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Ghost Town USA’s

Guide to the Ghost Towns of

IDAHO

“The Gem State

 

 

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Western & Eastern Treasures

Ghost Town USA Column Index for Idaho

The state of Idaho is rich in natural resources and scenery, and has been drawing people to its high mountains and wide rich river bottoms for nearly 200 years. Fur traders first discovered the Gem State in the 1830s and established fur trading enters here. When migration to Oregon began in the 1840s and the California Gold Rush after 1848, southeastern Idaho became an important traveling area, especially along the Snake River.

 

In the early 1860s gold was discovered in the mountains to the north of the Snake River basin, and all bets were off. Idaho then enjoyed boom after boom, and rush after rush as the rich deposits of gold, silver, copper and other minerals were discovered and exploited. Mining towns popped up overnight, boomed, and disappeared as the miners went off in search of another rainbow.

 

Today, because of the low population, and the ruggedness of some of the locations, Idaho has many remaining ghost towns and old mining camps still available for a visit. HOWEVER, many are located in the backcountry and a four-wheel drive vehicle or hiking are required to visit them.

 

Agriculture also played an important role in development of a number of ghost towns. The southern part of the state has wide, rich river lands that are amenable to farming, and during the last few decades of the 19th century and the first couple in the 20th, many farming communities were established to serve these agrarian pursuits. However, as is typical in most farming areas (especially as seen in the Great Plains states), the advent of improved transportation and loss of the small "mom & pop" farms to agricultural conglomerates have doomed many of these towns to ghost hood.

 

Idaho is rich in ghost towns, and a lifetime could be spent pursuing all of them. Listed below are 33 locations to get you started.

 

 

 

PLEASE NOTE: 

Where photos are indicated thusly, please use your browser’s “BACK” button to return to page with the photo link.  More photos will be added over time.

 

THE GHOSTS

 

BAYHORSE

Custer Co.

This class C silver mining town is located on Bayhorse Creek Road, along north side of Bayhorse Creek, five miles west of SH 75 at a point seven miles south of Challis. The mines were discovered in 1877. A smelter, stamp mill and six charcoal kilns were built to process the ore. The main street was lined with wooden saloons, boarding houses, stores and other businesses. In 1893 silver was demonetized and the economy took a tumble, taking Bay Horse with it. By the early 1920s, the town was deserted. Wooden buildings still stood in the 1980s.  A cemetery is located west of the charcoal kilns, which are located west of town.

 

·        W-Ctr Sec 2, T12N, R18E, BM (Boise Base Line & Meridian)

·        Latitude: 44.3976983 / 44° 23’ 52” N

·        Longitude: -114.3117306 / 114° 18’ 42” W

 

Cemetery:

·        E-Ctr Sec 3, T12N, R18E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.398161

·        Longitude: -114.319332

 

Coke Ovens:

·        E-Ctr Sec 3, T12N, R18E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.397639

·        Longitude: -114.315469

BLACK BEAR

Shoshone Co.

Part of the Gem to Burke strip of mining camps in the canyon northeast of Wallace, Black Bear in 2009 consisted of a handful of old mobile homes and a few cabins.  At the east end of “town” is a concrete walled mine adit (entrance) and along the creek north of the road is a large concrete foundation.  It is located 1.0 mile northeast of the large brick assay office in Gem and 2.2 miles southwest of the huge mill building in Burke.  The mine adit is 0.1 mile northwest of the cabin cluster on the north side of the bend in the road, north of, and above the creek. 

 

·        SE¼ Sec 8, NE¼ Sec 17, T48N, R5E, BM

·        Latitude: 47.5160407 / 47° 30’ 58” N

·        Longitude: -115.8523830 / 115° 51’ 09” W

·        Mine adit shown in photo:  47.519230, -115.849092

BONANZA CITY

Custer Co.

This class C mining town is nine miles north of Sunbeam, which is on SH 75, 44 miles southwest of Challis.  Bonanza was founded in 1876, and four years later boasted 1500 people and a busy main street lined with businesses. Some buildings still remain.

This is one of the towns featured in my newest book, GHOST TOWNS: Yesterday & TodayTM.

 

·        NW¼ Sec 17, T12N, R15E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.3704682 / 44° 22’ 14” N

·        Longitude: -114.7278568 / 114° 43’ 40” W

BURKE

Shoshone Co.

Anchoring the eastern end of the Gem to Burke strip of mining camps seven miles northeast of EXIT 62, north of I-90 at Wallace, Burke is a true gem of a ghost town.  Ruins include the massive Hecla Mine complex and a small row of commercial buildings.

