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Note:  Below is a reproduction of the bulletin produced by the family of Col. Jones for the dedication ceremony.  Some of the actual dedication presentation material is reproduced below.  All pictures were added by the 42nd web author.

The MIDI file of "America the Beautiful" is used by permission of Benjamin Robert Tubb from his website at Public Domain Music http://www.pdmusic.org

See Also:  Colonel James Garrard Jones Grave Marker Ceremony Newspaper Article Page

DEDICATION OF BRONZE MARKER FOR COLONEL JAMES GARRARD JONES

JUNE 23, 2001, 2:00 P.M.
OAK HILL CEMETERY
EVANSVILLE, INDIANA

 

 

JAMES GARRARD JONES
3 JULY 1814 - 5 APRIL 1872
FIRST MAYOR OF EVANSVILLE 1847 - 1853
ATTORNEY GENERAL OF INDIANA 1860 - 1861
COLONEL FORTY-SECOND REGIMENT
INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY 9 OCT 1861 - 1 NOV 1864
JUDGE OF FIFTEENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT 1869 - 1870

 

 

 

MARCHING IN AND POSTING OF COLORS 
BY REENACTORS OF THE
42ND INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY REGIMENT


STEWART DEVANE,  PRIVATE
PRESIDENT OF THE 42ND REENACTORS,
PAT CROSLEY, FIRST SERGEANT
JOEL FOUST, CORPORAL
STACEY HOUCK, PRIVATE
DYLAN HOUCK, DRUMMER

POSTING OF GUARDS

 

 

GREETINGS: THE REV. DEACON MARY-FRANCES JONES


A letter from Camp Andrew Jackson, Nashville,
Tennessee March 10, 1862 by Colonel Jones to his sons:

Maurice and Percy, my dear boys, I was so glad to see you when last at Evansville, and regretted so much to have to leave you so soon. A soldiers life is a hard one, and I knew it before I became a soldier, but my country was in great peril, and as the Governor had offered me three commissions as Colonel, I felt bound by every consideration that can move a good citizen and a patriot, to take command of a regiment and do all I could for the preservation of the union. I hope that this same duty may never devolve on you, but if, when you are men, your country should need your services, you will not fail to do as I have done. I want you to cultivate manly feelings. Be truthful, just, generous, and brave; do no wrong, nor submit to wrong from any one; be guided always by honorable feelings and principles. Then you will be good citizens and useful and honored members of society. Bless you my dear boys. I wish I could embrace you.  

Your Father, 
Jas. G. Jones

 

ENTRY INTO THE CONGRESSIONAL RECORD BY SENATOR RICHARD LUGAR READ BY DEBI TRELEASE:

 

CONGRESSIONAL RECORD

Proceedings and Debate of the 107th Congress, First Session
Washington, Monday June 18, 2001, Vol. 147, No. 84

SENATE

HONORING COLONEL JAMES GARRARD JONES, FIRST MAYOR OF EVANSVILLE

Mr. Lugar, Mr. President, I rise today to honor a true pioneer in public service, Colonel James Garrard Jones.

Colonel Jones was born in Paris Kentucky on July 3, 1814, but soon became a resident of the great start of Indiana when his family moved there in 1819.  This move was Indiana’s good fortune, for it did not take long for Colonel Jones to become involved in public life.

The young Colonel Jones served as Surveyor and Deputy Recorder of Vanderburgh County, leaving a lasting mark as the county’s early field notes and books of deeds and mortgages appear in his handwriting.  He went on to serve as Evansville Trustee and Evansville Attorney under the town corporation.  In 1847, Colonel Jones’s efforts in establishment of a city government culminated with his election as Mayor in 1850.  Colonel Jones took his service to the state level with his election as Attorney General of Indiana in 1860, but shortly thereafter he was appointed Colonel of the Forty-Second Regiment of the Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and he left office to serve with the regiment.

