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Being the largest cemetery in the Upper Napa Valley, St. Helena Public Cemetery is the final resting place for many citizens from St. Helena and the neighboring areas, including Calistoga, Rutherford, Oakville, Angwin, Deer Park, and Pope Valley.  The adjoining Holy Cross Cemetery is the only Catholic cemetery in the Upper Napa Valley, so it is also the final resting place for many citizens of that faith in this area.

The following list is essentially an online notebook of information I have gathered about the Civil War veterans buried in these cemeteries.  It is a work in progress, so it will be routinely updated with new information.
infantryman
 

 
It should be noted that this list also includes the names of individuals who are thought to be Civil War veterans, but whose service has not yet been confirmed.  If anyone reading this has corrections or additions, please let me know.  Your comments are welcome!
Updated 14 October 2016
Dean A. Enderlin
Member, Col. Elmer Ellsworth Camp, No. 23, SUVCW
E-mail: enderlin@sonic.net

Scroll down to use the Quick Index, or . . .
 

  
QUICK INDEX...

ALLISON, David A.

HAY, John S.

RUTHERFORD, John R.

WILLIAMS, George W.

ANDREWS, John M.

HEEMAN, Edgar

SAUNDERS, Oliver H.

WILSON, Henry P.

BACON, M. Luther

HOLIHAN, James W.

SCHNEIDER, Fanny P. O.

WOOLDRIDGE, C. C.

BAGWELL, Anderson C.

HORN, G. H.

SCHNEIDER, Henry

WORRELL, William H.

BAKER, William A.

HOTZ, Elisha A.

SCHNOOR, Christian

 

BARRY, James

INMAN, Marcus F.

SCOTT, John W.

 

CARR, Byron O.

KENNEDY, George B.

SIMMONS, Edwin P.

New Additions:

CARRIER, Victor

KOCH, Adam

SIMMONS, William T.

GOETSCHE, John H.

CHASE, George W.

KRAY, Charles

SPIERS, John R.

HARRISON, Simon N.

CHURCH, William W.

LOGAN, William A.

SMITH, Oliver

PRITCHARD, Charles P.

COOK, Charles W.

LOWRY, John

SMITH, William H.

STEPHENS, Thomas S.

COOK, Samuel M.

MADDIGAN, Martin

STANDIFORD, Benjamin F.

 

DAVIS, Levi P.

MAGUIRE, Andrew K.

STARR, Augustus W.

 

DICKINSON, Frederick M.

MIXON, John C.

STARR, Edward T.

 

EBELING, William

MULDROW (1883)

STILLMAN, James

 

ECKERT/ECKERS

OUTWATER, Nelson T.

SWARTOUT, Alonzo B.

 

FEE, James P.

NESTEN, Charles J.

TOLAND, James F.

 

FEE, John D.

NIMAN, John

TUCKER, James E.

 

FISHER, George W.

NICKERSON, Nelson

WAHL, A. W.

 

FLYNN, John D.

O'LEARY, Joseph

WALLER, Aaron W.

 

GIERAU, Eggert

RAHN, Henry S.

WALLER, Thomas D.

 

GLANCEY, Theodore M.

RAMMERS, Henry C.

WARNER, Maria

 

GROGAN, Barney

RICHARDS, Jared G.

WEISKER, Conrad H.

 

HAIRE, Benjamin

ROSSMAN, William

WENTZELL, Charles

 

HASKIN, Royal A.

RUTHERFORD, George V.

WHITE, William W.

 

stars



David A. Allison
(1843 - 1920)
Rank:  Private

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 30 January 1920):
RESPECTED CITIZEN DIES.
-----
David A. Allison Passes to the Great Beyond.
-----
   David A. Allison peacefully passed away at is home near Napa, Wednesday morning at 5 o'clock.  Mr. Allison had been in failing health for a long time and was confined to his bed for six weeks before the end came.
   David A. Allison was born in Pennsylvania, July 22, 1843, and, had he lived until next July would have been 77 years of age.  When but nine years old the subject of this sketch drove an ox team from his native State to Boise City, Idaho.  He made his home in that State until nineteen years ago, when he came to California, locating near St. Helena.  He had a nice home and orchard but advancing years led him to sell out and, with Mrs. Allison, move to a smaller place just outside the Napa City limits.
   Deceased was married to Miss Ellen Aberthany [Abernathy] in Idaho about forty-five years ago.  She, with the following children survive:  Oliver E. Allison, of Boise City, Idaho; Mrs. A. R. Blue, of Sacramento; and F. E. [Francis Eugene] Allison, of St. Helena.
   Deceased spent his entire life tilling the soil and always met with success in his chosen vocation.  He was a man of steady and industrious habits, quiet and unassuming and of the strictest integrity.  He had many friends and those who knew him best loved him most.
   Funeral services will be held this morning at Treadway's undertaking parlors in Napa and the remains will be brought to St. Helena on the 1 o'clock car for interment in the St. Helena cemetery.
Notes:  Native of Pennsylvania, born 22 July 1843.  His full name was probably David Alexander Allison.  A son, born 1883, was also named David Alexander Allison.
   According to the "History of Monona County, Iowa," published in 1890, David's father, Alexander Allison, settled in Section 20 of Lake Township in Monona County, Iowa, in 1859.  The family later lived in West Fork Township, where David's father served as a supervisor.  David Allison was enumerated in West Fork Township (Onawa City Post Office), Monona County, in the 1860 census, living in the household of his parents, Alexander and Jane Allison.  David was listed as age 15, born in Pennsylvania, attending school.  Others in the household were William Allison (age 13, born in OH) and Christina Allison (age 10, born in PA).  The father was listed as a native of Scotland, and the mother a native of England.
   David's father was one of the first supervisors in Monona County in 1861, and it was while the family was living there that David enlisted in the Northern Border Brigade during the Civil War (see Military Information below).  According to the above-mentioned "History of Monona County," David's father left Iowa about 1863, reportedly going to Colorado.  By 1870, the family had moved into the Idaho Territory.
   David Allison appears in the 1870 census in Ada County, Idaho Territory, living in the household of Andrew Abernathy (age 27).  Also in the household was Ellen Abernathy (age 15, Andrew's sister?), who later became David's wife.  Andrew's father Alexander Allison (age 58, native of Scotland) and wife Jane (age 55, native of England) lived on a nearby farm.  David Allison was listed as age 21, born in Pennsylvania, working on the farm.  He owned $250 in real estate, and had $600 in his personal estate.
   According to the Western States Marriage Index, David Allison married Ellen Abernathy in Ada County, Idaho, on 19 June 1870.  The marriage was recorded in Ada County marriage records, volume 1, page 64.  A second record of the marriage was apparently recorded in Ada County marriage records, volume 1, page 80.
   David Allison and his family appear in the 1880 census in the Upper Weiser Valley, Washington County, Idaho.  He was listed as a farmer, age 37, born in Pennsylvania, parents both born in Scotland.  His household included his wife Ellinor (age 24), son Olliver (age 7), son Eugene (age 5), and father Alexander (age 67, native of Scotland).
   David Allison was enumerated in the 1900 census in Salubria Precinct, Washington County, Idaho, along with his wife Ellen E. (born Dec. 1854 in IA) and son Alexander (David Alexander, born December 1883 in ID).  Their son Oliver Allison (born July 1873 in ID) was living near them.  David was listed as a farmer, age 56, born July 1843 in Pennsylvania.  His parents were both born in Scotland.  It was noted that Ellen was the mother of 4 children, all living.  The Allisons had been married 30 years.
   By April of 1910, David and Ellen Allison had moved to St. Helena, where the census listed them as living on a farm on the "county road between St. Helena and Napa" (now Highway 29).  David was listed as a farmer on his own farm, age 66, born in Pennsylvania, father born in Scotland, mother born in Pennsylvania.  He and Ellen had been married for 39 years.  Ellen was noted as the mother of 5 children, 4 still living.  The census noted David as a Union Army veteran.  In addition to Ellen (listed as age 54), the Allison household included their son Alex (age 26), who was working as a farm laborer.
   David Allison died near Napa on 28 January 1920, and was buried on 30 January 1920 in Lot 14, Block 22, St. Helena Public Cemetery.
Military Information:  Union Militia.  Noted as a Civil War veteran in the 1910 census.  He served in Co. E, Northern Border Brigade, Iowa Militia Infantry.  The brigade was formed in 1862, during a time when Iowa settlers desperately needed protection from Indian attacks.  With most troops having been called into Federal service in the War of the Rebellion, the governor of Iowa issued orders to organize a militia force for the "defense of the northwestern frontier."  The various companies of the Northern Border Brigade were organized in September, 1862.  They disbanded in the fall and early winter of 1863, as troops from the Iowa Cavalry were positioned to relieve them.  The last company was disbanded in December of 1863.  Company E was mustered out on 19 September 1863, however, David Allison was discharged in May of that year.
    David Allison's wife, Ellen Allison, applied for an "Indian Wars" widow's benefit in California on 7 December 19__ (class "Mid.15," application no. 94121).  No certificate was issued.  Her application was listed as being filed under the Act of 3 March 1927.  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  Service from 1862 to 1863 in Co. E, Northern Border Brig., Iowa Vols.  The card also notes that David Allison died at Napa on 28 January 1920.
   He appears in ROSTER OF IOWA SOLDIERS, VOL VI. DES MOINES: 1911 in the historical sketch for the Northern Border Brigade of the Iowa State Militia, Co. E, as follows:  "Allison, David. Age 18. Residence Winona County, nativity Pennsylvania. Enlisted Sept. 27, 1862. Mustered Oct. 7, 1862. Discharged May 12, 1863." (Source:  Iowa GenWeb).  The listing of the residence as "Winona" County is apparently a transcription error.  David was a resident of Monona County.
infantry
Company E
Northern Border Brigade
(Iowa State Militia)






John M. Andrews
(1839 - 1872)
Rank:  Unknown

Obituary (Napa County Reporter newspaper, Saturday, 6 April 1872):
DIED.
   At the residence of Mr. Brown, in St. Helena, March 29th, of consumption, John M. Andrews, aged 33 years.
   Deceased leaves a wife and child in California, and a mother and brother in Iowa to mourn his loss.
   Marshall county, Iowa, and Brown county, Nebraska, papers, please copy.

Notes:  He died 29 March 1872, at the age of 33 years, 1 month and 11 days, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery.  His calculated date of birth would be 18 February 1839, based on the headstone information.

Military Information:  Noted as a Civil War veteran in the sexton's list of 30 May 1887.

