Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

 

 

Welcome to the Monroe County History and Genealogy Website

Click here for more about this website

Click here to go to the MCHS website

Click here to go to the MCC of OGS website

 

CDs of important Monroe County record books are now available.  Each page of dozens of Monroe County record books have been photographed and made into CDs.  For a current list of available CDs click here.

 

 

Monroe County Obituaries

1885

 

Albright, Ruben Albright

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 11, 1885

Ohio Notes --  Ruben Albright, a graduate of Ohio Wesleyan university and a student for some time in Germany, suicided at Delaware.

 

Allen, Dr. Allen

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 17, 1885

Old Story of Murder Will Out - Joliet, Ill., November 11, (1885).

Jas. Young, a convict, serving a ten year term from Carroll county for burglary, has confessed that he is the murderer of DR. ALLEN, of Sandwich, Ill.  A young man named Wm. Thomas, who is of respectable parentage, was convicted of this murder on the evidence of a female detective from Chicago, and sent to prison for seventeen years.

     Young is a notorious burglar, who has been an inmate of several western prisons.  In his confession he accurately described the premises where Dr. Allen lived.  He also drew a diagram of the house, showing the room in which he claims he had the life and death struggle with the murdered man, from whose grasp he was endeavoring to escape when he committed the murder.

     The Circuit Court of DeKalb county has issued a writ of habeas corpus for Young, and Sheriff Wood took him from the prison last evening to Sycamore to stand trial for the murder.  In the mean time Wm. Thomas has served about six years on his seventeen years term but has always insisted that he was innocent.  Thomas says he knows nothing regarding the man James Young, and never saw or heard of him until he came to the prison to serve his sentence for the Carroll county burglary.

     The impression at the penitentiary is that Young is really Dr. Allen’s murderer.  Young says remorse for his past misdeeds compelled him to confess the murder.

 

Allen, Major T. G. Allen

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 12, 1885

Death of Major T. G. Allen

MAJOR ALLEN, of Baresville, this county, died on Saturday, the 2d inst.  We clip the following notices from the New Martinsville, (W. Va.,) Democrat

The venerable Major Allen, of Hannibal, O., died on Saturday inst.  He was an old soldier of the Mexican War and a man of excellent character.  He held the office of Justice of the Peace in Monroe County for many years.  He died loved and respected by all who knew him and was buried by the Masonic order on Tuesday, of which he had long been a member.

“Major Allen, who died at Hannibal Monroe County, O., last week, in the earlier part of his life had an adventurous career.  He was not only with General Taylor in the Mexican was but he was with Col. Davy Crockett at the Alamo, and was reported killed.  However, as he with others, were being marched under guard, after dark, to the place of execution, he managed to make his escape by hiding in the tall grass unobserved by the guard, until they passed by.

 

Allen, Martha A. Allen
Source: Monroe County courthouse records, Woodsfield, Ohio, July 29, 1885
Martha A. Allen, female, died July 29, 1885, aged 76 years, 4 months and 1 day , born in Virginia and died in Seneca township,  Monroe county, Ohio, spouse Joel Allen.

 

Anderson, Abbe J. Anderson
Source: Monroe County courthouse  death records
Woodsfield, Ohio, October 9, 1886
Mrs. Abbe J. Anderson died October 9, 1886, aged 42 years, housewife, born and died in Monroe county, Ohio, married to Joseph Anderson.

 

Armstrong, Wm. M. Armstrong

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 15, 1885

     WM. M. ARMSTRONG, a well known citizen of Washington township, died at his home on Captina creek, on Monday morning, from a cancer on the face, from which he had suffered intensely for a long time.  And his funeral took place on Wednesday.  Deceased was born January 18, 1830, on the farm where he afterward lived and died, which was entered by his father in 1812.  He was a prudent and active business man, and accumulated considerable property.  In 1869 he was elected county commissioner, which office he filled acceptably for one term.  He was one of the projectors of the B. Z. & C. railroad, and one of the most active spirits in securing its construction, holding the office of director of the company, and vice president of the same, at the time of his death.

 

Arnold, Rose Arnold

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 23, 1885

Miss Rose Arnold, daughter of Jr. James Arnold, of Beallsville, died of spotted fever on Saturday last.  A brother has the same disease, but is recovering.

 

Atzenhofer, Minnie Atzenhofer

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  January 13, 1885

Died:  December 26, 1884, MINNIE, wife of Peter ATZENHOFER, aged 40 years, 4 months and 1 day.

     She was born in Germany August 25, 1814, and moved to this country in 1849, where she lived until her death.  She was a member of the Lutheran Church for many years, and lived in hopes of meeting those that went before.  She was the mother of 11 children, 9 of whom are living, the oldest being 17 years of age, and the youngest, one hour at the time of her death.  It was hard, indeed, to part with our sister, but God thought it best to take her from our side.  Our loss will be her eternal gain.  The funeral service was held by Rev. John Hueneke, of the M.E. Church.  He read from the book of Matthew, 24th chapter and 44th verse: “Therefore be ye also ready, for in such an hour as ye think not the son of man cometh.”

          Farewell, sister dear, farewell;

          Our time is but a space,

          When we together there will dwell

          In that blessed, happy place.

.

          Farewell, sister, a short farewell,

          Then we will all meet again;

          In heaven, where the angels dwell,

          There’s no trouble, no sorrow and no pain.

.

          Farewell, mother dear, farewell,

          Thy spirit is now at rest,

          But in heaven we hope to meet thee,

          And be forever blest.                          A Sister

 

Baker, Col. R. L. P. Baker

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 4, 1885

     COL. R. L. P. BAKER died in Columbus, Ohio, last week.

 

Baker, Marx Baker

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

Probate Court Proceedings --  July 18, 1885

Will of MARX BAKER late of Summit township, deceased, admitted to Probate and ordered of record.

Elizabeth Baker, widow of Marx Baker, deceased, elected to take under the will of her deceased husband.

 

Barkes, Lewis Barkes

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 31, 1885

Died --  March 12th, of typhoid fever, Mr. LEWIS BARKES, in his 22d year.  During the last weeks of his life he was hopeful in his suffering that he might again be restored to his usual health, yet in the midst of expressed hope of recovery, he was perfectly reconciled to God the Father through Jesus Christ the Savior.  He had no fear of deaths approach.  His soul anchored in Christ enabled him to say that he was going home to God.  Though apparenity [sic] a dark cloud of sadness has come over the family and loved ones who are left to mourn his loss, the Lord knows what is best and does what is best, making all things work together for good to those who love him.

     Yours truly,                              Ivy

 

Barlow, George W. Barlow

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 24, 1885

Died --  March 9, of consumption, at the residence of his brother, J. W. Barlow, near Stafford, Ohio, GEORGE W. BARLOW, in the 23d year of his age.

The deceased was converted and joined the M. E. Church when quite young, being a faithful and useful member, and was for many years a teacher in the Sabbath School.  He shed a hallowed influence over all who knew him, endearing him to his friends and neighbors.  A few moments before he died he called his friends around him, and exhorted them to meet him on the other shore.  His last were, “Glory to the Lamb: I’ll soon be higher.”  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. K. Shafer.

          No more with varied ills oppressed,

          His spirit soars beyond its cares;

          He has gone where the weary rest,

          A house his gracious Lord prepares.                 Sopha

 

Bartlet, Abner Bartlet

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 8, 1885

ABNER BARTLET, a pioneer of Monroe county, is dead of heart disease, aged 90 years.

 

Beardmore, John Beardmore

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

Mr. JOHN BEARDMORE, an old resident of Washington township this county, died on the 31st ult.

 

Bell, Dr. J. C. Bell

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 16, 1885

DR. J. C. BELL, of Stafford, was found dead near Lewisville, this county, last Friday morning.

 

Berger, Mrs. Berger

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 8, 1885

Clarington Independent, 4th inst.  --  MRS. BERGER, an old lady living about three miles back of Baresville, died on Monday morning of this week.  Her remains were interred in the St. John churchyard on Tuesday at 10 o’clock A. M.

 

Bishop, Mrs. Bishop

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 12, 1885

Mrs. BISHOP, of Woodsfield, an aged lady, died on Friday, the 8th inst.

 

Blake, Thomas Blake

Blake, Charles Blake

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 22, 1885

THOMAS and CHARLES BLAKE, brothers, intoxicated, were killed by a train near Dexter City, Noble county, on the 10th inst.

 

Blowers, (two sisters)  Blowers

Blowers, (brother) Blowers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 9, 1885

The following lines were suggested by Cora Blowers while speaking of the death of her two sisters and little brother, Sabbath, May 17, 1885:

I am thinking to-day of the lost and the loved ones

Who have gone to that bourne [sic] whence no traveller [sic] returns,

Who are lost to me here in this world’s tribulation,

But thrice happy redeemed in the regions above,

.

Whose souls have been wafted far beyond where the billows

Tumultuously well on the rock-girded shore;

Where angels descend on their bright wings of zephyr,

And shout loud hosannas to the Lamb ever-more.

.

I thought it was cruel when the somber-winged angel,

Laid the pallor of death on Olive’s fair brow:

But Roy and Maud were next summoned to leave me,

And fate seemed to Charley scarcely life to allow

.

How much I will miss her, that constant companion,

That sister whose image I ne’er shall forget,

When I roam in the meadow and cud the bright floweret,

And often recur to the scene I regret.

.

When I roam in the valley or search in the wildwood,

Where oft the wild flowers we have gathered at down,

Oh! Say, will thy spirits be round and about me,

As guardian angels to hasten me on?                   C.

 

Blowers, Lilian Maud Blowers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 9, 1885

Died --  Of consumption, Mary 9, 1885 about 8 o’clock P. M., LILIAN MAUD, second daughter of C. M. and H. J. BLOWERS, in the 17th year of her age.

“Death, the arch enemy of life,” has been in our midst again and taken from us one we all loved with a tender and warm affection.  Maud was a young lady loved by all who knew her.  After weeks of patient and intense suffering death at last relieved her.  A few short months ago her cheeks bloomed with the roses of perfect life.  One would have thought, who saw her then in all her youthful buoyancy, that she had a long life of prosperity and happiness before her; but the “grim monster,” Death, laid his spell upon her and blighted her young life as the frost blights the tender plants.  A few moments before she expired she called the family to her bedside and bid them all good by.  She said she was willing to die.  She asked them not to weep for her and said that everything had been done for her that could be done by tender parents and a loving sister.  She said the Master had called her to a world where there was no more sickness nor death.  She then closed her eyes and passed triumphantly from life.  The bereaved and stricken family have the heart felt sympathy of the entire community.

A way from the family circle

A loved one is called to night;

The Master has said; “Tis done,

Come dwell with the angels of light.”

.

But yesterday thy cheeks were blooming

With the glow of morning light,

To day they are pale and wan,

They are cold in death to night.

.

We meet at the family sideboard,

A place is vacant there,

We list for a welcome footfall

Trip down the tufted stair.

.

In vain may we wait and listen

For a footfall on the stair;

No loved one is seen approaching

To sit in the vacant chair.

.

They have lain thee low in the churchyard,

They have hid thy form away:

Yet, Maud, we hope to meet thee

In the realms of endless day.

 

Blowers, Olive Blowers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 17, 1885

Died - On Wednesday, March 4, of inflammation of the brian, OLIVE, youngest daughter of C. M. and H. J. BLOWERS, aged 7 months and 4 days.

          Close the door lightly,

          Bridle the breath.

          Our little earth angel

          Is talking with death;

          Gently he woos her,

          She wishes to stay;

          His arms are about her,

          He bears her away.

.

          Music comes floating

          Doen from the dome,

          Angels are chanting

          The sweet welcome home

          Come, stricken weeper,

          Come to the bed;

          Gaze on the sleeper --

          Our Olive is dead.

.

          Smooth out the ringlets,

          Close the dark eye;

          No wonder such beauty

          Was claimed in the sky.

          Cross the hands gently

          O’er the white breast,

          So like a wild spirit

          Strayed from the blest;

          Bear her out softly.

          This idol of ours:

          Let her grave slumber

          Bemid [sic] the sweet flowers.                  C.

Gazette please copy.

 

Blowers, Walter Leroy Blowers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 9, 1885

Died --  April 30, 1885, of lung fever, WALTER LEROY, son of C. M. and H. J. BLOWERS, aged 4 years, 6 months and 16 days.

Weep not because your darling

Was borne to worlds on high,

Before his charms did half unclose

To your admiring eyes.

.

“Tis true you miss your darling,

And often think him near;

In visions of thy memory,

In starts, you see him here.

.

Had he lived but a few short years,

In all his beauty bright,

His eyes would oft been dimmed with tears,

His heart been touched with blight.

.

You miss his childish footfall,

His prattling tense of glee;

No more before the cottage door

His cherished form you see.

.

But he has gone to dreamless sleep

‘Mid tears and heart wrung sighs;

Oh! Do not for the angel weep,

His home is in the skies.

.

He has joined his angel sister,

And they’re waiting till you come;

Pray God to guard and keep you

Till you [sic] safely meet at home.

 

Bonham, Frank Bonham

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 24, 1885

Lynching in Kansas --  At a late hour Saturday night, March 14th, a party of over a hundred men stormed the jail at Independence, Kan., took FRANK BONHAM, a young farmer therefrom [sic] and hanged him to a railroad trestle.  Bonham was charged with the murder of his mother, brother and sister, the 31 of last month.  The District Court granted a change of venue to Cherokee county, which insensed [sic] the residents of the neighborhood where Bonham lived.  His guilt was not proven, though all appearances were against him.  He refused to plead when arraigned.

 

Bothwell, Mrs. Anna Bothwell

Source: Spirit of Democracy  December 22, 1885

Departed this life at her residence in Center Township, on Friday, the 18th inst., of heart disease, MRS. ANNA BOTHWELL.

     The deceased was born in Armah Co., Ireland, on the 25th day of January 1833.  She united with the M. E. Church and was converted when only thirteen years of age.  She was married to Mr. Asher Okey, in 1853, who lived but a short time.  In June 1861, she was married to Mr. Bothwell.

     The departed was possessed of many most excellent qualities of mind and heart.  As a wife she was devoted; as a mother, kind and affectionate; as a christian, earnest and faithful.  During her illness everything that tenderest love could suggest was done to win back the bloom of health, but all in vain. “Man proposes but God disposes.”  Just before her death she repeated the following lines:

 

Bradford, _____ Bradford

Source: Spirit of Democracy  January 13, 1885

BRADFORD, the Bellaire man who was shot by Kraus in that city last week, died last Saturday morning.

 

Bradford, Charles Bradford

Source: Spirit of Democracy  January 13, 1885

Balzer Kraus Wings Charles Bradford in Bellaire the Night of the 3d inst.

Bellaire Independent, 8th inst.

   Balzer Kraus, who runs the Windsor House barber shop, left the shop about half-past 12 o’clock and started on his way home, in Sheets’ addition, at the north end of Belmont street.  When he reached the last square and near the upper end, he noticed three fellows start down the street toward him.  Balzer went toward the fence when he reached Judge Anderson’s lot, the last one on the square.  One of the trio also went toward the fence, whilst the other two kept to the outer edge of the pavement, one of them jumping as if to keep warm Balzer thought nothing of their presence there, but walked on, and just as he was passing between the men one of the two on the outside threw his arm around his neck and bent his head back.  With this the other two rushed in and began to go through his pockets.  His watch chain was unhooked, and they were just pulling it out of his pocket, when Balzer who had his dinner basket in his left hand, and a revolver, a Smith & Wesson, 38 calibre, in his right, in his overcoat pocket, pulled the weapon to shoot the man behind him, who was choking him with his arm.  In swinging the revolver around it struck some object, Balzer didn’t know what, and he pulled the trigger.  The ball entered Charley Bradford’s right breast three or four inches below the collar bone, and passed blear through him, coming out near the shoulder blade.  With this they all let go, and in pulling at the watch chain, broke it loose from the watch.  The three started to run, but just as the second shot was fired, which was but an instant after the first, Bradford fell on the pavement close to the gate entrance to Judge Anderson’s residence, and a third shot was sent after the two retreating highwaymen down Belmont street.  The man who was lying on the pavement by this time had called to Balzer not to shoot, any more, saying he had enough.  Balzer asked his name, but he made no reply.  He left him then and came down town, where he found two friends, who went with him to the scene of the struggle.  In the meantime, Officer Leach from Gravel Hill and Marshal Burke had showed up, and after finding a board, Bradford was taken to the Marshal’s office and Dr. Anderson summoned to dress the wound.  Balzer lost nothing in the scuffle, his watch chain being found on the pavement near where Bradford laid, and his grit in defending himself so successfully is commended on all sides, more because of it being Charley Bradford who was unlucky enough to receive the probably fatal shot.

 

Brannon, Mrs. Brannon

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 5, 1885

Belmont County Items --  Bellaire Independent, 1st inst.

Mrs. Brannon, who was buried yesterday in the Old Wegee burying ground, was 97 years of age at the time of her death.