After hostilities ended, Colonel Jones practiced law until Governor Baker appointed him to his final position of public service in 1869 as Judge of the Fifteenth Judicial Circuit.

Colonel Jones passed away on April 5th, 1872.  This public servant, husband, and father to eight children is remembered not only for his public service, but also for his intelligence, kindness, and geniality.

On June 23, 2001, the descendants of Colonel Jones, the current mayor of Evansville, Indiana, Russell Lloyd Jr., the Friends of the Forty-Second Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and others will gather to remember Colonel Jones with the placement of a new bronze marker at this grave site in Oak Hill Cemetery in Evansville.  I am pleased to join them in honoring this fine man who contributed greatly to Evansville, the state of Indiana, and our nation.

 

INTRODUCTIONS AND COMMENTS BY DIGNITARIES

RUSSELL LLOYD, JR., Mayor of Evansville, Indiana

THE REV. SHANE SCOTT-HAMBLEN, Rector of St.Paul's Episcopal Church in Evansville, Indiana

 

 

NAMING OF DESCENDANTS PRESENT:  DAVID PONSTEIN

MR. AND MRS. DAVID PONSTEIN
MR. AND MRS. TOM TRELEASE
MS. PRISCILLA JONES
THE REV. AND MRS. JAMES GARRARD JONES, JR.
THE REV. MICHAEL STEPHEN JONES
THE REV. DEACON MARY-FRANCES JONES
MR. JAMES GARRARD JONES III

 

PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE:  DAVID PONSTEIN

I pledge allegiance to the flag
of the United States of America
and to the Republic
for which it stands,
one Nation under God, indivisible,
with liberty and justice for all.

 

EXCERPTS FROM A NEWSPAPER OF THE BATTLE OF PERRYVILLE, KENTUCKY ON OCTOBER 10, 1862 
READ BY TOM TRELEASE

 

"...Calm and collected rode Col. Jones upon his horse, cheering the men, urging them on, and sharing with us all the dangers of the field.  Many of the enemy's balls were aimed at him, but miraculously he escaped being hurt himself, but his horse was wounded. All the while the brave and gallant Colonel led us on, and nobly did he do honor to the 42nd, it to him, and all to our beloved State.."

 

 

WHY A NEW MARKER?   SUSAN PONSTEIN

 

REPORT OF THE HISTORIAN; MR. TIM BECKMAN,
Historian for the 42nd Regiment

 

Hello, my name is Tim Beckman and I would like to thank the family of Col. Jones for inviting me here today to speak to you about the 42nd Indiana.

The 42nd Indiana Volunteer Infantry was organized in Evansville (Vanderburg County) on October 9th, 1861.  Although the regiment was organized in Evansville, many of the men came from other southwestern Indiana counties such as Daviees, Gibson, Pike, Spencer, and Warrick.  These men came from all “walks of life” and were made up of all nationalities.  The vast majority of the men listed their occupation on their enlistment papers simply as “Farmer.”  Some were mere boys as young as 9 years of age.  All responded to the call of their country with great pride, fervor, and a sense of patriotic duty.  You can feel this same sense of duty toward country as one reads the letters written by Col. Jones to his family back home, like the one just previously read, when he wrote “I felt bound by every consideration that can move a good citizen and a patriot, to take command of a regiment and do all I could for the preservation of the union.”

In his book, The History of the 42nd Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Captain Horrall relates the following humorous story concerning Col. Jones.   “Col. J. G. Jones, after the battle of Perryville, Ky., as all did, felt greatly the want for water which was just beyond our reach in plenty, in Chaplin river, until the ninth of October, inside the enemy’s lines.  The colonel, suffering from thirst, offered a private soldier $10.00 to get him a canteen of water.  Starting at eight o’clock, the comrade tramped till twelve o’clock that night, not securing a drop of water.  All the wells in our lines were under guard for use at the field hospitals, for the wounded.  Upon the comrade reporting his ill luck, Colonel J. said,  “Well, I’ll give you $5.00 for trying.”