Return to Quick Index
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Service unknown





Martin Luther Bacon
(1828 - 1896)
Rank:  Private

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 17 April 1896):
Death of a Veteran
-----
   Martin L. Bacon died suddenly Friday last, the 10th inst., at the residence of M. Payne in Conn valley.  The immediate cause of his death was inflammation of the bowels, and his illness was manifested only twelve hours previous.  When Mr. Bacon was first attacked his daughter, Mrs. A. Rossi, was sent for, and medical aid summoned from St. Helena, but human skill could not avail and he passed away.
   The body was brought to St. Helena Sunday and, according to the expressed wish of deceased, was buried in the soldiers' plot.  The services were at the grave, conducted by Rev. James Mitchell.
   Martin Luther Bacon was born in Tompkins county, New York, September, 1828, and was married in 1848 to Miss Eliza Hurd, the wife dying in 1864.  Removing to Kansas soon after his marriage, in 1863 he enlisted for three years or until the close of the war in company M, 15th regiment, Kansas cavalry volunteers, and was discharged by being mustered out of service in October, 1865.  Coming to California he settled in St. Helena and for some years conducted a meat market here.  He was afflicted with asthma, and on account of ill health gave up business some seven years ago, living with his daughter, sometimes with his friend, M. Payne and family, and occasionally at the Veterans' Home at Yountville.  Deceased leaves four daughters -- Mrs. S. Greenwood, of Napa; Mrs. Nettie Sperry, of Topeka, Kansas; Mrs. L. Bailey, of San Jose, and Mrs. A. Rossi, of St. Helena.
Notes:  He died in Conn Valley, Napa County, on 10 April 1896, and was buried in the G.A.R. plot of the St. Helena Cemetery on 12 April 1896.  His grave is marked by a military headstone.
Military Information:   Union.  He enlisted on 21 September 1863, residence Mound City, Kansas.  He was mustered into Company M, 15th Kansas Cavalry on 17 October 1863.  Mustered out on 19 October 1865.

cavalry
Company M
15th Kansas Cavalry






Anderson C. Bagwell
(1840 - 1896)
Rank:  Sergeant

Article from the Big Valley Gazette, 27 December 1894 (Source:  Rootsweb, B. C. & A. J. Reynolds posting, 1 Sept. 2003):
MARRIED
BAGWELL - SWAN
   A quiet wedding was celebrated at the toll house, between here and Fall River on Christmas day, the contracting parties being A. C. Bagwell and Mrs. Emma Swan. Only the near relatives of the parties were present and at one o'clock in the afternoon Judge Schooler, in his usual impressive manner pronounced them man and wife. After the ceremony an excellent dinner was served to which those present did ample justice.
   The bride was formerly a resident of Plumas County and is highly spoken of by those who know her, while the groom is well known for his generous traits and genial disposition, possessed of those peculiar characteristics that make life one round of happy anticipation.
   The editor acknowledges the receipt of a bountiful supply of wedding cake and extends the heartiest congratulations to the married couple, accompanied by the best wishes for a life of uninterrupted happiness and prosperity.
Notes:  Native of South Carolina according to his pension file, voter registration and censuses.  He was probably born in Greenville County, South Carolina, where his parents were living in 1840.  Cemetery records indicate he was a native of Pennsylvania, which is incorrect.  He was most likely the oldest son of William Bagwell (b. circa 1805) and Elizabeth "Lizzie" Roe / Rowe (b. circa 1824) (Sources: IGI and Hourigan Cemetery, Marion County, KY, information).  Anderson's parents appear alone in the household in the 1840 census for Greenville District, Greenville County, South Carolina, suggesting that he had not yet been born when the census was taken.  When he was examined as a part of his pension application in October 1891, he was described as 5 feet 6 inches in height, weight 186 pounds, age 51.  This age places his year of birth about 1840.  Other sources give conflicting ages.  The 1895 marriage license lists his age as 53.  The 1896 death record lists his age as 69, which is clearly in error.  The preponderence of evidence suggests he was born in late 1840.
   Anderson Bagwell's whereabouts prior to the Civil War are sketchy.  He is most likely the same individual as "Anderson Bagwell," who appears in the 1860 census in the 10th District (Rural Vale P.O.), Whitfield County, Georgia (in northern Georgia on the Tennessee border), under the household of his parents, William and Elizabeth Bagwell.  The father was noted as age 55, native of North Carolina.  The mother was noted as age 36, native of South Carolina.  Anderson was the oldest child in the household, listed as age 19, born in South Carolina.  His siblings in the household included Henderson (age 18), Jefferson (age 17), Jackson (age 15), "Jno. Q. A." (age 12), "Geo. W." (age 8), Martha C. (age 5), and Milton (age 3).  All the children were born in South Carolina, suggesting that the family had only recently relocated to Georgia.
   It appears that Anderson Bagwell resided in nearby Murray County, Georgia (just east of Whitfield County), just before the outbreak of the war and lived there for a short time after the war.  A marriage record in Murray county -- dated 18 June 1861 -- lists "Anderson C. Bagwell" as having married "Mary Cox."   The marriage apparently did not last more than a few years.  Bagwell enlisted in the Tennessee Cavalry in February 1864, possibly after the marriage had ended.
  Not long after the Civil War, Anderson Bagwell chose Kansas as his home.  According to Hollibaugh's Biographical History of Cloud County, Kansas, (1903), "A.C. Bagwell" was a neighbor to George W. Teasley in Summit Township, and was a former neighbor back in Murray County, Georgia.  Bagwell "had traveled over the beautiful valley during his army life, and when he returned to Georgia reported its great possibilities to Allan Teasley and a Mr. Hayes."  In the same volume of the Cloud County Kansas history, it was noted that A. C. Bagwell joined members of the Teasley family and others in a buffalo hunt near the forks of the Soloman River in July 1866.  The Teasleys had only settled in Kansas in May of 1866, so Anderson Bagwell must have either accompanied them in the move or joined them in Kansas shortly after they arrived.
   There in Kansas around 1867, Anderson Bagwell remarried and settled down to raise a family.  His wife, Glaphrey, was probably Glaphrey Nicholas, daughter of Thomas Travis Nicholas and Zilla Moore (Source: Moore News, Vol. 1, No. 12, 31 July 1996, posted online by Doug Moore Genealogy).
   "Anderson Bagwell" appears in the 1870 census in Soloman Township (Shirley P.O.), Cloud County, Kansas, listed as head of household, age 29, native of South Carolina, occupation farmer.  His household included his wife Glaphrey (age 20, native of Mississippi), son James P. (age 3, native of Kansas), and son William J. (age 1, native of Kansas).  Anderson's mother in the meantime had moved to Haysville Precinct (Riley's Station P.O.), Marion County, Kentucky, taking her children George (age 17), Martha (age 14), Jack (age 12), Lawson (age 10) and James (age 7) with her.  Henderson Onie Bagwell and his family lived next door.
  The Anderson Bagwell family left Kansas between 1875 and 1877, settling in southern California.   In 1880, "Anderson Bagwell" appears in Santa Ana Township, Los Angeles County, California, listed as head of household, age 40, native of South Carolina, occupation farmer.  His household included his wife Glaphrey (age 38), sons James (age 13) and William (age 12), daughter Cynthia (age 9), son Elmer (age 7), daughter Zilla (age 5), and son George (age 1).  All of the children -- with the exception of George -- were born in Kansas.  The census noted that Anderson's parents were born in South Carolina, while Glaphrey's were born in Tennessee.  A. C. Bagwell was listed as living in Garden Grove near Santa Ana in the 1883 Los Angeles directory (Charles Beal, 2009, pers. communication).
   In 1884, Anderson C. Bagwell was still living in Santa Ana, California, where he appears in the Great Register of voters as a farmer, age 43 (on May 20, 1884), born in South Carolina.  From Santa Ana, Anderson moved to Bieber in Lassen County sometime between 1884 and 1891.  Two of his sons appear to have moved with him:  George (born 6 August 1877) and Walter Henderson Bagwell (born 17 December 1883 at Santa Ana).  Elmer Bagwell remained in San Francisco, where he married Cora M. Walsh circa June 1902.
    Anderson Bagwell married Emma Swan (nee Ament) on 25 December 1895 in Little Valley, Lassen County, California.  Emma was the widow of Amos Gilbert Swan, a Civil War veteran (Pvt., Co. H., 2nd Iowa Inf.) who died 23 May 1894 at Greenville, Plumas County, California.  Emma's first marriage (to Swan) was at Calistoga on 20 August 1874.  She was a native of Centerville, Alameda County, California, having been born 13 April 1854.  Emma remained with Anderson Bagwell for less than one month after they married, their residence being at Bieber, Lassen County.  Upon their separation, Emma moved in with her sister at Hayden Hill for a time, then moved back to her home at Greenville, where she resided until 1898.  Anderson Bagwell moved to St. Helena after the separation.  Emma's third marriage was to Walter H. Kelso in 1915.  She had one daughter, Alice, by Amos Gilbert Swan (most of the above information comes from Emma's widow's pension application).
   Anderson Bagwell died on 26 July 1896 near St. Helena, Napa County, and was buried in an unmarked grave in the G.A.R. plot, Block H, in St. Helena Public Cemetery on the same date.  Cemetery records state that he was age 69 at the time of death (he was actually about 55), native Pennsylvania (also incorrect), married.  Cause of death was listed as general debility.  In the cemetery record book, the name of McCurdy was noted next to the plot location information.  This was Dr. Samuel McCurdy (the treating physician) who advertixed himself as "late surgeon of the U.S. army."  For an unknown reason, no obituary appeared in the St. Helena Star newspaper after his death.
  His grave -- located in the G.A.R. section of St. Helena Public Cemetery -- was unmarked for many years.  Arrangements for a military headstone were made in early 2010 by Col. Elmer Ellsworth Camp #23, Sons of Union Veterans.  The headstone was installed on Thursday, 22 April 2010.  The inscription reads:  "ANDERSON C. BAGWELL | SERG CO I | 12 TENN CAV | 1840 | 1896"  This is the second headstone ordered by Ellsworth Camp #23 for an unmarked grave at St. Helena Cemetery.
Military Information:   Union ("galvanized" from C.S.A. service).  "A. C. Bagwell" enlisted at Atlanta, Georgia, as a Private in Co. C of the 11th Georgia Infantry regiment (C.S.A.) on 3 July 1861.  He was described at the time of enlistment as age 21, eyes blue, hair dark, complexion fair, height 5' 10", born in Greenville District, South Carolina, occupation farmer.  He was admitted to Chimberazo Hospital, No. 2, at Richmond, Virginia, on 22 March 1863 suffering from "debility."  He was released back to duty on 13 April 1863, and next appears on the rolls wth the rank of 1st Corporal.  He served in the regiment for nearly three years before deserting while the regiment was at winter quarters near Morristown, TN, on 23 February 1864.  Two days later, Anderson C. Bagwell enlisted in the 12th Tennessee Cavalry, which at the time was stationed to guard the Nashville & Northwestern Railroad in Tennessee.
   Anderson C. Bagwell enlisted as a Private on 25 February 1864 at the age of 24.  He was mustered into Co. I, 12th Tennessee Cavalry on 11 March 1864.  This company was mustered in at Nashville, and composed mainly of men from states other than Tennessee.  Bagwell was appointed Corporal on 11 March 1864, and was promoted to Sergeant on 1 October 1864 (Source: Report of the Adjutant General of the State of Tennessee of the Military Forces of the State from 1861 to 1866).  Bagwell was discharged as a Sergeant at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on 7 October 1865 (Source: Pension file).
   Henderson Onie Bagwell (b. February 1842) -- believed to be Anderson C. Bagwell's younger brother -- served in the Civil War on the side of the Confederacy.  Henderson O. Bagwell served as a Private in Company D, 6th Alabama Infantry.  He enlisted on 15 April 1861 for a period of service of one year, and was discharged on account of disability (having contracted Typhoid) on 8 January 1862.  He was described at the time of enlistment as age 19, native of Greenville District, SC, height 5'10", fair complexion, hazel eyes, dark hair.  It appears that he may have recovered and re-enlisted, as a Henderson (a.k.a., H. O.) Bagwell served as a Private in Company E, 12th Georgia Cavalry.  The same Henderson Bagwell (listed as a Private in Company E, 4th Georgia Cavalry) was captured at Liberty, Tennessee, on 16 April 1862.  He was sent to Baltimore on May 7, 1862, and paroled at City Point, Virginia, on that date.  If this Henderson is indeed Anderson Bagwell's brother, then this is a case of a family whose siblings fought on opposite sides during the war.
   Anderson C. Bagwell applied for and received a veteran's pension benefit in California on 13 August 1891 (application no. 1047342, certificate no. 793697), claiming debility due to "contractive piles" since 1883, catarrh since 1876, and rheumatism since 1864.  His widow, Emma Kelso, filed for a remarried widow's benefit in 1927 (after the passing of her third husband, Walter H. Kelso, on 30 June 1922).
 
infantry
Company C
11th Georgia Infantry
(C.S.A.)
Deserted


cavalry
Company I
12th Tennessee Cavalry
(Union)






William A. Baker
(1840-1914)
Rank:  Private
Notes:  Born 30 December 1840.  He died 26 October 1914, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery.  His grave is marked with a military headstone.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private at New York City on 19 February 1862, and was mustered into Co. F, 93rd New York Infantry regiment on the same date.  His age at enlistment was 19.  He transferred from Co. F to Co. D on 19 December 1863, and from Co. K to Co. D at an unstated date.  He was discharged at Hatcher's Run, Virginia, on 27 March 1865.
   He applied for a veteran's disability pension in California on 16 May 1910 (application no. 1413988, certificate no. 1174987).  His wife, Susan J. Baker, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 28 December 1914 (application no. 1039018, certificate no. 794940).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  D, F & K, 93 N.Y. Inf.

infantry
Co's F, K & D
93rd New York Infantry






James Barry
(1838 - 1891)
Rank:  Private

Biography in Records of Members of the Grand Army of the Republic (William H. Ward, 1886, p. 169)
JAMES BARRY.
   Born in Ireland in 1838; arrived in New York in 1860; is by occupation a tailor; enlisted May 16, 1861, in the 5th U.S. Artillery (Griffin's Battery), and served as a private; was attached to the 2d Brigade, 5th Army Corps, taking part in the following-named battles:  Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mills; Malvern Hill, Antietam, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Mine Run, Grovetown, Gettysburg, eleven days in the Wilderness, and Spottsylvania Court-house; was honorably discharged at the expiration of his enlistment, May 16, 1864.  Comrade Barry is a member of Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, at St. Helena, Cal., where he resides.

