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MONUMENT OF COMPANY F
42ND INDIANA


Note: This monument is located in Oakland City, Indiana (Gibson County) in front of the American Legion Post # 256, 211 E. Washington Street.  This monument is directly across the street from the Oakland City city hall/police station on Washington Street and is near the intersection of Washington and Broadway Streets. It is believed to have been moved to its present location around 1991.  The previous location of this monument, in Oakland City, was believed to have been situated along the railroad tracks at the corner of Clay and Oak Streets.


Wording on Front Top Panel (click here for close up image):

DIED AT ANDERSONVILLE

A. E. CANNON
A. C. COLEMAN
C. P. DILL
A. FARMER
H. H. HUNTER
J. M. HUNTER
J. W. MARTIN
A. H. MARRINER
W. W. OLIVER
W. A REAVIS
JAC. STRICKLAND

 

Wording on Front Middle Panel (click here for close up image):

           Company
Commissioned Officers

            LIEUT.
COl. W. M. COCKRUM
Capt. S. C. BARRETT
Capt. J. D. SKELTON

1st LIEUTENANTS
    J. W. SKELTON
    J. Q. A. STEELE
    A. A. KEYS

2nd LIEUT. J. C. WHITE

 

Wording on Front Upper Base (click here for close up image):

            KILLED AT STONES RIVER, TENN.

A. H. STEEL                             J. W. McCLEARY
J. GUEST                                  R. M. MARTIN
D. KRUSE                                 ?(Unreadable)
J. K. McGREGOR                   J. ? KILPATRICK

            CO. F. 42. REG. IND. VOL.

 

Wording on Front Lower Base:

ENTERED THE U.S. SERVICE OCT 7, 1861
        DISCHARGED JULY 21, 1865

 

Wording on Right Top Panel (click here for close up image):

(very worn)

J. W. ALLMAN
W. ADAMS
A. H. BALDWIN
W. J. BALDWIN SR.
W. J. BALDWIN JR.
D. W. BARNES
J. W. BRYANT
W. H. BASS
J. BASS
J. T. BELL
F. BRASELTON
A. CANNON
J. W. CRISWELL
A. C. CLIFFORD
H. C. COCKRUM
J. W. CORDER
WM. CRISWELL
J. A. COLEMAN
J. C. CAIN
J. DILL
A. J. DILL
J. H. FRENCH
W. GILLUM
G. GARRISON
H. G. GILLUM
M. GEORGE

 

Wording on Right Middle Panel (click here for close up image):


ORIGINAL FIELD & STAFF 
        OFFICERS

COl. J. G. JONES
LT. COl. C. DENBY
MAJ. J. M. SHANKLIN
ADJT. DeWITT C. EVANS
Q. M. J. L. ORR
CHAP. W. ATCHESON
SURG. W. D. TAYLOR
ASST. SURG. J. MAGENISS

 

Wording on Right Upper Base (click here for close up image):


                    KILLED AT ATLANTA GA.

D. W. WALN     D. W. JOHNSON     JNO. WARRICK

                            JAS. WILSON(?)

 

Wording on Back Top Panel (click here for close up image):


B. COMPTON
R. COMPTON
J. FINN
J. L. HOLCOMB
J. HANNAH
J. M. HARPER
C. HOPKINS
J. W. HARGROVE
J. INGRAM
H. J. KESTNER
H. V. KEYS
J. K. McGREGGOR
J. C. McGREGGOR
G. W. McGREGGOR
J. L. McCLEARY
J. C. MINNIS
JNO. W. McCLEARY
J. McDOWELL
W. M. MARRINER
J. D. McCULLOUCH
GEO. MANNING
W. H. MEAD
G. C. McGREW
ZAD. McCLEARY

 

Wording on Back Middle Panel (click her for close up image):


J. H. SIMPSON
J. P. SIMPSON
WM. SELBY
H. H. SHUBARD
J. D. SPENCER
JOS. SKELTON
J. M. STEPHENS
J. SOVERCOOL
N. H. WATSON
L. WOODS
C. H. WILLIAMS
H. H. WALLACE
J. A. WILLIAMS
GEO. WAITE
WASH. STRICKLAND

 

Wording on Back Upper Base (click here for close up image):


                                BATTLES ENGAGED IN

FLINT RIVER ALA.     STEPHENSON ALA.     PERRYVILLE KY.
                            MURFREESBORO TENN.

Wording on Back Lower Base (continuation of list of battles):


????? GA.         LOOKOUT MT. GA.         MISSION RIDGE GA.

???????     BUZZARD ROOST GA.     ??????? GA.     KENNESAW MT. GA

BIG SHANTY GA.     SNAKE CREEK GAP(?) GA.     CHATTAHOOCHIE RIVER

????????? GA.         JONESBORO(?) GA.     ATLANTA GA. ??????????

                                        BENTONVILLE NC.

