feasting upon the abundant game which they found in the area. But sadly, within the year, the Trinity River rose again to a new high and sought out that little oak cabin which had won its bout with her the year before. This time the cabin was no match for the river's mighty strength - the log structure was torn assunder. The BRYANs took up residence in a tent made of wagon canvas until a new cabin could be built.
157. Dallas County, TX, Deed Record Book, 'D', pp. 398, 399.
158. A. C. GREENE, Bryan Family records indicate their marriage at Pin Hook (now Paris), TX.
159. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 68,
Margaret BEEMAN mar. John Neely BRYAN, 26 Feb 1843.
160. John Beeman Family Bible, Marriages,
John N. BRYAN and Margaret BEEMAN was maried Febuary 26th 1843.
161. Citizens of the Republic of Texas, 1977, The Texas Genealogical Society,
Margaret BEEMAN married John Neely BRYAN, 26 Feb 1843.
162. LDS Ancestral File, AFN:Q6JQ-JL, John Neely BRYAN mar.
Margaret BEEMAN, 26 Feb 1843, Dallas, Dallas County, TX.
163. WFT #22-3269 BEEMAN.
164. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
John Neely BRYAN mar. Margaret BEAMAN, 26 Feb 1843, Ft. Bonham, TX.
165. Linda Warrenburg,
John Neely BRYAN mar. Margaret BEEMAN, 26 Feb 1843, Bonham County, TX.
166. WFT#2:390 Bryan,
John Neely BRYAN mar. Margaret BEEMAN, 28 Feb 1842, Fort Inglish (now Bonham TX) daughter of John BEEMAN & Emily hUNNICUTT.
167. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
John Neely BRYAN mar. Margaret BEEMAN, 28 Feb 1842, Fort Inglish (now Bonham, TX).
168. Citizens of the Republic of Texas, 1977, The Texas Genealogical Society, p. 96,
William Hunnicutt BEEMAN and family.
169. The Dallas Journal D. G. S. Dec 1995, Voter Registration 1867-1869, Dallas County, Tx,
Wm. H. BEEMAN, Precinct 6, State 23 yr, County 23 yr, Precinct 23 yr, Native-IL.
170. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 258, p. 443B, 1655, 1648, Line 27, Precinct #1, Enumerated 27 Sep 1870,
BEEMAN, William 43 m w Wheelwright IL;
BEEMAN, Martha E. 45 f w Keeps House KY;
BEEMAN, Joseph E. 14 m w TX Can't Write;
BEEMAN, Novado 13 m w TX Can't Write;
BEEMAN, Adda 12 f w TX;
BEEMAN, Senoma 11 f w TX Can't Write;
BEEMAN, Sarah C. 10 f w TX Can't Read nor Write;
BEEMAN, William F. 9 m w TX;
BEEMAN, Lee O. 8 m w TX;
BEEMAN, Mattie 6 f w TX;
BEEMAN, Holland 5 m w TX;
BEEMAN, Roxy 1 f w TX.
171. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
W. H. BEEMAN died 14 Jan 1905 aged 78 years In loving remembrance of my husband. Here lies Father and Mother dear, They are gone but not forgotten. They have gone to their reward.
172. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 100B, 406, 421, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
BEEMAN, William H. 23 m Farmer IL.
173. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, Dallas P. O., pp 191-192, 314A-314B, 1324, 1330, Precinct #1, Dallas P. O., Enumerated 27 Sep 1860,
BEEMAN, Wm. H. 34 m Wagonwright $1800 $650 IL;
BEEMAN, Martha 34 f KY;
BEEMAN, Joseph E. 7 m TX Attends School;
BEEMAN, Nevada 6 f TX Attends School;
BEEMAN, Ada 5 f TX Attends School;
BEEMAN, Sonoma 4 f TX;
BEEMAN, Sarah 2 f TX;
BEEMAN, Infant (William Francis)
4/12 m TX;
DYE, Adelaide 18 f KY;
DYE, Benj. (Jr.) 32 m Farmer KY;
DYE, George 21 m Farmer KY.
174. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
William H. BEEMAN was bornd may the 11 in the year of our Lord 1827.
175. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, T9_1299, p. 143A, 261, 277, p. 29, Supv. Dist. #3, ED #59, Enumerated 1 Jun 1880,
BEEMAN, Wm. H. w m 53 mar. Farmer b. IL father b. SC mother b. SC;
BEEMAN, Eunice M. w f 55 Wife mar. Keeping house VA VA VA;
BEEMAN, Mattie w f 16 Daughter single At Home TX IL VA;
BEEMAN, Holland w m 15 Son single Working on Farm TX IL VA;
BEEMAN Roxie w f 9 Daughter single TX IL VA;
MYERS, Sonoma w f 22 Daughter mar. At home TX IL VA;
MYERS, Noma w f 2 Grand Daughter single TX SC TX;
MYERS, Carrie w f 1 Grand Daughter single TX SC TX.
176. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
William H., b. IL, 11 May 1827; d. Dallas, TX, 14 Jan 1905.
177. Michael Allen n,
William Hunnicutt BEEMAN, b. 1827 in Green, IL; d. 1905.
178. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Block #1,
W. H. BEEMAN, Died 14 Jan 1905; Here lies Father and Mother (Son of John & Emily & Husband of Martha DYE).
179. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
William H. BEEMAN, b. 11 May 1827, IL; d. 14 Jan 1905, Dallas, Dallas County, TX.
