Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Private William  Johnson  SUGDEN – 1804....1868

 Royal Veteran Regiment's Soldiers who stayed

Details of his life as known by Murray Macaulay. Paper prepared January 2009. The facts are in approximate chronological order, details of the source of the information is recorded, and where it might assist (or amuse), I have added my comment.

Prepared by and supplied from Murray Macaulay

 

Comment:  Daniels records the spelling of W. J. S’s name as William Johnston Sugden; the search of the Archives Office records the spelling as Johnson. Given that Daniels has obviously gone through the newspapers of the time, it seems of little use to go over the newspapers again. I have gone through the records as they exist on the Net, but I cannot find evidence of how and when W. J. S arrived in Hobart. There is no William Johnson or Johnston or Johnstone Sugden on the Convict records. There is a convict William Sugden in the Tasmanian records but he arrived in Hobart in 21 Feb 1836 on the Asia 4, so it can’t be him since the license was granted in late 1835. Also, this particular Sugden was convicted at York 18 July 1835 aged 17, so I think he is too young to be our William Sugden.

Comment : There is no evidence that W. J. S and Mary Price married, and years later, Mary Lewis’ Death Certificate ( Vic BDM No. 4504) sworn by her husband Richard Lewis, states that Mary and Richard had no children, and that her sons (unnamed on her death certificate) were illegitimate.

Comment: William’s Marriage Cert, signed by William as William S P Lewis, and is witnessed by Richard Lewis, his stepfather. George’s Marriage Certificate, signed by him as George Sugden Price Lewis, and is witnessed by his brother who signed as William S Price Lewis. It is possible that Mary had one child by a William Johnstone Sugden, and another son by a Robert Johnson Sugden – but I doubt it.

Comment:  It is always possible that William and Mary were married, maybe in England, maybe in Tasmania. Why then would they claim to be not married? In olden days, the mechanics of becoming divorced were more complex, and costly, and I am certain that some couples decided to split, and claim they had never been married. Given the lack of records and communications in colonial Australia, it would be easier for people to deny they had ever been married. From then on, both parties would have to keep denying they were married, because they would be guilty of bigamy, and then subject to imprisonment if they later married someone else. William Sugden did later marry Louisa Frost and Mary Price later married Richard Lewis. It would seem that if the disinheritance story is correct, William’s father might have been in the colonies. For William to write to England and then receive a response saying don’t marry her would have taken over 8 months at best.

Comment:  This is the first mention of a William J Sugden in Melbourne. The Melbourne Union Cricket Club did NOT become the Melbourne Cricket Club. Sugden being in Melbourne in February 1839 does not prevent him from being the sire of George Lewis born sometime in 1838.

 

Comment:  Although the source merely refers to Sugden, later references will show that the Sugden is almost certainly William Johnson Sugden. It shows that by late 1840, William Sugden has managed to get into some position of influence.

Comment:  A burgess is a sort of local councillor

Comment:  It is possible that Sugden already knew the Frosts in Hobart. Frost was a publican in Hobart in the late 1820’s to early 1830’s although an Index of Licensees Hobart Town Gazette 2 October 1834 states that Charles Thorpe had the Rose and Crown, and that John Sweep had the Dorchester, Sugden taking over this license at about this time. A search shows that early Hobart had a lot of pubs. The Net has several pages on the Frosts posted in 2007. Frost was a convict; his wife was born on Norfolk Island and was probably a daughter of convicts. Frost appears in Melbourne 10 January 1839 advertising his services as an undertaker, see Garryowen.

Comment:  This is about the only record I can find that has anything to say about Sugden the person. Although Sugden is probably my great great grandfather, and I am therefore possessed of some bias, I can’t help thinking that Garryowen is having a cheap shot at Sugden and perhaps settling an old score or two. Maybe the fact that Sugden was a keen Freemason and Garryowen an Irishman had something to do with it. One would have to read other profiles by Garryowen to see if in fact he was having a cheap shot at Sugden.

Comment:  Note the actual name of the son for later discussion.

Comment:  The Chief constables of Geelong and Portland received 70 pounds per year. Note the misspelling of the name.

Comment:  At this time William and Gorge Lewis’ stepfather Richard Lewis is the Licensee of the Woolpack Inn, Digby, Victoria. I wonder if they ever met up for any purpose. Regarding the late licence, if Sugden came back to Melbourne today, he would probably have a club in King Street.

Comment:  Obviously no money in public utilities – until the 1990’s

Comment:  Given that according to Bronwyn, this Association ultimately became the AHA, it is nice to see that William Sugden’s Great Great Great Grandson John Lewis was CEO of the South Australian branch of the AHA for seven years up to 2005. Garryowen is still apparently grinding his axe.

Comment:  Sugden must by this time have been a VIP in Melbourne. I have yet to see any mention of Sugden being knighted.

Comment:  Nothing new here, but it is possible to assume that Sugden was held in some esteem by those who ran the colony to be called to advise such a committee.

Comment:  Shortly after this, he quits the Bull and Mouth so this trip to Tasmania was probably intended to set up to take him and his family to Tasmania. The term Esquire denotes that the person, among other reasons has or holds an office of trust under the Crown.

 

Comment:  WJS and family have gone back to Tasmania for some reason or another.

Comment:  William Sugden is moving in the right circles in Tasmania. I wonder why he was in Tasmania – maybe it was to advise the government about policing?? Or hotels ?? or maybe he just wanted to return to Tasmania and show people that he had “made it”. 

Comment:  Family moves back to Melbourne and settles for rest of life in St Kilda.

Comment:  Family has moved back to Melbourne.

Comment:  This is the earliest piece of paper I have found where Sugden actually signs it – and he signs as W J Sugden witnessing that his name is William Johnson Sugden.

 

William Johnson Sugden certainly led an interesting life. Born in Yorkshire in the early 1800’s, he ends up at the end of the planet in a small town (Hobart) on the edge of civilisation. He meets a woman, sires two children with her, goes broke in a pub, breaks up with the mother of his sons, and ends up in a slightly smaller town (Melbourne) also on the edge of the civilised world. Not many prospects for an out of work forty year old. In the next twenty years, he becomes a VIP in Melbourne and Hobart, being the chief copper, the leader of a parade to celebrate the formation of the colony, a leading hotelier, a leader of the Masonic movement, and a husband and a father of numerous children. The records also suggest that Sugden Place in central Melbourne is named after him. It’s fair to say that whatever he did right or wrong, he can certainly claim to be a significant pioneer of the city of Melbourne.

 

 Murray Macaulay January 2009.

 

Refernces :

(1) Victorian Births, Deaths , Marriages No 1336 Death Certificate Sworn by his son Robert Johnson Sugden. Certificate recorded that W.J.S’s father and mother unknown.

(2)   State of Tasmania Archives Office Ref HTG 8 Oct 1835 – other reference is from Lou Daniels (lvdan@ozemail.com.au) being information from Daniel’s review of newspapers of the day, and from his review of a correspondence file at Archives Office.

 (3) The Marriage Certificate of William Sugden Price Lewis recording his marriage 5 March 1868 in Redruth Victoria (near Hamilton) states that Williams father was William Johnstone Sugden, a settler, Vic BDM 3. By this stage, Mary Price had married one Richard Lewis in Launceston in 1841, and William had taken his stepfather’s name.