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 13 February 1891):
Death of James Barry.
-----
   James Barry, the tailor, who is well known in St. Helena, having conducted a shop here for several years, but moved to Napa last Spring, died at the family residence in that city Wednesday morning at 2 o'clock.  Mr. Barry had been in poor health for several years, being a sufferer from asthma but was able to transact his business up to a few days ago and only last week paid St. Helena a visit looking as well as usual.  Last Monday he went to San Francisco on business and in a day or two he telegraphed that he was ill at St. Mary's hospital.  His eldest son at once went down after him and brought him to his home in Napa where he gradually sank until death came to his relief.
   The deceased served in the late war, having been a member of Company D, 5th U.S. Artillery.  He enlisted May 16, 1861 and was discharged May 16, 1864.  He leaves a wife and three children, two sons and a daughter, to mourn his loss.  His remains will be interred in St. Helena cemetery.  The last sad rites will be performed by Kit Carson and Kilpatrick Posts, G.A.R.
   The flag is at half mast over the G.A.R. hall out of respect to the departed soldier.
 
Notes:  Native of Ireland, born 1838.  His wife was Johanna Barry (b. Sept. 1855 in Ireland) was living in St. Helena in 1900.  Included in her household was her son, John D. (born May 1878 in California).  Johanna was still living in St. Helena in 1910, when the census was taken.  She was living on Stockton Street, and was listed as a widow, age 76, born in Ireland, mother of 3 children, 2 still living.
   James died in Napa on 11 February 1891, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 14 February.  His grave is marked by a military headstone.
 
Military Information:   Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 16 May 1861.  He served in Battery D, 5th U.S. Light Artillery regiment (Regular Army).  He was discharged 16 May 1864, following three years of service.
   He applied for a veteran's disability pension on 5 February 1887 (application no. 596653), but no certificate was issued (the application was probably denied).  His wife, Johanna Barry, applied for and was granted a widow's benefit in California on 15 June 1891 (application no. illegible, certificate no. 386_49).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  D, 5 U.S. Art.
 
artillery
Battery D
5th U.S. Artillery
"Griffin's Battery"






Byron Oscar Carr
(1832 - 1913)
Rank:  Colonel & Division Quartermaster
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 7 November 1913):
DEATH CALLS COL. B. O. CARR
-----
Was Prominent Soldier and Citizen.
-----
END COMES AT VALLE VISTA.
-----
Resided Near S. Helena Many Years Ago and Returns to Pass Declining Days.
-----
    Col. B. O. Carr, many years ago a resident of Napa valley, and who has spent most of the time for the past year at his old home, Valle Vista," now the country residence of his father-in-law, Mr. R. H. Pratt, died Saturday, November 1st, in the place he loved so well and where he hoped the end would come.  For many years the distinguished soldier and citizen had been in failing health and his death was not unexpected.
   Col. Byron Oscar Carr was born in Erie County, New York, April 24, 1[8]32, and would have been 82 years of age had he lived until next April.  Deceased served throughout the Civil war as a commissoined [sic] officer, attaining the rank of Colonel and Division Quartermaster.  After the war Colonel Carr came to California and while superintendent of the Truckee division of the Central Pacific Railroad, married Miss Sarah Pratt, on February 15, 1872.  From 1873 until 1881 he was Supervising Inspector of steamboats for the Sixth United States District with headquarters at Memphis, Tenn.  Here a daughter, Mary Louise, was born to Colonel and Mrs. Carr.  While still ho[l]ding the position of inspector of steamboats Colonel Carr was transferred from memphis to Louisville, Kentucky.  A second child, George P., was born and two years later died at Albany, Ind., where the family resided prior to coming to California in 1882.  Colonel Carr, upon coming to this State, sought a home for himself and family in Napa valley.  Purchasing thirty-two acres near St. Helena, he built the commodious and comfortable house and established the charming country home now known as "Valle Vista."  Here another son, Wray Torrey, was born in 1884, but died in 1890.  Colonel Carr and family remained in Napa valley until December 1889, when they moved to San Francisco, deceased having been elected Secretary and Manager of the People's Home Savings Bank in that city.  In December 1891, he resigned to take the cashiership and management of the Bank of Lemoore in Lemoore, which position he held until his first serious illness in the Summer of 1898 incapacitated him permanently for business.  In April 1899 the family moved to Seattle, Wash., where deceased made his home continuously until July 1912, since which time he has resided in San Francisco and "Valle Vista," near St. Helena.
   Colonel Carr always took a deep interest in public affairs, especially those connected with the Grand Army of the Republic.  During his residence in California he was Post Commander of the G.A.R. Post at St. Helena, and Commander of the G.A.R. for the Department of California.  He was also Past Commander of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States Commandery of Washington.  His oldest brother, Eugene A. Carr, Brigadier-General and Bvt. Major-General, U.S.A., died at Washington, D.C., about two years ago.  His next oldest brother, Rev. Dr. Horace M. Carr, resides at Parsons, Kansas, and is at present Chaplain-General of the G.A.R.  His next youngest brother, Hon. Clark E. Carr, was for over twenty-five years Postmaster of Galesburg, Ill., and was Minister to Denmark under President Harrison.  He is still living at Galesburg.  His youngest brother, George F. Carr, died many years ago in Louisiana where he was Parish Judge.  All five brothers served with distinction throughout the Civil war; General Carr, who at the outbreak of the war, was Captain of Mounted Rifles, U.S.A., being appointed Colonel of the 3rd Illinois Cavalry, and later serving with great distinction as a brigade and division commander; Doctor Carr being Chaplain of the 3rd Illinois Cavalry; Clark E. Carr, Colonel on the Staff of Governor Richard Yates, charged with very important duties in connection with the equipment and care of the Illinois troops; and George P. Carr, as Captain of Volunteers.  Besides his surviving brothers and his surviving sister, Mrs. Grace D. Fahnestock, who resides in Galesburg, Ill., Colonel Carr leaves surviving him his widow, Sarah Pratt Carr, two sons, Eugene M. and Byron T. Carr, and a daughter, mrs. Mary Carr Moore.
   Colonel Carr was a very lovable man -- kind, genial and approachable.  During the seven years he resided in our midst he made many warm friends and all were glad to see him when he, in late years, came here to visit.  He always loved Napa valley and though business called him away he hoped to spend his declining days surrounded by the charm of our vine-clad hills, a wish that he had gratified.  As a husband and father his private life was always tender and unfailingly kind and he endeared himself to all about him.
   The funeral took place from "Valle Vista" Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock.  Rev. W. D. Simonds, pastor of a Unitarian church in Oakland, (deceased having been a member of that denomination) officiated.  He was assisted by Rev. James Mitchell, both clergymen speaking of the busy, useful and ideal life spent by deceased and of his kindness of hear and goodness.  At the house a choir composed of Mrs. Walter Metzner, Mrs O. A. Jursch, F. B. Mackinder and C. C. Coleman sang "Home of the Sour" and "Nearer My God to Thee," and at the cemetery the beautiful hymn, "Goodnight."  Interment was made in St. Helena cemetery.  The funeral was attended by those members of the G.A.R. residing in St. Helena and vicinity, most of whom had known their comrade when his home was in Napa valley.  The floral tributes were very beautiful.
 
Notes:  Native of Concord, New York.  He was born 24 April 1832  He married first to Mary E. Buck on 19 October 1858.  She died in Galesburg, Illinois, on 16 March 1861.  His second wife was Sarah Amelia Pratt (a minister in the Unitarian Church), whom he married in Carlin, Elko County, Nevada, on 15 February 1872.
   He died on 1 November 1913 in Napa County at the age of 81, and was buried on 4 November 1913 in Lot 23, Block C, St. Helena Cemetery.  Sarah died in San Diego, California, on 24 December 1935.
 
Military Information:    Union.  He enlisted 6 September 1861 at Camp Butler as 1st Lieutenant in the 3rd Illinois Cavalry (Field and Staff Officers) at the age of 29.  His residence at enlistment was Galesburg, Illinois.  He was promoted to regimental QM at an unknown date.  Discharged for promotion on 29 Sept. 1862.  Commissioned into the U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster Dept. on 29 Sept. 1862 with the rank of Captain and Assistant QM.  Promoted to Lieut.-Col. (Quartermaster) on 12 May 1864, and Colonel on 2 August 1864.  Mustered out 28 July 1865.
   He appears incorrectly as "Byron O'Carr" on the Illinois Civil War Muster and Descriptive Rolls Database.
   He applied for and received a veteran's pension benefit in California on 22 November 1892 (application no. 1139275, certificate no. 982309).  His wife, Sarah P. Carr, applied for and received a widow's benefit in California on 25 November 1913 (application no. 1017931, certificate no. 773506).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  Capt. & AQM U.S. Vols; RQM 3 Ill. Cav.

cavalry
Field & Staff
3rd Illinois Cavalry


infantry
U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster Department






Victor Carrier
(c.1840 - 1895)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 12 April 1895):
Death of Victor Carrier.
-----
   Victor Carrier died at his home in Chiles valley Wednesday morning shortly before 1 o'clock, having been a great sufferer for many years with a complication of diseases of the throat and lungs.
   Deceased was a native of France, aged 55 years.  He was a single man and had no relatives in this country.  Mr. Carrier had been a resident of Chiles valley for more than twenty years and was universally respected.  About two years ago he sold his farm to Mr. Metzner and Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Orchard were placed in charge.  With them Mr. Carrier has since lived.  He had been in failing health for years but for a long time had been a confirmed invalid.  His funeral took place Thursday at 2 o'clock.

Notes:  Native of France.  He died 10 April 1895, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery.

Military Information:   He is probably the same man as Victor Carrier, Pvt., Co. H, 8th California Infantry.  Enlisted at Mokelumne Hill as a Private on 7 January 1865.  Mustered into Co. H on 26 January 1865.  Mustered out on 24 October 1865 at Fort Point, San Francisco.
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 4 August 1890 (application no. 859133, certificate no. 657329).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  H. 8 Cal. Inf.
 
infantry
Company H
8th California Infantry










George W. Chase
(1847 - 1911)
Rank: Unknown

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 31 March 1911):
Funeral of George W. Chase.
-----
   The funeral of the late George W. Chase, who died on Howell mountain Thursday of last week, was held from the Presbyterian church Saturday morning at 11 o'clock, Rev. James Mitchell officiating.
  Deceased was born in Brooklyn, New York, October 21, 1848, and had reached the age of 62 years, 5 months and 3 days.  He had resided in California for forty years and on Howell mountain for thirty years.  A widow and the following children are left to mourn his loss -- Josephine and John W. Chase, Mrs. Peter Martinelli and Mrs. Frank Rhoda.
 