180. 1900 Census, Oasis, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, T623_1624, p. 10A, Enumerated 13 Jun 1900,
William BEEMAN w m May 1827 73 mar. 49 yrs. IL GA SC Landlord;
Martha E. BEEMAN Wife w f Apr 1827 mar. 49 yrs. 11 born 7 living VA VA VA;
Joseph H. BEEMAN Son w m Apr 1854 46 mar. 2 yrs. TX IL VA Surgeon Veterinary;
Katie M. BEEMAN Dau-in-law w f Aug 1854 45 mar. 2 yrs. 5 born 3 living NY NC TN.
181. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
182. The Beemans of Texas,
b. 11 May 1827, IL.
183. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
184. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 258, p. 443B, Precinct #4, 1655, 1648, Line #28, BEEMAN, Martha E. 45 f KY.
185. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
M. E. Wife of W. H. 30 Apr 1825 - 22 May 1912
Here lies Father and Mother dear, They are gone but not forgotten. They have gone to their reward.
186. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 191, p. 314A, 1324, 1330, Precinct #1, Dallas P. O., Enumerated 27 Sep 1860,
BEEMAN, Martha 34 f KY.
187. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, M432_910/Part 1, p. 150, p. 75B, 39, 40, Enumerated 26 Oct 1850,
DYE, Eunis M. 23 f VA.
188. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, T9_1299, p. 143a, p. 29, 261, 277, Supv. Dist. #3, ED #59, Enumerated 1 Jun 1880,
BEEMAN, Eunice M. w f 55 Wife mar. Keeping house VA VA VA.
189. Michael Allen n,
Martha Eunice DYE, b. 1825 in VA; d. 1912.
190. 1900 Census, Oasis, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, T623_1624, p. 10A, Enumerated 13 Jun 1900,
Martha E. BEEMAN Wife w f Apr 1827 73 Mar. 49 yrs. 11 born 7 living VA VA VA.
191. 1910 Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, T624_1544, p. 87A, 66, 70, Enumerated 19 Apr 1910, Eunice M. BEEMAN Mother f w 84 widow 12 born 8 living VA VA VA.
192. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 1,
BEEMAN, William H. mar. DYE, Martha on 25 Sep 1851.
193. The Beemans of Texas.
194. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 6,
Wm H. BEEMAN mar. Martha Eunice DYE.
195. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, p. 2,
Wm. H. BEEMAN mar. Martha DYE, 25 Sep 1851, by Jas A. Smith, M. G.
196. 1870 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, TX,
Martha E. BEEMAN 45 KY.
197. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A.C. Morgan 1998.
198. Early Dallas County Cemetery Records by Willie Flowers Carlisle (Mrs. George F.), p. 11,
BEEMAN, W. H., 1827 - 1905.
199. Coye Hawpe Beeman Cemetery Interment List from Ruth Cooper, Jun 1974, p. 1,
William H. BEEMAN (stone), 11 May 1827 - 14 Jan 1905;
Martha DYE BEEMAN (stone), 30 Apr 1825 - 22 May 1912 (beside).
200. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, #406, #421, Line 22, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
William H. BEEMAN 23 m Farmer IL.
201. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 191, 314A, #1324, #1330, Precinct #1, Dallas P. O., Enumerated 27 Sep 1860,
Wm H. BEEMAN 34 m Waggonwright $1800 $600 IL.
202. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 258, 443B, 1655, 1648, Precinct #1, Enumerated 27 Sep 1870,
BEEMAN, William 48 m w Wheelright $2600 $950 IL.
203. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998.
204. Coye Hawpe Beeman Cemetery Interment List from Ruth Cooper, Jun 1974, p. 1,
Martha DYE BEEMAN (stone), 30 Apr 1825 - 22 May 1912;
William H. BEEMAN (stone), 11 May 1827 - 14 Jan 1905 (beside).
205. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, 75B, #39, #40, Enumerated 26 Oct 1850,
DYE, Eunis M. 23 f VA.
206. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 150, 75B, #39, #40, Enumerated 26 Oct 1850,
Eunis M. DYE 25 f VA.
207. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 191, 314A, 1324, 1330, Precinct #1, Dallas P. O., Enumerated 27 Sep 1860, Martha BEEMAN 34 f KY.
208. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 258, 443B, #1655, #1648, Precinct #1, Enumerated 27 Sep 1870,
BEEMAN, Martha E. 45 f w Keeps House KY.
209. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 1,
BEEMAN, William H. mar. DYE, Martha on 25 Sep 1851.
210. The Beemans of Texas.
211. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 6,
Wm H. BEEMAN mar. Martha Eunice DYE.
212. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, p. 2,
Wm. H. BEEMAN mar. Martha DYE, 25 Sep 1851, by Jas A. Smith, M. G.
213. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, Dallas P. O., M653/1292/361A, 956, 956, Precinct #6, Scyene P. O., Enumerated 7 Sep 1860,
BEEMAN, Sam H. 30 m Farmer $560 $1100 IL;
BEEMAN, Mary A. 16 f MO.