 

Wording on Left Top Panel (click here for close up):


J. C. MARTIN
J. CAMERON MARTIN
M. S. McKANE
D. MASON
A. MASON
W. H. MASON
A. McGREGGOR
J. J. MANNING
W. NUNN
W. W. OWENS
D. O'NEAL
C. OHNING
J. PROCTOR
GEO. PARKE
W. L. ROWE
J. ROE
J. R. REAVIS
E. SKELTON
R. SKELTON
J. SKELTON
JNO. STRICKLAND
JAS. STRICKLAND
WM. STEEL
S. J. SAUNDERS

 

Wording on Left Middle Panel (click here for close up):


        SERGEANTS

1ST W. H. McCLEARY
2 " A. D. REAVIS
3 " A. HOLCOMB
4 " J. KILLPATRICK
5 " W. SANDERS

        CORPORALS

1ST J. S. WALLACE
2 " J. MARTIN
3 " J. KENNEDY
4 " G. J. E. CLIFFORD
5 " J. R. McMILLAN
6 " R. A. JENKINS
7 " N. S. MARTIN
8 " J. N. WHEELER

        MUSICIANS

ABNER B. CRISWELL
A. D. COMBS

        WAGONER

J. R. KILLPATRICK

 

Wording on Left Upper Base (click here for close up image):


            KILLED AT PERRYVILLE, KY.
WM. M. HUNTER                 JAS. SKELTON

KILLED AT CHICKAMAUGA, GA.     S.E. WARD

            KILLED AT BENTONVILLE, N.C.
LIEUT. J.Q.A. STEEL             J. KRONMILLER

 


COMPANY F, FORTY-SECOND INDIANA, MONUMENT

Source: History of Gibson County, Her People, Industries and Institutions, by Gil R. Stormont. 
B. F. Bowen & Co., Inc., 1915.  pp 268-270.

Note: The following history by Stormont records the date of the monument dedication as September 1893.  
This is incorrect.  The actual date of the dedication was on October 13, 1894

On a little triangular piece of ground near the track of the Southern railroad, in Oakland City, there stands a modest appearing shaft which attracts the attention of people passing by on the train. If these passing people are interested enough and inquisitive enough to ask someone what this modest shaft represents, the information will probably be that this is a monument erected by the surviving members of Company F, Forty-second Indiana Regiment, as a loving tribute to the memory of their comrades who gave up their lives in defense of the flag during the Civil war.

The monument was erected during the summer of 1893 and was dedicated in September of that year. The initial steps were taken at a reunion of the company a year prior to that time, when a committee was appointed to raise the necessary funds. This committee was composed of Col. W. M. Cockrum, John W. Corder, James T. Bell, John P. Simpson and Washington Strickland. Dr. George C. Mason acted as an advisory member and gave much financial and advisory aid which was greatly appreciated by the company. Col. W. M. Cockrum executed a deed to Gibson county for the lot on which the monument stands.

The contract for the monument was awarded to William Kelley of Oakland City at a cost of near one thousand dollars. The material used was oolitic limestone. The monument stands on a base seven feet square and is twenty-eight feet in height. On the top is the figure of a soldier carved in stone. On the several sides of the dies are the names of all the original members of the company and the recruits, one hundred and forty-three in number.

On a panel for that purpose are the names of the original field and staff officers of the regiment. On another side of the shaft there is a scroll in which is inscribed, "Starved to Death at Andersonville," and underneath are the names of eleven members of the company who gave this supreme test of their devotion to their country. Following are the names: Chesterfield P. Dill, Alford Farmer, J. M. Hunter, H. H. Hunter, John H. Martin, Adam Canon, William A. Reavis, W. W. Oliver, A. H. Mariner, Jacob Strickland and A. C. Coleman. These all were taken prisoners at the battle of Chickamauga and died at Andersonville.

In appropriate places on the shaft appear the names of battles in which the company participated. There are as follows: Perryville, Stone's River, Stevenson, Flint River, Chickamauga, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Ringgold, Buzzard Roost, Big Shanty, Snake Creek Gap, Chattahoochie River, Bentonville.

As stated, this monument was dedicated in September, 1893. At the dedication there was a large assemblage of the surviving members of the company and regiment, soldiers from other regiments, citizens and friends. These all gathered around the monument where an appropriate address was delivered by Capt. A. J. McCutchan, of Company A, Forty-second Regiment. It was a proud day for the veterans of this company when they could look upon the completion of this Monument as the crowning triumph of the cause for which they fought, even though this rejoicing was mingled with tears in memory of those whose names were inscribed on the monument who had given up their lives for that cause.

"For their cause was the cause of the races,
That languished in slavery's night,
And the death that was pale on their faces,
Has filled the whole world with its light."

 


The following article is believed to be from a newspaper in Gibson County, Indiana.  Date unknown.

Special thanks to Barbara Hunter who submitted this article.

 

Monument in O.C. Recalls Civil War
By   Alvin Hammons

One afternoon, in September of 1893 (Actually October 13, 1894) members of the Grand Army of the Republic gathered on the corner of Clay & Oak Sts. in Oakland City for the dedication of a monument to Co. "F", 42nd Regiment, Indiana Volunteers.