See our BURKE Page for more details & photos.

CAMAS STAGE STATION

Jefferson Co.

A class A stage coach station that was the site of a lost treasure legend. The station was located where the stage road crosses Camas Creek. A stage full of gold is said to have been robbed and the gold hidden near a lake on the south side of Camas Creek, south of the station. In the meantime, the station has disappeared also.  Possibly at or near the community of Camas, which just over a half mile east of I-15, about 35 miles north of Idaho Falls.

 

CAMAS:

·        SE¼ Sec 21, T8N, R36E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.0074083 / 44° 00’ 27” N

·        Longitude: -112.2210921 / 112° 13’ 16” W

CENTERVILLE

Boise Co.

2 SITES

·        NEW CENTERVILLE: Now a scattered class D agricultural community at the junction of the Placerville Road and the Pioneerville Road west of

Idaho City in the heart of the Boise Basin. It is just scattered homes, mobile homes and any semblance to a town is gone.

·        OLD CENTERVILLE: Old class B gold mining town on Grimes Creek, three miles north of New Centerville. I was told by a local that “You don’t       

want to go there.” It is north of New Centerville on a graded dirt stage road that follows Grimes Creek north to Pioneerville. It once had 3000 people              and had a main street lined with all the necessary buildings to support that many folks. Only rubble and the cemeteries remain.

See our Boise Basin page for additional details of this and other towns in this historic gold mining area.

CHESTERFIELD

Caribou Co.

Founded in 1881, this wonderful little class C/F Mormon agricultural ghost town is due east of Pocatello, 15 miles north of US 30, at a point 12 miles west of Soda Springs.  The buildings are being restored to their original appearance by Mormon missionaries. Several buildings are open to the public (free), and docents will guide you through the museum. The Chesterfield Foundation maintains a fascinating website about the town. 

This is one of the towns featured in my newest book, GHOST TOWNS: Yesterday & TodayTM.

See our CHESTERFIELD Page for more details & photos.

CORNWALL

 

 

Shoshone Co.

Part of the Gem to Burke strip of mining camps in the canyon northeast of Wallace, Cornwall in 2009 consisted of a handful of old mobile homes and a few cabins.  It is located 2.0 miles northeast of the large brick assay office in Gem and 1.1 miles southwest of the huge mill building in Burke.   

 

·        SW¼ Sec 9, T48N, R5E, BM

·        Latitude: 47.5185410 / 47° 31’ 07” N

·        Longitude: -115.8376606 / 115° 50’ 16” W

CUSTER

 

 

Custer Co.

A class C gold mining town on the north side of Yankee Fork Creek, two miles northeast of Bonanza, 26 AIR miles southwest of Challis on Yankee Fork Road. A museum in the old school house (operated by the Forest Service) and a few buildings are all that remain of this one-time gold camp. Custer was founded in 1876, shortly after General George A. Custer’s defeat at the Little Bighorn River.

 

·        NE¼ Sec 9, T12N, R15E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.3874133 / 44° 23’ 15” N

·        Longitude: -114.6959118 / 114° 41’ 45” W

De LAMAR

Owyhee Co.

A class C silver mining town is along Jordan Creek in the Owyhee Mountains, on a graded dirt road 15 miles east of Jordan Valley, Oregon and ten miles west of Silver City. It was a major 1890s transportation and silver mining center, with a two-mile long main street. About $8 million in silver was dug from the local mines, which were discovered in 1888. Many buildings remain.  It was named after Joseph R. De Lamar, a mining investor.

 

·        NW¼ Sec 4, NE¼ Sec 5, T5S, R4W, BM

·        Latitude: 43.0243249 / 43° 01’ 28” N

·        Longitude: -116.8315175 / 116° 49’ 53” W

FORT HALL

Bannock Co.

This class C/F reconstructed ($) replica of the original Fort Hall is located on US 30/91, a mile north of I-15 Exit #67, in southern Pocatello.  It was built in the 1960s and is operated as a museum.  Click here to go to their webpage.

 

The original site is marked by a historic marker and is located along the south side of the Snake River about 200 yards south of the county line, just north of the river’s inlet on the American Falls Reservoir northwest of Pocatello. 

 

The first site was originally established in 1834 by “Nathaniel J. Wyeth and named after one of his financial backers - Henry Hall of Boston. Several years later (1837) Wyeth sold the fort to the Hudson's Bay Company and Thomas McKay of HBC took it over.”