(4) George Lewis Marriage Certificate Vic BDM 323 date of marriage 24 March 1868 identifies George’s parents as Robert Johnson Sugden, and his mother as Mary Lewis nee Price.

 (5) The above references, particularly Mary’s Death Certificate where her husband records that her sons not by the marriage were illegitimate. According to Lynne Price of Hamilton, Victoria who has researched the Price family, the “story” is that William’s father George Sugden had forbidden his son to marry Mary and had threatened to disinherit him if he did.

(6) First Years at Port Philip 1834 to 1842, by Robert Boys, Chief Librarian of the Public Library of Victoria, 2nd Edition, Robertson & Mullens 1959. The work is a chronology of events with reference to printed material.

(7)  Fraternal Conflicts in Colonial Australia 1788 to 1850, G. Blainey, Odd Fellows, A History of IOOF Australia, Allen & Unwin 1991. 

 (8) NSW State Records

(9) Lou Daniels, see above for Net address. Also, the Chronicles of Early Melbourne by “Garryowen” Ferguson & Mitchell 1888. “Garryowen” was the penname of an Irish-born journalist named Edmund Finn, who upon his retirement recorded his recollections of early Melbourne. Its quite an extensive memoir of two volumes.

(10) Lou Daniels, see above.

(11) The Port Phillip Herald 8 Sep 1843  

(12)  All the relevant certificates of Sugden, his wife, and their children refer to the date and place of the marriage. I have sighted the photocopy of the St James Marriage Register in the State Library in Melbourne.

(13) . The father is recorded as W J Sugden, Sheriffs Officer.

 (14) Appointment to Benalla, Lou Daniels. Appointment in Melbourne, see Garryowen, plus many other sources. 

(15) Garryowens Melbourne, see above. Another source “An Irish Family In Early Melbourne”  

(16) Garryowen

(17) Past Patterns – Future Directions Victoria Police and the problem of corruption and serious misconduct – The Office of Police Integrity – published by Vic Govt Printer Feb 2007.

(18)  Vic BDM

(19) Garryowen

(20) Vic BDM. 

(21) Garryowen

(22) Garryowen and the 1847 Directory for the Town and District of Port Phillip.

(23) Publicans Index of 19th Century Victoria hosted by rootsweb, an ancestry.com.community. The reference to the late licence is from Garryowen.

(24) Vic BDM 

(25) Garryowen

(26) Committees of the Licensed Victuallers Association Of Victoria – An Index to Committee Members 1841 to 1920 – prepared by Bronwyn Higgs 1994. The comments about the sovereigns and joining the association are from Garryowen.

(27)  Publicans Index 

(28) Publicans Index 

(29) Police Detectives in History 1750 to 1950 by Clive Emsley

(30) Tas Archives Office 

(31) Publicans Index

(33) Lou Daniels, see above, place of birth confirmed Vic BDM

(34)The Hobart Courier 13 July 1854 

(35) Publicans Index see above. 

(36) Vic BDM

(37) Vic BDM

(39) Vic BDM 

(40) The Argus 28 Aug 1861

(41) Argus 25 Sep 1862

(42) Argus 15 November 1862.

(43) Vic BDM.

(44) A History of St Kilda

(46)  Vic BDM.

(47)Vic BDM.

(48)Vic BDM signed by son Alfred.


 

Details of his life as known by Murray Macaulay. Paper prepared January 2009 2nd Edition

William Johnston Sugden; – Details of his life as known by Murray Macaulay. Paper prepared February 2009. The facts are in approximate chronological order, details of the source of the information is recorded, and where it might assist (or amuse), I have added my comment.

 

Fact: Born in Bradford, Yorkshire, 1804/1805 England 63 years before his death in Melbourne, Australia on 11 August 1868

 

Source:       Victorian Births Deaths Marriages No 1336 Death Certificate Sworn by his son Robert Johnson Sugden. Certificate recorded that WJS’s father and mother unknown, birthplace is Yorkshire. A death notice in The Argus in 1868 states that Sugden was born in Bradford Yorkshire. According to Miss Madge Sugden born 1912, William’s great granddaughter, the Sugden family goes back to the Wool Guilds of the 12th century in Bradford Yorkshire. Her father Louis Bradford Sugden had told her this. Conversation between Murray Macaulay, Madge Sugden and John Sugden February 2009.

 

Comment: Extensive searching on the Net has so far as at February 2009 failed to reveal any other details of where or when WJS was born, nor any details of his parents or siblings.

 

Fact:  A William Johnson Sugden was Licensee of the Dorchester Butt Hotel in Campbell Street, Hobart in September 1835 to May 1836. The previous licensee was John Sweep. In May 1836, the License was transferred from assignees of William Johnson Sugden, insolvent, to John Sheppard. According to one history of Tasmania, more than half the colonists had become insolvent in 1836, due to very high taxes levied by the colonial govt, which had to make up the shortfall due to lack of funds from Britain.

 

Sources:     State of Tasmania Archives Office Ref HTG 8 Oct 1835 – other reference is from Lou Daniels (lvdan@ozemail.com.au) being information from Daniel’s review of newspapers of the day, and from his review of a correspondence file at Archives Office. Also, Hobart Courier dated 4 May 1836 contains an ad posted by solicitor Daniel Sutton on behalf of William Johnston Sugden of Hobart town stating that a meeting of creditors of the insolvent W J Sugden was held 4 May 1836, a further meeting to be held 11 May 1836.

 

Comment:  Daniels records the spelling of WJS’s name as William Johnston Sugden; the search of the Archives Office records the spelling as Johnson. Given that Daniels has obviously gone through the newspapers of the time, it seems of little use to go over the newspapers again. I have gone through the records as they exist on the Net, but I cannot find evidence of how and when WJS arrived in Hobart. There is no William Johnson or Johnston or Johnstone Sugden on the Convict records. There is a convict William Sugden in the Tasmanian records but he arrived in Hobart in 21 Feb 1836 on the Asia 4, so it can’t be him since the license was granted in late 1835. Also, this particular Sugden was convicted at York 18 July 1835 aged 17, so I think he is too young to be our William Sugden. The source for the level of insolvency in Hobart in 1836 is Life in Old Van Diemans Land by Joan Goodrick Rigby Aust 1977.

 

Fact:  A boy William Sugden Price was born in Hobart 21 July 1836; his parents were William Johnstone Sugden, and Mary Price. Tasmanian records record two baptisms in 1836 that are relevant to William Lewis’ parentage. One entry says William Sugden baptised 1836 In New Town Church of England Vol No 656/30 Page 34. Another entry says William Price baptised 1836 in New Town Church of England Vol 656/30 Page 34. It looks like this child was recorded twice in the records, one as William Sugden, one as William Price. There are no other children named either Sugden or Price in the Tasmanian records for 1836.

 

Source:       The Marriage Certificate of William Sugden Price Lewis recording his marriage 5 March 1868 in Redruth Victoria (near Hamilton) states that Williams father was William Johnstone Sugden, a settler, Vic BDM 3. By this stage, Mary Price had married one Richard Lewis in Launceston in 1841, and William had taken his stepfather’s name. The source for the Baptism records is Tasmanian Births and Baptisms 1803 to 1840 complied August 1991 by A.M.Buchanan State Library of Victoria G 994.6 IN2B in the Genealogy section of the Library.