During the 42nd’s nearly four years of service, they endured hardships of every kind; disease, starvation, exposure to all kinds of weather without adequate clothing and shelter, not to mention the separation from loved ones so far away.  They marched thousands of miles and spilled their blood and died on battlefields from Kentucky to Georgia in order to “preserve the government.”  Some of the more notable battles that the 42nd participated in were: Wartrace, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, the Campaign against Atlanta, and Bentonville.  Others “lucky” enough not to have been mortally wound in battle were captured as prisoners of war.  These men were detained in such horrible prisons such as Andersonville, Libby, and Belle Isle.  Many died in these God forsaken places, while others barely survived, always on the brink of death due to starvation and disease.

Other hardships awaited some of the soldiers toward the end of the war.  On April 27, 1865, the steam ship Sultana exploded on the flooded Mississippi River in the dark of the night 7 miles north of Memphis, TN.  The Sultana was grossly overloaded with paroled Union soldiers, and nearly 1700 men lost their lives.  Among the passengers were 3 members of the 42nd Indiana.  Only  1 of the 3 survived this horrific accident.  More lives were lost on the Sultana than were lost on the Titanic.  The Sultana tragedy still stands as America’s worst maritime disaster.

During its term of service, the 42nd Indiana lost 113 men who were killed and mortally wounded and 197 to disease for a total of 310.  Additionally, an estimated 443 men were wounded, and many of them were left with some form of disability for the rest of their lives.

In an e-mail about this dedication and the 42nd Indiana, Mary-Frances Jones observed that these men had suffered much during the war.  She is right.  These men did suffer many hardships.  As we stand here today surrounded by the graves of our fallen heroes, may we vow to always honor those who sacrificed so much in order to protect the freedoms that we now enjoy.

Capt. Horrall, in his book on the history of the 42nd Indiana, stated the following in the context of addressing the sons and daughters of Civil War veterans “…(may we) impress upon all the children of soldiers and comrades, of the 42d Indiana particularly, the high worth of being sons and daughters of veterans: - to transmit to them all, if possible, the zeal, patriotism, and love of country that stimulated their fathers to deeds of honor, and their mothers to great sacrifices, to save the Nation.  A saved Nation is a priceless heritage.  Its price was paid in blood.”

 

HYMN: FOR THE BEAUTY OF THE EARTH: 
FR. MICHAEL S. JONES

For the beauty of the earth, for the beauty of the skies,
For the love which from our birth over and around us lies.
Christ our God to thee we raise this our hymn of grateful praise.
 
For the beauty of each hour of the day and of the night,
Hill and vale, and tree and flower, sun and moon, and stars of light.
Christ our God, to thee we raise, this our hymn of grateful praise.

For the joy of human love, brother, sister, parent, child,
Friends on earth, and friends above, for all gentle thoughts and mild.
Christ our God to thee we raise this our hymn of grateful praise.

For the Church which evermore lifteth holy hands above,
Offering up on every shore thy pure sacrifice of love,
Christ our God to thee we raise this our hymn of grateful praise.

For each perfect gift of thine to the world so freely given,
Faith and hope and love divine, peace on earth and joy in heaven
Christ our God, to thee we raise this our hymn of grateful praise.

 

 

DEDICATION OF MARKER, FR. JAMES GARRARD JONES, JR.

 

FR. JONES:  I will greatly rejoice in the Lord; my soul shall exult in my God. He has clothed me with the garments of salvation;


PEOPLE:  He has covered me with the robe of righteousness.

LET US PRAY:

O God, who baptized us into the Body of your Son Jesus Christ,
And made us members with different functions,
All necessary and all to be honored:
Make this marker a sign of our common membership in Christ,
That we may know those who have departed this earthly life,
Not as the world esteems them, but as you know and love them;
Through Jesus Christ our Lord.  Amen.