214. The Dallas Journal D. G. S. Dec 1995, Voter Registration 1867-1869, Dallas County, Tx,
S. H. BEEMAN, Precinct 17, State 26 yr, County 20 yr, Precinct 8 yr, Native-IL.
215. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, p. 450A, 1745, 1738, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
BEEMAN, Samuel 41 m w Farmer $1000 $687 IL;
BEEMAN, Mary 26 f w MO;
BEEMAN, Henderson 9 m w TX;
BEEMAN, Nancy 7 f w TX;
BEEMAN, William 4 m w TX;
BEEMAN, Clemma 2 f w TX;
BEEMAN, John
3/12 m w Feb TX.
216. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, M432/910/PART1/100B, 406, 421, Line 23, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850, BEEMAN, Samuel H. 21 m Farmer IL.
217. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Samuel H BEEMAN was bornd May the 29 in the year of our lord 1829.
218. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Clarissa, Sam, James; These three died and are buried near Bluffton, Llano County, TX.
219. The Beemans of Texas.
220. Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson emaxwell@tstar.net.
221. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Sam BEEMAN.
222. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
Samuel H. BEAMAN, b. 29 May 1829, Alton, Madison County, IL.
223. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
Samuel H. BEAMAN, d. 20 Jan 1877, Kingsland, Llano County, TX.
224. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, 1745,
Mary 26 f MO.
225. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, M653/1292/361A, 956, 956, Precinct #6, Scyene P. O., Enumerated 7 Sep 1860, BEEMAN, Mary A. 16 f MO.
226. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
227. The Beemans of Texas.
228. Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson emaxwell@tstar.net.
229. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Mary WEATHERFORD.
230. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 10,
BEEMAN, Samuel H. mar. WEATHERFORD, Mary Ann on 29 Aug 1860.
231. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 7,
Sam, mar. Mary WEATHERFORD; they had two sons, William and Hence.
232. Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Marriage Book C, Part VII, p. 6,
BEEMAN, Samuel H., mar. WEATHERFORD, Mary Ann, 29 Aug 1860, John Scurlock, J. P.

233. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Samuel H. BEEMAN md. Mary Ann WEATHERFORD.
234. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 10,
Samuel H. BEEMAN mar. Mary Ann WEATHERFORD, 29 Aug 1860, by John Scurlock, J. P.
235. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
Mary Ann WEATHERFORD, b. 13 Sep 1844, Little Rock, AR.
236. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
Mary Ann WEATHERFORD, d. 15 Jan 1934, Kingsland, Llano County, TX.
237. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, #406, #421, Line 23, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
Samuel H. BEEMAN 21 m Farmer IL Attends school.
238. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 167, 302A, #1171, #1170,
Saml BEEMAN 66 m Farmer $3080 $1800 NC.
239. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, 450A, #1745, #1738, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
BEEMAN, Samuel 41 m w Farmer $1000 $687 IL.
240. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, 450A, #1745, #1738, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
BEEMAN, Mary 26 f w Keeps House MO.
241. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 10,
BEEMAN, Samuel H. mar. WEATHERFORD, Mary Ann on 29 Aug 1860.
242. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 7,
Sam, mar. Mary WEATHERFORD; they had two sons, William and Hence.
243. Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Marriage Book C, Part VII, p. 6,
BEEMAN, Samuel H., mar. WEATHERFORD, Mary Ann, 29 Aug 1860, John Scurlock, J. P.
244. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Samuel H. BEEMAN md. Mary Ann WEATHERFORD.
245. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 10,
Samuel H. BEEMAN mar. Mary Ann WEATHERFORD, 29 Aug 1860, by John Scurlock, J.P.
246. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, p. 100B, 406, 421, Line 24, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
BEEMAN, Isaac H. 18 m Farmer IL Attends school.
247. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Isaac H. BEEMAN was borne September the 27th in the year our Lord 1831.
248. John Beeman Family Bible, Deaths,
Isaac H. BEEMAN Departed this life July xx (sic) in the year of our Lord 1852 in Calafornia.
249. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Isaac BEEMAN, d. CA in 1852, at age of 21 yrs (unmarried).
250. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Isaac BEEMAN, d. CA.
251. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Isaac BEEMAN.
252. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
Isaac H. BEAMAN, b. 27 Sep 1831, Calhoun County, IL.
253. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
254. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, 406, 421, Line 24, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
Isaac H. BEEMAN 17 m Farmer IL Attends school.
255. The Dallas Journal D. G. S. Dec 1995, Voter Registration 1867-1869, Dallas County, Tx,
J. H. BEEMAN, Precinct 1, State 24 yr, County 23 yr, Precinct 6 yr, Native-IL.
256. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, M432/910/PART1/100B, 406, 421, Line 25, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850, BEEMAN, James H. 17 m Farmer IL Attends school.
257. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, #1167, #1166,
BEEMAN, James H. 27 m IL.
258. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
James H. BEEMAN was borne March the 20th in the year of our lord 1833.
259. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Clarissa, Sam, James; These three died and are buried near Bluffton, Llano Co, TX.
260. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
James H. BEEMAN.
261. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 7,
James mar. Mary HAMMOND.
They had one daughter, Haidee; one son, Forest. James and his 2nd wife had one son, Eustace and one daughter, Beatrice.
262. Beeman Newsletter, Nov 1977, p. 69.
263. Census, 1880 Edwards County, TX, p. 341,
BEEMAN, James H. h 48 IL NC SC;
BEEMAN, Mary F. w 50 MS NC SC;
BEEMAN, May d 15 TX IL MS;
BEEMAN, Ida d 12 TX IL MS;
BEEMAN, Forest s 8 TX IL MS;
BEEMAN, Hadie d 5 TX IL MS.