 

Comment : There is no evidence that WJS and Mary Price married, and years later, Mary Lewis’ Death Certificate ( Vic BDM No. 4504) sworn by her husband Richard Lewis, states that Mary and Richard had no children, and that her sons (unnamed on her death certificate) were illegitimate. The significance of the Baptism records is that the entry was made at the time of the birth of the child, showing that a child named William was named Sugden (and presumably also Price). These are the only entries in the index for 1836 for any children named either Price OR Sugden.

 

Fact:  A boy George Sugden Price was born in Hobart in about 1838; his parents were identified as Robert Johnson Sugden and Mary Price.  

 

Source:       George Lewis Marriage Certificate Vic BDM 323 date of marriage 24 March 1868 identifies George’s parents as Robert Johnson Sugden, and his mother as Mary Lewis nee Price.

 

Comment: William’s Marriage Cert, signed by William as William S P Lewis, and is witnessed by Richard Lewis, his stepfather. George’s Marriage Certificate, signed by him as George Sugden Price Lewis, and is witnessed by his brother who signed as William S Price Lewis. It is possible that Mary had one child by a William Johnstone Sugden, and another son by a Robert Johnson Sugden – but I doubt it. Compare this with the previous fact that William Lewis was baptised William Sugden. In the case of George Lewis, there is no reference in the Tasmanian Baptism records in 1838 to any child called George Sugden or George Price. In fact there are no children of that surname baptised in Tasmania in 1838. There is however a child baptised as follows – George William Lewis born 1838 baptised Launceston Church of England Vol No 32/3 Page 279. Maybe Richard Lewis had already taken Mary and the children under his wing, and Mary had him baptised Lewis instead of Sugden, even though on his marriage certificate, George Lewis identified his father as Robert Johnson Sugden.

 

Fact:  William Sugden and Mary Price were never married.

 

Source:       The above references, particularly Mary’s Death Certificate where her husband records that her sons not by the marriage were illegitimate. According to Lynne Price of Hamilton, Victoria who has researched the Price family in Australia, the “story” is that William’s father George Sugden had forbidden his son to marry Mary and had threatened to disinherit him if he did.

 

Comment:  It is always possible that William and Mary were married, maybe in England, maybe in Tasmania. Why then would they claim to be not married? In olden days, the mechanics of becoming divorced were more complex, and costly, and I am certain that some couples decided to split, and claim they had never been married. Given the lack of records and communications in colonial Australia, it would be easier for people to deny they had ever been married. From then on, both parties would have to keep denying they were married, because they would be guilty of bigamy, and then subject to imprisonment if they later married someone else. William Sugden did later marry Louisa Frost and Mary Price later married Richard Lewis. It would seem that if the disinheritance story is correct, William’s father might have been in the colonies. For William to write to England and then receive a response saying don’t marry her would have taken over 8 months at best.

 

Fact:  William Johnson Sugden had been an innkeeper in Bothwell, Van Diemans Land before coming to Port Phillip.

 

Source:       The Victorian Historical Magazine Volume XII 1927-28.

 

Comment:  It is possible for Sugden to be an innkeeper in Hobart and give up that licence in 1836, and then become an innkeeper in Bothwell. Or he may have been an innkeeper at Bothwell and then moved to Hobart in 1835. The Bothwell source does not mention Sugden keeping an hotel in Hobart at all. The reference to Bothwell does not tell us the year he was in Bothwell. Maybe the Vic Historical Society had the wrong information. Bothwell is about 45 miles north of Hobart. It is also of interest that halfway between Hobart and Bothwell on THE road north is Bridgewater. In August 1834, the vessel “Strathfieldsaye” berthed in Hobart, and on that vessel was one Mary Price aged 21. That Mary Price went to work as a house servant for a Mr Presnell at Bridgewater. Details from the passenger list of the Strathfieldsaye on the Web.

 

Fact:  W J Sugden also at some stage was involved in or knew those involved in a business of woolpressers in Tasmania, and still had some involvement in January 1838. A press notice Hobart Town Courier Friday 26 January 1838 says that “the business hitherto carried on under the firm of Joseph and Thomas Tetley is this day dissolved by mutual consent. Signed Joseph Tetley, Joseph Tolson and Thomas Tetley, witnessed by James Dixon and by W J Sugden. Dated Hobart Town 1 January 1838. All claims at Hobart against the above firm will be settled by Mr J Tolson and at Launceston by Mr T Tetley.

 

Source:       Hobart Town Courier. Also noted in the biographical card index of historian A S Kenyon, at one time President of The Victorian Historical Society, kept at the State Library Of Victoria.

 

Comment:  Sugden is still in Tasmania at the start of 1838. This makes it possible for him to be the father of George Lewis who was born prior to March 1838.

 

Fact:  W J Sugden arrives in Melbourne between the end of March 1838 and the end of September 1838.

 

Source:       Numerous references in histories of the Police and Melbourne refer to Sugden being in Van Diemans Land prior to 1838. In addition, the Census Of the Town Of Melbourne March 1838 does not mention a W J Sugden, but the September 1838 Census of the Port Phillip District does contain a W J Sugden (living alone). The source is Historical Records Of Victoria Volume 3 The Early Development Of Melbourne 1836 to 1839. Victorian Govt Printing Office 1984.

 

Comment:  This still allows Sugden to be the father of George Lewis. George was married March 1868 giving his age as 30, meaning he was born March 1838 or prior. It would appear Sugden was still around for George’s birth but left for Melbourne soon after that. The September 1838 Census records the total population of the city of Melbourne was 1036, not including military and convicts, although interestingly quite a few aborigines. One cannot be much more of a pioneer of the city than this.

 

Fact:  On 17 November 1838, a cricket match was played in Melbourne between civilians and the military, the former being the winners. On 9 February 1839, a meeting of the Melbourne Cricket Club was held. On 20 February 1839, a meeting of the Melbourne Union Cricket Club was held; William Johnstone Sugden was Secretary of The Melbourne Union Club.

 

Source:       First Years at Port Philip 1834 to 1842, by Robert Boys, Chief Librarian of the Public Library of Victoria, 2nd Edition, Robertson & Mullens 1959. The work is a chronology of events with reference to printed material.

 

Comment:  This is the first mention of a William J Sugden in Melbourne in the papers. The Melbourne Union Cricket Club did NOT become the Melbourne Cricket Club.

 

Fact:  William Sugden is a founder of the Odd Fellows Lodge in Melbourne in October 1840. Of the five acknowledged founders of the IOOF Lodge in October 1840, Greeves, Strode, Sugden, Graham and Hays all appear to have been Protestants. By 1846, Strode had dropped from public view, while the others remain publically Protestant and firmly IOOFMU members.

 

Source:       Fraternal Conflicts in Colonial Australia 1788 to 1850, G.Blainey, Odd Fellows, A History of IOOF Australia, Allen & Unwin 1991. Date of formation confirmed by Boys, see above. However, the 1841 Port Phillip Directory copied in the Vic State Library says that one of the members of the IOOF was George Johnstone Sugden.