Notes:  Native of Brooklyn, New York, born 21 October 1847.  George's father was Ship's Captain George W. Chase (1801-1878).  His sister, Sarah Esther Chase, was the wife of William Bowers Bourn, Sr.  Bourn was a business partner of Captain Chase, and a famous figure in California history.
   George Chase appears in Brooklyn, Kings County, New York, in the 1850 census, under the household of his sea captain father, George Chase.  George (Jr.) was listed as age 2, born in New York.  Others in the household were George's mother, Mary (age 42), and siblings Mary (age 23), Sarah (age 20), Charlotte (age 19), Georgina (age 16), Emily (age 14), Caroline (age 11), and John (age 7).
   George appears in San Francisco in the 1860 census, listed under the household of his master mariner father, George Chase.  George (Jr.) was listed as age 12, born in New York.  Others in the household were George's mother, Mary (age 51), and siblings Georgeiana (age 22), Emily (age 20), Caroline (age 18), and John (age 16).
   George Chase appears in St. Helena in the 1880 census, listed as a farmer, age 31, born in New York (parents both born in New York).  His household included his wife, Virginia K., age 27, a native of Missouri.  Her father was a native of England, and her mother a native of Kentucky.  The Chase family appears in Vineland Precinct of Napa County in the 1900 census.  George Chase was listed as a farmer, age 52, born October 1847 in New York.  His household included his wife Kate (born November 1854 in Missouri), daughter Eata (born October 1882), son John H. (born January 1886), and daughter Maria E. (born September 1891).  George and Kate (Virginia Katherine?) had been married for 21 years.  Kate was listed as the mother of four children, all living.
   The Chase family was listed in St. Helena in the 1910 census.  George was listed as a farmer, age 64, born in New York, parents born in Maine.  He was not listed as a Civil War veteran on the census.  His household included his wife, Kate (age 57), and son John (age 23).  Katherine Chase was living on Howell Mountain Road in 1920 when the census was taken.  She was listed as a widow, and was living with her son, John H. Chase.
   George W. Chase died at Howell Mountain, Napa County, on 23 March 1911, at the age of 63, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 25 March.  There is no monument.
 
Military Information:  Reportedly a Union drummer.  He may be the same soldier as George Chase, who enlisted as a Private at San Francisco on 9 January 1865.  He was mustered into Company D, 8th California Infantry regiment on 11 January 1865, and was mustered out at Fort Point (San Francisco) on 24 October 1865.

flag
Service unknown
(Provisional)






William Walter Church
(1822 - 1913)
Rank:  Private
Death Notice (St. Helena Star newspaper, 10 October 1913):
Death of An Aged Citizen.
-----
   Dr. William W. Church, an aged citizen of St. Helena, whose home had been here for the past ten years, died at his home on McKorkle avenue, last evening at 8:30 o'clock.  Deceased was a native of Vermont, and had reached the age of 91 years, 4 months and 12 days.  Dr. Church was a veteran of the civil war and had an interesting career, an account of which will be given in the next issue of the Star.

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 17 October 1913):
LAID TO REST.
-----
Funeral of An Aged Citizen Held Last Sunday.
-----
    The funeral of the late Dr. William W. Church, whose death Thursday night of last week was announced in the last issue of the Star, was held from W. F. Mercier's undertaking parlors Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.  Elder J. S. Hare officiated and a choir from the Sanitarium rendered appropriate selections.
   William Walter Church was born in Royalton, Vermont, May 29, 1822, and had reached the ripe old age of 91 years, 4 months and 12 days.  When a lad deceased moved with his family to New Hampshire and there studied medicine.  When a very young man he moved to Illinois and began the practice of his profession.  When the civil war broke out he enlisted with the 25th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, receiving his honorable discharge at the close of that historic struggle.  After the war deceased continued to reside in Illinois until the early '80s when he came to California, settling in Fresno.  In 1886 he returned to Illinois and made his home in Franklin county, that State, until the Fall of 1903, when he again came to California.  When in St. Louis, on the way West, his daughter, Mrs. Fannie Baxter, who with her daughters, was accompanying him, was struck by a street car and dragged a considerable distance, dying a few hours later as a result of the accident.  After a few days the others in the party continued their way to California, settling first in Rutherford.  After one year in that village they moved to St. Helena, deceased purchasing a home on McKorkle avenue ten years ago where he passed his remaining days in peace and comfort.  His wife died in the East in 1872.
   Deceased is survived by two sons and one daughter -- Edward and Abe Church and Mrs. Alice Heffley, all residents of Lincoln, Nebraska.  These grandchildren are also left:  Mrs. Mabel Bance, of Erie, Kansas; Mrs. Hazel Allen, Mrs. Ethel Beringer and Miss Alice Baxter, of St. Helena, and Herbert Baxter, of South Dakota.  There are also eight great grandchildren, four in St. Helena and four in Erie, Kansas.
   Dr. Church, for twenty years, was a member of the Adventist denomination.  He was a kind old man who had spent an interesting and useful life, retaining his faculties almost to the end.
 
Notes:  Native of Royalton, Windsor County, Vermont, born 29 May 1822.  William W. Church appears in the 1900 census in Benton Township, Franklin County, Illinois, under the household of his widowed daughter, Fanny Baxter.  He was listed as a widower, age 88, born May 1822 in Vermont, no occupation.
   William W. Church was enumerated in the 1910 census in St. Helena, listed as a widower, age 87, born in Vermont (parents both born in Vermont), living on his own income, Union army veteran.  His household included his grandchildren, Ethel C. Baxter (age 22), Herbert D. Baxter (age 20), and Alice J. Baxter (age 17).
   He died on 9 October 1913, and was buried on 12 October 1913 in the Block 2 Extension, Lot 54, St. Helena Public Cemetery.
Military Information:  Union.  He was listed as a veteran in the 1910 census.  William W. Church enlisted as a Private at Princeton, Illinois, on 15 May 1862, and was mustered into Co. K, 65th Illinois Infantry regiment at Chicago on the same date.  At the time of enlistment, he was described as a dentist, age 40, height 5' 9", hair dark, eyes blue, complexion dark, nativity Vermont.  He was mustered out at Chicago on 15 May 1865.
   His obituary states that he served in the 25th Illinois Infantry.  This is unlikely.  The 25th Illinois Infantry was a 3-year outfit.  It was mustered in on 4 August 1861, and was mustered out on 5 September 1864.
 
infantry
Company K
65th Illinois Infantry







Charles W. Cook
(c.1836 - 1882)
Rank: Unknown
Obituary (The St. Helena Star newspaper, 13 January 1882):
A Masonic Funeral.
-----
   Charles W. Cook died at his home on Pritchard hill, near Chiles canyon, Tuesday last, of an affection of the heart, resulting from a complication of diseases, including pneumonia and hernia.  His family have, for three years past, lived at the former Calderwood place on Pritchard hill, but Mr. Cook himself was little known, having been occupied in the city as a worker in brass in the manufacture of telegraph instruments.  Failing health compelled him last Summer to quit his business and come home, since which time he has been gradually failing, with fatal result as above state.  Deceased was a member of the Masonic Fraternity, belonging to Occidental Lodge No. 40, of Ottawa, Ills., and his funeral here yesterday was conducted by St. Helena Lodge No. 93 of that order, services being impressively read by D. B. Carver, W. M.  The procession was marshaled by E. W. Woodward, Marshal of the Lodge, in the following order:
The Tyler;
Stewards, with White Rods;
Master Masons;
Secretary and Treasurer;
Junior and Senior Wardens;
Past Masters;
The Holy Writings,
On a cushion covered by a black cloth, carried by Thomas Greer and supported by the Deacons with crossed rods;
The Master;
Hearse;
Pall Bearers
(A. C. Rampendahl, C. A. Gardner, Thos. Mooney, W. E. Anderson, Jas. R. Davis, R. G. Eubank)
Mourners,

   The following resolutions were adopted by the Lodge:
   WHEREAS -- Our late brother, Charles W. Cook, has been removed by the hand of death, depriving our Order of a valued member and a stricken family of a loved husband and father, Therefore be it
   Resolved -- By St. Helena Lodge No. 93 F. & A. M. that in the death of Brother Cook we deplore the loss of one of that loving circle of brothers whose fraternal band extends all around the world.
   Resolved -- That we condole with the stricken widow and orphans in their great bereavement, and commend them in their affliction to Him who is also OUR refuge and our strength -- the loving Father of us all who alone can comfort and support.
   Resolved -- That these resolutions be spread upon the minutes of the Lodge, and a copy thereof be sent to the widow of deceased, and also to the lodge of which he was a member,
W. J. G. Dawson, Chas. A. Gardner, A. C. Rampendahl, | Com.
 
Notes:  Native of New Hampshire.
   Chas. W. Cook was enumerated in the City of Ottawa, Lasalle County, Illinois, in the 1870 census.  He was listed as age 32, born in Massachusetts, occupation brass finisher, W.U.T. (Western Union Telegraph).  His household included his wife, Elizabeth (age 31) and son Charles J. (age 9).  Charles W. Cook appears in the 1880 census in Yount Township, Napa County, California, living near to Charles Pritchard (probably at Pritchard Hill, in the Conn Valley area).  Cook was noted as married, age 43, born in New Hampshire, father born in Massachusetts, mother born in New Hampshire, occupation brass stretcher.  His household included his wife, Elizabeth M. (age 39, native of Vermont), and son, Charles J. (age 20, native of Massachusetts).

   Charles died on 10 January 1882, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 12 January 1882.

Military Information:  Noted as a Civil War veteran in the sexton's list of 30 May 1887.

flag
Service unknown






Samuel Marion Cook
(1843 - 1900)
Rank:  Corporal
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 21 December 1900):
Death of Samuel M. Cook.
-----
   Samuel M. Cook died at the St. Helena Sanitarium Wednesday morning after an illness of one week with pneumonia.
   Deceased was born in Iowa January 14, 1843.  In 1851 he came with his parents to California.  When the civil war broke out he went to Aurora, Nevada, and enlisted with the Nevada volunteers.  After serving his country and receiving an honorable discharge he returned to this State and came to Napa county.  In 1876 he went to the southern part of the State remaining about four years.  Since 1880 his residence has been in St. Helena, following farming as his vocation.  Deceased was married to Miss Emily Sleeper in the early '60.  He leaves the following children, besides other relatives, to mourn his sudden demise:  Algernon, Mrs. J. M. Hicks, Mrs. C. H. Beeves, Romanso M., Frank E., S. E. A., and Vern Cook.
   The funeral took place from the Methodist church to-day at 10 o'clock.
 
Notes:  Native of Iowa, born 14 January 1843. 
   He lost his left arm in a shooting incident in early June of 1892.  He and his neighbor, Francis Markham, had gotten into a dispute over some of Cook's free ranging cattle.  Cook attacked Markham with an axe.  Martin (wounded by the axe attack) grabbed a shotgun and fire at Cook, striking him in the left arm.  Both survived, but what was left of Cook's left arm had to be amputated close to the shoulder.
He died at St. Helena Sanitarium (Deer Park) on 19 December 1900, and was buried in the G.A.R. plot of the St. Helena Cemetery on 20 (21?) December 1900.  His grave is marked by a military headstone.