(This section contributed by Dr. JoAn Dilweg, Aug 31, 2010)

 

A second Fort Hall was built about 25 miles from the original site and operated as a military post and important stopping point on the Oregon Trail. It was also the point at which many California bound emigrants split off and headed south towards California. It was in use from 1870-1883, and the old buildings were turned over for use as a school for Native American children.

 

·        NE¼ Sec 6, T5S, R33E, BM

·        Latitude: 43.0201915 / 43° 01’ 13” N

·        Longitude: -112.6347089 / 112° 38’ 05” W

FRISCO

Shoshone Co.

Part of the Gem to Burke strip of mining camps in the canyon northeast of Wallace, Frisco in 2009 consisted of a handful of old mobile homes and a few cabins, along with the massive ruins of the old four-story Frisco Mill on the south side of the creek, south of the road.  The mill is signed with a large state historic marker sign.  The mill sign is located 0.6 miles northeast of the large brick assay office in Gem and 2.3 miles southwest of the huge mill building in Burke.  

 

·        NE¼ Sec 18, T48N, R5E, BM

·        Latitude: 47.5121518 / 47° 30’ 44” N

·        Longitude: -115.8593273 / 115° 51’ 34” W

GEM

Shoshone Co.

This little class D silver mining town anchors the western end of the Gem to Burke strip of mining camps 3.5 miles northeast of EXIT 62, north of I-90 at Wallace.  It is a strung-out little town that has more past than it does present or future.  Little remains of its glory days of a century ago.  About all that remains are a burnt-out cabin, an old automobile repair garage (with rubble and an old sign hidden in the weeds), the Hecla Mining Company assay office and metallurgical laboratory, ruins of a couple of mills and other relics of the past.  These are all offset by the string of cabins and mobile homes housing the present residents.

 

·        Ctr Sec 18, T48N, R5E, BM

·        Latitude: 47.5082627 / 47° 30’ 30” N

·        Longitude: -115.8679385 / 115° 52’ 05” W               

GILMORE

Lemhi Co.

This class C silver mining town is west of SH 28, 18 miles south of Leadore. Gold was discovered here in 1873, but it wasn’t until 1889 when silver-lead ores were worked, the town boomed. The mines produced over $12,000,000 in silver and gold by the 1930s, when the town died. Many buildings remain.

 

·        Ctr Sec 17, T13N, R27E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.4588049 / 44° 27’ 32” N

·        Longitude: -113.2697472 / 113° 16’ 11” W

HELENA

Adams Co.

This class C copper mining town was named after Helena, Montana. It dates to the late 1880s and early 1890s, and remains include crumbling log buildings. It is located in the Seven Devils Mountains, just east of the Snake River, northwest of McCall, North of Boise and east of LaGrande (OR).  GNIS topo map lists it as a “SITE”, so it may now be a class A or B site.

 

·        SW¼ Sec 12, T21N, R3W, BM

·        Latitude: 45.1701582 / 45° 10’ 13” N

·        Longitude: -116.6523664 / 116° 39’ 09” W

IDAHO CITY

Boise Co.

This is a touristy, must-see class E gold mining town. Many old wood and brick buildings remain from the Boise Basin gold rush of 1863 when Idaho City had a population of 6000, and was considered for the territorial capital. After the boom ended in 1888, the town faded, always maintaining some population. Idaho City has grown slightly from a population of 188 in 1960, to 320 in the 1990 census. Today’s Idaho City is an active small community and present-day county seat proud of its mining heritage. It is located on SH 21, 40 miles northeast of Boise.

See our Boise Basin page for additional details of this and other towns in this historic gold mining area.

KELLOGG

 

 

Shoshone Co.

Right up front, I’m going to categorically state that Kellogg is NOT A GHOST TOWN.  However, it IS an old historic mining town, and the only reason it is posted here is due to that fact and a few pictures I wish to share.  On August 10, 2009, I sort-of visited Kellogg when I spent some quality camera time with the towns lining Canyon Creek, northeast of Wallace (Gem-Burke).  Right off the north side of I-90 at EXIT 51, I took a few pictures of a quaint real estate office on the north side of Kellogg that was shaped like a miner’s hat, was named Miner’s Hat Realty, and had a reproduction of a miner’s carbide lamp on the roof.

 

Real estate office: 

·        NW¼ Sec 5, T48N, R3E, BM

·        Latitude: 47.536316

·        Longitude: -116.113279

LEESBURG

 

 

Lemhi Co.