 

Comment:  Although the B;ainey source merely refers to Sugden, later references will show that the Sugden is almost certainly William Johnson Sugden. It shows that by late 1840, William Sugden has managed to get into some position of influence. As far as this man being either William Sugden or George Sugden, it appears that it is William Sugden. The 1841 Census of the Port Philip District has no other Sugdens in Melbourne but W J Sugden. Furthermore, I have a list of all the Sugdens in Australia up to 1905, and there are 167 of them. List supplied by B & M Chapman who keep the Redcoats in Australia website. This list does contain a couple of George Sugdens but all are born after 1840 so they cannot be forming the IOOF in 1840. It also means that Mary Price might have named her second son George because it was yet another name by which William Sugden was known.

 

Fact:  The 1841 NSW Census (Vic was still part of NSW at this time) states that a William J Sugden is living in Melbourne township

 

Source:       NSW State Records

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  On 13 March 1841, WJS was appointed Sheriffs Bailiff in Melbourne.

 

Source:       Lou Daniels, see above for Net address. Also, the Chronicles of Early Melbourne by “Garryowen” Ferguson & Mitchell 1888. “Garryowen” was the penname of an Irish-born journalist named Edmund Finn, who upon his retirement recorded his recollections of early Melbourne. Its quite an extensive memoir of two volumes.

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  During 1842 and 1843, William Johnson Sugden was an auctioneer in Melbourne.

 

Source:       Lou Daniels, see above.

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  8 Sep 1843 William Johnson Sugden whose house is in William Street is a Burgess in Burke Ward.

 

Source:       The Port Phillip Herald 8 Sep 1843

 

Comment:  A burgess is a sort of local councillor

 

Fact:  in April 1843, William Johnson Sugden married Louisa Frost at St James cathedral, Melbourne. Louisa, born 1824, was the daughter of Robert Frost and Louisa Gooding. Frost was a Hobart publican holding the Licence to the Rose And Crown at New Town in the late 1820’s, early 1830’s.. New Town was the next settled area out from Hobart heading towards Launceston. The marriage was witnessed by William Wright and his wife Mary Ann. The Wright’s daughter Frances was married to Arthur Thomas Frost, a brother of Louisa. William Wright, known as “the tulip”, had been a police constable in Hobart, had come across to Melbourne to be Chief Constable in Melbourne in 1839. He was eventually sent to Portland ( not Coventry) as constable because of allegations of impropriety in Melbourne. The history books have a bit to say about “the Tulip” who apparently got his name because he had a big red nose like a tulip. Wonder how he got that?  

 

Source:       All the relevant certificates of Sugden, his wife, and their children refer to the date and place of the marriage. I have sighted the photocopy of the St James Marriage Register in the State Library in Melbourne, and sighted a copy at the Vergers Office at St James Cathedral in Melbourne.

 

Comment:  It is possible that Sugden already knew the Frosts in Hobart. Frost was a publican in Hobart in the late 1820’s to early 1830’s although an Index of Licensees Hobart Town Gazette 2 October 1834 states that Charles Thorpe had the Rose and Crown, and that John Sweep had the Dorchester, Sugden taking over this license at about this time. A search shows that early Hobart had a lot of pubs. Population was about 20,000 people. The Net has several pages on the Frosts posted in 2007. Frost was a convict; his wife was born on Norfolk Island and was probably a daughter of convicts. Frost appears in Melbourne 10 January 1839 advertising his services as an undertaker, see Garryowen. Frost does not appear on the March 1838 Census for the Town of Melbourne. He does appear on the September 1838 Census living alone. The linkup to the Wright’s was supplied by Alan Frost, born 1916, living in Lara in March 2009. Alan has a large collection of family history material relating mainly to the Frosts. Anyone researching the Frosts should start with Alan’s material.

 

Fact:  A son, Arthur Sugden, is born to William and Louisa Sugden 25 October 1843. He dies the next day. His father is described on the Register as a Sheriffs Officer. Judging by the dates of the marriage and the date of the birth, William and Louisa were off to a flying start.

 

Source:       Vic BDM, see attached genealogy chart for details. The father is recorded as W J Sugden, Sheriffs Officer.

 

Comment: none

 

Fact:  In 1844, William Sugden is appointed Chief Constable of the Broken River (Benalla) area, and also in October 1844, he is then appointed Chief Constable of Melbourne, replacing Charles Brodie, who went to Benalla in his place. He was the second person to hold the position. Apparently, Brodie had been dismissed by the Town Magistrates of Melbourne on the grounds of discourtesy and disrespect to the Magistrates. Legally, they did not have the power to dismiss a constable. Superintendent Latrobe then dismissed Brodie and sent him to Benalla on the basis that it was “inexpedient” that Brodie continue in a situation contrary to the wishes of the Bench.

 

Source:       Appointment to Benalla, Lou Daniels. Appointment in Melbourne, see Garryowen, plus many other sources. The source for the facts relating to Brodie’s dismissal are contained in N.S.W. Governor George Gipps letter to Latrobe August 1844, see A.G.L.Shaw, the Gipps Latrobe Correspondence 1839 to 1846.

 

Comment:  Always wanted to say my fathers a policeman. Some more research may yield information as to why Sugden was selected for both positions, particularly the town position. I hope to read the letters and the journal of Superintendent Latrobe in the State Library Of Vic to see what if anything Latrobe said about Sugden.

 

Fact:  Sugden serves as Chief Constable until 1848. Garryowen writes as follows: Mr. William Johnson Sugden came after Charles Brodie as Chief Constable, and held the office for several years, when he retired to commence business as a Boniface (innkeeper) in the Royal Mail Hotel, corner of Bourke and Swanston Street, of which he was the first landlord. He afterwards kept the Bull And Mouth in Bourke Street, and later still, a hostelry in St. Kilda.   He was a tall, straight, good-looking man, who strutted like a retired dragoon through the streets. He once served in a cavalry regiment, which accounts for the half-cavalier manner in which he did other things besides working. He was Sheriffs Officer when he got the police preferment, and whilst Chief-Constable led an active bustling life of it. He was at times rather impulsive in his duty, and too confident and too pretentious in his conduct: he was partial to “blowing” about himself, but on the whole, served the public reasonably well and gave pretty general satisfaction. He was also the first superintendent of the first fire brigade founded in Melbourne, but in this capacity he never endangered life or limb, nor did anything special reportable as a public extinguisher. In his treatment of the police, he was deficient in that sameness of manner so necessary for the maintenance of proper discipline, for one week he would bounce, and the next do the other thing. Sometimes he was over-exacting, and at other times too indulgent, and many anecdotes used to be told of how he managed his men.

 

Source:       Garryowens Melbourne, see above. Another source “An Irish Family In Early Melbourne”

 

Comment:  This is about the only record I can find that has anything to say about Sugden the person. Although Sugden is probably my great great grandfather, and I am therefore possessed of some bias, I can’t help thinking that Garryowen is having a cheap shot at Sugden and perhaps settling an old score or two. Maybe the fact that Sugden was a keen Freemason and Garryowen an Irishman had something to do with it. In July 1846, there were serious riots in Melbourne between Catholics and Protestants ( “the Orange Riots”) which were broken up by the combined efforts of the police, headed by Sugden, the military, and the clergy of both sects. One would have to read other profiles by Garryowen to see if in fact he was having a cheap shot at Sugden.