 

Brooks, Mrs. Giles Brooks

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 20, 1885

MRS. BROOKS, of Antioch, widow of Giles Brooks, formerly a resident of Woodsfield, died on the 13th inst.

 

Brown, Mrs. Philip Brown

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 25, 1885

Mrs. Philip Brown, of this township, Center, died on the 17th inst., in her 73d year.  The remains were interred in the R. C. Church Cemetery.

 

Bruff, Col. Joseph Bruff

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 24, 1885

     COL. JOSEPH BRUFF, of Damascus, well-known as a soldier, politician and distinguished citizen, was found dead in the cemetery on the grave of his son, having committed suicide by shooting himself in the head.  Business complications are supposed to have been the cause of the act.

 

Butler, Thomas Butler

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  October 27, 1885

Clarington Independent, 23d inst.

     A shocking accident occurred on Fish P_t_s small stream which empties into Sunfish Creek some two miles above town, on Friday evening last, by which THOMAS BUTLER met a horrible death.--  We have been unable to get the full particulars of the affair, but from what we could glean they are something near as follows:  Mr. Butler was working at a sawmill that is located on the run a short distance from its mouth, and was carrying away the lumber as it was sawed.--  At the time of the accident he was riding on the carriage as it was being run back.  Some how his foot slipped and he fell forward on the saw, which caught him and threw him up into the air.  He fell back again and the saw caught him and threw him up the second, and again the third time before he could be got out of the way or the saw stopped.  He was horribly mangled, one leg being cut entirely off, one arm cut nearly off and he was cut down through the shoulder and into the breast until, it is said, his lungs came out.  He was still alive and talked after the accident occurred.  Drs. Walton and Hahermehl were sent for but could do nothing for the injured man and he died about eight o’clock that evening, some five hours after the accident occurred.  While Dr. Walton was trying to put his lungs back before he died, the injured man requested him to desist, saying that the operation hurt him.  Deceased was well up in years but was unmarried.

 

Cahal, Parker Cahal

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 24, 1885

PARKER CAHAL was found dead in his barn near Ripley.  He is supposed to have committed suicide, as he had just returned from Cincinnati where he had lost $8,000 in the bucket shops.

 

Calland, Catharine Calland

Source: Spirit of Democracy  February 24, 1885

We are pained to announce the horrible death of Miss Catharine Calland of near Berne, which occurred Sunday evening.  She was sitting in front of the grate Saturday morning reading a Bible, when she was seized with a fit and fell into the fire, and before she was discovered, was so badly burned that she was insensible.  She lived until Sunday evening.  Her clothes were almost entirely consumed and her flesh was so badly burned that it dropped from her limbs.  Miss Calland was about 24 years of age, a thorough christian and greatly beloved by all who knew her, and her tragically death has cast a gloom over the entire community.-Noble Co. Press 19th inst.

 

Carrothers, Water Carrothers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

From the New Martinsville (W.Va.) Democrat

     One of our oldest and best known citizens, JOHN W. CARROTHERS, departed this life on last Friday night, in the 73d year of his age.  Mr. Carrothers was a peaceable, law abiding and industrious citizen.  He was a painter by trade and an excellent workman, and there is not a house in New Martinsville, which does not contain his handiwork.  He was buried in the Williams cemetery on Sunday evening, Rev. Reynolds of the M.E. Church, South, conducting the services.

 

Chatham, John Chatham

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 10, 1885

Death From a Drink - Williamsport, Penn, Oct. 29.

     JOHN CHATHAM, of Pine Station, has been known as a heavy drinker, and has been held up as an example to youths of what degradation will follow the use on intoxicating liquors.  It was made known that John died yesterday afternoon drinking a pint of whisky.  Chatham has been on a protracted spree for a number of days.  All his money was gone, he was thirsting for a drink, and he walked to the hotel bar and asked the bartender for a glass of liquor.  The bartender said to Chatham; “If you drink a pint of whisky you can have it for nothing.”  This liberty astonished Chatham.  Recovering himself he blurted out in an excited manner: “Give me it and I’ll drink it.”  The barkeeper poured the pint of whisky in a large whisky glass.  Chatham grasped the glass in his hands, raised it to his lips, and never lowered it until the last drop gurgled down his throat. - Smacking his lips he put the glass on the bar, and rubbing his hands in ecstasy he exclaimed as he tottered toward the door: “That has made a new man of me.”  He fell to the floor unconscious, the bystanders picked him up, and on investigation the fact dawned upon them that Chatham was dead.

 

Clarke, Sarsfield Clarke

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 27, 1885

Death of an Aged and Highly Respected Citizen

Last Saturday morning, Oct. 3d at 7:30 o’clock, SARSFIELD CLARKE died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Emma Harding, this city.

     Then and there ended a very busy and very successful life, which had stretched far beyond the three score and ten allotted years of man of earth.  Had this venerable man lived a few days more he would have completed eighty-five years on earth life.  He was born in Ohio county, West Virginia, October 24, 1800.

     Had his death occurred one day later it would have fallen on the anniversary of the death of his wife, for she died October 4, 1881.  She had been a loved and devoted companion of his youth and his old age, having journeyed with him sixty-one years when death separated them for a little while.  They were married  in Monroe county, Ohio, in 1820.

     In 1860 the family removed to Illinois and located in Edgar county.

     Mr. Clark was always a farmer.  How energetically and how successfully he followed this honorable avocation may be judged by the fact that in his youth he worked on the farm for five dollars per month, and yet he was able to disburse to his children as they reached maturity about $80,000 besides  subsequent bequests.  Though so full of business, and so pushing in his labors, he esteemed it the highest compliment to himself that he never sued and never was sued in court.  His aversion to the settlement of differences by appeal to law was very great, and was a marked peculiarity of his life.

     Mr. Clark’s family consisted of eleven children, ten of whom lived to be men and woman with families of their own.  Five of them survive him.  They are Colonel Terrence Clark, the youngest of the family and the only surviving son, and Mrs. Archibold, Mrs. Woodyard, Mrs. O’Connor, and Mrs. Harding.

     The funeral occurred Tuesday afternoon from Mrs. Harding’s residence.  The religious services were conducted by Rev. E. D. Witkin, of Carlinville, assisted by Rev. R. D. VanDeursen, D. D. of this city.  A large company of friends followed the remains to the beautiful Edgar cemetery where the interment was made.

     In the death of Mr. Sarsfield Clark society has lost a bright mind, a loving heart, and a helpful hand.  --Paris (Ill.) Republican

 

Conger, (wife of David) Conger

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 3, 1885

     The Spirit of Democracy published the trial of David Conger for the murder of his wife.  The Court sentenced Conger to imprisonment in the Penitentiary for life.

 

Conger, (wife of David) Conger

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 14, 1885

A Terrible Tragedy  --  Down in Wayne township, this county about eight miles southwest of Woodsfield, on the George Rose farm, a terrible tragedy occurred last Sunday morning at the home of David CONGER.

Early Sunday morning Conger went to the spring house for a pie which he ate and then drank from a tin cup and threw a quantity of the water upon one of his small children.  His wife told him not to do that again when he replied with an oath that he would kill her if she did not shut her mouth.  She retorted that he might as well kill her then if he wanted to.

Conger immediately seized the coffee pot and struck her in the face and on the head.  The poor woman ran out on the porch followed by her demon of a husband who knocked her off the porch, which was a high one, then picked up an ax and struck her on the arm cutting it almost off.  Then he struck her again with the poll of the ax in the forehead mashing her skull and rendering her unconscious.  All this time the children were screaming and calling for help.  One of the boys started to a neighbors and Conger followed threatening to kill him if he did not stop, but the boy ran on and escaped.

Conger immediately went to J. W. Strickling’s a Justice of the Peace, and informed the Squire and Mr. Polen that he had killed his wife.  In the afternoon a summons came for Dr. Farquhar and Prosecutor Driggs and Sheriff Lude were informed of the affair.  Together they visited the scene of the tragedy.  Dr. Farquhar found Mrs. Conger unconscious, her skull mashed in and gave it as his opinion that her death was only a question of a few hours.

The scene at the house was a trying one.  Six children were weeping about the form of their unconscious mother, and many kind-hearted mothers were trying to console them, but the heart-broken children could do nothing but bewail the sad fate of their kind mother who, in all probability, would never speak to them again in this world.  Willing hands and kind hearts, and many of them, were there, but their efforts to aid the injured and console the bereft and afflicted survivors, in such an  hour were of no avail.

Conger was arrested and committed to jail Sunday evening.

MONDAY MORNING --  It is reported that Mrs. Conger died at 4 o’clock this morning.

 

Conger, (wife of David) Conger

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 21, 1885

David Conger, the man who so brutally assaulted his wife on the 12th inst., has been playing the “crazy dodge” during the past week, but in the opinion of many he works it too fine.  He pretends that he does not know his most intimate friends.

The Conger murder caused a great excitement throughout our locality.

 

Conger, (wife) Conger

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 11, 1885

CONGER, the man who murdered his wife in Wayne township, is playing a deep game, else is “off” his balance.  --  He refuses to talk, keeps moving his head sidewise continually and don’t recognize any one, not even those with whom he has associated for years past.

 

Conger, (wife) Conger

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 27, 1885

David CONGER, the man who murdered his wife in Wayne township, this county, in July last, has refused to talk a work from about August 1st., and to test whether he had lost the power of speech and whether he was in his right mind, Drs. Armstrong and Farquhar, one day last week, placed him under the influence of a powerful anaesthetic, [sic] which instead of causing him to talk had the effect of making him toot and blow loudly in imitation of the whistle of a steamboat; and to dance for some time in an energetic manner.  The physicians entertain the opinion that he has not lost the power of speech.  Their report will be made to the Court this week.

 

Conger, Mrs. (David) Conger

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 21, 1885

Death of Mrs. Conger --  Mrs. Conger, who was so brutally assaulted by her husband, David Conger, on Sunday, the 12th inst., died at 11 o’clock on Friday, the 17th inst.  Her sufferings were terrible for several days before death came to her relief.  A short time before she died - two days - she regained consciousness and recognized and spoke the name of her son, David.  About the same time she drank some milk.  During her ravings four strong men were required to hold the poor woman upon the bed.

 

Conley, Miss Lou Conley

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 3, 1885

     Miss LOU CONLEY, daughter of Mr. Isaac Conley, of Green Township, died last week of typhoid fever.

 

Cooper, Donald Cooper

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 17, 1885

     Donald, aged 2 years and 6 months, son of W. D. Cooper, Esq., Mayor of Bellaire, died suddenly on Sunday, the 8th inst., of gastric fever.

 

Cooper, Robert Cooper Sr.

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 31, 1885

February 26, 1885, at his residence in Malaga township, Monroe Co., Ohio, ROBERT COOPER SR.

Mr. Cooper was born in York County, Pa., May 17, 1799, hence on the day of his decease he was 85 years, 8 months and 8 days.

Deceased came to Monroe County, April 7, 1827; married Miss Mary G. Major January 11, 1829; connected with the Presbyterian Church at Malaga when organized in 1828, and afterwards he transferred his membership to Buchanan Presbyterian Church, of which he was a consistent member until his death.

By afflictions he was for many years prevented from taking an active part in the affairs of the church.  He bore his sufferings patiently and looked forward to death calmly.

He was a man of strict integrity, an excellent neighbor, a kind friend and an honest industrious man.

His last words to the writer were, “I have not fear of death, for Christ is my anchor.  He is my great foundation.”  Thus death to the Christian believer is always acceptable.  He shall die quietly, coming to the grave as to a quiet resting place.  “Thou shalt come to thy grave in a full age like as a shock of corn cometh in his season.   W. T. Garroway.

 

Cooper, Robert Cooper

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 3, 1885

Died - On the 27th Ult., ROBERT COOPER, of Malaga township, aged 85 years.  The deceased was an old and much respected citizen of the county.

 

Covert, Dr. Abraham B. Covert

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 19, 1885

Death of Dr. A. B. Covert --

Dr. ABRAHAM B. COVERT, of Perry township, this county, died on Thursday, the 14th inst.  He was born July 6th, 1845 and practiced his profession in Antioch and that vicinity until 1866, when he turned his attention to farming and stock raising.  Dr. Covert was a good citizen and was highly respected by his friends and acquaintances.

 

Cox, Mrs. Ezekiel T. Cox

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 14, 1885

     Mrs. Ezekiel T. Cox, mother of Hon. S. S. Cox, died at the residence of her son-in-law, Colonel Spangler, in Zanesville.

 

Crasey, (son) Crasey

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 8, 1885

Ohio Notes --  A young son of Martin Crasey of Wooster choked to death while eating peanuts.

 

Cratty, John S. Cratty

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

Ohio News - John S. Cratty, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of Bellaire, died Monday.

 

Crump, Alfred Crump

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 15, 1885

Ohio Notes --  ALFRED CRUMP, aged 92 years, died at Millersburg Tuesday.  He was the last of the soldiers of the war of 1812 in Holmes county.

 

Dalzell, (young son) Dalzell

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 3, 1885

     The Marietta Leader is responsible for the following: “Last July a young son of Private Dalzell, of Caldwell, died from injuries received in a railroad accident.  His dog, Frank, of which he was very fond, appeared to be inconsolable.  Every Sunday after his master’s death, Frank went to church and sat in the lad’s pew, and he frequently visited the grave, showing many signs of deep grief.  About two weeks ago Frank disappeared and it is supposed that he has committed suicide.”

 

Dalzell, Monroe Dalzell

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 14, 1885

Caldwell Press, 9th inst.  MONROE DALZELL, the little son of Hon. J. M. Dalzell, who was injured at the turn-table of the narrow gauge railroad a week ago, died on last Saturday and his funeral occurred on Sunday.  It is a sad case and may serve as a warning to thoughtless children and thoughtless parents.  But parents are not always thoughtless, and yet accidents will occur.  Mr. Dalzell is a kind and watchful parent, yet this son received a fatal injury.  The funeral was largely attended and the community sympathized sincerely with the afflicted parents.

 

Danford, Michael Danford

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 14, 1885

Mr. Michael Danford, an old citizen, died at his home near Hunter, Belmont county, last week, aged 82 years.  He has been afflicted for some time.  He was a worthy citizen, and well known and respected by a large circle of friends.

 

Danford, Michael Danford

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 21, 1885

Michael Danford a well known citizen of Wayne township, Belmont county, an uncle of Hon. L. Danford, of Bellaire, died on Thursday of last wee, from general debility, in the 83rd year of his age.

 

Daugherty, Mrs. Alelia Daugherty

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 1, 1885

Mrs. ALELIA DAUGHERTY died at her home on Muckingum creek Thursday, August 26th, after a lingering sickness of two years.  She was born in Sardis, this county, August 22d, 1848.

 

Daugherty, Mrs. Alelia Daugherty

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 22, 1885

MRS. ALELIA DAUGHERTY died at her home on the Muskingum, Thursday, August 20th, 1885, after a lingering sickness of two years.  She was the daughter of Henry and Ann E. Okey and lived all her life in Monroe county.  She joined the Methodist Church when quite young in Woodsfield under the ministry of Rev. Wilkinson.  Since last March it was plain to be seen that her disease was making inroads upon her constitution and that she had but few months to live.  Indeed, for sometime she had been wasting away with consumption.  Although her sufferings at times were most intense, she never murmured, but seemed so anxious to go to meet her Saviour ---.  About two weeks before she died she desired to give her name to the M. E. Church at Conor’s Ridge which she did.  Mrs. Daugherty has been left a widow for 7 years with three children to comfort her.  She always looked on the bright side of every thing and tried to make those about her happy.  She was a kind noble hearted woman.  To know her was to love her.  A few days before she died she bid farewell to her friends and told them to meet her in Heaven --.  Later she called her children one at a time and told them to be good children and meet their mother in that better world.  The day she died she said: Mother, I am going home to a mansion not built with hands.

Blessed are the dead that died in the Lord.               M. H. C.

One of her favorite hymns was the following:

.

Hark! The voice of Jesus crying --

“Who will go and work to-day?

Fields are white, and harvest waiting

Who will bear the sheaves away?

Loud and strong the Master calleth,

Rich reward He offers thee;

Who will answer, gladly saying,

Here am I; send me, send me.

.

If you cannot speak like angels,

If you cannot preach like Paul,

You can tell the love of Jesus,

You can say He died for all

If you cannot rouse the wicked

With the judgment’s dread alarm,

You can lead the little children

To the Saviour’s waiting arms.

 

Davenport, Benj. Davenport

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 5, 1885

Belmont County Items --  BENJ. DAVENPORT, mention of whose illness was made last week, died on Thursday evening.  His remains were taken to Barnesville, on Friday, and the funeral took place Saturday.  He was aged 72 years.

 

Davidson, (child) Davidson

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  February 17, 1885

A child of Isaac and Josephine DAVIDSON, about five months old, died on last Friday night.  It was interred in Christian Cemetery Sunday.

 

Day, unknown Day

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 17, 1885

Oliver Borham, the man who killed DAY in Belmont county last December was tried last week and found guilty of murder in the second degree, and sentences to the Penitentiary for life.