 
Military Information:   Union.  Samuel Cook enlisted as a Corporal in Co. F, 1st Nevada Cavalry battalion.  His date of enlistment is unknown, however, his obituary notes that he signed up in Aurora, Nevada.
   He applied for and received a veteran's pension benefit in California on 7 July 1892 (application no. 1120702, certificate no. 1039913).  A minor child (Emily L. Kingsfield, guardian) received a survivor's benefit in California on 20 January 1902 (application no. 755390, certificate no. 530175).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  F, 1 Nev. Cav.
 
cavalry
Company F
1st Nevada Battalion Cavalry






Levi P. Davis
(1835 - 1881)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 11 February 1881):
  It grieves us to record the death of a good man.  Mr. Levi P. Davis, residing in the mountains, about four miles east of St. Helena, died on Sunday last of bilious pneumonia, in the 45th year of his age  Mr. Davis was a native of Modino County, Ohio, where he was born August 23, 1835.  For several years past he had been a great sufferer from hemorrhage of the lungs, and about five years ago he removed to this vicinity with the hope of benefiting his health.  He was encouraged in this until within a few days of his death, when his disease assumed an alarming form and he became aware that his earthly existence was near its close.  He was fully prepared for the change, and died as he had lived -- trusting in the merits of his Redeemer and having a clear testimony of his acceptance with God and of his assurance of a home in heaven.  His funeral was held was held Monday at 2 p.m. from the Methodist church.  Rev. M. D. Buck preached an eloquent and instructive funeral sermon, and Reverends James Mitchell and J. A. Fisher assisted in the exercises.  At the grave, exercises were conducted by Mr. Fisher, assisted by Mr. Buck.
 
Notes:  Native of Medina County, Ohio, born 23 August 1835.  Levi P. Davis and Lucretia Dora Ann May were married in Greene County, Iowa, on 3 July 1859.  Levi appears in the 1860 census in Washington Township, Greene County, Iowa, listed as a farmer, age 24, born in Ohio.  His household included recent bride, Lucretia, age 16, born in Missouri.  Levi appears in the 1870 census in San Joaquin Township, Sacramento County, California (Sacramento P.O.), listed as a farmer, age 34, native of Ohio.  The household included his wife, Lucretia, age 25, native of Missouri, and a 24 year old farmer named James Martin, native of New York.  Levi appears in the 1880 census in Hot Springs Township ("Vicinity of St. Helena"), listed as a farmer, married, age 45, native of Ohio (parents also Ohio natives).  His household included his wife, Lucretia E. Davis, age 35, native of Missouri (parents from Kentucky).
   Levi's widow, "Lucretia Ellen," remarried about 1894 to James Nelson Rutherford.  She and her new husband appear in Burbank, Los Angeles County, in the 1900 census.  They appear in the 1910 census in Malibu, Los Angeles County.  In 1920, Lucretia was once again widowed, living as a boarder in Malibu Township, in the household of Samuel Faulks.  Lucretia applied for a widow's benefit in 1924.
   He died 6 February 1881 at age 45, and was buried on 7 February 1881 in Block 1, Lot 16, St. Helena Public Cemetery. 
He was listed in the Sexton's list of veterans on 30 May 1883 as "Levi P. Davis," and on the list of 1887 as "L. C. Davis."
 
Military Information:  Union.  Levi P. Davis enlisted as a Private on 15 August 1862, and was mustered into Co. E, 39th Iowa Infantry on 3 September 1862.  At the time of enlistment, he was noted as age 27, residing in Rippey, Iowa, native of Ohio.  He was discharged on 17 February 1863 at Cairo, Illinois.
   He applied for -- but was apparently not granted -- a veteran's pension benefit on 30 September 1865 (application no. 91004).  His wife, Lucretia E. Rutherford, applied for and received a widow's benefit in California on 10 July 1925 (application no. 617459, certificate no. 973166).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  E 39 Iowa Inf.
infantry
Company E
39th Iowa Infantry






Frederick Minor Dickinson
(c.1840 - 1929)
Rank:  Private
Notes:  Native of Connecticut.
   Frederick M. Dickinson was registered as a voter, age 66, at the Veterans Home in Yountville in 1906, and continued to be listed as a voter there until 1918.  In 1920 and 1922, he was registered as a voter (Republican) in San Francisco, retired, living at 532 Noe Street.
   In the 1910 census, he appears as an inmate at the Veterans Home of California (Yountville), Napa County, listed as a widower, age 70, born in Connecticut, father born in Massachusetts, mother born in Connecticut, occupation "none," Union army veteran.
   Frederick M. Dickinson died in San Francisco on 21 December 1928.  He was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 16 May 1929.  His grave is marked by a military headstone.

Military Information:   Union.  Listed as Frederick M. Dickerson.  He enlisted as a Private on 21 February 1862, residence New Haven, Connecticut.  He was mustered into Co. M, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery regiment on 25 February 1862.  Re-enlisted on 5 February 1864.  Mustered out on 25 September 1865 at Washington, DC.

artillery
Battery M
1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery






William Ebeling
(1846 - 1910)
Rank:  Private
Biography (History of Napa and Solano Counties, California, 1912):
WILLIAM EBELING
   The life which this narrative depicts began in Germany in 1846 and closed in St. Helena, Napa county, March 9, 1910.  When he was a lad of thirteen years Mr. Ebeling left Germany and came to America, locating in New York City, where he learned the barber's trade.  At the outbreak of the war in 1861 (at the age of fifteen years and four months) he enlisted in the Thirty-ninth New York Volunteers, being sworn in and attached to Company E on September 9 of that year.  Up to 1862 he was occupied with camp life and an occasional skirmish.  On June 8, 1862, he was wounded in the battle of Cross Keys and remained in the hospital for some time.  He was taken prisoner by Stonewall Jackson on September 15, and later released.  He saw service in the battles of Gettysburg and also Bristow Station and the battles of the Wilderness and Petersburg in the spring of 1864.  He received his discharge September 9, 1864.  Among the prized possessions of his widow is an old pocketbook that he carried all through the war.  After the war he worked at his trade in Baltimore, Md., and later lived with his family in Chicago, where he lost everything during the big fire of 1871.
   In 1875 Mr. Ebeling came to California and worked in San Francisco and Berkeley for eight years, then went to Windsor, Sonoma county.  Leaving this latter place, he came to Calistoga and entered partnership with W. F. Bornhorst in viticulture in 1884, continuing this until his death.  He was a member of the Odd Fellows and the Grand Army of the Republic.  He married Elizabeth Warns in Baltimore in 1866.  Their eldest child, Charles William, married Miss Ida Macks and they have two children, Walter and Victor; Lillian, the wife of E. L. Vander Naillen of Oakland, has two children, Gertrude and Edwin; Harry W. married Minnie Mack and resides in Fulton, Cal., where he is a fruit buyer; Minnie, the wife of E. J. Fletcher of Los Angeles, has two children, Earl and Lillian; Frank married Miss L. Walkmeister, and they have one son, Warren; Louis A. and Clemens A. complete the family.  About two years after the death of her husband Mrs. Ebeling became of the wife of his former partner, William F. Bornhorst, and they now make their home in St. Helena.

Obituary,
The Weekly Calistogian newspaper, Friday, 11 March 1910:
WILLIAM EBELING HAS PASSED AWAY
Former Calistogaite Dies at His Home Near St. Helena
   William Ebeling died at his home near St. Helena at 2 o'clock Wednesday morning at what was formerly known as the Lemme place.  Death was due to stomach trouble, of which he had long been a sufferer.
   Mr. Ebeling had been a resident of Calistoga for many years, being engaged in the barber business in the old Magnolia hotel building.  He retired about twelve years ago and moved out to his place in the hills west of town.  Last fall this place was sold by the owners, Ebeling & Bornhorst, and they moved to St. Helena where they had previously purchased a fine vineyard.
   The deceased was a veteran of the civil war and was a native of Hamburg, Ger., and was aged 64 years and 27 days.  A widow and several grown children survive.  He was for years a member of Morse lodge, No. 237, I.O.O.F., of San Francisco, and the funeral was held this morning at 11 o'clock under the auspices of St. Helena lodge, No. 167, from their hall.  He was also a member of Governor Morton post of the Grand Army of this place.
   Quite a number of Calistoga veterans and friends attended the funeral.  Interment was made in St. Helena cemetery.
 
Notes:  Native of Germany, born 13 February 1846.  Well known early winemaker in the Calistoga and St. Helena area.  Partner was Bornhorst.
   He died near St. Helena on 9 March 1910, and was buried in Section F, Block 1, of St. Helena Public Cemetery on 11 March 1910.  Cause of death was stomach and liver cancer.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private at New York City on 17 May 1861, at the age of 18.  He was mustered into Company E, 39th New York Infantry regiment on 1 June 1861.  Wounded at Cross Keys, Virginia, on 8 June 1862.  Transferred from Company E to Company B on 31 May 1863.  Transferred from Company B to Company I on 1 June 1864.  Mustered out on 9 September 1864 at Petersburg, Virginia.
   William Ebeling was a member of Calistoga's Gov. Morton Post No. 41, GAR, and succeeded Hiram G. Wyckoff (mid-term) as Post Commander there in May 1895.  In later years he served as Officer of the Guard for the Post.
 
infantry
Co's B, E, & I
39th New York Infantry
("Garibaldi Guard")






Mr. Eckert
(???? - ????)
Rank: Unknown
 
Notes:  He was buried in St. Helena Cemetery before 30 May 1883.  Listed as Eckers on the Memorial Day list of 1887.
Military Information:  None.

flag
Service unknown






James Peoples Fee
(1843 - 1879)
Rank:  Private
Death Notice (St. Helena Star newspaper, 14 November 1879):
DIED.
FEE -- at the residence of his sister, Mrs. T. B. Shamp, at "Walnut Grove," near Calistoga, Monday, November 10, 1879, of softening of the brain, James P. Fee, a native of Huntington county, Pennsylvania, aged 36 years, 6 months, and 3 [8?] days.

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 21 November 1879):
Death of James P. Fee.
-----
   The death of James P. Fee, brother of Mrs. T. B. Shamp, was noted last week.  Deceased had long been an invalid from a partial paralysis, affecting the brain -- originated, we believe, by sunstroke.  He has lain at his sister's house in a dangerous condition for many months, and his death was not unexpected.  He was a native of Huntington county, Pennsylvania, and was in his 37th year.  The funeral services were held at the family residence, Walnut Grove, Wednesday, Rev. James Mitchell officiating, and the remains interred here.
 
Notes:  Native of Huntington County, Pennsylvania, born either 7 or 2 May 1843.  He was the son of George Jackson Fee and Mary Jane Porter.  He married Martha Combes in Jefferson County, Iowa, on 26 July 1861.
   James Fee was enumerated in the 1850 census in Henderson Township, Huntington County, Pennsylvania, under the household of his farmer father, George Fee.  James was listed as age 7, born in Pennsylvania, attending school.  Others in the household were Mary Fee (age 56), Lydia and Mary (age 20), Prudence (age 17), John (age 16), George (age 13), and Frances (age 10).
   James P. Fee appears in the 1856 Iowa Census in Black Hawk, Jefferson County, Iowa, under the household of his parents, George and "Merry" Fee.  James was listed as age 13, born in Pennsylvania.
   He died 10 November 1879 at the home of his sister, Prudence Keller Shamp (nee Fee, widow of Thomas Barr Shamp), and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery.  His grave is marked with a military headstone.
 