This class C placer gold mining is located on a rough four-wheel-drive road in the Salmon National Forest, 14 miles northeast of Cobalt, and 8 miles west of US 93 at a point five miles south of Salmon. Leesburg began in 1866, and quickly was home to 3000 folks, and over 100 businesses. A cemetery and a number of wooden buildings remain along what used to be the main street of this isolated community.

 

·        NW¼ Sec 21, T22N, R20E, BM

·        Latitude: 45.2238080 / 45° 13’ 26” N

·        Longitude: -114.1139647 / 114° 06’ 50” W

MACE

Shoshone Co.

Part of the Gem to Burke strip of mining camps in the canyon northeast of Wallace, Mace in 2009 consisted of a sign, a dam and some ruins and rubble along the south side of the creek.  There were no cabins noted.  The sign is located 2.3 miles northeast of the large brick assay office in Gem and 0.6 miles southwest of the huge mill building in Burke, and just west of the western end of Burke.   

 

·        SW¼ Sec 9, T48N, R5E, BM

·        Latitude: 47.5182635 / 47° 30’ 06” N

·        Longitude: -115.8221047 / 115° 49’ 20” W

MINERAL CITY

Washington Co.

This class B 1880s silver mining town can only be reached by four-wheel drive road. It is due west of Cambridge, and just east of the Snake River. Once had three saloons and a store among its amenities.  It is not listed in GNIS.

MONUMENT CITY

Valley Co.

Located in the Frank Church wilderness, this old mining town is probably along Monumental Creek or west or northwest of Thunder Mountain, a dozen or so AIR miles northeast of Stibnite, and was probably part of the Thunder Mountain Gold Rush (1902-1908).  A rocky trail leads to the site where rock-walled ruins of cabins and fireplaces remain of this small, early 1900s mining camp.  Exact location not determined as it is not listed in GNIS.

Photos Courtesy of Dan Albert, January 1, 2011

PEARL

 

Gem Co.

A class D tough little gold mining camp east of Emmett and due north of Boise. It strings along a canyon along Willow Creek. Pearl dates to the late 1860s, but really didn’t boom until after 1893. By the early 1900s mining slowed, and not much happened until 1980 when the price of gold increased.

 

·        SE¼ Sec 15, T6N, R1E, BM

·        Latitude: 43.8557215 / 43° 51’ 12” N

·        Longitude: -116.3173499 / 116° 19’ 02” W

PIONEERVILLE

Boise Co.

AKA Fort Hog ‘em and Pioneer City, this 1860s era Boise Basin gold rush town that once had 2000 people, has faded to a scattered community hidden in the hills eight miles northwest of New Centerville. The road in is a rough road (old stage road), and I was advised by locals in New Centerville that it was too rough for my minivan, so we didn’t go. (GBS)

See our Boise Basin page for additional details of this and other towns in this historic gold mining area.

PLACERVILLE

Boise Co.

Only 20 or so permanent residents still live in this quaint little class D gold mining town northwest of New Centerville. The buildings cluster around a central square, and at the time of our visit nothing was open. In 1863 things were way different. 5000 people along with well over 300 buildings marked the town. Today many summer cabins lie around the edges of town.

See our PLACERVILLE page for additional details.

ROCKY BAR

Elmore Co.

“Rocky Bar had several homes, the jail and a saloon/store (?).  Rocky Bar was empty, someone lived there recently but I believe the last long-time resident had left. This site was accessible by passenger car in the summer, but at least high clearance would be advisable. We visited this site in 2000 before the really bad fire season so I don’t know what is left.”

Contributed by “abbzug” (06/30/2003)

 

·        S-Ctr Sec 8, T4N, R10E, BM

·        Latitude: 43.68906636 / 43° 41’ 21” N

·       Longitude: -115.2900855 / 115° 17’ 24” W

RUBY

Owyhee Co.

A class B gold mining town along Jordan Creek and about ¾ mile north of Silver City. It dates to the 1860s Jordan Creek/Owyhee Mountains gold and silver rush. It was the original town here, but as people arrived a need was seen for a better site, and many buildings and the population moved to the south and established Silver City.

 

·        SE¼ Sec 31, T4S, R3W, BM

·        Latitude: 43.0251596 / 43° 01’ 31” N

·       Longitude: -116.7376249 / 116° 44’ 15” W

SAWTOOTH CITY

Blaine Co.