 

Dickensheets, Charles Dickensheets

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

Ohio News - CHARLES DICKENSHEETS was buried in a bin of wheat which was being drawn out into a car at Enon and suffocated to death.

 

Dillon, William Dillon Dr.

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 28, 1885

Dr. William Dillon, of Washington township, died last week.

 

Dolbeare, Dr. L. R. Dolbeare

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

Found Dead in His Bed --  Philippi, W. Va. October 9, --  DR. L. R. DOLBEARE was found dead in his bed yesterday morning.  He was a man of about 57 years of age, resided here during the war, with his family, and has friends at Benwood - perhaps a daughter.  He was confined to his bed for a week or so.  He was an intelligent physician, a strong democrat and took great interest in politics.

 

Dougherty, Jeremiah Dougherty

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 8, 1885

     Jeremiah Dougherty, a resident of Graysville, this county, died very suddenly on Sunday morning, the 29th of November.  Cause, heart disease.

 

Duffy, John Milton Duffy

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 24, 1885

Died - Near Antioch, October 13, 1885, of typhoid fever, JOHN MILTON DUFFY, aged 27 years.

     The deceased was a very worthy and consistent member of the M. E. Church, having united with the same in his youth and lived Christianity [sic] till called to the church triumphant.

     The writer of this notice was personally acquainted with him from his childhood till his death, and can truly say that he was a young man of great worth.  Honest and reliable in all his business transactions with his fellows, a very kind and affectionate husband and father, calm and considerate in his daily avocations, he was beloved by all who knew him.  But in the prime of life he was called away, leaving a wife and one child with numerous relatives and friends to mourn the loss of one so dear.

          Farewell, husband, we shall miss thee,

          Miss thy coming, miss thee here,

          But are long we hope to meet thee

          In that land so bright and clear.       J. T. C.

 

Evans, William P. Evans

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 29, 1885

     Mr. William P. Evans, an aged and prominent citizen of Malaga, died very suddenly at his home last Tuesday morning, of, as is supposed, heart disease.  Mr. Evans was for many years a merchant at Beallsville and Malaga, and a prominent figure of the Christian Church, and was a useful man in the communities with which he identified himself.  He had been in poor health for some time, induced by the infirmities of age, but this sudden death has sent a gloom over the community in which he lived.  He was a devout christian, and has passed into his reward, leaving a wife and three sons and a host of friends to mourn his loss.  He was probably 75 years of age. - Barnesville Republican.

 

Felock, (child) Felock

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 5, 1885

A little CHILD, about two years old, of Mr. George FELOCK’s fell into a kettle of scalding water on the 1st inst, and was injured so terribly that death came to its relief on the following day.  Mr. Felock lives in the neighborhood of Miltonsburg.

 

Fogle, Dr. G. D. Fogle

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 12, 1885

Dr. G.D. FOGLE, of Graysville, died on Friday, the 8th inst.

 

Folger, Ann Folger

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 7, 1885

Seneca Township Items --  Calais, Ohio April 1, 1885

     Miss ANN FOLGER, daughter of Philip Folger, deceased, died March 30, 1885, at 9 o’clock P.M., in the 27th year of her age.  Her mother and sister, all that are left of the family, have the sympathies of the community.

          Her sufferings so great are o’er,
          She rests on Jesus’ breast;

          Though we shall see here no more,

          We know she is among the blest.

.

          Oh, may we live so as to meet her

          Over on the golden shore,

          Where sin and sorrow ne’er can enter,

          And pain and death are feared no more.        L.M.

 

Gallahan, John Gallahan

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 11, 1885

     The Huffman Verdict

The Alleged Murderer Barely Escapes a Lynching After Acquittal.

Zanesville, O., August 5, --  When the jury in the case of the people against Andreas Huffman, charged with the murder of JOHN GALLAHAN, yesterday returned a verdict of not guilty, the audience of 1,000 persons who had been summoned by the ringing of bells to listen to the verdict, became very indignant --.  The prisoner was hurried to jail, but a mob composed of the best citizens of the place soon surrounded the prison --.  It was only the earnest persuasions of a few level-headed persons that prevented the building from being torn down and the prisoner lynched.  The sheriff, as soon as there was a lull in the demonstrations of the crowd, wisely seized the opportunity to smuggle Huffman into a buggy and hurry him out of town.

 

Garden, Mrs. Garden

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 31, 1885

Messrs. Charles Garden, of Madison, Ind., and James Garden, of Barnesville, Ohio, were here, departing with their mother.

Alex Garden and wife, of Wheeling, were summoned by telegraph to take a farewell of Mrs. Garden.  They were with her in her dying moments.

 

Garden, Ruth P. Garden

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 31, 1885

Jackson Township Items:

The funeral of Mrs. Ruth P. Garden, who died at her residence on Sunday at 4 o’clock, took place on Tuesday morning.  The services at the house were conducted by Rev. Garrett, of the M. E. Church, and were very impressive.  The cortege took the morning train for Long Beach, W. Va., where the interment took place.  The deceased was 74 years old and a faithful member of the Presbyterian Church for 40 years.  Though a dark cloud of sadness has come over the family and loved ones who were left to mourn, yet behind that cloud beams the Father’s love and glory.

          Our mother is gone to a mansion of rest,

          From a region of sorrow and pain,

          To the glorious land of the blest

          Where she will never suffer again.

.

          While in this tomb our mother lies,

          Her spirit rests above;

          In realms of bliss never dies,

          But knows a Saviour’s love.

 

Geren, John Geren

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

Noble County Republican --  Twenty-five years ago John Atkinson, of Parkersburg, married Lucy Abbott, a girl of 14.  Shortly afterward he went away to fight for the stars and stripes --.  He never came back and his child-wife heard he was killed in one of the battles of the Wilderness.  For a time she mourned him dead, but when she had laid aside the weeds of mourning, she was wooed and won by JOHN GEREN, a young mechanic of Parkersburg.  For twelve years they lived together happily, and three children were born unto them.  In 1880 her husband died --.  Three years later, Mrs. Geren was married to Ira Collins, of Olive, a harness maker.  They lived unhappily and shortly separated.  Now comes the touch of romance that gives this prosaic tale its only claim to interest.  News came to Mrs. Geren not long ago that the husband of her youth, was still living, but supposing her dead, and in the regular army.  They corresponded and the old affection revived.   When his term of enlistment expires he will come home and join again the wife he loved and lost.

 

Gilbraith, Wm. Gilbraith

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 3, 1885

Horrible Death --  There was a distressing accident in the woods a few miles northwest of Barnesville Saturday afternoon.  Two young men names WM. GILBRAITH and James Arnold, were engaged in cutting a large tree for logs.  The tree stood on a hill side, and they had cut about half through the trunk when they inserted a wedge, aiming to fell the tree up the hill.  It split, and the butt end kicked backward striking Gilbraith in the face and crushing his head into the frozen ground,  killed him instantly, being mangled beyond recognition.  Gilbraith resided in Fairview, and was an exemplary young man.  He was 33 years of age, and leaves a wife and two little children. - St. Clairsville Gazette, 26th ult.

 

Gilmore, Elizabeth Gilmore

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 7, 1885

Clarington Independent, 3d inst.

Mrs. Elizabeth Gilmore, wife of Perry Gilmore, of Logan Hills, died of palsy, on Tuesday evening, 31st ult., aged 56 years.

 

Grant, Gen. Grant

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 4, 1885

     Riverside Park, on the Hudson River, has been selected as the burying place of GEN. GRANT.

 

Grant, Gen. Grant

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 4, 1885

Gen. Jos. E. Johnston is to be one of the pall bearers at GRANT’S funeral.  He commanded the Confederate army opposed to Gen. Sherman.

 

Grant, Gen. Grant

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

Gen. Grant’s body has been embalmed and will be buried in Central Park, New York, on Saturday, the 8th day of August.  The Government will conduct the ceremonies through the War Department.

 

Grant, General Grant

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 11, 1885

This volume contained several articles regarding the funeral of General Grant.

 

Grant, General Grant

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

The Spirit of Democracy published a full page article on GRANT’s burial.

 

Grant, General Ulysses S. Grant

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

GEN. U. S. GRANT died at Mr. McGregor, New York, on Thursday, July 23d, at 8:09 in the morning.

The South joins the North in mourning the death of GEN. GRANT.

The Spirit of Democracy reported a full page report on General Grant.

 

Griffith, Amelia Frances Griffith

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 5, 1885

Died --  March 30th, 1885, of typhoid fever, AMELIA FRANCES, daughter of A.J. and Margaret G. GRIFFITH, aged 1 year, 10 months and 13 days.

The deceased was a bright and lovely child beloved by all who knew her and the bright jewel of the household, but the reaper came at an unexpected hour and plucked the bright flower from earth to be transplanted to the fair climes of endless bliss and glory, and while a cloud of sadness seems to hover over the bereaved household as this is the 4th and only daughter of the afflicted family.  Father and Mother and an only brother who are thus left in their lonely household to mourn the loss of this the last of four bright and intelligent little sisters who have been removed in loveliness and innocence of childhood to bloom forever in the paradise of God.

          Farewell loved one, why should we weep?

          To see thy spirit rise,

          And through the heavenly portals sweep

          To live in Paradise.

.

          Too bright for earth the flower fades

          To bloom beyond the skies.

          The sinless soul from sorrow freed

          To endless joys arise.

.

          Thou hast tuned the harp of gold

          On the shining shore,

          And with thy angel sisters told

          All thy sufferings o’er.

.

          We shall miss thy prattling voice

          When we gather here on earth.

          Miss thee when we would rejoice

          In thy sinless mirth.

.

          Why should we mourn to bid adieu

          For life’s brief hour of pain.

          For soon the heavenly land we’ll view

          And meet our babe again.                          A.J.G.

 

Griffith, Charles Griffith

Source: Spirit of Democracy  January 13, 1885

Emmett Mitchell Sentenced to the Penitentiary for Life.  Bellaire Independent, 8th inst.

   The last scene in the Mitchell murder case was enacted Monday when Emmett Mitchell was taken into open Court to receive his sentence.  Captain Danford, his counsel, stated there was no motion for a new trial, when the prisoner was asked if he had anything to say, and replied that he believed if he had not shot CHARLES GRIFFITH he would have been killed by him.  Judge Kelly then sentenced him to the penitentiary for life, saying he believed the verdict and sentence were just and commensurate with the crime committed.

 

Hall, (son of Ephriam) Hall

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 11, 1885

Clarington Independent, 7th inst.  --   A little two year old son of Mr. Ephriam HALL, of Sardis, swallowed a quantity of concentrated lyn on Wednesday of last week, from the effects of which it died the next day.  The lye, which had been dissolved for washing dishes, etc., was setting on the stove when the child picked up the cup and swallowed some of it before the family knew anything about it.  The sufferings of the little fellow must have been intense. -- The funeral took place on Friday at 10 o’clock.  The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.

 

Hall, John H. Hall

Source: Spirit of Democracy  January 6, 1885

JOHN H. HALL, of Wayne township, who was accidentally shot on Sunday evening, the 28th ult, died on Monday the 29th ult., at 9 o’clock P.M.

     John was a clever, kind hearted man, respected by all who knew him.  The sympathies of all his friends are with the wife and two children so suddenly bereft of husband and father.

 

Hamilton, Woods Hamilton

Knittle, William Knittle

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 10, 1885

Ten Years a Fugitive -- Arrested at his Father’s Funeral for a Murder Committed when he was a Lad of 14.

Lima, Ohio, Oct. 30 -- J.B. Knittle has been arrested at Delphos, Allen county, for a murder committed near this city on Sept. 1, 1875.  Knittle was then only 14 years old and WOODS HAMILTON, his victim, was a married man and the father of seven children.  The scene of the crime was the public highway, five miles west of Lima.  Knittle does not deny the crime, but pleads self-defence. [sic]  From his statement it appears that both were under the influence of liquor, and that Hamilton undertook to chastise Knittle with a big blacksnake whip, when Knittle seized a club and struck Hamilton on the left side of the head, knocking him down unconscious.  Hamilton was taken home, where he died three days afterward.  The post-mortem showed a fracture of the skull.

     Knittle fled, and for ten years has been a fugitive from justice.  Detectives were put on his track, but he eluded them.

     About two months ago a stranger appeared in Delphos and opened a saloon.  He kept himself secluded as much as possible.  WILLIAM KNITTLE, father of the murderer, died yesterday at his home near this city, and among those who attended the services this morning was the strange saloon keeper.  He was recognized by the father of Hamilton, who swore out a warrant for his arrest, charging him with the murder of his son.

 

Harmon, Child Harmon

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 9, 1885

Ohio Notes --  The wonderful armless and legless child belonging to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Harmon of Granville died Saturday.

 

Harrtshorn, Mrs. Susan Hartshorn

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 28, 1885

Died --  On February 27th, Mrs. SUSAN HARTSHORN, wife of Mr. Samuel Hartshorn, of Wayne township, aged 73 years, 4 months and 17 days.

 

Haynes, King Haynes

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

     We understand from a gentleman just from Cow Run that Elisha Carpenter and KING HAYNES, both of Dana’s Run, had a quarrel on Tuesday, when Carpenter shot Haynes, killing him instantly.  Carpenter came into Cow Run and gave himself up to the authorities.  There has been a bitter feud between the parties for the last twenty years.  We did not obtain any particulars of the killing.  The gentleman who gave the information saw Carpenter at Cow Run, who told him of the killing and his determination to give himself up. --  Marietta Times.

 

Haythorn, Albert Haythorn

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 31, 1885

Died --  March 22d, Mr. ALBERT HAYTHORN.  The deceased leaves a large circle of friends to mourn his loss.

 

Haythorn, William Haythorn

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 21, 1885

Probate Court Proceedings --  Reason Forrest and George Haythorn, Adm’r’s of the estate of WILLIAM HAYTHORN, deceased, vs. Mary A. Haythorn, widow, et al.  Order of appraisement of real estate, free of dower, issued Geo. Hoffman, Henry Esmyer and Valentine Vogler appointed appraisers.

 

Haythorn, William Haythorn

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 12, 1885

Jackson Township Items: Trail Run, Ohio May 8th, 1885

Died --  May 1st, 1885, at his residence in Jackson township.  Monroe county, Ohio, WILLIAM HAYTHORN.  The deceased leaves a large circle of friends to mourn his loss.

 

Heiser, Henry Heiser

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 11, 1885

Ohio Notes --  A tramp, giving the name of George Dalla, was arrested at Sidney and proved to be the murder of HENRY HEISER.

 

Henderson, John Henderson Sr.

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 15, 1885

Ohio Notes --  At Bellaire, JOHN HENDERSON SR., fell from his chair and died instantly from heart disease.

 

Hendricks, Vice President Hendricks

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 1, 1885

     The sudden death of VICE PRESIDENT HENDRICKS, on last Wednesday, was a shock to the whole country.  To a casual observer he appeared to be in vigorous health, with physical energy unimpaired by age or disease.  He was a politician of marked ability and was very popular with the more ardent members of the party.  He has had followers in every Democratic National Convention since 1864, and in 1858 narrowly misred [sic] the nomination for the Presidency.

     As a statesman, if he was not in the first ranks he was at least well to the front in the second.

     The rumor that he was to be the rallying point for the Democrats disaffected toward the administration was stoutly denied by his friends, and seems not to be well authenticated.

 

Hendricks, Vice President Hendricks

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 1, 1885

     Vice President Hendricks will be buried in Crown Hill Cemetery, north of the city of Indianapolis [sic] on Tuesday, December 1st.  His body has been embalmed.

 

Hendricks, Vice President Thomas A. Hendricks

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 1, 1885

The Spirit of Democracy ran a large article reporting the events of this death.

Excerpts -- He died Wednesday, the 25th inst., at 4:45 in the afternoon, of Paralysis of the Brain.  Vice President Hendricks was born on a farm near Zanesville, Ohio, September 7, 1819.  His father, John Hendricks, was one of the earliest settlers of the Ligonier valley, Westmoreland county, and was a native of Pennsylvania. The deceased married Miss Eliza C. Morgan near Cincinnati on September 25th, 1845.  An only child, a boy, was the fruit of the marriage, who died 1851.

 

Hill, Bro. Hugh B. Hill

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 12, 1885

Testimonial of Respect to the Memory of Bro. HUGH B. HILL

Whereas, It has pleased the Great Architect of the Universe to call to himself, Bro. Hugh B. Hill, W. M. of Monroe Lodge, No. 189, F & A M.  Therefore:

Resolved That in his death the Lodge has lost a bright and worthy Mason, one who at all times and in all places proved his attachment to the Order, and by the purity of his life and conduct illustrated his faith in the principles of Masonry.

Resolved That while we mourn the loss of our worthy Brother, our deepest and most heartfelt sympathies are extended to the bereaved children and relatives of deceased.  To them the loss is irreparable.  They mourn a loving father - one ever ready to make sacrifices for them.  But they have the blessed consolation of knowing  he was a devout Christian gentleman, and has gone up higher to be greeted with “Well done, thou good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joys of thy Lord.”