 

Fact:  Sugden appears before the Supreme Court. Garryowen reports as follows. Judge A’Beckett also displayed a good deal of quiet humour on the Bench. The queer old Crown Prosecutor . . .one day he and Chief-Constable Sugden were “barneying” about some hitch in a criminal case. Their recrimination attracted the attention of the Judge, who, looking determinedly at both the offenders, exclaimed (turning to Sugden) if the Chief-Constable does not hold his tongue, I certainly shall commit him (for contempt) … the caution was not lost on the Chief Constable, who ever after took care to keep his often loud and unruly tongue in a state of good behaviour.

 

Source:       Garryowen

 

Comment:  See above comment.

 

Fact:  The Port Philip Herald 29 December, 1845, ran an article asking what, if anything, Chief Constable Sugden and his men were doing to put down the illegal lotteries for Christmas poultry that had been running all week, and that no less than 17 public houses had been running these lotteries.

 

Source:       Port Philip Herald 29 December, 1845.

 

Comment:  If only the police had stayed with a few chook raffles for a little extra.

 

Fact:  In August 1838, Henry Batman, Chief Constable of the City of Melbourne Police . . . was dismissed for bribery. Between 1838 and 1855, no less than six Chief Constables were engaged to lead Melbourne’s police. One of these, William Sugden, embraced the new English model of detectives and in 1848, devoted ten percent of his force to a detective branch.

 

Source:       Past Patterns – Future Directions Victoria Police and the problem of corruption and serious misconduct – The Office of Police Integrity – published by Vic Govt Printer Feb 2007.

 

Comment:  Didn’t I read about this sort of thing last week?

 

Fact:  Son William Sugden is born to WJS and Louisa in 1845.

 

Source:       Vic BDM

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  21 July 1845 a public meeting convened by the Mayor of Melbourne was held . . . . The result was the formation of a fire prevention society . . . . In September 1845, the society made the following appointments . . . . Inspector The Chief Constable Mr W J Sugden.

 

Source:       Garryowen

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  Son Robert Johnson Sugden is born 1846.

 

Source:       Vic BDM.

 

Comment:  Note the actual name of the son for later discussion.

 

Fact:  20 March 1846, the foundation stone for Princes Bridge was laid. The Masons and Odd fellows held high carnival that evening. . but the bridge was paid a unique and special compliment by the Chief Constable W J Sugden entertaining the members of the Police Force at a dinner at the Market Square Hotel.

 

Source:       Garryowen, and the Port Philip Herald 30 March, 1846.

 

Comment:  Note that at this time, Sugden is already a power in Freemasonry in Melbourne. And see later reference to the actual opening of Princes Bridge.

 

Fact:  In Jan 1847, the police force consisted of a chief constable, four sergeants, two watch house keepers, twenty petty constables and a messenger. The Chief Constable William Johnstone Sugden to receive 120 pounds per year, 4 sergeants to receive 3 shillings 6 pence per day and 6 pence for clothing, 2 watch house keepers to receive 2 shillings 6 pence per day, 20 petty constables to each receive 3 shillings and four pence for clothing per day, and the messenger to receive 2 shillings 6 pence per day.

 

Source:       Garryowen and the 1847 Directory for the Town and District of Port Phillip.

 

Comment:  The Chief constables of Geelong and Portland received 70 pounds per year. Note the spelling of the name.

 

Fact:  8 August 1848 W J Sugden takes over the License of the Royal Mail Hotel at the south east corner of Swanston St and Bourke St. The source continues to mention Sugden in relation to this hotel up to 3 September 1851. Sugden obtained one of the few city night licences enabling him to remain open after 9 pm

 

Source:       Publicans Index of 19th Century Victoria hosted by rootsweb, an ancestry.com.community. The reference to the late licence is from Garryowen, again grinding his axe.

 

Comment:  At this time William and George Lewis’ stepfather Richard Lewis is the Licensee of the Woolpack Inn, Digby, Victoria. I wonder if they ever met up for any purpose. Regarding the late licence, if Sugden came back to Melbourne today, he would probably have a club in King Street.

 

Fact:  W J Sugden receives a presentation from The Licenced Victuallers upon his retirement as Chief Constable in 1848. He receives a silver inscribed snuff box, in a presentation case made of various Australian woods. The snuff box is inscribed “ Advance Australia presented by the licenced victuallers of the City of Melbourne and friends to Mr. W.J.Sugden on his resignation of the Office of Chief Constable in testimony of their respect and esteem for the integrity of his character and his upright, manly and honourable conduct during his period of office, and their sincere wishes for his future prosperity and welfare Melbourne November 1st 1848. “ The snuff box is attributed to Joseph Forrester, Silversmith, from Perth, Scotland who arrived in Australia in 1829. The box is attributed to Charles Brentani from Como, Italy who arrived in Australia in 1829. The Melbourne Sun 19 December, 1938 says that this piece of silver was in the possession of Mrs. Charles Maxwell of Cheltenham, who was giving it to the National Museum for safekeeping and display. The Sun also says that this may be the first piece of silver plate given to anybody in Melbourne. Mrs. Maxwell was born Ethel Sugden, daughter of Robert Johnson Sugden, and she was a granddaughter of W J Sugden. She died in October 1960 aged 84.

 

Source:       National Gallery of Australia, Parkes, Canberra, ACT, the box and case having been purchased by the Gallery in 1983 for it’s decorative arts collection. Presumably the box went back to the Maxwell’s at some stage, and was then sold. From the Gallery’s website which has a picture of the case and box. Mrs. Maxwell’s details are from Vic BDM.

 

Comment:  Must be a nice thing for the Gallery to buy it. Obviously the innkeepers of Melbourne thought highly of Sugden to give him something this good. Or as Garryowen would suggest, maybe they owed him something. Next time I am in Canberra, I must try and see this thing.

 

Fact:  Son Alfred born 1850 in St Kilda.

 

Source:       Vic BDM

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  28 August 1850, a public meeting was held to . . . . form a company to supply gas to the city of Melbourne . . . .A provisional Committee to make necessary initiating arrangements was formed. This body included W J Sugden. Note Sugden is never again mentioned in relation to the gas company so his involvement was obviously short-lived.

 

Source:       Garryowen

 

Comment:  Obviously no money in public utilities – until the 1990’s

 

Fact:  27 September 1850 William Sugden, Latrobe Street, of the Royal Mail Hotel becomes President of the Licensed Victuallers Association of Port Phillip. Melbourne innkeepers first banded together in 1841 to form the Port Phillip Licensed Victuallers Association …. By 1843, it had fallen into disarray . . . . In late 1844, it was reformed. The association …. Was short-lived and two years later had become defunct. In 1850, a third and ultimately successful attempt to organise Melbourne inn-keepers was accomplished. It is this group that has had an almost continuous history and survived into modern times as the Australian Hotel Association. Sugden, upon his retirement to join the Licensed Victuallers, was presented by that brotherhood with a purse of sovereigns as an indication of the sterling esteem in which they held him, although it may be not unfairly rated as a questionable compliment, considering the powers then vested in the Chief-constable by the Licensed Victuallers Act.