Military Information:   Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 5 January 1864 at the age of 20.  Residence at the time of enlistment ws Fairfield, Iowa.  He was mustered into Company E, 2nd Iowa Infantry regiment on the same date as enlistment.  Mustered out on 12 July 1865 at Louisville, Kentucky.
 
infantry
Company E
2nd Iowa Infantry







John D. Fee
(1835 - 1914)
Rank:  Captain
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 20 March 1914):
VETERAN ANSWERS CALL.
-----
Captain John D. Fee Passes Away at His Home in St. Helena.
-----
  Captain John D. Fee died at his home on Stockton street, St. Helena, Sunday morning at 9:30 o'clock.  Captain Fee had been in poor health for a year or more, but was only confined to his bed a few days before the end came.  Heart trouble was the cause of death.
   Captain John D. Fee was born in Huntington county, Pennsylvania, October 18, 1835.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. George J. Fee.  He spent his early life at the home of his birth and after completing his education studied architecture with his brother.  When the civil war broke out deceased enlisted with the 125th Pennsylvania regiment, first serving as an infantryman and later in a company of cavalry.  He retired from the service as a Captain, having participated in many of the important battles of that terrible war.  After spending some time in his native State after the war, deceased went to Nevada where he engaged in mining near Virginia City.  Twenty years ago deceased moved to Pueblo, Coolrado [sic - Colorado], where he engaged in architecture and contracting, remaining there about ten years.  He then retired from active business and joined his sister and brother, Miss Fannie M., and the late George W. Fee, in St. Helena.  He has resided here for about ten years and during that time has made many warm friends.  Deceased was a quiet unassuming man, very pleasant and affable and kind.  He was never married and is survived by one sister, Miss Fannie M. Fee, and several nieces and nephews.
   Deceased was a member of Pueblo, Colorado, Lodge No. 832, B.P.O.E., and the Napa county Elks took charge of the funeral, which was held from the undertaking parlors of W. F. Mercier, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.  Rev. James Mitchell conducted a very impressive service which was largely attended by Elks and sorrowing friends.  The floral offerings were very beautiful.  The remains were laid beside those of other departed dear ones in the St. Helena cemetery.  At the grave the G.A.R. assisted with the services.  The pall bearers were W. A. Bingham, Julius Goodman, Walter Metzner, Leo H. Martin, J. G. Johnson and J. H. Steves, all members of the Elks.
Notes:  Native of Huntington County, Pennsylvania, born 18 October 1835 (headstone indicates year was 1834).  He was a son of George Jackson Fee and Mary Jane Porter, and was an older brother to James Peoples Fee (see above).  He was enumerated as "J. D. Fee" in the 1900 census in Pueblo, Colorado, as a lodger in a hotel on Main Street.  Only his name and gender were recorded in the census that year.
   John appears in the 1910 census in St. Helena, living on Stockton Street.  He was listed as single, age 75, born in Pennsylvania (as were his parents), occupation building contractor, Union army veteran.  His sister, Frances M. Fee (age 60) was living with him.
   He died in St. Helena on 15 March 1914, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 17 March.  His grave is marked with a military headstone.
Military Information:   Union.  His first enlisted in Pennsylvania on 13 August 1862, and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant in Co. I, 125th Pennsylvania Infantry regiment on the same date.  He was mustered out at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on 18 May 1863.  He re-enlisted as a 1st Lieutenant on 16 July 1863, and was commissioned into Co. A, 22nd Pennsylvania Cavalry on the same date.  He was promoted to Captain on 11 August 1863.  Mustered out on 5 February 1864.

infantry
Company I
125th Pennsylvania Infantry


cavalry
Company A
22nd Pennsylvania Cavalry






George Washington Fisher
(1848 - 1909)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (Napa Daily Journal newspaper, 24 November 1909):
GEORGE FISHER DEAD
   George Fisher, formerly a well known resident of St. Helena, and late Napa, died in San Francisco Tuesday, after a brief illness with pneumonia.  Deceased was a butcher, and was employed in the market of Zollner & Even when he resided in this city.
   He leaves a widow, who is the sister of Mrs. G. M. Francis.
Biography (History of Napa and Lake Counties, California, 1881):
   FISHER, G.W.  Was born in Ohio March 5, 1849 [sic].  When he was two years old his parents moved to Indiana.  When he was about nine years of age his parents died.  At the age of fourteen he enlisted in the 12th Indiana Cavalry as a private and served till the close of the war.  He then went to Kansas and engaged in freighting from Atchison to Denver.  In 1867 he went to Julesburg and freighted from there to Fort Laramie.  At the end of a year he went to Laramie Plains and helped draw the logs for the first house in Laramie City.  He then worked on the Union Pacific Railroad until the connection with the Central Pacific was made.  He then went to Elko, Nevada, and freighted from there to White Pine and other points.  In 1869 he came to California, locating in Calistoga.  In March, 1870, he came to St. Helena and engaged in the butchering business, and shortly afterward opened a shop in connection with J. Bruce.  In May, 1876, he bought his partner out, and is still conducting the business.  He was married August 25, 1877, to Miss Emma Horton, a native of Wisconsin.  They have had two children, both of whom are dead.
Notes:  Native of Ohio, born 5 March 1848.  George W. Fisher died in San Francisco on 23 November 1909, at the age of 61.  His grave is marked by a military headstones, which includes his birth and death years.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 12 January 1864, residence Porter County, Indiana.  He was mustered into Co. M, 12th Indiana Cavalry regiment on 12 January 1864.  Mustered out on 10 November 1865 in Indianapolis, Indiana.
 
cavalry
Company M
12th Indiana Cavalry






John Daniel Flynn
(1844 - 1926)
Rank:  Sergeant
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 5 November 1926, pg. 8, col. 3):
TAPS ARE SOUNDED.
-----
John D. Flynn Passes to the Great Beyond.
-----
    John D. Flynn, for nearly forty years a resident of St. Helena, died Thursday at noon at the family residence corner Tainter and Stockton streets.  Mr. Flynn had been a great sufferer from asthma and had been at the point of death many times so the end was not unexpected.
   John D. Flynn was born in Vermont and was 82 years old the 9th of last May.  When the civil war broke out he enlisted with the 1st Vermont regiment of volunteers, Company I, infantry and served throughout the four years of the war, being at the surrender of the confederate forces at Richmond.  Mr. Flynn had advanced to the rank of Sergeant during the period of his service and when mustered out located in Illinois.  When the Grand Army of the Republic was organized he became an enthusiastic member and upon coming to St. Helena became an officer of Kilpatrick Post, taking an active interest in it until the ranks were so diminished by the grim reaper, that the order here was abandoned.  Mr. Flynn, however, always participated in G.A.R. services at the cemetery on Memorial Day, usually reading the general orders and other portions of the ritual.
   Deceased was married to Miss Brigid Allen in Chicago on April 10, 1875 and in 1925, surrounded by loved ones and friends their golden wedding anniversary was celebrated.  Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Flynn came West and for about two years made their home in San Francisco.  They then located in Napa and in 1877 moved onto the William Baldridge farm near Oakville.  Farming continued to be Mr. Flynn's vocation until a little more than 38 years ago when he moved to town, and nearly all that long period he has occupied a comfortable residence at the corner of Tainter and Stockton streets.
   Deceased is survived by two daughters and one son -- Mrs. J. F. Maloney, of Richmond; Mrs. Louis G. Clark, of St. Helena; and Frank Flynn, of Richmond.  One son, Robert, passed away a few years ago at Cloverdale.  There are also surviving eight grandchildren.
   Deceased was a patriotic, loyal citizen, a devoted husband and father and a kind friend.  He experienced many hardships in his early life and in later days told interesting tales of the four trying years spent in defense of his country.
   The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, from the Catholic church, Rev. Father Galvan officiating.
Biography (History of Napa and Lake Counties, California, 1881):
   FLYNN, JOHN D.  Was born in Washington County, Vermont, May 9, 1844, and resided in his birthplace until 1862.  He then, being eighteen years of age, and at his country's call, enlisted as a private in Company "I," 9th Regiment, Vermont Volunteers, May 30th, of the above year, and served his country for three years, and took part in all the actions in which his regiment was engaged.  At the close of the war, Mr. Flynn was mustered out June 13, 1865, in Richmond, Virginia, and immediately returned to his home in Vermont, and engaged in farming.  We next find the subject of our sketch in 1872 located in Chicago, where he resided until April 30, 1875.  On the above date Mr. Flynn crossed the mountains to the Pacific Coast, first located in San Francisco, and eighteen months later we find him renting a place for five years of Mr. Wm. Baldridge, of Napa Valley, in which business he remained until he began his present business, November 1, 1880, in Oakville.  Mr. Flynn was married in Chicago, April 10, 1875, to Miss Bridget Allen, a native of Ireland, and by this union they have two children:  Mary A., born September 5, 1876; Margaret E., born April 6, 1878.
Notes:  Native of Vermont, born 9 May 1844.  He appears in the 1910 census in St. Helena, Napa County, and was noted as age 65, married 35 years, born in Vermont, parents both born in Ireland, occupation laborer doing farm work, veteran of the Union Army.  His household included his wife, Bridget A. (age 56) and son Robert E. (age 28).
   He died in Napa County on 4 November 1926, and was buried in St. Helena's Holy Cross (Catholic) Cemetery on 6 November 1926.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 30 May 1862, and was mustered into Co. I, 9th Vermont Infantry on 9 July 1862.  He was promoted to Corporal on 1 December 1863, and to Sergeant on 16 September 1864.  He was mustered out on 13 June 1865.  The G.A.R. membership roster of 1886 notes his service as Co. G, 9th Vermont Infantry, and his obituary states he served in Co. I, 1st Vermont Infantry.  Both appear to be errors.
   He applied for and received a veteran's pension benefit in California on 26 February 1883 (application no. 473783, certificate no. 557051).  His wife, Bridget Flynn, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 3 December 1926 (application no. 1562986, certificate no. A4-15-27).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  I, 9 Vt. Inf.

John D. Flynn
John Daniel Flynn
from the St. Helena Star newspaper
5 November 1926
 
cavalry
Company I
9th Vermont Infantry







Eggert Gierau
(c.1832 - 1880)
Rank:  Unknown

Death Notice (Napa Daily Register newspaper, Saturday, 24 January 1880):

DIED.
GIERAU. -- In St. Helena, Jan. 21, 1880, Eggert Gierau, aged 48, a native of Holstein, Germany.
 
Notes:  Native of the Holstein (now part of Germany).  His given name appears to be a variant of Eckhart.
   He died at the brewery in St. Helena on 21 January 1880, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 23 January 1880.  He was listed as Egger Gireau in the cemetery list of 30 May 1883, and as Egnet Given in the list of 30 May 1887.

 
Military Information: Unknown.  Noted as a veteran in the cemetery lists of 1883 and 1887.  He is not to be confused with Eber S. Gereau, who served as a private in Battery H of the 1st Michigan Light Artillery regiment.  The latter is buried in St. Clair, Michigan.

flag
Service unknown






Theodore M. Glancey (Glancy)
(1837 - 1880)
Rank: 1st Lieutenant

Biography from History of Mercer and Henderson Counties [Illinois], published in Chicago by H. H. Hill and Co, 1882 (p. 139):
   Some allusion to Mr. Glancey's life and sad end cannot be omitted in this place.  He was a native of Mercer county and reared in Abington township, where the survivors of his father's family yet reside.  On the breaking out of the war he enlisted as a private in company I, 17th Ill. Vol., and served till the expiration of his three years' term, and was mustered out as first lieutenant.  Soon afterward, as already observed, he engaged in the newspaper business; and after its final relinquishment in Keithsburg, went to California where, in March, 1874, he became managing editor of the "Placer Argus."  In 1880, he became editor-in-chief of the "Los Angeles Press," a republican organ, and in September of that year Clarence Gray, alias Maginiss, a man of dissolute reputation, republican candidate for district attorney, feeling himself aggrieved at Glancey's strictures upon his character, foully assassinated him when he was unarmed, without giving opportunity for defense.  He lived nineteen hours, at times in great suffering, but conscious to the last and full of courage.  His last words just before he expired were:  "Tell my friends that I die like a man -- die for principle; and that I would not go back on it now if I could."  He was high-tempered, self-willed, pugnacious; but earnest, courteous and generous.  Strong but honest in bias, he uttered his convictions with great boldness.  Whatever opinions were ever formed of his methods, his sincerity was always unquestioned.  He was a good speaker, and as a writer is said to have been one of the best on the country press.