Resolved That as a testimonial of respect the Lodge be draped in mourning and the Brothers wear the usual badge for thirty days.

Resolved That the Secretary furnish a copy of the foregoing resolutions to the family of the deceased, and a copy to each of the papers of Woodsfield with a request for their publication.

Jas. R. Morris, I. P. Farquhar, J. A. Watson - Committee

Lodge Room, Woodsfield, O., May 3, 1885

 

Hill, Hugh B. Hill

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 5, 1885

Died --  On Friday, May 1st, at his home in Woodsfield, HUGH B. HILL, aged 71 years, 6 months and 17 days.

Mr. Hill was born October 13th, 1814, in Montgomery County, Maryland.  He came to Ohio in 1833 and to Woodsfield in 1839, where he resided until summoned to the Lodge above.  He was a member of the Masonic Order for nearly forty years, and of the M.E. Church for fifty years.

In all the walks of life Mr. Hill was held in the highest esteem by his fellowmen.  A good citizen in every sense; a kind husband and father, the public and his immediate friends and family feel that they have lost an associate whose presence aided them under all circumstances.

The funeral ceremonies took place on Sunday, the 3d inst.  Services were held at the M.E. Church.  Rev. Garroway of the Presbyterian Church, led in prayer, and Rev. Stauffer addressed the large congregation in a few well chosen remarks, after which the Masons of Woodsfield Lodge, under the direction of J. R. Purnell, Past High Priest of the Chapter at Bellaire, took charge and conducted the closing ceremonies at the church and grave.  The exercises were decidedly impressive.

 

Hill, Mr. H. B. Hill

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 5, 1885

Mr. John Garchell, of Stafford; Mr. W. T. Koontz, of Antioch; Messrs. Thornberry and Riley, of Beallsville, and Mr. Reed Williams, of Calais, attended the funeral of Mr. H. B. HILL last Sunday and took part in the Masonic ceremonies.

 

Hill, Rev. J. J. Hill

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 24, 1885

REV. J.J. HILL, aged 80, one of the ablest ministers of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Ohio, died suddenly at his home Thursday night in Lebanon.

 

Hines, Joseph Hines

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 21, 1885

Died -- At his late residence in Franklin township, Monroe County, Ohio, April 2, 1885, JOSEPH HINES, in the 74th year of his age.

The subject of this notice was born June 6, 1812, in West Virginia, on a farm, the present site of the town of Cameron.

When he was 6 years old his father left Virginia, crossing the river at the present site of Moundsville, and settled on the Clear Fork of the Little  Muskingum creek --  two miles south of Stafford, then an unbroken wilderness, whose only inhabitants were the wild beasts of the forest who held undisputed possession of the same; here he lived and died, after over 70 years of life well spent; here he spent the days of his childhood, the days of sturdy manhood down to old age --  until life’s work was done.

     Mr. Hines began life a poor boy, but being possessed of an indomitable will, rare business qualities and an industry never excelled, he overcome every obstacle that stood in the way of success; fortune smiled upon his efforts, and for many years he was owner of the largest farm in Franklin township.  Fortune smiles on all who help themselves.

     As a neighbor there was none better.  Possessed of a kind and generous nature his heart was open to the wants of the needy and he never turned any away hungry that stood in need of assistance; many who have received benefits from his open hand will rise up and call him blessed.

     Mr. Hines leaves behind him five sons with interesting families to mourn his loss.  Four of these sons were constantly at his bedside through a sickness of several months, ministering to his every want and certainly filled to the letter the Scriptural injunction, “Honor thy father and thy mother.”  His son, Rev. N. Hines of Richmond, Va., visited him during his illness, but was not present at the time of his death.

     In early life Mr. Hines was converted and joined the M. E. Church.  In the year 1866 he and his wife united with the Baptist Church, constituting with a few others the Bethesda Baptist Church and donated to the church a neat house of worship and a tract of land adjacent; he was a liberal supporter of the church, a faithful and devout worshipper, and died in the faith.  Calling his sons to his bedside the day before his departure he blessed them and gave them the blessed assurance that Jesus was with him, and that he knew in whom he trusted and believed and was persuaded that he was able to keep that which he had committed to him against that day.

     Funeral services by the Rev. Henry Lyons, 2 Cor. 5:1, after which he was laid in the family burying ground beside his beloved wife, who had many years ago preceded him to the better land.

Ichabod Crane.                Stafford, O., April 9, 1885

 

Hines, Joseph Hines

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 7, 1885

Joseph Hines, an old and respected citizen of Franklin township, died last week.

 

Hissom, James Hissom

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 30, 1885

Jackson Township Items - Wittens, Ohio June 24, 1885

Called at last:  Mr. James Hissom, in the 109th year of his age.  His spirit took its flight heavenward to day.

 

Hissom, Minnie Hissom

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 17, 1885

Died - March 10th, Mrs. Minnie Hissom, Tue. Deceased was a member of the United Brethren Church.  Her life was patterned after the example of Christ.  She leaves a husband and one child and a large circle of friends to mourn her loss.

 

Hissom, Thomas Hissom

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 28, 1885

THOMAS HISSOM of Jackson township, died of Consumption on the 23d inst.

 

Hissom, Thomas Hissom

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 5, 1885

Passed away, at his home on Trail Run, April 23.  THOMAS HISSOM, in the 59th year of his age.  Mr. Hissom was an old resident of our county and for years has been one of our prominent farmers.

          A precious one from us has gone.

          A voice we loved is stilled;

          A place is vacant in our home

          Which never can be filled.

Mr. James Hissom, in his 110th year, walked to the cemetery with his last child.  He always claimed that he was going to live to see all of his children buried, and he has done so.

 

Hoagland, John Hoagland

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 16, 1885

JOHN HOAGLAND, aged 70, of Dawn, committed suicide by cutting his throat, rather than go to the poor house.

 

Howell, Elizabeth Howell

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 7, 1885

Mrs. ELIZABETH HOWELL, of Wayne township, died on the 21st inst.

 

Jackson, Jesse Jackson

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 3, 1885

     Jesse Jackson, formerly a resident of this county, was murdered in Baker county, Oregon, on September 23d.  His wife was badly injured at the same time.  Full particulars next week.

 

Jackson, Jesse Jackson

Unknown, Toney

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 10, 1885

Jesse Jackson Murdered in Oregon.

La Vaile, Sauk Co., Wis. - October 23, 1885

     Editor Spirit:  JESSE JACKSON, formerly of Woodsfield, Ohio, but lately living in the State of Oregon, himself and partner were murdered on the 23d of September, and his wife shot in the head and badly wounded while asleep in bed.  Two travelers stopped there the night the murder was committed.  It was a warm night and Jesse’s boy and partner and one of the men slept down by the hay stack and the other one slept in the house; the one that slept by the hay is supposed to be the one that done that deed.  He killed Toney, that is Jesse’s partner, with an axe and set the hay on fire burning him so badly that they could not put any clothes on him when they buried him.  Little Frank awoke just in time to save his life.  Jesse leaves a large circle of friends and relations in Monroe county, and also in Wisconsin, where his parents now reside.  He moved to Nebraska ten years ago, living there a short time he crossed the Plains with a train of emigrants bound for Idaho; he lived there till the fall of 1883 when he again went west and settled in Baker county, Oregon, where he lived till the time of his terrible death.

     Robbery was the cause of the act.                    Vincent Jackson.

 

Jeffers, William H. Jeffers

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  February 17, 1885

Died --  On the 8th inst., at Beallsville, of Consumption, WILLIAM H. JEFFERS, aged 40 years.  The funeral ceremonies were conducted by the Odd Fellows.

 

Jeffers, Wm Jeffers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 3, 1885

Resolutions of Respect

    Whereas, The great Ruler of the Universe has, in His infinite wisdom, removed from our midst our worthy and esteemed friend and late Superintendent, WM. JEFFERS, and

     Whereas, The intimate relation held during a long Christian life by him with the members of this school makes it fitting that we record our appreciation of him; therefore,

     Resolved, That the wisdom and ability which he has exercised in aid of our school work, by counsel, service and funds, will be held in grateful remembrance.

     Resolved, That the removal of such a man from our school, of which he has been Superintendent for two years, and a leading member of the church for more than twenty years, leaves a vacancy and shadow that will be deeply realized by all members of the school and his friends, and will prove a grievous loss to this school and community.

     Resolved, That, with deep sympathy with the afflicted relatives and friends of the deceased, we express an earnest hope that even so great a bereavement may be overruled for their highest good.

Annie Beazel, Knowles Doan, Alice Simeral, Committee of Resolutions

Beallsville, Ohio, Feb. 14, 1885.

 

Johns, Joseph Johns

Carr, Tom Carr

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

     Friday afternoon about 4 o’clock there occurred at Benwood a very strange and sad case of suicide.  JOSEPH JOHNS, a retired mill man, who also was a rope maker, aged 63 years, hung himself in his barn on a rope said to have been made by himself in Wheeling several years ago.  He was not missed for some time, and when found by a member of his family was cold in death.  No cause is assigned for the rash act, but it is supposed that he was laboring under a temporary fit of insanity.  He leaves a large family in moderate circumstances.

     We are informed that his father put an end to his life the same way a number of years ago.

     He is also said to have made the rope on which TOM CARR was hung, at St. Clairsville. -- Bellaire Tribune.

 

Johnson, Infant Son Johnson

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 12, 1885

Calais Items -- Calais, Monroe County, Ohio May 8, 1885

Died --  Very suddenly, infant son of Adam JOHNSON and was interred at the cemetery.  The father and mother have the heart felt sympathies of the community.

 

Joyce, James Joyce

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

Poisoned With Poke Root --  Wheeling, W. Va., May 25

James Joyce, William Garvin, Patrick Harrison, John Carney, Robert Lynch, Andrew Wright and his brother, all boys, found and ate on Wheeling Island a quantity of Poke root, and were almost immediately taken violently ill.  Garvin fell fainting into the river, whence he was with difficulty rescued.  Joyce ran up the bank to the street and died on the pavement in great agony.  Garvin lies at home in convulsions that will end in death, and the other boys are ill, but not in a dangerous condition.

 

Keefe, Mrs. Helen Keefe

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

Mrs. Helen Keefe dropped dead from heart disease at Freemont.

 

Keepers, Charles Keepers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 14, 1885

     CHARLES KEEPERS, of Standing Stone Run, died the morning of the 15th inst. His remains will be interred this Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock.

 

Kerr, Jenette Kerr nee Davidson

Source: Spirit of Democracy  February 24, 1885

Died - Feb. 12th, 1885, Mrs. JENETTE KERR, wife of John Kerr, near Woodsfield, Monroe county, Ohio.

     Mrs. Kerr, whose maiden name was Jenette Davidson, was born in the County of Hedington, Scotland, November 15th, 1805 hence on the day of her decease her age was

80 years 2 months and 17 days. 

     In early life she gave her heart to Christ by a profession of her faith, and was received into the communion of the Presbyterian Church in her seventeenth year, of which she was an active, faithful and devoted member for over 60 years.  In the last few years of her life she was Providentially hindred [sic] from the enjoyment of the privileges of the Sanctuary by afflictions. Yet her heart was in the “Sanctuary”.  She rejoiced in the prosperity of Zion.

     For months preceding her death at intervals she suffered intense pain, yet she never lost sight of “Him who suffered on Cavalry, by whose stripes she was healed.”  The prominent lesson of her life is one concerning the blessedness of Christian nurture.  She was trained for God and grew up into Christ.

     This was a gain not only because the impressions made upon the heart of childhood by holy living on the part of ministers, teachers and parents are more powerful to uphold, restrain and comfort in after life than any other class of influences.  She was at a loss how to be sufficiently thankful to her God for his loving kindness and tenderness exercised to her through her long life, and seemed especially thankful for the religious atmosphere of her early life.

     During her dark hours of infliction the precious truths of God’s word taught her “in sunny childhood’s home,” by the Sabbath evening conversation and Catechism, as it was the habit of the fathers and mothers beyond the great waters, shone back with beaming light, vivifying  her soul, as the beams of the sun in the natural world vivify and elaborate vegetable life from inorganic matter.  The texts of scripture impressed upon her heart in those precious hours were the abiding benedictions of her sick room.  Passages of family prayers offered long ago returned to bless her.

     Her religion was not a mere form, not a garment worn, but an influence absorbed.

     It was easy for her to pass from topics of common conversation to the higher themes of faith.  When she came to the borders of the grave she was abundantly supported by grace.

     Her soul was elated with a buoyant hope.  She was not only willing to go; but jubilant to view of the heavenly glory.  Ready to depart and be with Christ.

     Thus passed away a christian mother and christian wife to rest.  Calm and peaceful she fell asleep.  “And I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, write.  Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord from henceforth: Yes, saith [sic] the Spirit that they may rest from their labors; and their works do follow them.”  Bereaved family, aged husband, two sons and two daughters who remain to mourn her departure, we commend you to Christ.  Cling to the Cross.  “Sorrow not even as others which have no hope.  For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with Him.”    Wm. T. Garroway

 

Kerr, Mrs. Kerr

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  February 17, 1885

Mrs. Kerr, wife of Mr. John Kerr, who resides a short distance West of this place, died on the 12th inst.

 

Kettle, Mrs. Kettle

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 7, 1885

MRS. KETTLE, wife of Christian Kettle, who resides one mile south of Woodsfield, died on Friday, the 3d inst.

 

King, William King

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 14, 1885

Died --  Of consumption, January 7th, 1885, at his residence in Adams township, Monroe county, Ohio.  WILLIAM KING, aged 53 years.  Mr. King leaves a wife and two small children, a father, mother, two brothers and two sisters and a large circle of friends to morn [sic] his loss.

 

Koon’z, Adam Koon’z

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 17, 1885

We regret to chronicle the death of Adam Koon’z who died of typhoid fever.

 

Laughlin, Col. Alexander Laughlin

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 10, 1885

Bellaire Tribune, 5th inst.

     Col. Alexander Laughlin, of Wheeling, W. Va., dropped dead this morning at 10:30 o’clock from apoplexy, while walking around his works at Martin’s Ferry.  Col. Laughlin has for many years been a prominent iron man in the Ohio Valley, and has succeeded, by his indomitable perseverance and industry, in accumulating quite a large property.  The iron works at Martin’s Ferry, of which he was president, were owned almost entirely by him.

 

Lawrence, Mrs. Wm. Lawrence

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 15, 1885

     MRS. WM. LAWRENCE died at her home in Washington on Tuesday at 9 o’clock a.m., aged 65.  Mrs. Lawrence was born at Getteysburg, [sic] Pa., in 1820, and was married to Hon. Wm. Lawrence, August 3, 1847.  She was the mother of Hon. James Lawrence, Attorney-general, of Wm. Lawrence Jr., one of the editors of the Cambridge Jeffersonian and of Albert Lawrence Esq., of St. Clairsville.-- Quaker City Independent.

 

Leudolph, Rinard Leudolph

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 17, 1885

Very suddenly, March 8th, RINARD LEUDOLPH.  The deceased leaves a wife and one child to mourn his loss.

 

Little, Rebecca Little nee Jeffers

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 17, 1885

At Rest - Once again we pause amid life’s conflicts to chronicle the death of one of our aged Mother’s in Israel, that of Mrs. REBECCA LITTLE, wife of Thomas Little, who died at her home on Tuesday, the 10th inst.  Although she had been ill for several months, during most of which time she was confined to her bed, yet the announcement of her death was a shock to all, especially to her immediate friends who did not realize that the end was so near.  Her maiden name was Rebecca Jeffers.  She was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, January 22d, 1806, and at the time of her death was 79 years, 9 months and 18 days old.  She had been a member of the M. E. Church for a number of years, and was a great reader and a woman of more than ordinary intelligence and was held in the highest regard by all who enjoyed her acquaintance.  During her long and sore affliction she gave evidence of those virtues which mark the character of the Christian, and when she laid down her life, it was to enter into that other life which has been promised to those who do the will of the Master.

     In the absence of her pastor H. D. Stauffer, Rev. E. P. Edmunds, of Steubenville, former pastor of the M. E. Church of this place, conducted the funeral services, after which the procession solemnly and sadly wended its way to the cemetery where the mortal remains of Grandmother Little were laid to rest.  She leaves an aged companion, three sons and one daughter to mourn their loss who have the sympathy of all.  May the Father of all grace abundantly administer comfort and strength in this hour of bereavement and need.

 

Lively, David Lively Sr.

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 21, 1885

Wetzel Co. (W.Va.) Democrat

     David Lively Sr., one of the oldest and best citizens of Wetzel, died at him home near New Martinsville on the 14th inst., in the 85th year of his age.  He was born in one of the German States but was brought to America when but six months old.  He lived, when a boy, with the Ecoromists, near Pittsburgh, but left the colony when quite young to make his own way in the world.  He has lived for more than fifty years in or near New Martinsville and at one time was the proprietor of the Point House and owner of a steam flouring mill and was possessed of considerable property, but subsequently, through misfortunes, lost the greater part of it.  He was twice married, and leaves a widow and a number of young children.  He was buried by the side of this first wife in the Texas, O, cemetery on Wednesday.  Mr. Lively was a man of sterling integrity, industrious and economical in his habits.  He was incapable of a mean action and his word was always the truth.  Somewhat eccentric in his ways, he was always a good citizen.