 

Source:       Committees of the Licensed Victuallers Association Of Victoria – An Index to Committee Members 1841 to 1920 – prepared by Bronwyn Higgs 1994. The comments about the sovereigns and joining the association are from Garryowen, who interestingly doesn’t mention the silver snuff box being presented.

 

Comment:  Given that according to Bronwyn, this Association ultimately became the AHA, it is nice to see that William Sugden’s Great Great Great Grandson John Lewis was CEO of the South Australian branch of the AHA for seven years up to 2005. Garryowen is still at it.

 

Fact:  15 November 1850, Princes Bridge is finally opened with much pomp and ceremony. with the grandest processional display witnessed in the colony.  The Programme of the Procession for the Opening of Princes Bridge is in commemoration of the advent of separation Friday 15 November 1850. The Grand Marshal of the Parade on horseback is Mr. W J Sugden, followed by the Chief-constable – the programme then goes on and on about who else is in the parade. The bridge was opened to coincide with Victoria becoming a separate colony from New South Wales. There is a print in the Victorian State Library made in November 1850 showing a drawing of the opening of the bridge. Inscribed on the print in pencil are among other things the words “the horseman on the street horse in front is Mr. W Sugden Chf “

 

Source:       Garryowen, and the print is in the Picture Collection of The State Library Of Victoria

 

Comment:  Sugden must by this time have been a VIP in Melbourne. Previously, some records suggested that the inscription on the picture mentioned above said Sir W. Sugden Chf. In February 2009, I wrote to the Library suggesting that this must be incorrect since there is no evidence Sugden was ever knighted. An inspection of the picture by the staff of the State Library reveals that the inscription, although very hard to decipher, does in fact say Mr. and not Sir. If nothing else. my exercise has achieved the most minor of corrections in the historical record.

 

Fact:  3 September 1851 W J Sugden takes over Licence of Bull And Mouth Hotel in Bourke St Melbourne, near where Centrepoint Mall is in 2008.

 

Source:       Publicans Index see above.

 

Comment. None

 

Fact:  In 1852, William Sugden appears before a Legislative Council Parliamentary Select Committee on The Police. The Parliament had hearings on what sort of police force was needed and how big because of the huge, sudden increase in population because of the gold rush in Victoria. In 1844, a small detective force consisting of four constables and a sergeant was formed . . . . The founder of the detective force, William Sugden, recommended before a Select Committee in 1852 that the number of detectives be increased to twelve men, paid more than ordinary police considering the dangers and the risks they run . . . . William Sugden, the initiator of the detective force, remarked that it was common knowledge that Melbourne detectives accepted bribes ….

 

Source:       Police Detectives in History 1750 to 1950 by Clive Emsley

 

Comment:  Nothing new here, but it is possible to assume that Sugden was held in some esteem by those who ran the colony to be called to advise such a committee.

 

Fact:  5 Feb 1853 there is a record of W J Sugden Esquire sailing from Launceston to Melbourne on the “Clarence” occupying a cabin.

 

Source:       Tas Archives Office

 

Comment:  Shortly after this, he quits the Bull and Mouth so this return trip to and from Tasmania was probably intended to set up to take him and his family to Tasmania. The term Esquire denotes that the person, among other reasons has or holds an office of trust under the Crown. Source – Wikpedia.

 

Fact:  2 March 1853 records an entry in relation to William Johnson Sugden in relation to Bull And Mouth Hotel, which looks like he is transferring or quitting the licence.

 

Source:       Publicans Index

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  Daughter Louisa born 28 April 1854 in Hobart.

 

Source:       Lou Daniels, see above, place of birth confirmed Vic BDM

 

Comment:  WJS and family have gone back to Tasmania for some reason or another.

 

Fact:  13 July 1854, in Hobart, there is the opening of a new Lodge of The Manchester Unity of Odd Fellows. The inauguration of a new lodge, to be called the Loyal Rose Of Tasmania Lodge of the Independent Order Of Odd Fellows MU . . . The chair was occupied by . . . . he was supported on the right by . . . .and Past Provisional Grand Master Sugden . . . . His Excellency the Lieutenant Governor Sir William Denison was proposed . . . Odd Fellowship throughout the world was the next sentiment, which having elicited some sensible remarks from P P G M Sugden, in the course of which he observed that the principles of Odd Fellowship were better supported than anywhere else in the hemisphere.

 

Source:       The Hobart Courier 13 July 1854

 

Comment:  William Sugden is moving in the right circles in Tasmania. I wonder why he was in Tasmania – maybe it was to advise the government about policing?? Or hotels ?? or maybe he just wanted to return to Tasmania and show people that he had “made it”. 

 

Fact:  In December 1854, W.Sugden is on The Committee for the 15th Anniversary Boat Regatta , to be held in Hobart to commemorate the discovery of Tasmania by Abel Tasman in 1642.

 

Source:       Hobartown Mercury 2 December 1854.

 

Comment:  Sugden again is shown to be moving in high circles.

 

Fact:  January 1855 W J Sugden and family prepare to leave Tasmania. An advert says “ Monday 29 January 1855 an auction in Davey Street Hobart – instructions from W J Sugden Esquire who is leaving the colony -to be sold – Household furniture and other effects comprising – handsome secretary and sideboard, ten morocco covered chairs, horse hair sofa, pier glass, curtains and blinds, barometer, handsome loo table, carpet and rug, fender and irons, screen, wardrobe, chest of drawers, press table, bed stops, washstand, dressing table, bedsteads, bedroom chairs, towel horse, full size huon pine bedstead and palliasse, work table, rosewood cabriole in rich amber damask, stone china dessert service, six handsome silver mounted dish covers and sauce boats, ornaments and a variety of other articles AND a new Mail Phaeton, A superior new gig built to order, by Fowler and Yeoman, with silver-mounted upon German white metal Harness, and the celebrated pony “Tommy”, unequalled in the colony for pace and symmetry, and too well known to require eulogy or recommendation, the harness, gig and pony in one lot. Plus a set of Tandem Harness, brass mounted, a cart and frame, a quantity of hay, a pigeon house and sundries AND a small quantity of really choice wine.

 

Source:       Hobart Town Courier Jan 1855.

 

Comment:  I listed all the details to show that my man Sugden obviously had a few bob. Or maybe it was borrowed money. “Tommy” and the gig is obviously the colonial equivalent of today’s Mercedes or Jaguar. He’s got nearly as much stuff as I have in 2009. Family obviously moves back to Melbourne. Some of this stuff would be worth a lot of money today.

 

Fact:  W J Sugden is recorded on some stationery as the Proprietor Of the Belvedere Hotel, Victoria Parade, Corner of Brunswick Street. Offerring superior accommodation for Families and Boarders.

 

Source:       Details are on a business card held by Gordon Dowell, Great Great Grandson of W J Sugden, Great Grandson of Elizabeth Martha Dean nee Sugden, born 1857. Gordon, who in 2009 lives in Newstead, Victoria, advises that he has no information as to when Sugden was involved with this business. According to Victorian Heritage database on the Web, The Belvedere Hotel was built between 1854 and 1856, and was later known as the Eastern Hill Hotel, and is now at 77 Victoria Parade, Fitzroy. Although no longer a hotel, the building is of historical significance to the State of Victoria. The façade is original. In March 2009, I noted that some people were painting the building to bring it back to it’s best. It’s a nice looking building.