This class B 1880s silver mining town is located on Beaver Creek, a few miles west of US 93, south of Alturas Lake and southeast of Stanley. It was an outgrowth from the activity at nearby Vienna.  The mine was discovered in 1878, and the mining camp quickly boasted a population of 600 or so. It died by 1889, and only rubble remains.

 

·        NE¼ Sec 32, T7N, R14E, BM

·        Latitude: 43.8965718 / 43° 53’ 48” N

·        Longitude: -114.8403490 / 114° 50’ 25” W

SILVER CITY

Owyhee Co.

This class D community is considered Idaho’s finest old mining town, and is located on a graded dirt road 21 miles southwest of Murphy, and 24 miles east of Jordan Valley, Oregon. Founded in 1863, the silver mines were exceptionally rich. In 1867 the booming city grabbed the Owyhee County seat, which it held until 1935. Some 20,000 people walked its now curled boardwalks, but by 1880 the boom fizzled. In 1942, when the government ordered the mines to close, Silver City was nearly a ghost town. Today, its few citizens jealously guard the remains of the town’s weathered wooden buildings, and dusky rock-walled structures.

This is one of the towns featured in my newest book, GHOST TOWNS: Yesterday & TodayTM.

 

·        E½ Sec 6, T5S, R3W, BM

·        Latitude: 43.0243249 / 43° 01’ 28” N

·        Longitude: -116.8315175 / 116° 49’ 53” W

STIBNITE

Valley Co.

Located in the Frank Church Wilderness, nine AIR miles southeast of Yellow Pine, and along Meadow Creek, just west of its confluence with the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, this old tungsten mining town is “only accessible by foot.”  It has a number of interesting structures as shown by the linked photos by Dan Albert.  The GNIS maps do show a road in, but according to Mr. Albert, it appears the road is not open to vehicle traffic.  The topographic map also shows a number of other named mining camps in the vicinity (Forest Grove, Midnight, Monday Camp).

 

One of the major mines was the Meadow Creek mine (indicated on GNIS), which produced gold, antimony, mercury and tungsten.  The gold and antimony mines began operation around 1914 when Albert Hennessey staked some claims.  Mining began and in 1918 there was a mercury boom.  In 1927, the Bradley Mining Company purchased the mines and major development began and by 1932 production began.  The camp grew and operated through WWII as an underground mine.  In 1943, it was turned into an open pit. This was a major supplier of tungsten and antimony to the US War effort in the 1940s and was one of the few mines that remained open due to its production of this vital material.  It produced as much as 80% of the tungsten and 90% of the antimony used in the war.  Many of the miners lived in frame-tent houses, or older log houses.  A number of wood frame homes were also built by the mining company to provide decent shelter for the miners and families.  There was a high turnover of miners due to the isolated position and harsh winters.  Amenities included a bowling alley, gas station/garage, hospital, post office, recreation center, school and a theater (possibly in the recreation center?).  The town is said to have had over 1500 residents between 1941 and 1945 due to the huge boom in mining during the war years.

 

The mine closed in 1952 and in 1955 the processing plant and many of the buildings were torn town or relocated.  In 1965, the small dam that was built on Meadow Creek to provide hydroelectric power to the operation failed and caused some flooding.  There was renewed activity beginning in 1970, when off-and-on again mining for gold occurred until 1998. 

 

Ruins, foundations and a few standing buildings remain of this historic old mining town.

 

ALL Photos Courtesy of Dan Albert, January 1, 2011

 

·        E½ Sec 15, T18N, R9E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.8982407 / 44° 53’ 54” N

·        Longitude: -115.3392759 / 115° 20’ 21” W

THUNDER MOUNTAIN

Valley Co.

Site of a gold rush in 1902-1908.  The Roosevelt Cemetery has at least 13 graves in it.  Numerous grave markers and headboards remain.  It is not shown on the GNIS database, but Roosevelt Lake is.  Thunder Mountain is located near the mountain of the same name, about a dozen AIR miles northeast of Stibnite.  The GNIS topo doesn’t show a named Thunder Mountain mine or camp, others on the northeast flank of the mountain include: Sunnyside Mine, Dewey Mine, and Venable Mine.  There is also a Belleco (site) indicated.  All lie east of Monumental Creek.  Along the creek, west of the peak is the Twentieth Century Mill and Roosevelt Lake.   Just north of Roosevelt lake is the mouth to Trap Creek, where there are additional ruins.  These consist of mortared-together flat rocks stacked on top of each other, the remains of a rock-walled cabin at the base of a rock pile.