 

Logan, Judge Logan

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 3, 1885

Death in the Illinois Legislature

Judge Logan, of Whiteside, dropped dead at the head of the House stairs as he was on the way to the chamber.  Mr. Logan has been ailing all the session with heart disease.  When he dropped on the House floor opposite the main entrance to the chamber he was picked up and carried into the ante room.  Five minutes later he was dead.

Judge Logan was a Republican and his death breaks the tie in the Legislature, giving the Democrats a majority of one.  This means a Democratic United States Senator from Illinois, if the factions can unite on any one man before the adjournment of the Legislature.

 

Mann, Child Mann

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 24, 1885

A child of Markle MANN, about one year old, fell in the fire on Thursday, the 19th inst., and was so severely burned that it died on the following day.   Friday.

 

Marlott, (daughter) Marlott

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 11, 1885

Ohio Notes --  A daughter of Josephua MARLOTT was struck by lightning and instantly killed while standing under a tree near Cambridge.

 

Marshall, James W. Marshall

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

Placeville, Cal, Aug. 12 --  JAMES W. MARSHALL, the discoverer of gold in California, died yesterday at his home in Kelsey.  He was seventy-four years old, and died a poverty-stricken, disappointed man.

 

Martin, David Martin Esq.

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

Marietta Times, 23d inst.  --   DAVID MARTIN, Esq., died at his home in Lawrence township on Tuesday, July 14th, aged 58 years.  Mr. Martin was born in Monroe county, but removed to this county in 1856.  He was a man of more than ordinary ability and was active as a local politician and legal adviser.  He had a very extensive acquaintance and his death will be mourned by many friends.  He had been sick for a long time prior to his death with kidney disease.

 

Martin, Enoch Martin

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 19, 1885

Suicide of Enoch Martin

ENOCH MARTIN, of Antioch, this county, took his own life by drowning himself in Sunfish creek, near the mouth of Fishpot, on Tuesday, the 12st inst. The particulars, as nearly as we have been able to gather them, are about as follows:

Mr. Martin, on Monday, the 11th inst., informed his wife that he was going to buy a farm.  Before leaving home he handed his wife his papers and all his money except $27.  On Tuesday some children, returning from school, saw the body of a man in the water.  Persons in the neighborhood were notified and the body was identified as that of Mr. Martin.  He had taken off his over coat, folded it, laid it near the creek and placed his hat upon it.  He then laid face downward in water not more than eighteen inches deep and died in that position.  The body was taken to Antioch on the 14th inst., for interrment. [sic]

 

Martin, John Martin 

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

Martin - Died in Salem township on 12th day of May, JOHN MARTIN Esq.  This venerable person was born July 15th 1808 in Beaver Co., Pa., was married to Nancy Archer January 27th by Wm. Atkinson, Esq.  He moved from Beaver Co., Pa., with his partner and family to Pipe Creek Belmont Co., Ohio, in 1812 and in 1814 they removed to near Opossom [sic] Creek in Ohio township in this county (now in Salem) in which township he and family resided during the remainder of his life.

The writer of this brief sketch has had the acquaintance of deceased for over 45 years and would say of him that he possessed a warm genial disposition  and a more hospitable family was hard to find.  He was slow to make up his mind on any subject, but when once decided it was to be permanently so.  He had a high regard for his friends and was of a courteous and kind temper of mind.  He was always willing to award to others their rights, and might be termed tenacious as to his after ascertaining what they were.  He was buried in Clarington Cemetery on the 14th.

Two of our aged citizens, Stephen Hathorn and Boston Rouch in front of the procession, and Valentine Schneider, William Rutter, Eliel Smith, Samuel S. Sanford, Henry Schutty and Jacob T. Morrill as pall bearers, besides a large number of relatives and fellow citizens.  He outlived a number of his children.   J. T. M.

 

Mattimo, Peter Mattimo

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

Alleged Cholera in Ohio --  Toledo, August 14.

     That part of the Eighth ward known as Lenka Hill, is terribly excited, almost bordering on a panic, which is rapidly spreading over the whole city, over what is supposed to be a case of cholera.  PETER MATTIMO was attacked last night with every symptom, and died this morning.  His limbs are drawn up as in cholera; and for an hour after death his fingers and toes twitched.  The health authorities promptly buried the victim’s clothing and fumigated the premises, and this gave additional alarm.  Most of the physicians of the city says it is a case of acute cholera morbus, but the officers of the Health Board are very reticent.  Mattimo was a sewer contractor.  There is considerable anxiety to night.

 

McClellan, General George Brinton McClellan

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 3, 1885

Gen. McClellan Dead --  An Affliction of the Heart Call Him Away In the Night.

How the General Died - He Unexpectedly Expires.

Orange, N. J. October 29 --  General McClellan has for the past two weeks suffered occasionally from the pains at the heart.  Yesterday he felt in good spirits and with his wife and daughter visited friends in the neighborhood.  Before returning to his home he made an appointment with a gentleman to meet him this morning at 11 o’clock.  Upon his return to his home he ate heartily and spent the evening in conversation with his wife and daughter, retiring at 10 o’clock.

     At 11 o’clock the pains returned.  So severe were they that a messenger was dispatched on horseback to the General’s physician.  The physician at once came, and for four hours endeavored to give him relief, but his efforts were unsuccessful.  At 3:10 a.m., the sufferer sighed, smiled and said, “Thank God I have pulled through.  Am now feeling relieved.”  A moment later he raised himself upon one hand, and fell back dead.

     It is not yet settled when the funeral will take place.  General Marcy, the father in-law of General McClellan, will arrange for the details of the funeral.

     GEORGE BRINTON McCLELLAN, was born in Philadelphia, December 3, 1826. 

The Spirit of Democracy published a full column article: Sketch of his Career.

 

McCloskey, Cardinal McCloskey

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

CARDINAL McCLOSKEY died at his home in New York, at 12:50 Saturday morning the 10th inst.

 

McComas, Mrs. Sarah McComas

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 16, 1885

Died - On the 10th inst., at her home in Bridgeport, Mrs. SARAH McCOMAS, aged 95 years.  She came to this county in 1832 and moved to Belmont county in 1862.  She was the mother of Mr. G. McComas, of this place.

 

McDowell, Maj. Gen. Irwin McDowell

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 19, 1885

MAJ. GEN. IRWIN McDOWELL died in San Francisco on the 4th inst.  He was born in Ohio in 1818.

 

McElroy, Mrs. McElroy

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

     A horrible accident occurred a half mile east of St. Clairsville Junction, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad on last Thursday morning.  Samuel McElroy, workman on the new Courthouse, had decided to remove to Bellaire, his goods were shipped by the National Road, and his mother and two little boys started to that city by rail.  They went to the Sunction [sic] by the Narrow Gauge, where they missed the connecting train, and then set out to walk to Bellaire.  On the first bridge the west bound fast line caught the unfortunate woman and killed her instantly.  One of the boys was slightly bruised, but the other escaped injury.  Mrs. McELROY was sixty-six years old, and very deaf. -- St. Clairsville Gazette, 13th inst.

 

McFadden, Henry McFadden

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 21, 1885

Died --  On Saturday, the 18th inst., of consumption, Mr. HENRY McFADDEN.  The deceased was a worthy young man and had the respect of all who knew him.  Sincere sympathy is extended to the bereaved family.

 

McFadden, Henry McFadden

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 19, 1885

HENRY McFADDEN departed this life near Woodsfield, Monroe County, Ohio, April 18th, 1885.  The unexpected death of this loved one calls for a tribute to his memory from one who knew him well.  He was a young man in the prime of life.  The prominent trait of his life was rectitude of character manifested from his childhood to his death.  He was converted while in Texas, lived a good life beloved by all who knew him and now he is enjoying the rest which such a life insures.  He leaves three sorrow-stricken and weeping sisters to mourn his departure.  The shadow of great affliction rests upon this community, but our loss is his gain.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev.Stauffer in an impressive manner.               X

 

McKelvey, Murwood McKelvey

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 3, 1885

Clarington Independent 30th ult.

    MURWOOD MC KELVEY, son of Robert McKelvey of Round Bottom, this county, died at the home of his aunt, Mrs. Susan Neff, at Glencoe, Belmont county, on Friday, October 22d, of an aflection  [sic] of the brain.  His remains were brought home and interred in the Pleasant Ridge burying ground on Saturday, 24th inst.  Deceased was about 15 years of age.

 

McMonies, Elizabeth McMonies

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 9, 1885

St. Clairsville Gazette  --  Mrs. Elizabeth McMonies, widow of Samuel McMonies, died at 4 ½ o’clock P. M. Wednesday, May 27th, 1885, at her residence on the National Road, one mile east of St. Clairsville, in the 67th year of her age.  Mrs. McMonies was a daughter of John Hulse, and was born at the “Hulse Homestead” a short distance south of the old “Good Intent” tavern stand.  In 1840 she married Samuel McMonies, who built a house on the Hulse farm where they resided until 1848 or 1849, when they removed to where Fred Troll, Jr., now lives, (known as the Gen. Weir property,) and in 1852 they changed their residence to South Marietta Street, St. Clairsville, where they remained until the Spring of 1853, when they removed to the farm, east of town, where she died.  She was the mother of seven children, five of whom, William W., Nancy H., Jane R., Eva and James P., are living, and Mary E., and Joseph H., are dead.  Mr. McMonies had been a consistent member of the St. Clairsville M. E. Church for fifty years, and died in the faith.  She was a faithful and dutiful wife, a kind and affectionate mother, and was known by all her neighbors as one who was always ready to minister to those in need of assistance.  Her funeral took place at 2 P.M. Friday, May 29th, and was largely attended. The services were conducted by Rev. W. H. Haskell, Interment in the M. E. Cemetery at St. Clairsville.

 

McNeeley, Col. Hugh McNeeley

Source: Spirit of Democracy  January 13, 1885

Col. HUGH McNEELEY, of Philadelphia, formerly a resident of Belmont county, died on the 20th ult., aged 89 years.

 

Meek, Henry Meek

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 24, 1885

Mr. Henry Meek, an aged and respected citizen of Beallsville, died on the 14th inst.

 

Mellott, Benjamin T. Mellott

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 7, 1885

BENJAMIN T. MELLOTT, a resident of Adams township, died suddenly on Friday, the 31 inst.

 

Meyer, Henry Meyer

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

Ohio News - HENRY MEYER of Cincinnati committed suicide by hanging himself to a doorknob.  He became desperate over a protracted illness.

 

Michael, Clara Michael

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 12, 1885

Died --  In Sardis, on Saturday, April 25th of pneumonia, CLARA, eldest daughter of Albert E. and Jettie MICHAEL, aged 20 months.

She was a bright and lovely child too pure for earth.  Jesus has taken her where there are no rough roads for her little feet to travel, and all is bright and fair.  The parents have our sympathy in their sad and lonely hours.  God grant that they may meet little Clara at the gates of Heaven to welcome them in.     W. M.

 

Miles, Mr. R. C. Miles

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

Bellaire Independent, 8th inst. --  Mr. R. C. Miles, of Somerton, died suddenly Sunday afternoon at 3 o’clock, presumably of heart disease.  He had gone to a back building, where his wife found him dead.  He was a wealthy merchant and a large tobacco and wool buyer, and one of the most prominent men in Eastern Ohio.  He leaves a widow but no children.  He was a keen business man.  He had just returned from the Eastern markets.  He was 60 years old.  He had a beautiful home, and was a man of a large heart, of genial social quantities, and munificent to the poor.

 

Miller, August Miller

Miller, (son) Miller

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 1, 1885

AUGUST MILLER, of Grandview, O., who lived near Ward’s and a man about 55 got tired of life and last Friday, in spite of all efforts of his friends forced the powder of “Rough on Rats” into his mouth and then took water to wash it down.  The result was death, and his burial took place Saturday.  Miller’s wife is blind from the effects of poison, they buried a son who was poisoned and other members of the family have suffered violent deaths.      Marietta Register

 

Miller, Mrs. Anna Miller

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 10, 1885

     Mrs. Anna Miller died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Jacob Cramer in this place, on Saturday, October 31st.-  Deceased was born in Virginia March 18th, 1800, and was consequently 85 years, 7 months and 13 days old at the time of her death.  She had been a member of the Disciples Church for 55 years before her death.  She leaves two daughters, several grand-children and a number of great grand-children to mourn her death.

 

Miller, Mrs. Miller

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 21, 1885

Mrs. MILLER, mother of Henry and Cyrus E. Miller, of Sunsbury township, died on the 14th inst.

 

Miller, Stephen Miller

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

STEPHEN MILLER of Huntsburg fell from a scaffold in his barn and was instantly killed.

 

Mobley, John Mobley

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 21, 1885

Probate Court Proceedings --  July 8 (1885) William McDougal, Adm’r with the will annexed of the estate of JOHN MOBLEY, deceased, vs. Mary Mobley, widow.  Order of sale at private sale returned, no sale reported.  Order for public sale issued.

 

Moon, Willie Moon

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 8, 1885

At Polk, Willie Moon, aged 9 years, shot his sister Jennie, aged 6, with his father’s musket, killing her instantly..

 

Moore, Mrs. Sarah Moore nee Henthorn

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

     Mrs. SARAH MOORE died at Bellaire, July 13, after a lingering sickness of many months.

     She was born in Monroe county, Jan. 9, 1828, being 56 years, 5 months and 4 days at the time of her death.

     All her life, except the last few months, was spent in Monroe county.  Through that county she is widely and favorably known.  Her maiden name was Henthorn, a prominent family of the county.

     Early in the winter she came to Bellaire accompanying her daughter, Mrs. Asa Morgan, with whom she lived. --  From her first appearance in Bellaire it was plain that her disease was making it roads upon her constitution and that she had but few months to live.  Indeed for some years she had been wasting away with consumption.  While in our midst she steadily failed until she was called home.  During her sickness she manifested patience and recognition.

     At an early age, perhaps sixteen, she united with the Christian Church, of which she was a consistent member up to the time of her death.  She had great love for the cause of the Master.  In her christian life and character she has been beloved by all who knew her.  She now rests from her labors.  “Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord.”

James M. Monroe.      Bellaire, Ohio, Aug. 7, 1885

 

Morris, John A Morris

Source:  Page 3 of the Halstead Kansas Independent dated Friday, February 6, 1885 edition

Provided by the Harvey County Kansas Historical Society -- Submitted by Paula Frichtl

John A Morris, Wednesday morning at about 2 o'clock at his home in this township.  Mr. Morris was born in Monroe county Ohio, March 22, 1825, and consequently would have been 60 years old on the 22d of next March had he lived.  He has been a citizen of this community several years and is well known to a large number of our readers.  He was taken sick the latter part of last August and has been a great sufferer ever since.  His disease seems to have been consumption, aggravated, no doubt, by kidney troubles from which he has suffered more or less for a number of years.

His funeral occurred yesterday and he was buried at Pleasant Valley cemetery, nine miles south of here in Sedgwick county by the side of a brother of Mrs. Morris buried there a few years ago.

The deceased was a member of the church for about 30 years, twenty years of which time he was a member of the Christian church, with which he was connected at the time of his death.  He left assurance behind him that he died in the faith of the gospel and hence has only been transferred from the church militant to the church triumphant.  He leaves behind an' aged companion and several grown children to mourn his taking off.  The sympathies of a large circle of neighbors go out to the bereaved family. 

Card of Thanks:  The family of John A Morris desire to express their heartfelt thanks to their neighbors for the uniformly kind treatment during all the period of sickness of the husband and father. 

 

Morris, John A. Morris

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 10, 1885

Halstead (Kan.) Independent

Died - JOHN A. MORRIS, Wednesday morning, February 18, 1885, at about 2 o’clock, at his home in this township.

Mr. Morris was born in Monroe county, Ohio, March 22, 1825 and consequently would have been 60 years old on the 22d of next March had he lived.  He has been a citizen of this community several years and is well known to a large number of our readers.  He was taken sick the latter part of last August and has been a great sufferer ever since.  His disease seems to have been consumption, aggravated, no doubt, by kidney troubles from which he has suffered more or less for a number of years.

His funeral occurred yesterday and he was buried at Pleasant Valley cemetery, nine miles south of here in Sedgwick county by the side of a brother of Mrs. Morris buried there a few years ago.

The deceased was a member of the church for about 30 years, twenty years of which time he was a member of the Christian Church, with which he was connected at the time of his death.  He left the assurance behind him that he died in the faith of the gospel and hence has only been transferred from the church militant to the church triumphant.  He leaves behind an aged companion and several grown children, to mourn his taking off.  The sympathies of a large circle of neighbors go out to the bereaved family.