Summary of the murder case from A Memorial and Biographical History of the Counties of Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura, California, by Yda Addis Storke, 1891 (pp. 87-89).
THE GRAY-GLANCEY MURDER.
   This was one of those criminal cases which became causes celébrés throughout the State.  Theodore M. Glancey, a native of Illinois, came to California in 1873, and was for a time editor and general manager of the Los Angeles Herald.  Resigning this position, he had removed to Placer County, and here and in Sutter County he was engaged in the journalistic profession.  After a few years he was tendered the editorship of the Press at Santa Barbara, and, accepting, he removed here, conducting the Press with the same devotion to truth and duty that had marked his career hitherto.  He was a veteran of the civil war, a man of nerve, and true to his convictions.  He was, further, a man of liberal education, with legal training, and just views of matters in general.  He was polite and urbane in manner, notwithstanding the positive character of his mentality.
   Clarence Gray came to this county in 1870, and was immediately recognized as its natural leader by the lawless element composed of the roughs, the gamblers and disorderly parties in general.  While there were not more than 200 of these characters, they were formidable, holding in many instances the balance of power.  Gray had a bad record, so far as it was known.  It was asserted that his real name was Patrick McGinnis, and it was understood that he had been closely connected with the Molly Maguire assassins in Pennsylvania, which State he had been obliged to leave.  He was reckless, unscrupulous, audacious, brilliant, enterprising, witty and obtrusive, being ready always to thrust himself into notice.  Ostensibly a lawyer, his knowledge of the law consisted mainly of an understanding of its defects and weaknesses, whereby he became the natural defender of violators of the law.  Like all men of that class, he relied upon personal prowess for security in his personal rights, and he had committed personal assaults on many occasions.  It is said that he had been arrested more than twenty times for breaking the peace.  While nominally a Catholic, he beat a Catholic priest to insensibility for a reproof justly administered, and was fined therefor.  When a fire occurred in the Press office, he was so strongly suspected of having caused it that he left the State for a year or two, but returned and resumed his former career.
   On one occasion the Republican party nominated him for District Attorney, and, in consequence of his bad repute, a public meeting was held to consider the means of defeating his election, which, it was deemed, would endanger the safety of the community.  Nevertheless, so strong was the lawless party that he came within seven votes of election.  When the new constitution was adopted in 1880, the country was in doubt whether the officials elected the previous year should complete the usual terms, or whether a new set would be elected.  Pending the decision the Republicans held a convention and nominated candidates for the supposed vacancies, among them Clarence Gray for District Attorney.  When the Supreme Court decided that no election was necessary that season, the Press, of which Mr. Glancey was editor, commenting upon the reasons for satisfaction therefor, said:  "Not the least of these in this county is the fact that the Republicans here will be relieved of the necessity of defeating the candidate for District Attorney.  The nomination was disgraceful in every respect, and while it is extremely disagreeable for earnest Republicans to take such a course in a presidential year, there is no difference of opinion among those who have the good of the party at heart.  They are convinced that all such candidates should be beaten, and Republican conventions taught, if they do not realize it already, that the decent people of Santa Barbara County will not submit to having the officer for the administration of justice chosen from among the hoodlums and law-breakers."  While this language was moderate, compared to what had been printed many times before, Gray's friends urged that it was a gratuitous insult, as no election was to take place, and Gray set about finding the party responsible for the article.  Meeting John P. Stearns in Judge Hatch's office, he inquired if Stearnes was responsible, and was met with a prompt, "I am, sir!"  Nevertheless, something, possibly the number present, induced him to defer shooting until a more convenient season.  Later, he met Stearns at home, but again postponed his proposed punishment.  On the evening following the issue of the article, Gray met Glancey, and inquired if he was responsible for the article in question.  Glancey replied in the affirmative, whereupon Gray drew a revolver and attempted to shoot, when Glancey caught his wrists, saying, "You shall not draw a revolver on me; I am unarmed."  A bystander separated them, but Gray again leveled his revolver and fired at Glancey whilst retreating through the door of the Occidental Hotel; the ball took fatal affect, striking Glancey in the wrist, and thence passing into the abdomen, and out near the hip.  Glancey's vitality enabled him to walk to a hotel in the same block, where he fell.  Gray meanwhile followed him, endeavoring to obtain another shot.  Glancey was attended by three physicians, but was past help, and died the next day.
   While the lawless element justified Gray's deed, the better portion of the community emphatically denounced it.  The press of the State, too, condemned the dastardly act unequivocally, as did the pulpit unitedly.
   Yet hardly were the funeral ceremonies over before Gray's friends were planning an active defense, $4,000 were raised to employ counsel, and all the technicalities of the law were invoked to delay or thwart justice.  Although he had uttered numerous threats that Stearns or Glancey must die before night, Gray pleaded self-defense and sought to prove by witnesses that Glancey made the first attack.  The jury failed to agree, and the case was transferred to San Mateo County, where Gray was found guilty and sentenced to twenty years' imprisonment.  Eminent legal talent was employed in this trial.  One most censurable feature of the case was that Gray was permitted many privileges seldom granted to persons on trial for high crimes, in that he was allowed, during his term of incarceration, to visit processions, shows, etc., and to visit and dine at the houses of his friends.  His partisans made application for a new trial, which was granted on such singular grounds as to become historical.  This feature is explained in the appended statement of Justice Thornton:
   "The trial commenced on the first of June, 1881, and terminated on the morning of the 12th of the same month, about 9 o'clock, when the jury rendered the verdict, and were discharged.  As soon as the jury was complete, they were, by the order of the court, placed in charge of the sheriff, and instructed as to their duties.  They remained in charge of the sheriff, not being allowed to separate until they were discharged on the morning of the 12th.  After the jury was complete, and before the cause was submitted to them, on the afternoon of the 11th of June, about 5 o'clock, a period of about eight days, four five-gallon kegs of beer were brought into the room at the Tremont House, where the jury was kept by the sheriff, of which about seventeen and a half gallons (of the beer) were drank by them; that during the same period a two-gallon demijohn of wine was brought in a drank by them; that during the same period some of the jurors drank claret wine, amounting to three bottles, at their meals; while some of them drank whiskey at their meals; that all this drinking was done before the case was submitted to them on the afternoon of the 11th of June; that on the 11th of June, during the noon recess, two of the jurors procured a flask of whiskey; that one of the jurors (price, the foreman) drank nothing; that all the drinking by the jurors was without the permission of the court, or the consent of the defendant, or of the counsel engaged in the cause, and, in fact, without the knowledge of either of them; that all the beer, wine, and whiskey drank were procured by such of the jurors as desired it of their own notion and at their own expense; that the verdict was agreed on about 8:30 o'clock on the morning of the 12th.  Further, the evidence affords strong reason to suspect that one of the jurors drank so much while deliberating on the verdict as to unfit him for the proper discharge of his duty. * * * For the reason above indicated, the judgement and order are reversed, and the cause remanded for a new trial."
   This conclusion was concurred in by Justices Myrick, McKinstry, Ross and Sharpstein.  The third trial of Gray occurred in the same county, in December, 1882, and it resulted in his acquittal.
News article (St. Helena Star newspaper, 1 October 1880):
   THEO. GLANCY, editor of the Santa Barbara Press, was murdered by Patrick Maginniss, alias Clarence Gray, an Irish bully, in that city Saturday.  The wife and family of deceased live at Calistoga, and the remains will be interred there Sunday.
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 8 October 1880):
Funeral of Theodore Glancy.---
   The remains of Theodore Glancy, the murdered editor of the Santa Barbara Press were interred here Sunday, the procession coming from Calistoga, where the family of the deceased reside.  The body was taken up on the cars Saturday, and Sunday morning funeral service [w]as held at Calistoga, Rev. James Mitchell officiating.  A large number of citizens of our sister town accompanied the remains; also the following special representatives from abroad:  Wm. H. Mills, manager of the Sacramento Record Union, with his wife; John P. Stearns, proprietor of the Santa Barbara Press, with his wife and daughter, and W. M. Webster, of San Francisco, General Agent for the Pacific Coast of the Associated Press, who attended as the representative of that body.  The pall-bearers were J. A Chesebro, J. H. Gibbs, A. M. Gardner, H. W. Scott, A. B. Canniff and G. W. Weeks.
 
Notes:  Native of Abington, Mercer County, Illinois.  He was the son of Joseph Glancey (1794- ) and his third wife.  Theodore appears in the 1850 census in his widowed father's household in Twp 13 North, Range 4 West, Mercer County, Illinois.  He was listed as age 12, born in IL.
   Theodore Glancey was an outspoken editor of the Santa Barbara Press newspaper, which had recently been acquired by John P. Stearns, for whom Stearns Wharf in Santa Barbara is named.  Glancy was considered a many of "young man of marked literary attainments."  On 25 September 1880, Glancy was shot and mortally wounded by an attorney named Clarence Gray, who was running for District Attorney.  The attack was in retaliation for critical editorials about Gray that had appeared in the newspaper.  Gray was tried in San Jose for the crime, but two juries reportedly hung over the case, and he was not convicted.  Gray reportedly died an outcast in San Francisco a few years later.
   Theodore Glancy was shot at Santa Barbara about 2:00 p.m. on 25 September 1880, and died there at about 9:00 a.m. the following day.  His dying words were, "Tell my friends that I die like a man -- die for a principle, and would not go back on it now if I could."  He was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 3 October 1880 in Lot 16, Block 7.  The inscription on his headstone reads as follows:  THEODORE GLANCEY | BORN | IN MERCER COUNTY, | ILLINOIS, | OCTOBER 19, 1837, | DIED | AT SANTA BARBARA, | SEPTEMBER 26, 1880.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 25 May 1861 at Peoria, Illinois, and was mustered into Co. I, 17th Illinois Infantry regiment on the same date.  He was described at the time of enlistment as single, age 24, height 5' 9", hair brown, eyes grey, complexion light, occupation miller.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Abington, Mercer County, Illinois, and he was noted as being a native of that place.  He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant in the Company on 2 April 1863 (Illinois Sec. of State reports the date as 1 June 1863), and to 1st Lieutenant at Vicksburg, MS, on 24 May 1863 (Illinois Sec. of State reports the date as 4 September 1863).  He was mustered out with his regiment at Springfield, Illinois, on 4 June 1864.
    He applied for a veteran's disability pension in California on 10 May 1879 (application no. 285371).  No certificate was granted, suggesting that the application was denied.  His wife, "Inez E. Glancy," applied for a widow's benefit in California on 18 July 1882 (application no. 349694).  No certificate was granted for her claim, either.  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  I, 17 Ill. Inf.
 
infantry
Company I
17th Illinois Infantry







John H. Goetsche (Götsche)
(1848 - 1909)
Rank:  Unknown
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 24 September 1909):
DEATH OF J. H. GOETSCHE.
-----
Prominent Howell Mountain Resident Passes Away.
-----
   J. H. Goetsche, founder and one of the owners of the Howell mountain resort known as White cottages, died at 7 o'clock Monday evening, after a lingering illness, which had made him an invalid for the past five or six years.
   J. H. Goetsche was born in Germany and had reached the age of 60 years.  At the age of 7 years he crossed the Atlantic and settled first in Montreal, Canada, later moving into the Eastern States.  At the age of 13 he was a drummer boy in the civil war and after that struggle was over learned the trade of machinist.  He became an expert mechanic and had employment in some of the largest foundries and steel works in the country.  He invented a machine for the manufacture of wire steel nails and had made other inventions to facilitate branches of labor in which he had been engaged.  Mr. Goetsche came to California many years ago and assisted in laying the first cables on the old car system in San Francisco.  Deceased came to Howell mountain about fifteen years age [sic - ago] for the benefit of his health, his physician telling him that if he remained in San Francisco he would become a victim of consumption.  Becoming fully restored to health he purchased property on the mountain eleven years ago and established White Cottages.  Several years ago his health began to fail again and he gradually grew worse, his sickness assuming a form of paralysis.
   Deceased was married to Miss Margaret Klein, at Montreal, Canada, in 1886, who survives him.  Their one child died in San Francisco many years ago.
   Deceased was an intelligent, honorable man, a good citizen, and was held in high esteem by all who knew him.
   The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock from J. S. Noble's undertaking parlors, Rev. James Mitchell, officiationg.  The pall beareres were W. D. Mooney, W. S. Brownlee, R. H. Gans and Joe Galewsky.
 