Photos Courtesy of Dan Albert, January 1, 2011

 

ROOSEVELT LAKE

·        E-Ctr Sec 24, T19N, R10E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.9676976 / 44° 58’ 04” N

·        Longitude: -115.1728541 / 115° 10’ 22” W

 

THUNDER MOUNTAIN (peak)

·        SE¼ Sec 29, T19N, R11E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.9501881 / 44° 57’ 01” N

·        Longitude: -115.1334376 / 115° 08’ 00” W

 

MOUTH OF TRAP CREEK

·        NEC Sec 24, T19N, R10E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.9774101 / 44° 58’ 39” N

·        Longitude: -115.1687167 / 115° 10’ 07” W

VIENNA

Blaine Co.

A class B, 1880s silver mining town eight miles north of Sawtooth City. Over 800 people lived and worked here between 1879 and 1892. Only rubble remains, along with a forest service sign.

 

·        NE¼ Sec 32, T7N, R14E, BM

·        Latitude: 43.8165704 / 43° 49’ 00” N

·        Longitude: -114.8300695 / 114° 49’ 48” W

YELLOW DOG

Shoshone Co.

Part of the Gem to Burke strip of mining camps in the canyon northeast of Wallace, Yellow Dog in 2009 consisted of a handful of old mobile homes and a few cabins located north of the road and creek just west of Cornwall, 1.6 miles northeast of the large brick assay office in Gem and 1.3 miles southwest of the huge mill building in Burke.  It is not shown on GNIS. 

 

·        SW¼ Sec 9, T48N, R5E, BM

·        Latitude: 47.516998

·        Longitude: -115.842977

YELLOWJACKET

Lemhi Co.

Yellowjacket had a stamp mill with many of the stamps still in the frames. There were also many buildings, some cabins, part of the mill building and the standing remains of a five-story hotel.  Yellowjacket seemed to have a caretaker but no one was there when we were.  This site was accessible by passenger car in the summer, but at least high clearance would be advisable. We visited this site in 2000 before the really bad fire season so I don't know what is left.”

Contributed by “abbzug” (06/30/2003)

 

GNIS also shows a cemetery there. It is shown on NFD 112 Road and buildings are shown on the GNIS aerial photo and topo map. (GBS)

·        S-Ctr Sec 8, T4N, R10E, BM

·        Latitude: 44.9796397 / 44° 58’ 47” N

·        Longitude: -114.5317520 / 114° 31’ 54” W

 

MORE INFORMATION

 

 

Historians estimate that there may be as many as 50,000 ghost towns scattered across the United States of America. Gary B. Speck Publications is in process of publishing unique state, regional, and county guides called

The Ghost Town Guru's Guide to the Ghost Towns of “STATE”

These original guides are designed for anybody interested in ghost towns. Whether you are a casual tourist looking for a new and different place to visit, or a hard-core ghost town researcher, these guides will be just right for you. With over 30 years of research behind them, they will be a welcome addition to any ghost towner's library.

Thank you, and we'll see you out on the Ghost Town Trail!

 

For more information on the ghost towns of IDAHO, contact us at

Ghost Town USA.

 

E-mailers, PLEASE NOTE:

Due to the tremendous amount of viruses, worms and “spam,” out there, I no longer open or respond to e-mails with unsolicited attachments, OR messages on the subject lines with “Hey”, “Hi”, “Need help”, “Help Please”, “???”, or blank subject lines, etc.  If you do send E-mail asking for information, or sharing information, PLEASE indicate the appropriate location AND state name, or other topic on the “subject” line.

THANK YOU!  :o)

IMPORTANT

 

These listings and historical vignettes of ghost towns, near-ghost towns and other historical sites in IDAHO above are for informational purposes only, and should NOT be construed to grant permission to trespass, metal detect, relic or treasure hunt at any of the listed sites.

 

If the reader of this guide is a metal detector user and plans to use this guide to locate sites for metal detecting or relic hunting, it is the READER'S responsibility to obtain written permission from the legal property owners. Please be advised, that any state or nationally owned sites will probably be off-limits to metal detector use. Also be aware of any federal, state or local laws restricting the same.

 

 

When you are exploring the ghost towns of IDAHO, please abide by the

Ghost Towner's Code of Ethics.

 

 

 

Also visit: Ghost Town USA’s

 

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FIRST POSTED:  June 01, 2000

LAST UPDATED: October 11, 2012

 

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