264. 1900 Census, Burnet County, TX,
James H. BEEMAN 67 b. Mar 1833, mar. 15 yrs Father b. NC, Mother b. SC;
Martha E. ALLEN 53 GA;
James E. BEEMAN b. Jul 1886 13 TX; Bessie B. BEEMAN b. Mar 1888 12 TX.
265. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Births,
J. H. BEEMAN 20 Mar 1833.
266. 1870 Census, Burnet County, TX, House #156,
J. H. BEEMAN 36 IL;
Mary N. HAMMONS wife 26 AL;
Mae BEEMAN 5 TX;
Ida BEEMAN
11/12 TX (Aug);
Nancy HAMMONS 20 AL;
Margaret HAMMONS 18 TX.
267. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Deaths,
J.H. BEEMAN 20 Jun 1905.
268. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
James BEEMAN.
269. BEN G. REAVIS b,
Mary Frances NIXON BEEMAN.
270. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Deaths,
Mary Frances BEEMAN, wife of J.H. BEEMAN 8 Oct 1882.
271. Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson e,
Mary HAMMONS.
272. BEN G. REAVIS bgreavis@prodigy.net.
273. Beeman Newsletter, Nov 1977, p. 69.
274. 1880 Census, Edwards County, TX.
275. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Births,
Mary HAMMONS (wife of J. H. BEEMAN) 1 Oct 1840.
276. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Deaths,
Mary BEEMAN, wife of J. H. 2 Dec 1877.
277. 1870 Census, Burnet County, TX,
Mary BEEMAN 29 AL.
278. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 10,
BEEMAN, James H. mar. HAMMOX, Mary A. on 22 Aug 1861.
279. Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Marriage Book C, Part VII, p. 7,
BEEMAN, James H., mar. HAMMOX, Mary A., 22 Aug 1861, John Scurlock, J. P.
280. The Beemans of Texas, vol. 1, p. 69,
James H. BEEMAN mar. Mary HAMMOND.
281. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 11,
James H. BEEMAN mar. Mary A. HAMMOX, 22 Aug 1861, by John Scurlock, J. P.
282. 1870 Census, Burnet County, TX,
Mary BEEMAN 29 AL.
283. Karylon Russell, Llano, TX.
284. 1900 Census, Burnet County, TX, ED #46, S-2.
285. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Deaths,
Martha E. BEEMAN, wife of J. H. BEEMAN 17 Dec 1919.
286. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Births,
M. E. BEEMAN 23 Nov 1846.
287. Burnet County, TX, Marriages, Book F, #187,
James H. BEEMAN mar. Mrs. M. E. ALLEN, Burnet, Burnet County, TX, by A. A. Baxter, Minister.
288. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Marriages,
J. H. BEEMAN & M. E. ALLEN md. 26 Mar 1885.
289. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
290. Dallas County, TX, Tax List Index, 1840-1849, p. NPN.
291. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, #406, #421, Line 25, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
James H. BEEMAN 17 m Farmer IL Attends school.
292. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 10,
BEEMAN, James H. mar. HAMMOX, Mary A. on 22 Aug 1861.
293. Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Marriage Book C, Part VII, p. 7,
BEEMAN, James H., mar. HAMMOX, Mary A., 22 Aug 1861, John Scurlock, J. P.
294. The Beemans of Texas, vol. 1, p. 69,
James H. BEEMAN mar. Mary HAMMOND.
295. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 11,
James H. BEEMAN mar. Mary A. HAMMOX, 22 Aug 1861, by John Scurlock, J.P.
296. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Marriages,
J. H. BEEMAN & Mary HAMMONS md. 23 Aug 1861.
297. Burnet County, TX, Marriages, Book F, #187,
James H. BEEMAN mar. Mrs. M. E. ALLEN, Burnet, Burnet County, TX, by A. A. Baxter, Minister.
298. James Hunnicutt Beeman Bible, Marriages,
J. H. BEEMAN & M. E. ALLEN md. 26 Mar 1885.
299. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
James H. BEAMAN mar. M. E. ALLEN, 26 Mar 1884, Burnet County, TX.
300. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, p. 100B, 406, 421, Line 26, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
BEEMAN, Clarissa 14 f IL Attends school.
301. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Clarisa BEEMAN was born March the 25th in the year of our Lord 1836.
302. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Clarissa, Sam, James; These three died and are buried near Bluffton, Llano County, TX.
303. The Beemans of Texas.
304. Beeman Newsletter, Nov 1977, p. 69.
305. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, M593_1581, p. 364A, p. 99, 629, 624, Precinct #3, Enumerated 5 Aug 1870,
WALKER, Clarissa 34 f w Keeps House IL.
306. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Clarissa BEEMAN.
307. 1860 Census, Dallas P. O., Dallas County, TX, p. 301B, 1166, 1165, Precinct #1,
Danl MASON 37 m Farmer $775 $370 OH;
Clarissa (BEEMAN) 24 f IL.
308. Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson e,
Clarissa BEEMAN, b. 25 Mar 1836, Calhoun County, IL.
309. Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson e,
Clarissa BEEMAN, d. 1877
(Bluffton, TX, although no trace can be found of her).
310. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Daniel N. MASON.
311. Eulene Maxwell Wilkerson e,
Daniel N. MASON.
