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Page updated by Carolyn S. Rosemore 21 Nov 2005
VOL. 6.     ST. LAWRENCE, SOUTH DAKOTA, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1913.     NO. 3
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Professional Cards
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PORT McWHORTER
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office: Second Floor of Collins' Drug Store
Miller, South Dakota
Phone Office, Red 55; Res., Green 55
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DR. G.H. SESSIONS, M.D.V.
VETERINARY SURGEON AND DENTIST
Office over Collins' Drug Store. Phone No. Main 16.. Calls answered day or night.
MILLER, SOUTH DAKOTA

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F.R. FISHER
LAWYER
OFFICE OVER FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Miller, South Dakota
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JOHN PUSEY
LAWYER
Practice in all Courts. Prompt attention given to all business intrusted to our care.
MILLER, SOUTH DAKOTA
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C.M. CARROLL
LAWYER
Practice in All Courts of the State ______
Judge of Probate Hand County, S. D.
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B.F. & J.M. MAGNESS
PUBLIC AUCTIONEERS
Double service for single day. Two percent charged for first $509; over that amount one percent. Satisfaction guaranteed or no charge will be made.
Phone Green 143, St. Lawrence, S.D.
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Locals and Personals
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DAKOTA STATE NEWS
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L.T. Jarmuth has purchased a 45-horse power Overland car.

John Kramer's school in ontario closed this week, Wednesday.

G.H. Kiddle was up from Huron for an over-Sunday visit with his family.

Frank Clegg has been sick for a number of days with tonsilitis and a bilious attack.

J.B. Stanger and A.A. Friemark departed Wednesday morning enroute to Fairview, Montana.

Mrs. C. McPhail and Mrs. B.F. Magness went to Onida yesterday as delegates to the W.C.T.U. convention.

N.W. Jacobs and Carl Mortensen were up in York township Monday and erected a windmill for M.L. Goyke.

Miss Alice Woodruff, of Rose Hill township, is visiting this week at the home of her sister, Mrs. R.E. Carl, and family.

The Misses Ethel Ice and Jessie Kintigh went to Huron on the evening passenger last Saturday and returned on the night train.

Mrs. B.F. Magness went to Huron Saturday evening to meet Mrs. Grover Magness, who arrived on the night passenger from Council Bluffs, Iowa.

F.B. Raymond, of Vilas, owner of the St. Lawrence mill, was in town the first of this week with a miller to look over the property with a view to buying same.

Clara Swab's little school-mates carried out a surprise on her Tuesday after school, when they gathered at her home o help celebrate her eleventh birthday anniversary.

Mrs. Allen Harris suffered a deep and ragged wound in the palm of her right hand the latter part of last week, made by a bent nail in a board, which she picked up and threw.

A.H. Shoultz, the Watertown architect, was here Monday showing the school directors plans of schoolhouses.  A picture of one about the size required here is at the First State Bank.

Mrs. T.J. VanBrunt received a scalp wound Tuesday which, to close, required four stitches.  She was visiting at the Will Wilson home when a large patch of plaster fell from the ceiling.

The high school class play will be given in Haul's hall Friday night, May 9.  All who are interested in our schools is
[are]  requested to buy tickets and thereby help a good cause.   Remember the date..

We are informed that Emil Finder bought the Wagoner building of Hans Callsen and engaged D.C. Furrer to tear down the same.  Emil will have a building erected on the lot, to be used as a cream station.

Francis Ice, Floyd Reeves and a friend, Otto Jahn, all students from the Huron college, arrived here Saturday night and remained over until Tuesday morning to attend the concert and reading given Monday night by the Huron Trio and Mrs. C.W. Miller.

Walter Hanson, who, in company with his brother, Emil, went over to his old home in Sweden about two years ago with intention of reamining, arrived here Wednesday forenoon.  He thinks America suits him better.  His brother married in the old country and will remain there.

Last Sunday night C.L. Starr had his car put out of commission by breaking one of the hind axles.  He took it to W..J. McPhail who, on Monday, put it in running order again.  Mr. McPhail is putting in necessary supplies and machinery and before long will  have a first-class garage in running order.

Miss Pearl Kramer closed a term of school last Friday in Harrison township.