 

Comment:  It doesn’t really matter when Sugden ran a business at these premises, but it is clear that upon his return to Victoria, he got straight back into the hotel trade.

 

Fact:  30 April 1857 William Johnson Sugden is mentioned in relation to the Carlton Hotel, Robe Street, St Kilda.

 

Source:       Publicans Index see above.

 

Comment:  None

 

Fact:  Daughter Elizabeth Martha born in St Kilda 1857.

 

Source:       Vic BDM

 

Comment:  None.

 

Fact:  Sugden is involved with the Globe Hotel in Swanston Street in 1859.

 

Source:       Alan Frost, from files on licensing held by State Library of Victoria.

 

Comment:  none.

 

Fact:  Daughter Amelia born in St Kilda 1859.

 

Source:       Vic BDM

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  Amelia dies in 1860 in St Kilda, death certificate sworn by Sugden signing as William Johnson Sugden, Hotel Keeper.

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  Son Joseph born in St Kilda 1861.

 

Source:       Vic BDM

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  28 August 1861 William Johnson Sugden of the Temple Court Hotel, Corner of Queen and Little Collins St, Melbourne, is a Committeeman of The Victorian Licensed Victuallers Association (Melbourne Branch)

 

Source:       The Argus 28 Aug 1861

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  25 September 1862 William Sugden of the Temple Court Hotel is a member of the Committee of the United Licensed Victuallers Association ( federal branch)

 

Source:       Argus 25 Sep 1862

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  15 Nov 1862 William J Sugden of Temple Court Hotel Queen Street Melbourne is a member of the Committee of the Licensed Victuallers Association (Melbourne branch)

 

Source:       Argus 15 November 1862.

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  Daughter Rosa Alice born in St Kilda 1864.

 

Source:       Vic BDM.

 

Comment:  none.

 

Fact: In 1864, William Johnson Sugden took over the licence of the Grand Junction Hotel in St Kilda.

 

Source:       A History of St Kilda

 

Comment:  none

 

Fact:  Daughter Emiline born in St Kilda 1866.

 

Source:       Vic BDM.

 

Comment:  none.

 

Fact:  William Johnson Sugden dies at St Kilda Junction 11 August 1868 of Bright’s disease (probably actually died of nephritis), his death certificate sworn by his son William Sugden states that he was 63 years old and was born in Yorkshire, and that details of his parents are unknown. His occupation is recorded as Revenue Inspector. His grave (and that of his wife and a couple of the children) at Melbourne General Cemetery is still there, but the tombstone and other funerary works have now disintegrated, and the grave can only be found using a map from the cemetery office. Its not hard to find.

 

Source:       Vic BDM.

 

Comment:  Interesting that in all my research, I can find no reference to Sugden being a Revenue Inspector. He has done many other things but I find no reference to his being an inspector.

 

Fact:  Louisa Sugden, Williams’s wife dies 7 December 1868 of disease of the liver.

 

Source:       Vic BDM signed by son Alfred.

 

Comment.  None

 

Issues to be resolved.

 

1.           From my point of view, my main issue is to find more evidence to confirm that William Johnson Sugden is the father of George Sugden Price Lewis, my great grandfather. It is obvious that Sugden has sired all the Sugden children, and it is pretty certain that he is the sire of George’s elder brother, William Sugden Price Lewis. As well as the above evidence, one of William Lewis’ grandsons was named Francis Sugden Lewis. Information supplied by Frank’s daughter, Val McGinnis, Of Geelong. The problem in relation to George is the recording on George’s Marriage Certificate that his father is Robert Johnson Sugden, and that there is no Baptism record in the name of Sugden as there is for his brother William Lewis. This is less of a problem when one considers the fact that various certificates of the Sugden children refer to their father as Robert Sugden. One of William Johnson Sugdens sons by Louisa Frost was named Robert Johnson Sugden. The death certificate of Alfred Sugden, born 1850, died 1920, says that Alfred’s father was Robert Johnson Sugden. Coincidentally, this certificate was sworn by an undertaker named L Lewis (no relation it seems). Since Alfred was 18 when his father died, he would have remembered him quite well. The Marriage certificate of Rosa Alice Sugden, born 1864, married 1903, records her father as Robert William Sugden. Most people can recall and point out similar, shall we say, naming problems in family tree work. In researching other lines of my family, I struck trouble trying to find a woman called Lillian Hamilton. I eventually found out her real name was Marie Louise. In my own case, my full name is Frederick Murray Macaulay, but have always been known to my family as Murray. I have always introduced myself as Murray. To make the point finally, many people I have known for many years have called me Max. The confusion with Lillian’s name and with my name is not unusual. I also refer back to the fact that W J Sugden lives at Hobart and either before or after that at Bothwell during the time that a Mary Price of the right age is employed nearby at Bridgewater. I also refer to the Baptism records of 1836 and 1838 in Tasmania.

2.           Alan Frost of Lara also tells the story that one of the Sugdens had once told him a story that when Sugden was in Tasmania, he had been involved with an improper woman, or maybe they had said he was in an improper relationship with a woman. Or maybe he was in an improper relationship with an improper woman. This is interesting because this information does not come from the Lewis’ but from, as it were, the other side, the Sugdens and the Frosts. Alan told me this when I visited him in April 2009. Alan, born 1916, has a large collection of family history records immaculately filed, and for a man of 94, seemed to have very good recall.

3.           The fact that William Johnson Sugden’s name, as he records it, is sometimes spelled as Johnstone, and in one instance as Johnston, is not a big problem. Even in the more literate society of today, where records are supposed to be kept better, it is not uncommon for names to be misrecorded. In my lifetime, I have seen Macaulay spelled in more than a dozen ways just in letters sent to me. I am satisfied that the records that refer to William Johnstone Sugden and other similar references are referring to William Johnson Sugden.

4.           The main issue for me to resolve after the issue of George Lewis’ paternity is to identify what happened to Sugden before he appears as the licensee in Hobart in 1835. If born in Yorkshire, when and where was he born? Who were his parents, or his siblings? Was he a convict sent to Australia, and if so, why? All roads point to Yorkshire. When one scans the Net, the name Sugden appears more in relation to Yorkshire than to any other place, and the origin of the name is in Yorkshire. Just scanning the net is not going to yield much since there are lots and lots of Sugdens in Yorkshire – and still are. As to where in Yorkshire, we will have to narrow the field down. It seems most likely that he was born in Bradford. Press clippings and other sources say he was born in Bradford, Madge Sugden born 1918, daughter of Louis Bradford Sugden, niece of Arthur Bradford Sugden, says he was born in Bradford. The Yorkshire Surnames Series Part One Bradford & Districts by George Redmonds 1990 held in the State Library of Victoria says that the name Sugden says there are Sugdens on the record in Yorkshire in the 14th Century, and that over time, the name became prolific in both Bradford and Keighley by the late 1500’s.