 

Morris, John A. Morris

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 17, 1885

February 25, 1885  Ed. Spirit:

As my father, JOHN A. MORRIS, was for a great many years a resident of Monroe county, Ohio, that being his place of birth and residence until seven years ago, at which time he removed to Kansas, I wish to inform his many acquaintances and friends in old Monroe of his death, which occurred February 4, 1885, at his place of residence in Harvey County, Kansas.

He was born March 16, 1825 and if he had lived until March 26, would have been 60 years of age.  His disease was Bright’s disease of the kidneys. His sufferings were long and severe.  He was confined to his room about five months.  At the end of which he crossed the chilling stream of death and we trust is now safely landed in the haven of eternal repose.

He had been a member of the Christian Church for about 25 years with which he stood connected at the time of his death.  He leaves mother with five grown children to mourn his death; but we all hope to meet father again where we shall never be compelled to say fare well, but shall live an unbroken family through all eternity.

          The eye that shuts in a dying hour,

          Will open the next in bliss;

          The welcome will sound in the heavenly world

          Ere the farewell is hushed in this.

                     Wm. Morris -- Halstead, Kansas

 

Morris, Mrs. A. N. Morris

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 23, 1885

Noble Co., Journal, 8th inst. --  Mrs. A. N. Morris, of Jefferson township, committed suicide on the 9th inst., by hanging himself.  A sister threw herself into the river at Marietta last winter and drowned herself. Since that time Mrs. Morris has been greatly depressed by the occurrence and from ill health.  Mrs. Morris was a good woman, and leaves a husband and a family of children, nearly grown to mourn her loss.  She was evidently insane as no trouble had ever entered the domestic circle.

 

Morris, Mrs. Sarah Morris

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

Died --  On Friday, July 24, 1885, at 1:15 P.M. at the residence of her son James R., in Woodsfield,  MRS. SARAH MORRIS, relict of Hon. Joseph Morris, aged 90 years, 2 months and 4 days.

Grandmother Morris’ great age and the many years she lived in this place endeared her to the entire community, by whom she was greatly beloved and respected.  In her declining days she was surrounded by her children and many of her grandchildren and great grandchildren.  For many years past she was a member of the Christian Church, and until her great age and feeble health prevented, was a regular attendant upon the services of the Church.  That she was a sincere and devoted Christian all who knew her can testify.

Grandmother Morris was born in Greene County, PA., and was a daughter of James and Elizabeth Hill.  She was united in marriage to Joseph Morris, in March 1816, whom she survived nearly thirty-one years.  She was the mother of nine children, but three of whom survive her -- Mrs. Elizabeth Driggs and James R. and W. T. Morris --  who were with her in her last hours.  She was a woman of strong, practical judgement, great good sense, and of a vigorous constitution that continued with her until a few years ago when she became somewhat of an invalid from the effects of a fall.  She was, however, able to walk from her son Thomas’ residence to her son James’ with a little assistance, only ten days before her death.  The disease, which was the immediate cause of her death, was cholera morbus, with which she suffered about a week.  For the last two or three days she seemed unconscious of any pain or suffering, and passed away as calmly as if falling into a dreamless sleep.

There has passed from among us a mother in Israel, who, in her day, was a kind and charitable neighbor and friend, a devoted wife and tender mother.

The deceased was one of the oldest residents of the county, having came into it in April, 1829, and to Woodsfield two years later, where she ever afterward resided.  On the afternoon of the 25th inst., she was conveyed by loving kindred and neighbors to the family burying ground, where she was laid to rest beside her departed husband and six children, there to rest until the blessed God shall say “well done, thou good and faithful servant; enter thou into the joys of thy Lord.”

 

Morty, Charles Morty

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 8, 1885

Charles Morty fell under the wheels of a freight train at New Philadelphia and was killed.

 

Mowder, George Mowder

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 3, 1885

Died - Of croup, GEORGE, son of Wm. And Margaret MOWDER.  George was born Sept. 14th, 1880; died Oct. 23d, 1885, aged 5 year, 1 month and 9 days.  He was a bright and cheerful little boy.  He leaves father, mother, two brothers and one sister to mourn besides a large number of friends and relatives.

 

Nalley, Marion Nalley

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 10, 1885

Died - On the 28th ult., of consumption, MARION NALLEY, of Wayne township, aged 52 years and 8 days.

 

Neil, Henry P. Neil

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  February 17, 1885

Belmont County News - St. Clairsville Gazette, 12th inst.

HENRY P. NEIL, a farmer 72 years of age, dropped dead while sitting in his chair at his home at Glencoe Monday.  He formerly lived near Powhatan.  The funeral took place Tuesday.  Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause of his death.

 

Nesbitt, Caroline Nesbitt

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 17, 1885

     Caroline Nesbitt was born November 24, 1826 in Tyler County, W. Va., married to James Nesbitt Oct. 1845, and died at her home near Sardis Nov. 9th 1885.  She was converted and united with the M. E. Church at the age of 16 and lived a consistent member until her death.  She was of a quiet, reserved disposition, yet always cheerful, looking on the bright side of everything -.  She had a smile for everybody; and like the beams of the sun, carried cheerfulness wherever she went and was loved by all who knew her.  During her last illness though long and severe, she was patient and resigned.  She was a true wife, a loving mother and a very exemplary christian.  She leaves a husband and nine children to mourn their loss.-  But their loss is her gain.  A few days before her death she remarked to the writer that the time of her departure was near; but her comfort and consolation was assurance of blessed immortality beyond the grave.

     She was followed to her last resting place by a large concourse of sorrowing friends and relatives.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Hammond of New Martinsville, W. Va.

     The family have our sympathy in their sad and lonely hours.  God grant that they may all meet in the city of God where death never enters.     Wilson Martin

 

Neuhart, Mrs. Sarah Neuhart

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 23, 1885

Mrs. Sarah Neuhart, aged 80 years, died at the residence of Henry Shaffer, in Woodsfield, on the 11th inst.

 

Okey, Judge John W. Okey

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 4, 1885

Ohio State Journal, 27th ult. --  To The Court Above --  Judge Okey’s Case is Carried

The Fatal End of His Severe Illness  Saturday Morning --  Action of the Franklin County Bar and the State Officers.

Taken from a full page article in Spirit of Democracy August 4, 1885

     A brief note in the State Journal of Saturday morning stated that the symptoms of JUDGE JOHN W. OKEY were not so favorable Friday night as they had been the day before, but it was not feared at that time that his death was a probability, as he had developed strength to pass through a crisis which appeared much more serious.  The relapse was worse than was thought, however, and he rapidly sank until 10 o’clock Saturday morning, when he died.  The blow was a hard one, for his family and friends had come to believe that he would recover.  All his family was by his bedside when he died, except his daughter, Mary L., the wife of Charles N. Danenbower, of Cincinnati, who was too ill to leave her room.

     A committee was named as follows for pall bearers:  Judges Gilmore, Bingham, Harrison, Daugherty and Collins, Attorney General Lawrence, Hon. H. J. Booth and Hon. J. H. Heitman.

     The funeral services over Judge Okey’s remains in Columbus will be held this morning  at his late residence, No 50 East Broad Street at 6:30 o’clock.  The body will then be taken to Cincinnati by the 7:30 train, and will be met there by members of the Hamilton County Bar and other citizens.  At 11:30 services will be held there and the interment will be held at Spring Grove Cemetery.

     The following excellent biographical and eulogistic sketch is published in the new Biographical and Historical Cyclopedis [sic] of Ohio:

     John Waterman Okey, lawyer and jurist, Columbus, was born near Woodsfield, Monroe County, Ohio, January 3, 1827, and is of English parentage on the paternal, and Scotch-Irish on the maternal side.  His grandfather, Laven Okey, emigrated to Ohio before it became a State, and on the organization of Monroe County, was elected an Associate Judge.  His father, Col. Cornelius Okey, represented Monroe County in the lower house of the General Assembly for several years, and was a man held in high repute by all who knew him.  He died in 1859 at the age of 77 years.  The mother and maternal grandmother and great-grandmother of Judge Okey are buried at Woodsfield, and the inscription on the tomb of the latter shows that she died at the advanced age of 103 years.

     In 1849 Judge Okey was married to Miss Bloor of Belmont county.  Four children were born of this union, two sons and two daughters --  George B., Trevitt W., Mary I. (now the wife of Charles N. Danenbower of Washington, D. C.) and Inez.   Judge Okey’s brother James represented Monroe county for several years in the General Assembly of Ohio.  His brother William was a member of the constitutional convention of 1873, and judge of the Court of Common Pleas of the Belmont district.  At the October election 1882, Judge Okey was elected to the Supreme court for a term of five years by a majority of 16,500 votes over his principal competitor, Hon. John H. Doyle of Toledo.

 

Okey, Judge John W. Okey

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 4, 1885

Cambridge Jeffersonian  --  JUDGE JOHN W. OKEY, of the Supreme Court of Ohio, died on Saturday morning at Columbus after a sickness of several weeks duration, of disease of the stomach.  Here where he formerly presided in the Court of Common Pleas; here where he formerly lived and where nearly everybody knew him and loved him, the announcement of his death was received with sincere sorrow.  But it is not only as a friend that he is mourned.  He was one of the greatest Jurists that ever sat on the bench of the Supreme Court of Ohio, and his loss to the State which he loved so well, is one that can not be easily filled.

 

Okey, Judge John W. Okey

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

Judge William Okey left here on Saturday to attend the funeral of his brother, JUDGE JOHN W. OKEY, who died at his home in Columbus on that day.

 

Okey, Judge John W. Okey

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

Death of Judge John W. Okey --

John W. Okey, of the Supreme Court of Ohio, died at his home in Columbus, Ohio, at 10 o’clock on Saturday, the 25th inst.

The remains were taken to Cincinnati for interment on Monday, the 27th inst.

Judge Okey was a resident of Woodsfield Monroe county, for many years.  Here he studied law and was admitted to practice.  Afterwards he was elected to the Common Pleas bench, from which he resigned to aid in the preparation and publication of Okey’s and Gholson’s Digest.

He was twice elected a Judge of the Supreme Court of the State, and was serving the second year of his second term at the time of his death.

He was an able jurist, a good citizen, a kind husband and father.  The wife and children have the sympathies of the people of Ohio.

 

Okey, Lt. Henry Okey

Lynch, G. B. Lynch

Reed, B. F. Reed

Hardesty, J. L. Hardesty

McCammon, George Mc Cammon

Dougherty, Matthew Dougherty

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 30, 1885

Tombstones, For the following named soldiers are at the B. Z. & C. Depot in Woodsfield.  The friends of the parties named should have them put up.  All expenses of making and shipping have been paid by the Government:

          Lt. Henry Okey, Co. D. 116th O.V.I.

          G. B. Lynch, Co. C. 21 W. Va. Cav.

          B. F. Reed, Co. C. 21 W. Va.

          J. L. Hardesty, 824 Ohio Inf’y.

          George McCammon, Co. A., 116th Ohio Inf’y.

          Matthew Dougherty, Co. K. 621 O.V.I.

 

Peck, Daniel Peck

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 10, 1885

     Daniel Peck, one of the oldest lawyers of Ohio, died at his residence in St. Clairsville on Friday last.  Mr. Peck was a leading attorney in St. Clairsville for many years, then removed to Wheeling, but returned to St. Clairsville about a year ago and is now gone.  He is the eighth lawyer that has died in St. Clairsville within a few years.

     It may be truthfully said of Mr. Peck that he died without an enemy.

 

Perry, Abraham Perry

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 8, 1885

Harrisburg, Pa., Sept. 2 --  ABRAHAM PERRY, a colored man of this city, was found dead this morning.  Several years ago, when the graveyard insurance business was at its height, policies to the amount of $150,000 were taken out on Perry’s life. He was then supposed to be tottering on the verge of the grave and was always kept intoxicated by his policy holders in order to shorten his existence.  He was 84 years old.

 

Pickens, Alexander Pickens

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 29, 1885

An aged, estimable citizen of Franklin township, was born in Belmont county, Ohio, Aug. 31, 1811 and died at his residence near Swazy, Ohio, September 21, 1885, being 74 years and 21 days old.

Mr. Pickens’ father came from Campbleton, Scotland, and was one of pioneer settlers of the new world, his first residence being near Philadelphia.  In 1790 while at Pittsburgh he bought land in the territory of Belmont county, on Scotch Ridge, where he settled soon after.  The old home farm is still in the possession of one of his sons.

But little is known, to the writer, of the early life of Mr. Pickens, except as gleaned from reminiscences related in conversation.  The impressions are, however, that he at one time lived far out on the frontier and was engaged in cleaning forests and trading with the Indians.

About middle life he purchased the farm near Swazy and his later life has been spent in farming and raising stock.  His home and farm bore the evidence of that thrift and industry which made Mr. Pickens one of the foremost husbandmen of the community.  His fields and buildings, crops and fruits bore that silent yet incontrovertible testimony that neither welfare nor best interests of man and beast were forgotten.

The manner in which he cultivated his crops and tilled the soil showed that his knowledge of his vocation was beyond the average.

He was a man of more than ordinary intelligence and his conversational powers of a character unequalled nor surpassed.  He seemed possessed of that happy faculty of making every one feel at ease in his presence, which we think is due in a great measure, to a well stored mind and  a close observation of passing events.  We never saw the time when any subject was presented upon which he could not converse with clear, concise language often times taking off into avenues of thought, not expected and presenting his convictions in statements often unanswerable.  How often in our boyhood have we, when struggling with something puzzling, found a pleasant teacher and instruction in our noble friend.

As a citizen he always manifested an interest in the management of public affairs and lent a helping hand to anything that affected the public welfare.  Every enterprise to build up the interests of the community he encouraged, and was always on hand to help by word or kindly advice.  He was a fast friend of the public schools and always advanced the idea of a higher standard of education among all classes of society.  It was his delight to attend any kind of a literary performance and hear young people speak, and seemed anxious that each one should succeed well.

The estimate in which he was held by the young men especially, was voiced in an utterance from a young man to the writer during Mr. Pickens’ late illness.  He said: “When Mr. Pickens dies the young men have lost one of their best friends.  I tell you, he was a friend to the young men.”  No grander eulogy could be pronounced at the bier of any man than to say he was a lasting friend to the rising men of the future.  He always had something grand to tell the boys and that gave them an inspiration.

During a long and lingering illness he gave that evidence of the higher life wrought within so full of comfort and cheer to the hearts of friends.  No murmur against fate --  no repining at his illness --  his only care seemed  to be that he should be no burden upon his friends.  In conversation with his pastor he gave clear and conscious testimony of his hope of a future life and said, “All is well. My trust is in Jesus.”

A touching sermon was delivered by Rev. A. W. Gruber, a former pastor, from Rev. 11:10, “Be thou faithful unto death and I will give thee a crowns of Life.”  He was followed by Revs. Reim and William Danford who spoke of his private life.

The last sacred rites at the grave were performed by the Masonic fraternity of which Mr. Pickens was a member.  He has gone from among us; we shall see form and face no more; shall hear his friendly voice never again, for he sleeps - he sleeps till grand triumphal morning.

His beloved wife, who cared for him so tenderly during his last illness, has the sympathy of the entire community and blest assurance of a happy reunion in the everlasting kingdom of the redeemed.  T.J.H.Taggart.

 

Pickens, Mr. Pickens

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 6, 1885

Swazey Items:  Mr. PICKENS, one of our oldest citizens, departed this life on the 22d ult.  Our community has lost a good citizen and the wife a good and kind husband.  The funeral services took place on the 23d at the Swazey cemetery, followed by a large number of friends and neighbors.               Fannie

 

Pickens, Mrs. Nancy A. Pickens

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 22, 1885

Died --  At her home in Monroe Co., Ohio, Sep. 11, 1885, MRS. NANCY A. PICKENS, aged 55 years, 2 months and 24 days.

The subject of this notice was a member of Buchanan Presbyterian Church for 24 years, but deprived of the ordinances of God’s house on account of physical infirmity for a considerable period previous to her decease.

During her protracted illness she manifested a cheerful resignation to the will of God.  Relying with perfect confidence upon the merits of Christ for salvation, she calmly awaited the approval of death.

She led a quiet peaceable life and enjoyed the confidence and respect of all who knew her.  Her remains were followed by a large number of friends and neighbors to the cemetery at Buchanan church.

Her children are sad as they enter the old home and look upon the vacant chair and await in vain for her kindly greeting, but they have the best of all consolations in the thought “that to be absent from the body is to be present  with the Lord.  For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with Him.”     Wm. T. Garroway.

 

Pierce, Willard Pierce

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

Ohio News - Fred Jay was inducted for murder in the first degree at Marietta, for the murder of WILLARD PIERCE.

 

Plantz, Mrs. Hiram Plantz

Plantz, Two Babies Plantz

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 19, 1885

Dead With Her Two Babies

Lititz Lancaster Co., Pa., May 12 --

This quiet Moravian village was thrown into the greatest excitement just before dusk this evening by the mad action of Mrs. Hiram Plantz, who deliberately threw her five children into Benkley’s mill dam, and jumped into the water herself.  To-night the dead bodies of the mother and two of her children lie side by side in a downstairs little room, while the three remaining children are confined to their beds upstairs suffering from the effects of their terrible experience.  It is supposed that the woman was laboring under religious excitement at the time she committed the deed.

