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 Private Joseph Griffiths (........1857)

 

Back To . . . The New South Wales Corps. ( Rum Corps. ) "Renamed 102nd Regiment
  • Born :
  • Where Born :
  • Occupation : Soldier
  • Date Arrived : , 15 June 1801
  • Ship Arrived on : "Earl Cornwallis"
  • Rank attained : Private
  • Date of Enlistment : 1800
  • Where Enlisted : Sydney
  • Date of Discharge : 25 March 1803
  • Where Discharged : Sydney
  • Died : 24.December.1857
  • Where Died / Buried : Mittagong NSW
  • Parents Names :
  • Spouse's Name : Martha (Davis)
  • Born :
  • Where Born :
  • Occupation :
  • Date Arrived :
  • Ship Arrived on :
  • Date Married : 1804
  • Where married : NSW
  • Died :
  • Where Died / Buried :
  • Parents Names :
  • Descendants
    The following information was kindly supplied by Lina Moffitt disability@optusnet.com.au
     
    Area Settled :
     
    Children :
    1 . Anne Griffiths, born NSW 1805 who married James Comer 5.10.1818
     
    History & Achievements :
     

    Joseph Griffiths - Arrived Sydney, a soldier, on the convict ship “Earl of Cornwallis”.  This ship weighed 784 tons, with James Tennant, master, and on this voyage traveled from England via the Cape of Good Hope; from which it departed 18th November 1800. They arrived Sydney 12th June 1801, with 253 convicts. The journey lasted 206 days. 193 males departed, 166 arrived; 95 females departed, 87 arrived. Joseph was a Private with the 102nd regiment of foot or NSW Corps on garrison duty in Sydney.

    Privates in NSW around this time earned 18 p.a. (each regiment had a paymaster on location).

    Pay on active duty was given at monthly Musters when men usually received 1.1.11 subsistence – this was halved when men were on transports between posts. Because of an acute shortage of currency prior to 1806, payments to troops were usually in the form of goods instead of cash. So those soldiers involved in escorting convicts from ships had more access to goods arriving from overseas. This was still a time of limited access to food and clothes – soldier’s great coats had to last 7 years. Officers did quite well accumulating assets and had access to convict labour to work on their land grants. Obviously, this is what Joseph Griffiths decided to do – taking monies owed him in the form on an 80 acre land grant and having convicts assigned to work it.


     
    References
    Military records  ,Pay rolls, Pay Musters, Cemetery Records, Church Records & General Muster Records, Mitchell Library ,Sydney Australia
    The information is intended for short Historical value only,
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    Copyright B & M Chapman (QLD) Australia