The now weather-worn monument stands today, almost forgotten even by those whose grandfathers names appear thereon.

The $1,000 limestone monument has recorded on its shaft, the history of the regiment.

The Oakland City area company entered the service on October 7, 1861, and was discharged on July 21, 1865, compiling a string of battles which reads like a list of the bloodiest campaigns of the Civil War; Bentonville, Chattahoochie River, Lookout Mountain, Perryville, Stone's River, Big Shanty, Chickamauga and many others.

When the company entered the battle of Chickamauga, 11 men were destined to have their names carved on the monument under the heading of "Died at Andersonville."  The men, Wm. Cannon, A.G. Coleman, C.P. Dill, A. Farmer, H.H. Hunter, J.M. Hunter, J.H. Martin, A.H. Marrimer, W.W. Oliver, W.A. Reavis and J.A.G. Strickland were captured by the confederate forces during the battle and later starved to death at the infamous Andersonville prison camp.  According to existing records, these men were the only prisoners ever taken from the 143 men of the 42nd (the writer must mean from Co. F only).

Worn, but still visible, are the names of all the men of the regiment.  Many from one family joined the company, with three McGregors, Skeltons, and Stricklands being carved on the monument.

The monument grew out of a company reunion in 1892, when the surviving members of the 42nd were beginning to dwindle.  The committee headed by Col. W.M. Cockrum, who deeded the triangular strip of land, contracted William Kelley of Oakland City to construct the monument.

Miller, an Oakland City stone mason, carved the gray limestone soldier atop the monument. Miller's mastery of carving is witnessed today by the clarity and perfection of the rifle the stone on which the soldier stands, his inspection perfect uniform and even facial features.

The book "A History of Gibson County" states, "It was a proud day for the veterans of this company when they could look upon the completion of the monument as the crowning triumph of the cause for which they fought, even though this rejoicing was mingled with tears in memory of those whose names were inscribed on the monument who had given up their lives for that cause."


COMPANY F, 42nd INDIANA MONUMENT DEDICATION

 Source: The Oakland City, Indiana Journal, October 17, 1894
Article Submitted by Bill Marshall

 

 CO. F, 42ND IND. MONUMENT

 ----------------

Dedicated with Appropriate Exercises Last Saturday

---------------

    The beautiful monument erected in this city by the members of Co. F, 42nd Ind. Vol. Infantry was dedicated last Saturday afternoon in the presence of a large audience of comrades and friends of the company.  The ceremony consisted of patriotic music by the Oakland City band, calling the roll of the company, to which about 25 answered the “present,” and the remainder were accounted for either as “dead” or residing in some remote part of the country.  John W. Corder, president of the monument association then stepped forward and in a neat little speech stated that the monument was completed and fully paid for at a cost of about $410 and thanked the people for their kind assistance in building it.  He then turned the monument over to Capt. A. J. McCutchan of Evansville, to be dedicated to the memory of the dead heroes whose names were inscribed upon it.  Capt. McCutchan was greeted with a round of applause when he mounted the platform and delivered a most excellent and touching oration that pleased everybody present.  The Capt. Was a member of the 42nd, belonging to a company that touched elbows with Co. F, where he was in a position to see and be with the men and was personally acquainted with most of them, which made his talk all the more interesting.

    Hugh Carlisle, editor of the Princeton Leader, was next introduced and made a very pleasing short address, and when he had concluded the audience was dismissed.

    The monument is an elegant structure located on a triangular lot at the corner of Oak and Clay streets, near the Columbia Mill.  It is constructed of Green river limestone which is bleached almost white and is very pretty.  The monument stands 25 ½ feet high and is surmounted by the statue of a soldier uniformed and equipped with all of the accoutrements of war, standing at “parade rest.”  There are in all about 160 names engraved on the monument, including the original field and staff officers, the company officers and the privates, together with the name of every engagement in which Co. F participated with the names of those killed in each engagement.

    On the front of the shaft is a scroll on which is inscribed “died at Andersonville,” and underneath this are the names of the brave men that were starved to death in that foulest of prisons.

    The monument is one that reflects credit upon the company that built it and is quite a distinction for Oakland City, being the only company monument in the state, and every citizen should be proud that our city has been favored by being the chosen site for such a structure.

    Among the distinguished visitors present were Jas. L. Orr, quartermaster of the regiment and whose name occupies a position upon the monument.  Mrs. J. M. Shanklin and George Shanklin, editor of the Evansville Courier.  The last two mentioned are the wife and brother of Maj. J. M. Shanklin, one of the original officers of the regiment and whose name is inscribed on the monument.  All of the above are of Evansville.  The G.A.R. post of Princeton came over in a body on a special train, about 40 members in all.  There were also many visitors from other points.


Dale, Indiana Weekly Reporter, October 12, 1894


The monument of Company F. Forty-Second Indiana Volunteers will be dedicated at Oakland City tomorrow, Capt. A. J. McCutchan delivering the oration on the occasion.


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