          The Cumuing [sic] of Madness

The father was absent from home.  According to the story of the children their mother took them out toward evening to the dam. The oldest was a boy only nine years old.  She took them to the edge of the dam and threw the three oldest into the water, and after assuring herself that they could not reach land, took the two others into her arms and cast herself and them into the water.  Some men in the mill witnessed the occurrence and hastened to the rescue, but, as before stated, only succeeded in saving the three oldest children.  The bodies were all recovered, but the mother and her two babes, aged one and three, were already dead.

The Coroner has summoned a jury and will proceed to hold an inquest in the morning.  The husband and father came home soon after the terrible event and was grief stricken over the awful affair.  Mrs. Plantz was forty-two years of age.

 

Pope, Mrs. Sarah Pope

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 20, 1885

Gone Home --  We regret to announce the death of MRS. SARAH POPE, wife of Robert Pope, which occurred on Friday morning the 16th inst.

Though a sufferer from heart disease for many years she was never known to murmur or complain.  She was all that a true Christian woman could be in the duties of wife, mother, neighbor, friend.  She was one of those pure natures free from guile, and all through life preserved the serenity of her nature and the purity of her character.  She was a conscientious, consistent member of the M. E. Church and died in the faith of which she had been a living ornament.  The esteem in which she was held was testified by the large number who attended her funeral on last Sunday.  Her funeral services were conducted by Rev. W. H. Stauffer, who seemed to feel deeply every word he uttered.

Her remains were interred amid the tears of relatives and friends, and the profound sympathy of all assembled there. Her husband and four children survive her.  Her example will shine and be an influence long after the clay has moldered to dust.  Her friends and neighbors all will deplore her, but her family so sadly bereft must drain to the dregs the bitterest cup.  We can only offer our sympathy to the bereaved family.  In this dark hour no word can be spoken to break the pang of grief; but we can weep with those who weep when the darkness of an unspeakable calamity wrings the very innermost heart with a grief they can find no words to express the agony in which there is no solace.  May the God of all consolation bear up the broken hearted family.

 

Rairs, John Rairs

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 1, 1885

     Rufus Huffman, of Monroe county, returning home by night saw what he thought was a bear in a fence corner.  Turning back to the nearest house, he and a man named Jacob Pine got guns and started to hunt it.  Arriving at the spot, they fired simultaneously on the brute inflicting mortal injuries, instead of a bear, however it turned out to be a man by the name of JOHN RAIRS. --  New Martinsville Democrat.

 

Reiser, Lewis H. Reiser

Source: Spirit of Democracy  February 24, 1885

Died - Jan 30, LEWIS H. son of F. and F. E. REISER aged 2 years, 2 months, and 9 days, he was a bright and happy child and was only sick two days.

          “Tender Shepherd, thou hast stilted

          Now thy little lamb’s brief weeping!

          Ah how peaceful, pale, and mild

          In its narrow bed t’is sleeping!

          And no sigh of anguish sore

          Heaves that little bosom more.”

 

Riley, Mrs. Hulda Jane Riley (nee Mellott)

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 30, 1885

Died --  June 9, 1885, at her home near Beallsville, Ohio. HULDA JANE, wife of George W. RILEY, aged 25 years, 1 month and 26 days.

Mrs. R. was a daughter of James and Liza Jane Mellott.  A few weeks before her death she identified herself with the Baptist Church, Rev. Lyons, Pastor.  She told him that she wanted to die and was willing to give herself to Christ.  He sung a hymn and prayed with her, and then asked her if she was willing to die. She told him that she was ready and willing.

She leaves a husband and three small children, and a large circle of friends, to mourn her departure.  A while before her death she told her husband to get her a drink and then she was going home, and looking up she said the door was open.

Mrs. R. was highly esteemed by all who knew her.  We deeply sympathize with the husband and children in this sad bereavement.  We feel assured that she has gone to rest, but their loss will be her eternal gain.

Be ye also ready, for in such an hour as ye think not the Son of man cometh.

.

Farewell, Hulda dear, farewell,

Our time is lowing fast,

When we together there will dwell,

And be forever blest.

.

Farewell husband, children, all,

The coice of God has come

To call me from this world of care,

To join with angels around the throne.

                           Lizzie Latich.

 

Rodgers, Joseph Rodgers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

Death of JOSEPH RODGERS -- Clarington Independent, 14th inst.

     We are deeply pained to have to announce the death of Mr. Joseph Rodgers, an old resident of this place, and whose severe illness  we announced last week.  He died on Monday afternoon at 3:15 o’clock.  He had begun to improve rapidly the latter part of last week, but was suddenly taken worse on Sunday.  His family and relatives at Pittsburg, Belpre and elsewhere were telegraphed for, some of them barely getting her in time to see him breathe his last.  His ailment was dysentery, and inflammation of the bowels set in which soon terminated fatally.  The funeral took place on Tuesday at 5 o’clock P.M., a large concourse following deceased to his last resting place in the village cemetery.  Mr. Rodgers was one of our best citizens, but being a steamboatman, he was seldom at home.  He was well respected by all who knew him.  The relatives of the deceased have the sympathy of the community in their sad and sudden bereavement.  Deceased was in his 64th year.

 

Rodgers, Joseph Rodgers

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 1, 1885

Died --  At Clarington, on Monday, August 10, of derangement and inflammation of the bowels,  JOSEPH RODGERS.

Deceased was born near Meadville, Crawford County, Pa., April 9, 1822.  When a young man he and a comrade came to New Castle, where he resided a short time.  In 1841 he went to Woodsfield, where he resided and married Miss Charlotte Miller, and continued to reside there and carry on his trade of machinist and blacksmithing.  In 1859 he and his family moved to this place where they resided up to the time of his death.  He engaged in his former business, but for a number of years he had been an engineer, having made several trips South, remaining during the winter and returning in the spring.  For a considerable time he had been engaged with his son, Capt. William Rodgers, at Pittsburgh, as engineer on the steamer “Tide,” in which he owned an interest.  He was a good mechanic, a steady man, and led a quiet and peaceable life, and it is believed without an enemy.  The writer of this humble tribute had his acquaintance for near forty years, and during all that time he was always the same even tempered and useful citizen.  He loved his family and was sociable and agreeable with his fellow citizens.

His remains were laid at rest the day following, followed by his many relatives and friends, in the beautiful cemetery that he and a number of us as officers of the village purchased some fifteen years ago.

He was always careful and painstaking in all he undertook and but seldom it ever failed.  They have raised a large family, most of whom are men and women, all honored and respected as are their parents -- nine children, fourteen grand children, and five sons and daughters-in-law, making thirty including the father and mother.  One of the children died in infancy.  He was well cared for during his last sickness, and had all the attention that his family and three physicians and neighbors could do.

          “Lost to sight to memory dear,

          We shed the sympathetic tear.”              J. T. M.

[Gazette and Wheeling papers please copy.]

Bereft of wife, mother, father, sisters and brothers, and the calling away recently of Mother Morris, for whom I conceived so much respect and regard, and then Chief Justice John W. Okey, my companion in youth, friend and adviser, and now my worthy and respected acquaintance and neighbor, JOSEPH RODGERS, arouses more than ordinary sympathy.

 

Roth, Mrs. Ann Roth

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

Died - On the 29th ult., in Center township, MRS. ANN ROTH, aged 84 years.

 

Runyan, Samuel Runyan

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 4, 1885

SAMUEL RUNYAN, born June 27, 1817; died January 29, 1885, after an illness of about four weeks.

     The deceased was born in Jefferson County, Ohio; removed to Monroe county about thirty years ago, where he resided until his death.  He was converted and united with the M. E. Church over forty years ago  and lived a zealous Christian life, devoted to his Master’s service.  Many times during his last illness did he give his friends the comforting assurance that he was reconciled to God’s will, awaiting the summons which should call him home, and exhorted them “to be faithful, so that they might meet again where partings shall be no more.”  He leaves a wife, one daughter and many friends to mourn his departure.  But who can realize their loss is his eternal gain?

          Yes, we’ll meet again,

          Meet ne’er to sever;

          Meet in heaven,

          There to dwell forever.

 

Runyon, Samuel Runyon

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 21, 1885

Probate Court Proceedings -- July 6 (1885) Sarah J. Runyon, widow of SAMUEL RUNYON, deceased, elected to take under the will of her deceased husband.

 

Saffel, Mary Elizabeth Saffel nee Boughner

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  January 13, 1885

     MARY ELIZABETH Boughner was born February 4th, 1863; and married to Mr. J. D. SAFFEL in June, 1881; and died December 30, 1884.  She joined the Church of Christ in February, 1879, and was immersed by Elder J. W. Arnold. 

     During her sickness of several months, suffering with consumption, she had great patience, trusting in Christ Jesus.  She said that she knew He would take her safe home to heaven.  She often asked her father, mother, husband, brothers and sisters to prepare to meet her in heaven.  She often prayed and plead with her mother, sisters and brothers to be ready to meet her beyond the grave.  She was buried at Cameron January 1, 1885; the funeral services were conducted by Elder R. McPaceters.  The following lines, which she often read, and carefully preserved to accompany her obituary, will show the state of her mind in her last moments:

          On the banks beyond the stream,

          Where the trees are always green;

          There’s no night, but endless day,

          There is where the angels stay.

          There’s no sorrow, pain nor fear,

          There’s no parting farewell tears.

          There’s no cloud, no darkness there.

          All is bright and clear and fair.

.

          Flowers of fadeless beauty there,

          Trees of life with foliage rare,

          Fruit’s the most inviting grow,

          There is where I want to go.

          Hark!  I hear an angel sing,

          Heavenly harpers on the wing

          Throng the air and bid me rise

          To the music of the skies.

.

          Soon from earth I’ll soar away

          To the realms of endless day,

          Soon I’ll join the ransomed throng,

          Sing with them redemption’s song;

          Pearly gates stand open wide.

          Just beyond death’s chilling tide,

          There my mansion bright I see,

          There the angels wait for me.

.

          Earthly home adieu, adieu;

          Earthly friends farewell to you;

          Softly breathe your last good bye,

          Angels call me, let me die,

          Hallelujah! They have come;

          Hallelujah! I’m most home;

          Friends and loved ones weep no more,

          Meet me on the other shore.

 

Schaub, Michael Schaub

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 5, 1885

Mr. MICHAEL SCHAUB of Woodsfield, one of our best citizens, died Monday morning, 4th inst., at 2 o’clock.  Deceased had been confined to his bed for ten days past with something like cramp colic.  Sunday evening Dr. Armstrong informed the family that he could not possibly live many hours.  At midnight Mr. Schaub sent for W. E. Mallory, Esq., and had his will written and was raised up in bed to sign it when he lost consciousness and died shortly afterwards without signing the paper.

 

Schmitz, Jacob Schmitz

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 15, 1885

Mr. JACOB SCHMITZ, died very suddenly on last Tuesday morning about three o’clock.  The cause of his death was consumption from which he had been a sufferer for the past two years.-- The remains were taken to the Buchanan Church for interment.

 

Schmitz, Jacob Schmitz

Source: Spirit of Democracy  December 22, 1885

Died - At his residence near Woodsfield, Ohio, Dec. 8, 1885.  Mr. JACOB SCHMITZ, aged 58 years and 6 months.  He suffered for a number of years with pulmonary aflection [sic].  A few days previous to his death the disease which grew worse at intervals returned apparently in its usual form and the usual remedies produced, temporary relief.  He retired on Monday night at the usual hour, about 9 o’clock, resting easier and expressed himself as feeling better.  In the silent watches of the approaching morning Mrs. Schmitz awoke and upon examination discovered her husband was dead.  Suddenly the messenger came, calmly and peacefully his spirit was borne away.

     Deceased was a member of the Presbyterian Church for 25 years.  He was a man positive in character, faithful to his convictions and principles with his fellow men in outward life.  Positive in his faith in God.  Positive in the hope of redemption through the blood of Christ.  In conversation with the writer several months preceding his death when speaking of his health be said, God does everything right; if it is His will I will get better, if it is not I am ready to go.  I am not afraid to die.  I have trusted in Christ.  I trust Him now.”  Bereaved family, suddenly indeed has the stroke of the death messenger entered the old home, and deep the grief it brings to your hearts, but beyond the dark cloud of grief stands the messenger of peace who says: “Let not your heart be troubled.”  “My peace I give unto you, not as the world giveth [sic] give I unto you.”  Look up to Jesus the Chief Shepherd of the sheep.”  Your Shepherd heard His voice.  “I will not leave you comfortless.”  What I do thou knowest [sic] not now but thou shalt know hereafter.  Sorrow not as lost who have no hope.”    W. T. Garroway

 

Schuchardt, Dr. G. Schuchardt

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 3, 1885

Guenther Schnelle, the murderer of his uncle, Dr. G. SCHUCHARDT, whom he claimed was his father, who was convicted and sentenced about three months ago, was taken to Moundsville Wednesday, and placed in the penitentiary for five years. -- Bellaire Tribune, 26th ult.

 

Schultz, Mrs. Herman Schultz

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 22, 1885

MRS. SCHULTZ, wife of Herman SCHULTZ of Cambridge, well known to many residents of Woodsfield, died last week.

 

Sharkey, Mrs. John Sharkey

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 8, 1885

At Youngstown, MRS. JOHN SHARKEY fell in a fit on the street, and died soon afterward.

 

Shields, James Muswood Shields

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 24, 1885

JAMES MUSWOOD SHIELDS, son of Rachel McKelvey, of Round Bottom, Monroe County, Ohio, was born November 20, 1870, and died October 23, 1885.

     Deceased had been a patient sufferer for several months, but had so far recovered as to be able to go about again and had gone to spend the winter with his aunt, Sue Neff, at Glencoe, Belmont County, Ohio, where he died of meningitis.  The remains were interred in the Pleasant Ridge Cemetery, near Round Bottom.

     Deceased was a promising young man of splendid mental abilities and kind and loving disposition, which won for him many warm friends.  He bore his suffering with a patience and fortitude rarely seen in those of maturer ]sic] age.

     Many and tender are the ties which bind us together in this world of sorrow, and especially those of parent and child.  But death severs them all.

     In the darkest hours of our affliction when our spirit seems almost willing to give over the contest, then should we be able to recognize the hand of Him “who doeth all things well,” and gather comfort from the thought that our loss is his eternal gain.

          Flowers in the world’s broad field,

          Stand among the withered leaves,

          And the Reaper with his scythe

          Gathers all into his sheaves.

.

          “While in life we are in death.”

          Young and old around us fall,

          Ne’er can we the fleeting breath

          Back into its mansion call.

.

          Rest in peace; thy labors done,

          From thy earthly cares set free,

          Wait the rising of the sun

          When shall dawn eternity.       W.

 

Simpson, Thomas D. Simpson

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

Ohio Items --  THOMAS D. SIMPSON, first master mechanic of the Philadelphia and Reading Railway, died on the cars between Mt. Vernon and Warsaw.

 

Sines, Elizabeth Sines nee Scott

Source: Spirit of Democracy  January 6, 1885

Salem Township --  Clarington Dec. 31, 1884

     Mrs. Elizabeth Sines, nee Scott, across the river a little above Clarington, died night before last.  She was of considerable age and was a very estimable woman.

 

Snack, Christian Snack

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 7, 1885

Christian Snack, an old citizen of Switzerland township, died on Wednesday morning of last week, aged 59 years.  His disease was dropsy, supposed to have been caused by an injury received four years ago.

 

St. John, Miss Katie St. John

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 24, 1885

     MISS KATIE ST. JOHN, of Bellaire, a young lady aged about 17 years, dropped dead at the Niagara rink on Saturday evening.  Her death was caused by heart disease, most likely super induced by the exercise of roller skating, and the excitement.

 

Steel, Mrs. Eliza Steel

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

Ohio Items --  MRS. ELIZA STEEL, a widow nearly 70 years old, living on a farm near Fort Recovery, went to the barn Wednesday, and climbing a ladder to a point thirty feet above the threshing floor, threw herself down, causing instant death.  In her hand was a note to her children saying her act was intentional, that she could not stay any longer.

 

Stephens, Rachel Ann Stephens

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  January 13, 1885

Died --  November 11th, at her residence in Center township, of typhoid fever, RACHEL ANN, wife of F. M. STEPHENS, aged 48 years, 2 months and 3 days.  The deceased was married to F. M. Stephens July 9th, 1854, and during a series of meetings at Brownsville, August 1854, she united with the M. P. Church of which she remained a faithful and consistent member until her death, always attending upon every means of grace when blessed with health to attend divine service, and ever ready to perform the duties of a true christian, and to testify to the efficacy of the salvation of the Redeemer and the sweet consolations of the Christians hope --.  Sister Stephens seemed to have had a premonition of the approach of death, as she informed her companion previous to her illness that she was nearing the close of her earthly pilgrimage, and during her illness she often spoke of the approaching dissolution, and always with calmness and joy, expressing her unwavering faith and unfaltering trust in the merits of the blessed Redeemer.  She bore her sufferings with christian fortitude, and frequently expressed  her willingness to submit to the will of the Master; and her “desire to depart and be with Christ which is far better,”  Ass the end drew nigh she was strengthened by divine inspiration and sang.  “I’m going home” and many other sweet stanzas until the summons came, and the angel opened the everlasting gates and gave her a triumphant entrance into the city of the living God.