312. Beeman Newsletter, Nov 1977, p. 69.
313. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 19,
BEEMAN, Clarissa mar. MASON, Daniel on 1 May 1860.
314. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, p. 9,
Daniel MASON/Clarissa BEEMAN 1 May 1860 by H. J. Newell M. G.
315. Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Marriage Book C, Part VII, p. 5,
MASON, Col. Daniel, mar. BEEMAN, Clarissa, 1 May 1860, H. J. Newell, M. G.
316. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 7,
Clarissa mar. 1st: John MASON;
2nd: WALKER.
317. The Beemans of Texas, vol. 1, p. 69,
James M. WALKER.
318. Beeman Newsletter, Nov 1977, p. 69.
319. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, M593_1581, p. 364A, p. 99, 629, 624, Precinct #3, Enumerated 5 Aug 1870,
WALKER, J.M. 43 m w School Teacher $258 SC;
WALKER, Clarissa 34 f w Keeps House IL;
WALKER, Jonathan 9 m w TX;
WALKER, Orilla
11/12 f w TX July.
320. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 24,
BEEMAN, Clarissa mar. WALKER, James M., 3 Oct 1867.
321. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, p. 17,
James M. WALKER/Clar(r)isa BEEMAN Oct 3, 1867 by John N. Bryan, J. P.
322. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Clarissa BEEMAN md. (1) Daniel N. MASON,
(2) James M. WALKER.
323. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 10B, #406, #421, Line 26, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
Clarissa BEEMAN 14 f IL Attends school.
324. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 19,
BEEMAN, Clarissa mar. MASON, Daniel on 1 May 1860.
325. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, p. 9,
Daniel MASON/Clarissa BEEMAN 1 May 1860 by H. J. Newell M. G.
326. Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Marriage Book C, Part VII, p. 5,
MASON, Col. Daniel, mar. BEEMAN, Clarissa, 1 May 1860, H. J. Newell, M. G.
327. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 24,
BEEMAN, Clarissa mar. WALKER, James M., 3 Oct 1867.
328. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, p. 17,
James M. WALKER/Clar(r)isa BEEMAN Oct 3, 1867 by John N. Bryan, J. P.
329. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Clarissa BEEMAN md. (1) Daniel N. MASON,
(2) James M. WALKER.
330. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Nancy HOBBS 26 Mar 1839 - 21 Feb 1907
"Asleep in Jesus, Blessed Sleep."
331. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, M432/910/PART1/100B, 406, 421, Line 27, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850, BEEMAN, Nancy 11 f IL Attends school.
332. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Nancy BEEMAN was born March the 26th in the year of our Lord 1839.
333. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Nancy BEEMAN, b. IL, 26 Mar 1839; d. Dallas Co., TX, 21 Feb 1907.
334. The Beemans of Texas.
335. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, T9/1299/216B, p. 14, Supv. Dist. #3, ED 63, 115, 115, Enumerated 8 Jun 1880, Nancy HOBBS w f 39 Wife mar. Keeping house IL SC SC.
336. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Miscellaneous Grave Sites,
Nancy HOBBS, Born 26 Mar 1839; Died 21 Feb 1907
(Dau. of John & Emily).
337. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Nancy BEEMAN, b. 26 Mar 1839, Bowie County, TX; d. 21 Feb 1907, Dallas County, TX.
338. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
Nancy Elizabeth BEAMAN, b. 26 Mar 1839, Calhoun County, IL.
339. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
340. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
W. W. HOBBS 17 Jul 1833 - 29 Nov 1918.
341. The Beemans of Texas.
342. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, T9_1299, p. 216A & 216B, pp. 13 & 14, Supv. Dist. #3, ED #63, 115, 115, Enumerated 8 Jun 1880,
HOBBS, W. W. Husband w m 45 mar. Farmer AL AL AL;
HOBBS, Nancy w f 39 Wife mar. Keeping House IL SC SC;
HOBBS, Florence w f 12 Daughter single Assist Keeping House Cannot Write TX AL IL;
HOBBS, Lennie w f 7 Daughter single Attends School TX AL IL;
HOBBS, Gaston w m 1 Son single TX AL IL;
FERGUSON, John L.(S.?) w m 28 Son in law mar. Works on Farm Cannot Write MO MO IL;
FERGUSON, Helen w f 20 Daughter mar. Assist Housekeeping MS AL IL;
FERGUSON, Elmer w m 2 GSon single TX MO MS;
FERGUSON, Chas. w m
3/12 March G.son single TX MO MS;
HOBBS, Jno F. w m 68 Father No Employment AL AL SC.
343. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, M593_1581, p. 443A, 1647, 1640, Enumerated 27 Sep 1870,
HOBBS, William W. 36 m w Farmer $3500 $660 AL;
HOBBS, Nancy f 30 f w Keeps House IL;
HOBBS, Josephine f 12 f w MS Attends School;
HOBBS, Ellen B. f 9 f w TX Attends School;
HOBBS, Florence f 1 f w TX.
344. 1900 Census, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, Ed 134, S-12,
HOBBS, William W. Husband Jul 1833 66 Farmer AL AL AL;
HOBBS, Nancy Wife Mar 1839 61 IL MO SC;
HOBBS, Gastson K. Son Oct 1878 21 TX AL IL;
HOBBS, Ollie Daughter-in-law May 1881 19 TX TX TX;
HOBBS, Violett Daughter Nov 1899 6/12 TX TX TX;
THOMPSON, Obi Ni Nov 1886 13 TX IL IL;
Shown married 44 yrs., 8 children born, 5 living.
345. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Miscellaneous Grave Sites,
W. W. HOBBS, Born 17 Jul 1833; Died 29 Nov 1918 (Husband of Nancy).
346. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
W. W. HOBBS.
347. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, Books A - B, p. 6,
Wm. W. HOBBS mar. Nancy BEEMAN mar. 27 March 1856 by A. Beard, J. P.
348. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 5,
BEEMAN, Nancy mar. HOBBS, William W. on 27 Mar 1856.
349. John Beeman Family Bible, Marriages,
William W. HOBBS and Nancy BEEMAN was married March the 27th 1856.
350. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
William H. HOBBS, mar. 27 Mar 1856.
351. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Nancy BEEMAN md. W. W. HOBBS.
352. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A.C. Morgan 1998, Lot #7,
William W. HOBBS, 17 Jul 1833 - 29 Nov 1918.
353. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A.C. Morgan 1998.
354. Coye Hawpe Beeman Cemetery Interment List from Ruth Cooper, Jun 1974, Lot #7,
Nancy BEEMAN HOBBS (stone), 26 Mar 1839 - 21 Feb 1907.
355. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, #406, #421, Line 27, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
Nancy BEEMAN 11 f IL Attends school.
356. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998.
357. Coye Hawpe Beeman Cemetery Interment List from Ruth Cooper, Jun 1974, Lot #7,
William W. HOBBS (stone), 17 Jul 1833 - 27 Nov 1918.
358. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, Books A - B, p. 6,
Wm. W. HOBBS mar. Nancy BEEMAN mar. 27 March 1856 by A. Beard, J. P.
359. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 5,
BEEMAN, Nancy mar. HOBBS, William W. on 27 Mar 1856.
360. John Beeman Family Bible, Marriages,
William W. HOBBS and Nancy BEEMAN was married March the 27th 1856.
361. Robert D. Beeman Descendant Tree FTM,
William H. HOBBS, mar. 27 Mar 1856.
362. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Nancy BEEMAN md. W. W. HOBBS.
363. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
J. S. W. (Scott) BEEMAN 23 May 1841 - 18 Jan 1930.
364. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, p. 100B, 406, 421, Line 28, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
BEEMAN, John W. S. 9 m TX Attends school.
365. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, 1167, 1166,
BEEMAN, Scott 19 m TX.
366. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 256, p. 442B, 1637, 1630, Precinct #1, Enumerated 27 Sep 1870, ID#: TXf00100132437,
BEEMAN, John 28 m w Farmer $1000 $476 TX;
BEEMAN, Betty 21 f w KY.
367. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
John Scott W. BEEMON was bornd May 23rd A. D. 1841.
368. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
J. S. W. (Scott) BEEMAN, b. Bowie County, TX, 23 May 1841, d. Dallas, TX.
369. The Beemans of Texas.
370. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, T9_1299, p. 145A, p. 33, 286, 303, Supv. Dist. #3, ED #59, Enumerated 1 Jun 1880,
BEEMAN, Scott w m 39 mar. Farming TX NC SC;
BEEMAN, Bettie w f 30 Wife mar. Keeping home KY KY KY;
BEEMAN, Annie w f 9 Daughter single Attends school TX TX KY;
BEEMAN, Emma w f 7 Dau single TX TX KY;
BEEMAN, Lizzie w f 5 Dau single TX TX KY;
BEEMAN, Scott M. w m 1 Son single TX TX KY;
BEEMAN, Emily w f 73 Mother single SC VA SC;
BRYAN, Margaret w f 54 Sister Widowed IL NC SC;
SPURLOCK, Peter A. w m 23 Other single Laborer GA GA GA.
371. 1910 Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, T624_1543, p. 27B, 115, 114, Enumerated 19 Apr 1910, BEEMAN, J. S. W. 69 mar. 45 yrs. TX Unk SC Farmer;
BEEMAN, Elizabeth Wife 61 mar. 45 yrs. 12 born 5 living KY KY KY;
BEEMAN, Ira Son 22 single TX TX KY Office Stenographer;
Shown married 45 years, 12 Children born, 5 living.
372. 1920 Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County,TX, T625_1791, p. 24A, 6, 6, Enumerated 2 Jan 1920, Orphans Home Road,
BEEMAN, John W. S. m w 78 mar. TX IL NC;
BEEMAN, Elizabeth B. M. Wife f w 70 KY KY KY.
373. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Block #3,
J. S. W. (Scott) BEEMAN, Born 23 May 1841; Died 18 Jan 1930 (Son of John & Emily).
374. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
John Scott Winfield BEEMAN, b. 23 May 1841; d. 8 May 1886, Dallas County, TX.
375. 1900 Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, T623_1624, p. 5A, 77, 78, Enumerated 6 Jun 1900,
John BEEMAN w m May 1841 58 mar. 35 yrs. TX NC SC Farmer;
Bettie BEEMAN Wife w f Jan 1849 67 mar. 35 yrs. 11 born 7 living KY KY KY;
Katie BEEMAN Dau w f Jul 1882 17 single TX TX KY;
Cleavland BEEMAN Son w m Dec 1884 15 single TX TX KY;
Ira BEEMAN Son w m Nov 1887 12 single TX TX KY;
Milton BEEMAN Son w m Mar 1879 21 single TX TX KY.