Remember that the special school election, called for the purpose of voting bonds for a new school-house, will be held Friday, May 9.
[see April 25, 1913 edition for full article]
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Notices:
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Notice to Stock Owners.
You are hereby notified to keep your stock from running at large.  If this notice is not complied with the marshal will impound same.
By Order of Village Council.
P.C. Arends, Marshal.
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Notice to Clean Up.
Every property holder and renter is hereby notified to clean up his preemises of weeds, trash, etc., by Mary 20, 1913, or same will be done by order of the village council and expense of same taxed against the property.
P.C. Arends, Marshal.
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Cover Your Cisterns.
There are a number of cisterns on vacant lots about town which are not properly covered for the safety of the public.  Each owner is requested to see that same is put in safe condition.
By Order of Village Council.
P.C Arends, Marshal.
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HOWARD - During the electric storm Tuesday nite, the barn on a farm worked by Oscar Valin, seven miles northwest of Howard, was struck by lightning and burned to the ground.  A horse, new buggy harness, a load of corn, some hay, 100 bushels of millet seed, and three hogs were also burned.  Valin, who slept in the house three rods away, knew nothing of the fire until neighbors came to assist in getting the stock out of the barn.

FLANDREAU - No trace has been found of Chris Grotjohn, of Spring Creek, who disappeared mysteriously on April 10.  He walked into town and bought a pair of shoes.  The day was one of the stormiest of the spring, and relatives fear that in walking home he got lost and froze to death.  He had been living with his brother, Harry, in Spring Creek township, about 10 miles from Flandreau.  They owned and worked the farm together.

STAMFORD - Without doubt the most unique bridge in the state has been provided by the commercial club at what is known as the Rocky Ford crossing of White Riiver, near town.  The bridge is a cable stretched across the river, to which a huge basket is attached.  Homesteaders and others coming to and going from town are hauled back and forth across the river in the basket.
[No surnames here, but I tho't this so interesting.  No, I wouldn't have liked  to ride in this, no matter how much  I wanted to get to town! - csr]!

Stamford, South Dakota, United States [Place] is in Jackson County; location is 4353'42"N 1015'19"W; elevation is 2,398 feet [SourceGSP] * note, no "population" stated. csr

DELMONT - As the result of getting possession of a dynamite cap during the temporary absence of his father, Johnnie McMahan, the 10 year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. William McMahan, living near town, had two of his fingers blown off and was badly burned about the breast.  To discover whether the dynamite cap would explode, he placed a lighted match to it.
[see April 25, 1913 edition - Madison dateline...another boy did the same thing!!! I'm hoping descendants will spot these and learn just WHY "great grandpa" didn't have fingers! csr]

ABERDEEN - Fred Seaman, a pioneer of Faulkton, who had recently returned to that place from Florida, where he had gone in a fruitless quest for health, committed sucide by shooting himself through the head with a revolver.
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TRAIN WRECK CAUSED BY CHILDREN AT PLAY
Volga, SD - April 25 - The mystery of the wreck on the Chicago & Northwestern railroad recently was cleared up through the efforts of Claim Agent Winter.  He found a clue that led to the home of A. Santema, a farmer residing a couple of miles from where the wreck took place. Learning where the three Santema children had been playing along the railroad track before the train was wrecked, Winter questioned them, and a six year-old boy admitted that he had placed a large nut on the track, which caused the derailment of the train.  The other two children were a boy and girl, aged 8 and 10 years, respectively.  The childred found the nuts and other pieces of iron along the right of way, and as the nuts were too large to play with they placed them on the track without realizing the danger of their act.
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GUNS ARE FORFEITED TO OFFENDED FARMER
Howard, SD - April 25 - W. F. Kavaney, a farmer living some miles from town, has possession of two valuable shotguns--- and the interesting feature of the matter is that the owners do not dare to call upon him for the surrender of the weapons.  The owners of the weapons, who are supposed to be hunters, took Kavaney's new buggy without his knowledge and after driving it through mud on a hunting expedition, left it outside Kavaney's barn at night.  When he saw the buggy and noticed how mudbespattered it was, Kavaney was pretty mad, but when he found the weapons in the buggy, where the hunters had evidently overlooked them in their effort to be as quiet as possible in returning the buggy, he came to the conclusion that he was ahead of the game after all.  And in the meantime two men are out valuable weapons and do not dare to claim them, as to do so would reveal their identity.
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WILL GAIN FREEDOM AFTER THIRTY YEARS
Pierre, SD - April 25 -- The way to freedom has been opened to Edward Davis, who was sent to the penitentiary 17 years ago from Stanley county on a charge of murder.  Davis, who was a boy at that time, was found guilty of murdering a Wyoming horse dealer by the name of Carlson, and disposing of his horses.  Davis claimed the death of Carlson resulted from a fight, but he was given a life sentence.  He has had an application before the state board for commutation of sentence for many years, but this has been opposed by residents of  Stanley county.  But after this lapse of time the opposition to clemency has been withdrawn and the board commuted the sentence to 30 years, which,, with good time off, means that Davis will be free in less than a year. 

