Nathaniel Greene Letter to Samuel Huntington 3/23/1781
Papers of the Congressional Congress M247 roll 175 v2 pg. 13
National Archives and Records Administration
Transcribed by Billy Markland




Camp at Buffaloe [sic] Creek; March 23d 1781

Sir,

On the 16th instant, I wrote your Excellency giving an account of an Action which happened at Gilford [sic] Court House the Day before. I was then persuaded that notwithstanding we were obliged to give up the ground we had reaped the advantage of the Action. Circumstances since confirm me in this opinion that the Enemy were too much [ crushed?] to improve their success. We lay at the Iron Works three Days preparing ourselves for another Action, and expecting the Enemy to advance, but of a sudden they took their departure leaving behind them evident marks of distress. All our Wounded at Gilford which had fallen into their Hands, and seventy of their own too bad to move, were left at new Garden. Most of their Officers suffered. Lord Cornwallis had his horse killed under him, Col. Stewart of the Guards was killed, and General O'Harra [sic] and Colonels Tarlton and Webster wounded. Only three field Officers escaped if reports which seem to be authentic can be relied on.

Our Army are in good Spirits notwithstanding our sufferings, and are advancing towards the Enemy, who are retiring to Cross Creek. I find so much difficulty in procuring provisions that I am afraid I shall not be able to pursue far. The times of the greatest part of the Militia will soon expire and leave us once more greatly inferior to our Enemy. I beg Congress to be persuaded that nothing will be left unattempted which is calculated to promote the interest of the Service in the Southern Department, but I cannot flatter their expectations.

In South Carolina Generals Sumpter and Marion have gained several little advantages. In one the Enemy lost sixty Men, who had under their care a large quantity of Stores which were taken, but by an unfortunate mistake were afterwards retaken.

I have the honor to be with [the] greatest respect
Your Excellencys most hble. srvt.

Natl Greene


His Excly Saml. Huntington Esq.





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