5.           Another avenue down which to pursue Sugdens origins relate other Yorkshire families of Sugdens who came to Australia in the 1800’s. In one family, there was a son named Robert Johnson Sugden, who was born in 1843. The family has been written about in a novel, based upon a long memoir, called “The Classer”. The book was written by Robert Bennett, a descendant of the family. It is all about a man called Joshua Sugden who came to Australia and according to the book and other sources, was important in establishing proper wool classing in the Australian industry. Joshua’s children were Humphrey b 1837, Joah born 1839, George Frederick born 1841, Ada born 1842 and Robert Johnson born 1843. What is the significance of the Johnson as a second name ? Joshua’s father was Joah Sugden born 1780 died 1845 and he had business interests in textiles in Kirk Burton in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Madge Sugden advises that according to her father Louis, all of the Sugden families that he knew of in Australia were related in some way or other. Presumably this also includes the family of Edward Holdsworth Sugden, a noted academic who was Master of Queens College at Melbourne University in the late 19th and early 20th century.

6.           Was William in the military as Garryowen suggests? Was he in the cavalry, or was he a dragoon? If so, was his service in England or in Australia? Or both ? Maybe instead he was at some stage in the militia in Yorkshire, which started to form militia in 1805 and then reduced them or reformed them from time to time, particularly when the French appeared as if he might invade England? The muster rolls as they appear on the net do contain Sugdens, but then most records in Yorkshire contain Sugdens. The first mention of any Sugdens in either Keighley or in Bradford are on Muster Rolls dated 1510 and 1539. Madge Sugden advises that according to her father Louis, W J Sugden served at one time in the Coldstream Guards. If he did so, then I can probably check with their archives as to whether this is true or not. I have written to the Guards in February 2009 but as of April 2009 have received no response. There is a Private William J Sugden in the records and to date, he has become the favourite for my William Johnson Sugden. This man was born in Yorkshire in 1804 or 1805. He enlisted in England, and his regiment boarded the “Orpheus” which left England 8 May 1826, reprovisioned in Rio 22 June 1826, and arrived in Sydney 12 September 1826. After the Orpheus arrived, Private William J Sugden was added to the Master Roll Of the First Company of Royal New South Wales Veterans Company to serve for the period 25 September 1826 to 26 October 1827. Private Sugden served at Newcastle during the years 1826 to 1835 in the Second Veterans Company Regiment Of Foot. I do not have details of his exact service period. As background, In Britain during 1826, three companies of veterans were raised to serve in NSW and Tasmania. At the completion of two years service, they were allowed to take land grants and settle. I think this William Sugden is a prospect for our William Sugden. Firstly, the dates fit in, in that Sugden be born in 1804 or 1805, could finish his enlistment and get down to Tasmania get on with his life in time to meet Mary, run the pub and so on. A review of the records shows quite a few ex Veteran soldiers owned licenses in Hobart. Secondly, remember that Garryowen stated that Sugden had served in the military. This further makes the case for this William Sugden. Third, I think that given all that was recorded about our Sugden, there would have been mention of his convict past if he had been transported. I am sure Garryowen would have mentioned it. Fourth, William Lewis’ Marriage Certificate states that his father was a settler. Finally, I am not sure that William Sugden would have been placed in the sort of positions he held had he had a criminal past. He might have achieved some position, but not positions like Sherriffs officer, District Constable, Chief Constable and so forth. In other words, William Johnson Sugden may have been a Redcoat in NSW. I will endeavour to have someone in the family in London follow up on this, to see if the William J Sugden who boarded the “Orpheus” was a William Johnson Sugden. If the records still exist, or can be found, this should sew it all up.

7.           Recent searches of the Net have disclosed a possibility for our William Sugden in Yorkshire. A William Sugden was born in Bradford Yorkshire April 10, 1805 the 6th child of Joseph Sugden born 26 March 1775 and Mary Pullan born 5 November 1779 who married January 11 1795. This would be the right date for our William Sugden of Bradford to die at age 63 in August 1868. The interesting thing about this Sugden is that the 7th child Elizabeth born 5 February 1808 married one Joseph Tetley 28 April 1828. In 1838, W J Sugden was associated with a business in Tasmania part owned by a Joseph Tetley, see above. Furthermore, it seems plausible to assume from the record that this family of Joseph and Elizabeth Tetley left the United Kingdom. Joseph and Elizabeth had 8 children born between 1825 and 1837. However, the Tetley family website says that Joseph and 7 of the children appear to have died before 1841. It also records that Elizabeth dies in Yorkshire in 1891 and daughter Betsey dies in Yorkshire in 1897, and that everyone else dies before 1841. The 1841 is the significant date. In 1841, the first ever UK Census was held. The researcher for this branch of the Tetley family is saying that he or she can find Elizabeth and Betsey on the record, and find their deaths, but cannot find any reference in any UK Census for anyone else. And if the whole family emigrated and only Elizabeth and Betsey returned, for whatever reason, then none of the others would appear upon any Census. The other thing about this William Sugden is that the person posting on the net says that of the 9 Sugden children born to Joseph and Mary, only four of them married. In other words, the researcher cannot find a record of the other five marrying for whatever reason. Some may have died including their William Sugden – but this William Sugden may have been married outside the UK – in Melbourne. I am not yet saying that this is my Willam Sugden – but nothing I have found out so far disqualifies him. It is worth pursuing.

8.           This paper is a work in progress. I am hopeful that some future research into this man’s interesting life will resolve his origin, and show more of his movements in Britain, and then in colonial Australia.

 

 

Conclusion.

 

William Johnson Sugden certainly led an interesting life. Born in Yorkshire in the early 1800’s, he ends up at the end of the planet in a small city (Hobart) on the edge of civilisation. He meets a woman, sires two children with her, goes broke in a pub, breaks up with the mother of his sons, and ends up in a much smaller place (Melbourne) also on the edge of the civilised world. Not many prospects for an out of work thirty something year old man. In the next twenty years, he becomes a VIP in Melbourne and Hobart, being the chief copper, the leader of a parade to celebrate the formation of the colony, a leading hotelier, a leader of the Masonic movement, a witness at Parliamentary Hearings, and a husband and a father of numerous children. It is also quite obvious that he had been at some stage financially successful, although Alan Frost suggested that he thought he might have died broke. The funeral monument that is now gone seems to have been on the cheap side. The records, and the Chief Librarian of the Victorian State Library writing in 1957, also suggest that Sugden Place, formerly Sugden Alley, in central Melbourne is named after him. It’s fair to say that whatever he did right or wrong, he can certainly claim to be a significant pioneer of the city of Melbourne. His photograph is in the collection of photos in the State Library of Victoria in The Explorers and Early Colonists of Victoria published in 1872 by Thomas Foster Chuck.

 

Murray Macaulay April 2009.

 

 

References
 (A) Australian Vital Record Series 1788 - 1905 Discs 1 to 4 (2)
Family members Military records  ,Pay rolls, Pay Musters, Cemetery Records, Church Records & General Muster Records, Mitchell Library ,Sydney Australia
The information is intended for short Historical value only,
E- mail address
Refer to Home Page
© Copyright B & M Chapman (QLD) Australia
Last revised: Monday, 11 May 2009 07:04:55