     The funeral services took place at the Baptist Church at Neuhart’s conducted by Rev> Bash, assisted by Robert Jackson, after which the remains were interred in the cemetery in the midst of a large concourse of mourning friends and relatives.

.

Farewell, dear sister, the parting is sad.

And the bitter heart swelling will rise,

Though we know the angel bands are glad

To welcome thee home to the skies.

.

Farewell, though with pain and grief oppressed

Our earthly ties we must sever;

We know thou hast gained a home with the blest,

To-dwell with the angels forever.

.

Farewell, but while with anguish sore.

We weep o’er thy senseless olay;

Tho spirit has flown to the shining shore

To the realms of endless day.

.

Farewell, life’s fleeting day is o’er;

The twilight shadows past;

Immortal glories just before;

The glittering crown at last.                      E. J.

 

Stewart, Hon. C. B. Stewart

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

Hon. C. B. STEWART, one of two surviving signers of the declaration of Texas independence died at Montgomery, Tex., aged 81 years.

 

Stewart, John G. Stewart

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 11, 1885

Ohio Notes --  JOHN G. STEWART, a prominent business man of Coshocton, died Monday after a long and painful illness.  He was a member of the Ohio delegation to the Charleston (S C) convention of 1860.

 

Stokes, Anna Stokes

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 7, 1885

Burying a Woman With Honors --  Lebanon (O.) Special Dispatch

“When I die I want to be buried with the honors of war.”  That was the request made by Miss ANNA STOKES long ago to her friends here and to-day, in accordance with that request, and as a fitting and appropriate tribute to her noble and patriotic services as a nurse with the Union army during the rebellion, the members of Granville Thurston Post, No. 213 G. A. R., in their regalia and with muffled drums and the flag she loved so well, escorted the remains to the church, and thence to the cemetery, where they went through the solemn rites usually performed over the grave of a dead conrade.

 

Strickline, Pate Strickline

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 28, 1885

Sentenced for Ninety-nine Years --  Mount Sterling, Ky., July 21

Mrs. Strickline, widow of Pate Strickline, who was murdered by Lloyd Williams, who is here awaiting the day of his execution for the killing of her husband, Pate Strickline, had her trial at the Special Term of the Wolfe Circuit Court last week, charged with complicity in the murder of her husband.  She was sentenced to the penitentiary for ninety-nine years.

 

Talbot, John Talbot

Talbot, (wife of John) Talbot

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 28, 1885

     JOHN TALBOT and WIFE, an aged couple living near Steubenville, were murdered in their beds.  It is supposed, for their money, though everything in the house was found in perfect order.

 

Thomas, James Thomas

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

At Waynesburg, PA., JAMES THOMAS and William Falkner, two farmers who were working at the bottom of a well 40 feet deep, were overcome by impure air.  Thomas died in the well, and Falkner was taken out in an unconscious condition.  His recovery is doubtful.

 

Tingle, Evaline Tingle

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 29, 1885

     Evaline Tingle, the oldest inhabitant of Cambridge, Ohio, is dead.

 

 

Trescott, unknown Trescott

Source: Spirit of Democracy  July 21, 1885

While raising a building in Sarahsville, Noble county, on the 11th inst., a piece of timber fell upon a man names TRESCOTT killing him instantly.

 

Tubaugh, David C. Tubaugh

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 28, 1885

Died --  April 18, 1885, at 10 o’clock P.M., DAVID C., son of Susanna and Peter TUBAUGH, Jr., aged 10 years, 6 months and 22 days.

     His remains were taken to St. John’s Cemetery followed by a number of sympathizing friends, after which a funeral discourse by Rev. Miller:

          Oh, may we believe is as to meet him

          Over on the golden shore;

          Where sin and sorrow ne’er can enter,

          And pain and death are feared no more.             G.T. Caldwell

 

Twinem, Margaret Twinem

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 17, 1885

Died - March 5, 1885 of Pneumonia, Mrs. MARGARET TWINEM, wife of Andrew Twinem, near New Castle, Monroe County, Ohio, in her 52d year.

Deceased was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church of New Castle for many years.  She was of a meek, mild disposition.  Looking well to her household she manifested kindness and cheerfulness to all who entered her home.

In this sad dispensation of Providence the stricken family sustain the loss of a faithful wife and an affectionate, loving mother; the church a humble, devout, faithful member, and the community mourns the loss of a kind-hearted friend and an esteemed Christian woman.

Bereaved family, sorrow-stricken friends, God knoweth [sic] best and doeth all things well.  What is dark to us a light to him.

Our faith should enter into God’s view of life and death as far as human minds can grasp the thought of God, and where we cannot understand we should trust the loving Father with the joyful certainty that “All things work together for good to them that love God.”  W. T. G.

 

Unknown (mother-in-law)

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  November 3, 1885

     One of the convicts pardoned out of the penitentiary by Hoadly on condition that he would abstain from liquor in the future, took a spree after some months of abstinence and either killed, or nearly killed his wife.  Republican indignation toward Hoadly for this pardon was freely ventilated in the Republican newspapers of the State.  Now comes the word from Zanesville that one George Howell, pardoned out by Foster on the same terms, wound up a spree in that city the other day by first stabbing his wife and then his mother-in-law, the latter fatally.  No Republican indignation has yet been manifested in consequence of Mr. Foster’s relation to the latter tragedy.  Bellefontaine Examiner.

 

Unknown Baby Girl

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

Ohio Items --  Considerable excitement was created in the Fifth ward, Bellaire, Saturday evening by the discovery of an infant child hanging by the neck beneath a bridge over a cut.  It was a girl baby, and the physician called states that it was not more than 24 hours old when hanged.  It is supposed to be an attempt to hide shame, and suspicion points in the direction of highly connected parties.

 

Unknown

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 15, 1885

     Mr. J. F. M. Lloyd, Jeweler, of this place, after an absence of two weeks, caused by the sickness and death of his mother at Harriettsville, Noble county, has returned home.

 

Unknown

Source: Spirit of Democracy  February 24, 1885

Borham, indicted in the Belmont County Court for murder in the 2nd degree.  Ples, [sic] not guilty.  Trial March 30.

 

Unknown

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 23, 1885

Coal Mine Disaster --  Explosion of Fire Damp and Two Hundred Perishing

Manchester, June 19 --  A terrible explosion of fire damp has occurred at the Clifton Hall collier, near this city.  There were 350 men in the mine at the time, and 120 have been rescued.  Two hundred and thirty are still entombed, and it is feared they will be either suffocated or burned to death.  Great excitement prevails and the scenes in the vicinity of the mine are heart rendering.  The wives, mothers and relatives are congregating near the entrances crying, shrieking, and imploring God to save their loved ones imprisoned below.

The cages used by the exploring parties got stuck in descending the shaft, and delayed them fully two hours.  Many have not yet succeeded in reaching the imprisoned miners.  The rescued men say that at the time of the explosion they rushed to the bottom of the main shaft and barely got there with their lives.  They are ignorant of the fate of those left behind.

 

Unknown

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 3, 1885

The town of Wellsburg, West Va., has been visited by several destructive fires within the last few days, one of which originated from an explosion of natural gas, and caused the death of a number of persons.

It seems from recent occurrences at Pittsburgh, Wellsburg and other places, that great caution must be exercised in the use of natural gas, or great destruction of life and property is the inevitable consequence.

 

Unknown

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 13, 1885

Ohio Items --  A man died near Defiance last week from enlargement of the liver, and a post mortem developed the fact that that organ weighed over 22 pounds.

 

Unknown

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 6, 1885

Bellaire Tribune, 29th ult. -- A Drowned Man Found.

The dead body of a man was found in the Ohio river near Hannibal, Monroe county, Ohio.  The man was apparently about 35 years old, 5 feet 10 inches high, with dark hair, dark brown eyes, sandy complexion, sandy mustache, pretty well dressed, and would weigh about 175 pounds.  There was nothing in the pockets of his clothes that could have offered a clew [sic] to his identity.  A. G. W. Potts, a justice of the peace at Hannibal held an inquest, and the body was buried in the Hannibal grave yard.  The coroner’s verdict was accidental drowning.  The theory is advanced that this is the man drowned at the time the skiff was run down in the night by the towboat Maggie.

 

Utterbach, John Utterbach

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 2, 1885

The body of JOHN UTTERBACH, who has been missing from his home in Mr. Vernon for several weeks, was found in the woods near the town, with a bullet hole in the head.  Death is attributed to suicide.

 

Vanderville, Henry Vanderville

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

Henry Vanderville, a stone cutter, fell from the new bridge pier at Nashville, Tenn., a distance of one hundred and fifty feet, and was instantly killed.

 

Veitch, Lucy Veitch

Source:  Spirit of Democracy  December 29, 1885

Horrible Accident -- A Little Child Shot and Killed

     A most heart-rending accident occurred in the family of Henry VEITCH of this place on Monday afternoon.  His youngest child, a daughter three years old, of a sweet and sunny disposition, was a favorite of the family and neighbors.  This was especially the case in the family of Jacob Albright, their nearest neighbor, where Lucy’s welcome was so cordial that the little one spent much of her time there.  About half-past four o’clock on Monday evening she was engaged in playing with two of the Albright children at their home, and in her childish was trying to scare one of them, Frank, a lad of fifteen years.  He, to scare her in turn, picked up an old musket which was close by.  “Snap bat her,” said a sister of Frank, who was helping on the fun.  This being done, a loud report followed, and the little one fell dead on the lounge where she was sitting.  As the muzzle of the gun was not over three feet from the child when discharged, the heavy load of shot entered her face on the right side, litterally [sic] tearing away that entire portion of her head.  Blood, brains and flesh were scattered over the walls and floor, and also on the lounge upon which she was lying.

     The shock was so terrible as to paralyze the members of both families, rendering them unable to do anything for a time but give vent to their anguish.  The unfortunate boy was wild with remorse uttering regrets that he was not the one sent into eternity instead of his little friend.  It appears that an elder brother that an elder brother, of Frank had had the gun out hunting, a few days before, and failed to discharge it on his return home; as was the usual custom.

     This unfortunate occurrence was a shock to the entire community, and all hearts go out in sympathy to the grief-stricken parents.

     It is to be hoped that this sad affair may prove a warning to all those who are in the habit of carelessly handling fire arms. --  Cambridge Jeffersonian, 17th inst.

 

Way, Hon. Thomas A. Way

Source: Spirit of Democracy  January 6, 1885

Death of Thomas A. Way --  Hon. THOMAS A. WAY, a resident of Washington to Wayne township, this county, died on the 31st ult.  Mr. Way removed to Monroe county many years ago from Wrightstown, Belmont county, where his remains were taken to be interred by the side of his wife.  Mr. Way was a good citizen.

 

Weber, Emma Weber

Source: Spirit of Democracy  October 6, 1885

Lebanon Items --  Died --  On Saturday, September 19, EMMA, daughter of Jacob WEBER, of this township.  The remains were interred in the cemetery here on Sunday the 20th ult.    A Kid.

 

Wells, Chas. C. Wells

Source: Spirit of Democracy  January 13, 1885

   Chas. C. Wells, who died at his home on Wells’ Bottom, W. Va. Last Saturday, 31inst, while feeding his stock, was born and raised within gun-shot of where he died, and within his quiet farm life of seventy-six years he had amassed a considerable fortune for one of his vocation Wells’ Bottom contains over 1,400 acres of as fine land as is on the Ohio, and is estimated as being worth over $100,000.  He had no children, so that his fortune will probably descent to his relict and his nieces and nephews.

 

West, Dr. Simon B. West

Source: Spirit of Democracy  May 19, 1885

St. Clairsville Chronicle, 14th inst.

Dr. SIMON B. WEST, brother of Dr. Henry West, of this place, who has been in feeble health for some time, died at his home in Martin’s Ferry, on Monday, and his remains were interred in Walnut Grove cemetery, on Wednesday, at 10 o’clock.  He was born in Jefferson Co., Ohio, July 13, 1812, and was reared on a farm, and received his early education in the common schools, and afterwards attended Franklin College, graduating in 1831.  In 1832, the memorable cholera year, he began reading medicine with his brother, Dr. Henry West, who was then located in Bridgeport.  After close attention to his studies for nearly three years, he entered the Medical College of Cincinnati, attending two courses of lectures, and graduated from that institution in the winter of 1836.  In the following spring he began his professional career, which was an eminently successful one, in Martin’s Ferry, and continued in practice for nearly fifty years, and until the infirmities of age admonished him to lay off the harness.

In 1838, he was united in marriage to Mary Zane Martin, daughter of Ebenezer Martin, the founder of Martin’s Ferry.  Eight children were the fruits of the union, all of whom with their mother, are deceased.

In July, 1864, he was appointed a surgeon in the army, and served until the close of the war.

Dr. West was a public spirited citizen, and contributed largely by his prudent counsel and otherwise, in developing and building up the town in which he lived.  In his domestic relations, he was an affectionate husband and loving father; as a neighbor he was kind and obliging’ as a friend he was genial, warm and true, and in all the relations of life he bore his part as becomes a man.

 

White, Mary White

Source: Spirit of Democracy  April 21, 1885

Miss Mary White, an aged lady at Burton’s station, died on Tuesday of last week, from cancer of the breast.  She was 80 years of age.

 

Wichterman, Christian Wichterman Sr.

Source: Spirit of Democracy  August 18, 1885

Died --  In Salem township, Monroe county, Ohio, on Saturday, August 1st, CHRISTIAN WICHTERMAN, SR., aged 72 years, 4 months and 8 days.  His remains were interred in the township cemetery, formerly known as the John Rutter burying ground, on Monday, August 3rd.  Notwithstanding the unfavorable ness of the weather there was a large attendance at the house to listen to the funeral sermon preached by the Rev. A. J. Bartels, of Hannibal, Ohio., from the text “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, from henceforth.”

     Deceased was born in Switzerland and cam to this country with his father and two sisters, in December 1833;  made this township his home ever since --  a period 52 years.  He leaves a wife and eleven children who all hope to meet him again in a better world.

Soon shall we meet again, meet never to sever.

Soon shall peace wreaths her chain around us forever.

Our hearts will then repose, secure from worldly woes;

All our songs of praise close, never, no, never.

 

Wilbur, George Wilbur

Source: Spirit of Democracy  March 3, 1885

GEORGE WILBUR, a traveling corn doctor, died in the County Infirmary last week.   He refused to tell where he was from, or give any information concerning himself.  His disease was consumption.

 

Witten, John Witten

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 16, 1885

Jackson township Items - Witten’s Ohio June 10, 1885

Entered into rest, at 7 o’clock on the 7th inst., Mr. JOHN WITTEN in the 69th year of his age.  In the hour of separation when ties, that seemed so strong, are sadly severed forever how marked the character and how beautiful the traits of him who now has passed beyond all earthly eulogy or praises.  The friend so dear to us has departed this life esteemed, respected, loved, and all who knew him, in silent grief now do him honor.  Helpful, tender, true, what merit there be of earnestness in manhood, sincerity in profession, kindness in thought and gentle courtesy in act, illumined and made lovely his life and from honored usefulness called home to rest, sleeping the sleep of the just made perfect; but regret is not without its consolation, for the lingering influence of a manly life softens our sorrow and gives sweetness to the memory of the dead.

 

Witten, John Witten

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 16, 1885

Died - On Sunday, the 7th inst., at his home in Jackson township, this county, JOHN WITTEN, aged 70 years.

 

Wolff, Cyrena Wolff nee Mellott

Source: Spirit of Democracy  September 1, 1885

Died -- At Clarington, August 11, 1885, of liver affection and its results, CYRENA, wife of Henry WOLFF aged 42 years and 4 months, formerly of Cameron, Ohio

Her maiden name was Mellott.  My information is that she was a consistent member of the M. E. Church. She has left a large family but no small children.  She expressed herself as willing to leave this world in exchange for a better one; was very much of a home woman, seeming to regard it as one of her special duties to see to her family.  The family all felt their loss, but especial sympathy was felt for the only daughter, Rose, who realized her lonely situation.

She was buried on the 12th in the village of the dead, Clarington Cemetery, attended by a large following of relatives, neighbors and friends.       J. T. M.

 

Woodruff, Mrs. Sophia B. Woodruff

Source: Spirit of Democracy  June 9, 1885

Mrs. Sophia B. Woodruff, widow of the late Ashel Woodruff, died at her home in Marietta Monday, aged 85 years.

 

Last modified May 30, 2011 by BK.

 

 

Click here for the Short-Cut Table of Contents