 

 

HYMN: AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL: 
FR. MICHAEL JONES

O beautiful for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain,
For purple mountain majesties above the fruited plain!
America! America! God shed his grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea.

O beautiful for heroes proved in liberating strife,
Who more than self their country loved, and mercy more than life!
America! America! God mend thine every flaw,
Confirm thy soul in self control, thy liberty in law.

O beautiful for patriot dream that sees beyond the years
Thine alabaster cities gleam, undimmed by human tears!
America! America! God shed his grace on thee,
And crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea.

 

 

RIFLE SALUTE 42ND REENACTORS

 

RETIREMENT OF THE COLORS 42ND REENACTORS

 

DISMISSAL: THE REV. DEACON MARY-FRANCES JONES

Out great grandfather told his sons that he hoped "this same duty may never devolve on you, but if, when you are men, your country should need your services, you will not fail to do as I have done."  As simple and natural as it surely is, I think this statment carries our heritage into the present and plants it right here in the communties from which we come.  We are each called by a greater power, the Lord Jesus Christ, to go in peace to love and serve the Lord.  Now go in peace, to Love and serve the Lord.  Alleluia, Alleluia.

People:  Thanks be to God.  Alleluia, Alleluia

 

 

The descendants of JAMES GARRARD JONES thank you for joining them and the Friends of the Forty-Second regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry as we honored Colonel Jones' contributions to our Country, the State of Indiana, Vanderburgh County and Evansville with the placement of an additional marker on his gravesite at Oak Hill Cemetery.

 


We extend particular thanks to the following who helped make this ceremony possible:


Tim Beckman for sharing his great historical insight and wisdom
Mary Goldman, Hampton Inn
Debi Trelease who updated two of the flags for program use 
Susan Ponstein and Michael Jones who supplied copies of Col. Jones' picture Susan Ponstein who obtained flags representing our various communities 
Mr. And Mrs. Robert E. Jones who provided letters by Col. Jones to his sons Senator Richard Lugar and his staff for their reading into the Congressional Record 
Sunnner Sisney, Sales Support Manager, Evansville Convention & Visitors Bureau 
Jack Kirwer, Superintendent of the Oak Hill Cemetery that gifted the setting of the bronze marker on the grave of Col. Jones 
Anderson Memorials, Inc. of Austin, Minnesota who designed the marker and offered guidance and coordination 
Mark Coomer of The Evansville Courier and Press for covering this entire event 
Susan Ponstein who dreamed this dream of the marker and ceremony 
Ormonde Plater who provided the dedication form for the marker 
Daniel H. Reigle of West Chester, Ohio for his financial help 
Tim Beckman for his financial help
James Garrard Jones, III for his financial help
Susan and David Ponstein for their financial help
Mary-Frances Jones for her financial help
James Garrard Jones, III who acted as our photographer today
Chaplain (Colonel) Wallace Alcorn, U.S. Army (retired)
Chris Lukes and Cindy Engelman of Austin Printing, Inc.

A very special thank you to
Stewart DeVane, Private and all of the other
42nd Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry Reenactors

We invite you now to the Hampton Inn, 
8000 Eagle Crest Boulevard in Evansville 
to share soft drinks and light refreshments. 
The hotel phone number is 473-5000.

End of Bulletin

See Also:  Colonel James Garrard Jones Grave Marker Ceremony Newspaper Article Page

 

Acknowledgments from your 42nd Indiana web host, Tim Beckman

I would like to personally thank the family of Col. Jones for inviting me to speak at their dedication ceremony.  I would also like to thank the 42nd Indiana, Co. H Reenactment Group for their excellent duties, and Mark Coomer of the Evansville Courier & Press for his two fine articles about the event.  Lastly, I would like to thank all the friends and descendants of the 42nd Indiana that attended the ceremony.  I know the family of Col. Jones appreciated all the support.

 

Please E-mail any comments to Tim Beckman at tbeckman@42ndindiana.com

 

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This Page was Last Edited on January 26, 2002