The board also recommended a pardon for William Widesley, sent from Gregory county on a larceny charge.
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PERFUMERY USED FOR PURPOSES OF BEVERAGE
Pierre, SD - April 25 -- Frank Mesteth, an Indian lad of 17 years, is causing all kinds of trouble at the Indian school in this city.  The boy has been getting drunk and an investigation brought out the fact that he had been spending money sent him from home to buy perfumery, which he used for drinking purposes.  Superintendent Crandall has issued notice that he will apply the law where anything is sold to his pupils containing alcohol.
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LODGE DIRECTORY
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TURTLE VALLEY LODGE NO. 61
I.O.O.F.
Meets every Monday night at 8 p.m.
F. C. CALLSEN,  N.G.
J. L. FLINT,  V.G.
J. L. WALSH, Secretary
EMIL FINDER,  Treas..

Visting brothers always cordially welcome
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REBEKAH LODGE NO. 124

Meets First and Third Wednesday Evening at 8 o'clock in Odd Fellows Hall.
MRS. HANNAH LOOMIS,  N.G.
MRS. IDA FLINT,  V.G.
MRS. LULU MIDLER,  Treas.
MISS ETHEL ICE,  Sec.

Visiting brothers and sisters are cordially invited to meet with us.
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A. O. U. W.

Meets first and third Thursday of each month

F. A. ALTENOW,  Master Workman
H. CLEGG,  Recorder
G. SMITH,  Financier
Visiting brothers cordially invited.
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DEGREE OF HONOR
Meets Second and Fourth Friday of Month.

MRS A. ALTENOW,  C.O.H.
MRS. IDA JARMUTH,  L.O.H.
MRS. M. CLEGG, Financier.
MRS. IDA JARMUTH, Receiver.
Visiting members are always cordially invited.
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NINETY-FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF ODD FELLOWSHIP
The Odd Fellows and Rebekahs spent a most enjoyable evening last Saturday in their hall on the 94th anniversary of that order.
Rev. J.L. Walsh delivered a very interesting address, followed by short speeches from other members.  Many laughable stunts were indulged in, and ice cream, cake, sandwiches and coffee were enjoyed.
Sunday forenoon the members of both orders marched to the Presbyterian church, where they, and many others, listend to a highly interesting sermon delivered by Rev. G. Isaac.
No morning services were held in the Methodist church in order that Rev. Walsh and his congregation might attend the services in the Presbyterian church.
The attendance at both the church and hall was large, and the sermon was greatly appreciated.
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C. E. LECTURE COURSE WAS A GRAND SUCCESS
The last number of the Christian Endeavor lecture course was given Monday night.  The Huron Trio, consisting of Miss Hazel B. Peeks, reader, Mr. Fred A. Palmer, baritone, and Mr. Everett L. Hunt, tenor, greatly delighted the large audience with a well-rendered program.  Miss Fay Reeves, who also is a studen at Huron College, presided at the piano.  Mrs. C.W. Miller assisted in the program by giving readings.
That each participant in the program deserves credit for the manner in which he or she rendered his or her part, was amply proven by the long and hearty encores given by the audience.
The manner in which the songs were rendered by Messrs. Palmer and Hunt showed no small amount of vocal training.
Miss Peek gives promise of developing into one of the best readers on the platform in the very near future -- in fact shows a high degree of training right now --and, we understand, will go on the Chautauqua platform this summer, on a tour through Kansas.
This lecture course, under the direction of the C. E. Society, has proven a decided success --in the way of entertainment and instruction, as well as financially. The society will have about $40.00 left in its treasury for next winter's course.

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