376. W.S. ADAIR Article, Dallas Morning News, 11 Oct 1925, Sec. 5, p. 12, col. 1-5,
"I was born May 18 of the same year (1841).
377. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A.C. Morgan 1998,
Elizabeth B. MERRIFIELD BEEMAN, Wife of J. S. W. BEEMAN 22 Jan 1849 - 13 Apr 1923.
378. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 256, p. 442B, 1637, 1630, Precinct #1, Enumerated 27 Sep 1870,
BEEMAN, Betty 21 f w KY.
379. The Beemans of Texas,
John W. Scott BEEMAN, md. Betty BOONE MERRIFIELD.
380. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, T9_1299, p. 145A, p. 33, Supv. Dist #3, ED #59, 286, 303, Enumerated 1 Jun 1880,
BEEMAN, Bettie w f 30 Wife mar. Keeping house KY KY KY.
381. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 87, p. 383A, 594, 594, Precinct #8, Cedar Hill P. O., Enumerated 15 Aug 1860,
MERRIFIELD, Betty 11 f KY.
382. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Block #3,
Elizabeth B. MERRIFIELD, wife of J. S. W. BEEMAN, Born 22 Jan 1849; Died 13 Apr 1923.
383. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Elizabeth B. MERRIFIELD, b. 22 Jan 1849; d. 13 Apr 1923, Dallas County, TX.
384. 1900 Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, T623_1624, p. 5A, 77, 78, Enumerated 6 Jun 1900,
Bettie BEEMAN Wife w f Jan 1849 67 mar. 35 yrs 11 born 7 living KY KY KY.
385. 1910 Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, T624_1543, p. 27B, 115, 114, Enumerated 19 Apr 1910, Elizabeth BEEMAN Wife f w 61 mar. 45 yrs. 12 born 5 living KY KY KY.
386. 1920 Census, Dallas, Precinct #1, Dallas County,TX, T625_1791, p. 24A, 6, 6, Enumerated 2 Jan 1920, Orphans Home Road,
Elizabeth B.M. BEEMAN Wife f w 70 mar. KY KY KY.
387. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 10,
BEEMAN, John S. W. mar. MERRIFIELD, Bettie B. on 3 Aug 1865.
388. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
John W. Scott BEEMAN md. Betty Boone MERRIFIELD.
389. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
John Scott Winfield BEEMAN mar. Elizabeth B. MERRIFIELD, 3 Aug 1865.
390. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 13,
John S. W. BEEMAN mar. Bettie B. MERRIFIELD, 3 Aug 1865, by H.H. Ware, M. G.
391. Brenda Beaman Parker b,
Elizabeth Boone MERRIFIELD, d. 13 Apr 1923, Cedar Hill, Dallas County, TX.
392. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Elizabeth B. MERRIFIELD BEEMAN, Wife of J. S. W. BEEMAN, 22 Jan 1849 - 13 Apr 1923.
393. Coye Hawpe Beeman Cemetery Interment List from Ruth Cooper, Jun 1974, Lot #6,
Elizabeth B. MERRIFIELD BEEMAN (stone), 22 Jan 1849 - 13 Apr 1923.
394. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 87, 383A, #594, #594, Precinct #8, Enumerated 15 Aug 1860,
Betty MERRIFIELD 11 f KY.
395. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p.256, 442B, 1637, 1630, Precinct #1, Enumerated 27 Sep 1870,
BEEMAN, Betty 21 f w Keeps House KY.
396. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 10,
BEEMAN, John S. W. mar. MERRIFIELD, Bettie B. on 3 Aug 1865.
397. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
John W. Scott BEEMAN md. Betty Boone MERRIFIELD.
398. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
John Scott Winfield BEEMAN mar. Elizabeth B. MERRIFIELD, 3 Aug 1865.
399. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 13,
John S.W. BEEMAN mar. Bettie B. MERRIFIELD, 3 Aug 1865, by H. H. Ware, M. G.
400. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Sarah Ann BEEMAN FUGATE and Infant Daughter buried in Lot #48 (stone not found).
401. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, p. 100B, 406, 421, Line 29, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
BEEMAN, Sarah A. 6 f TX Attends school.
402. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, #1167, #1166,
BEEMAN, Sarah A. 16 f TX.
403. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Sarah Ann BEEMON was borned Oct 21st A. D. 1843.
404. John Beeman Family Bible, Deaths,
Sarah Ann FUGATE Departed this life April the 17th 1867.
405. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Ann BEEMAN, b. Dallas Co., TX, in 1843, d. in Dallas, TX.
406. The Beemans of Texas.
407. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Ann BEEMAN, b. 1843, Dallas County, TX; d. WFT Est. 1871-1937, Dallas, Dallas County, TX.
408. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
409. The Beemans of Texas.
410. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 119, Microfilm p. 352A, Line 23, Scyene P.O.,
FUGATE, J. M. 27 m Wagonwright $200 $900 b. KY.
411. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
John FUGATE.
412. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, p. 10,
John M. FUGATE/Sarah A. BEEMAN mar. 19 December 1860 by John Scurlock, J. P.
413. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 15,
BEEMAN, Sarah A. mar. FUGATE, John M. on 19 Dec 1860.
414. Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Marriage Book C, Part VII, p. 6,
FUGATE, John M., mar. BEEMAN, Sarah A., 19 Dec 1860, John Scurlock, J. P.
415. The Beemans of Texas, vol. 1, p. 69,
Sarah Ann BEEMAN md. John FUGATE.
416. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 10,
John M. FUGATE mar. Sarah A. BEEMAN, mar. 19 Dec 1860, by John Scurlock, J. P.
417. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
418. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, #406, #421, Line 29, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
Sarah A. BEEMAN 6 f TX Attends school.
419. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, p. 10,
John M. FUGATE/Sarah A. BEEMAN mar. 19 December 1860 by John Scurlock, J. P.
420. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 15,
BEEMAN, Sarah A. mar. FUGATE, John M. on 19 Dec 1860.
421. Early Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Marriage Book C, Part VII, p. 6,
FUGATE, John M., mar. BEEMAN, Sarah A., 19 Dec 1860, John Scurlock, J. P.
422. The Beemans of Texas, vol. 1, p. 69,
Sarah Ann BEEMAN md. John FUGATE.
423. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 10,
John M. FUGATE mar. Sarah A. BEEMAN, mar. 19 Dec 1860, by John Scurlock, J. P.
424. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, p. 450A, 1744, 1737, Line #26, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
FISHER, Caroline 25 f w Keeps House TX.
425. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, p. 100B, 406, 421, Line 30, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
BEEMAN, Caroline 4 f TX.
426. 1860 Census, Dallas County, TX, #1167, #1166,
BEEMAN, Caroline 14 f TX.
427. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949, p. 4,
Caroline BEEMAN, b. in Dallas Co., TX, 11 May 1845, d. at DeSoto, Dallas County.
428. The Beemans of Texas.
429. 1880 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 224A, FHL Film #1255299, NA Film #T9-1299, Precinct #3,
Caroline BEEMAN Wife 32 f w Keeping House TX IL IL.
430. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Caroline BEEMAN was Bornd May 19th 1846.
431. WFT#2:390 BEEMAN,
Caroline BEEMAN, b. 11 May 1845, Dallas County, TX; d. WFT Est. 1873-1939, DeSoto, Dallas County, TX.
432. John Beeman Family Bible, Births,
Caroline Beeman was Bornd May 19th 1846.
433. The Beeman Family 1841 - 1949.
434. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, p. 450A, 1744, 1737, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
FISHER, Isaac 27 m w Farmer $435 MO.
435. 1880 Census, Dallas County, Precinct #3, T9_1299, p. 224A, FHL Film #1255299,
Jas, I. FISHER 36 m w Farmer MO KY KY;
Caroline FISHER Wife 32 f w Keeping House TX IL IL;
Samul FISHER Son 8 m w TX IL IL;
Annie FISHER Dau 5 f w TX IL IL.
436. BEN G. REAVIS b,
James Isaac FISHER, b. Abt. 1844, MO; d. 2 Feb 1910, Dallas, TX.
437. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, p. 17, J. I.
FISHER/Caroline BEEMAN married 28 November 1867 by H. C. Sweet, J.P.
438. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 14,
BEEMAN, Caroline married FISHER, J. I. on 28 Nov 1867.
439. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Caroline BEEMAN md. Isaac FISHER.
440. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 17,
J. I. FISHER mar. Caroline BEEMAN, 28 Nov 1867, by H. C. Sweet, J. P.
441. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998, Lot #10.1,
Caroline BEEMAN, Wife of J. I. FISHER, d. 3 May 1892, Aged 47 years.
442. Early Dallas County Cemetery Records by Willie Flowers Carlisle (Mrs. George F.), p. 11,
FISHER, Caroline BEEMAN, wife of J. I., d. 1892.
443. Richard S. Jones, Garland, TX, Beeman Cemetery Survey, Apr 1996, Miscellaneous Grave Sites,
Caroline BEEMAN, Wife of J. I. FISHER, Died 3 May 1892, Aged 47 Years (Dau. of John & Emily).
444. 1850 Census, Dallas County, TX, p. 200, 100B, #406, #421, Line 30, Enumerated 16 Dec 1850,
Caroline BEEMAN 4 f TX.
445. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, 450A, #1744, #1737, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
FISHER, Caroline 25 f w Keeps House TX.
446. Beeman Memorial Cemetery Survey, A. C. Morgan 1998,
Could not locate Joseph FISHER's gravemarker.
447. 1870 Census, Dallas P. O., Precinct #1, Dallas County, TX, p. 271, 450A, #1744, #1737, Precinct #5, Enumerated 1 Oct 1870,
FISHER, Isaac 27 m w Farmer $435 MO Can't Write.
448. Marriages, Dallas County, Books A-E, 1846-1877, p. 17,
J. I. FISHER/Caroline BEEMAN married 28 November 1867 by H. C. Sweet, J. P.
449. Marriage Records, Dallas County, Texas, Book A-D, p. 14,
BEEMAN, Caroline married FISHER, J. I. on 28 Nov 1867.
450. The Beemans of Texas, Vol. 1, p. 69,
Caroline BEEMAN md. Isaac FISHER.
451. Marriages Dallas County, Texas, Vol 1, Books A - E (1846-1877), Pub. Dallas Genealogical Society, Book C, p. 17,
J. I. FISHER mar. Caroline BEEMAN, 28 Nov 1867, by H. C. Sweet, J. P.