Notes:  Native of Germany, born 19 March 1848.  He died 20 September 1909, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 22 September 1909.  His wife, Margaret, was born in 1861, and was buried next to John on 17 January 1949.  A son, John H. Goetsche, Jr., (1888-1890) is also buried in the family plot.  John's nephew, Charles Henne, is also buried there.
   John Goetsche was not enumerated in Napa County in the 1900 census, but his wife, listed as "Mrs. John Goetschee" was listed as a head of household in Vineland Precinct (which included the Howell Mountain area).  She was listed as age 36, born September 1863 in Germany, married for 16 years, immigrated 1884, working as a housekeeper on her own farm.  John may have been living in San Francisco or another part of the Bay Area at the time.
   Margaret Goetsche was enumerated in the 1910 census on Howell Mountain Road in St. Helena Township (ED2, page 13A), listed as the proprietor of a summer resort (White Cottages).  She was listed as widowed, age 47, born in Germany, immigrated 1884.  She was noted as being the mother of one child, not living.  Her household included her "partner" (a nephew) Charles Henne, two hired men and several boarders.  Margaret appears in the 1920 census in College Precinct, St. Helena area, living on Howell Mountain Road under the household of her nephew, Charles A. Henne.  Margaret appears in the 1930 census in the "district surrounding Pacific Union College" still living under the household of her nephew, C. A. Henne.  She was listed as age 68, native of Coblenz (Koblenz), Germany.
  The nail-making machine mentioned in Goetsche's obituary was patented on 16 December 1902 by John H. Goetsche of San Francisco (U.S. patent no. 716030).  The application was filed on 5 October 1899.

Military Information:  John H. Goetsche was reportedly a drummer boy in the Civil War.  No other details are available.

flag
Service Unknown






Barney (Bernard?) Grogan
(1848 - 1881)
Rank:  Unknown
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 15 July 1881):
FATAL ACCIDENT.
-----
Barney Grogan Killed by an Accidental Shot from his own Gun.
-----
   A sad and fatal accident occurred about a quarter to five o'clock Sunday afternoon last at the upper vineyard of W. H. Jordan.  Mr. Jordan, it will be remembered, bought sometime ago the vineyard of Bereta Brothers, on the hill back of Beringer Brothers.  He sent up from Oakland to attend to it a man eight years in his employ, and found from long experience to be faithful and trusty, named Barney Grogan, who with his family took up his residence on the place.  Sunday afternoon Mr. G. and two of his little sons were watching, with a double-barreled shot gun, for rabbits, which on hill vineyards like the one in question, are a great nuisance and a source of much damage.  It appears that he had laid the gun down, cocked, and left it for awhile, and on returning, in some manner discharged it as he picked it up, both barrels going off and sending their charges through his right thigh; completely shattering it.  He fell and his little sons gave the alarm when assistance was had as soon as possible and medical aid summoned, but to no purpose, for the unfortunate man died about 8 o'clock.  Deceased was a native of Ireland, 33 years old last march and leaves besides a wife, 5 children, the eldest of whom is about 9 years of age.  The funeral was held from the residence, Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock.
 
Notes:  Native of Ireland, born March 1848.  He may be the same person as Bernard Grogan, who was enumerated in the 1880 census in Oakland, Alameda County, California.  He was listed as married, age 34, born in Ireland, occupation laborer.  His household included his wife, Margaret (age 34, born in Ireland), daughter Elizabeth (age 7, born in NY), son Thomas J. (age 6, born in Illinois), son William B. (age 5, born in California), and daughter Margaret Ann (age 1, born in California).
   He died at St. Helena on 10 July 1881, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 12 July 1881.
Military Information:  Unknown.  He was listed as a veteran in the sexton's list of 30 May 1887.

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Service Unknown






Benjamin H. Haire
(1837 - 1882)
Rank: Unknown
Death notice (St. Helena Star newspaper, 19 May 1882):
HAIRE. -- In St. Helena, Wednesday, May 17, 1882, of consumption.  Benjamin Haire, a native of New York, aged 44 years, 9 months and 28 days.

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 19 May 1882):
Death of Benjamin Haire.
-----
   Benjamin Haire, an old resident of St. Helena, died Wednesday morning, 17th inst., of consumption.  Deceased was a native of Canandaigua, New York, where he was born July 19, 1837, and was consequently near 45 years old.  He had been an invalid for about two years, with the disease of which he died, and has been confined to his bed for near three months.  He was a farmer by occupation.  He was a member of the Catholic Church, from which his funeral was held at 2 o'clock yesterday.  He leaves a widow and three children, James, Sarah and John, aged 17, 14 and 12 years respectively.  He crossed the plains in 1862, stopping in Washoe until the next year when he settled here, where he has ever since resided.

Notes:  He was a native of Canandaigua, New York, born 19 July 1837.  Benjamin Haire ("Hire") and his family appear in the 1870 census in Yount Township (Napa City P.O.), Napa County.  He was listed as age 31, born in New York, occupation farmer.  The household included his wife, Bridget (age 30), son James (age 5), and daughter Sarah (age 1).
   B. H. Haire appears in the 1880 census in St. Helena, along with his wife and three children.  He was listed as married, age 43, born in New York (father born in New York, mother born in Rhode Island), occupation laborer.  His household included his wife, Bridget (age 40, born in Ireland), son James (age 15, born in Nevada), daughter Sarah (age 11, born in California), and son John (age 8, born in California).  His widow, Bridget, was still living in the St. Helena area in 1900, living next door to her son, James V. Haire.  Bridget was listed in the 1900 census as being born in April of 1845, mother of 8 children, 3 living.  She immigrated to the U.S. in 1855.  James was noted as being born in March 1866 in Nevada, and just married to wife, Kate.

   He died on 17 May 1882 (headstone inscription indicates date of death as 21 May), and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 17 May 1882.

Military Information:  He was noted in the list of veterans in St. Helena Public Cemetery, published in the St. Helena Star for Memorial Day, 1882.
 
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Service Unknown






Simon Nicholson Harrison
(1844 - 1900)
Rank:  Unknown
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 16 November 1900, pg. 3, col. 3):
Death of S. N. Harrison.
-----
    S. N. Harrison, who fell from a windmill tower last Friday, report of which accident appeared in the last issue of the STAR, died Friday night at 11 o'clock after being unconscious most of the time for twelve hours.  The injuries received in the fall of nearly forty feet were internal and too serious to yield to the skill of physicians.  Mrs. Harrison, who was in Sonoma county at the time of the sad accident, did not reach the bedside of her husband until life had become extinct.
   Simon Nicholson Harrison was born in Nova Scotia 56 years ago.  He was a carpenter by trade and for many years was a prominent contractor in Oakland.  With his family he has resided in St. Helena for the past seven years, much of the time following his trade.  He had been particularly busy this year and for several months was engaged in erecting the STAR building.  He leaves a widow and four children.  The funeral took place sunday from the Presbyterian church, Rev. James Mitchell officiating.
Notes:  Native of Nova Scotia, Canada, born June 1844.
   The family was living in Oakland, Alameda County, CA, on 3 August 1877 when their son Wilbur Alvin Harrison was born.  The family was still in Oakland on 3 October 1890 when their son Ralph Ignatius Harrison was born.  According to his obituary, he and his family settled in St. Helena around 1893.
  Simon Harrison was enumerated in the 1900 census in Hot Springs Township, St. Helena, Napa County, CA.  He was head of household in a rented house.  Simon was listed as married (for 25 years), age 56, born June 1844 in Canada, father born in England, mother born in Scotland, naturalized, year of immigration 1864, occupation carpenter.  His household included his wife Mary (born November 1855 in California), son "Wilber" (born August 1877 in California), son Ralph (born October 1890 in California), daughter Carmlita (born April 1895 in California), and nephew Tommy Burns (born November 1888 in California.  The household also included a border named Alexander Crawford (born May 1865 in Scotland).
  St. Helena Cemetery records note his date of death as 11 November 1900.  He is buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery in Lot 17, Block 3.

Military Information:   Reported to be a Civil War veteran by his descendant, Frank Harrison of St. Helena.  Said to have fought at the Battle of Gettysburg, however, the 1900 census indicates that he didn't immigrate to the United States until 1864.  The Battle of Gettysburg was fought in July 1863.
  A Simon Harrison enlisted as a Private in Company B of the 17th Wisconsin Infantry on 11 March 1864, and was mustered in on 3 November 1864.  His residence at the time of enlistment was New Berlin, Waukesha County, Wisconsin.  He was mustered out on 14 July 1865 at Louisville, Kentucky.  Thus far, I have not been able to confirm if this is the same Simon Harrison of St. Helena.
 
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Service unknown






Royal Augustus Haskin
(1833 - 1881)
Rank:  Corporal
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 2 September 1881):
Death of Royal A. Haskin.
-----
   Royal A. Haskin, whose long illness and probable demise has been heretofore noted in this paper, died at his rooms in Bussenius' building, Hunt avenue, yesterday forenoon.  He became insensible sometime before his decease and for some days was probably unconscious of pain.  A post mortem examination was held last evening by the physicians to settle some doubtful points of his disease, and resulted in finding the liver very badly affected.  His remains were interred this afternoon, the funeral being attended by a long concourse of citizens, including her [sic] son, DeWitt C., who arrived last evening from New Mexico -- just too late to see his father in life.
-----
A Card.
   A report has been busily circulated by evil disposed persons that R. A. Haskins, who has been sick for the past four months with dropsy, had been poisoned by improper treatment.  We, as consulting physicians, after a thorough examination, are satisfied that there has been nothing improper in the treatment of the case, and all such reports are base falsehoods.  ISAAC TABOR, M.D., H. M. POND, M.D., W. J. G. DAWSON, M.D.
   Dated Sept. 1st, 1881.

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 9 September 1881):
   The late Royal A. Haskin was born near Troy, New York, in 1832, and was consequently 49 years old at the time of his death.  He came to California in 1852 and remained until 1858, when he went back to Indiana and married.  He served in the army as a member of the Ninth Illinoise [sic] Cavalry, from 1861 to '63, being principally engaged in the Southwestern States.  Shortly after the close of the war he returned to California, locating at this town, where he has ever since resided.  He has ever taken an active interest in public affairs, being a man of ardent political feeling, and held for one term the office of Justice of the Peace.  He leaves a wife and three children, being DeWitt C., who has long been in the Railroad service, and a brother and sister younger.

Notes:  Native of Pittstown, Rensselaer County, New York, born 1832, he was the son of Charles Haskin (1797 - 1844) and Harriet Halstead (1802 - 1834).  Royal married Maria Brundage in 1859, and by her had at least four children:  Harriet, DeWitt, Evelyn and Hiram.  Royal died on 1 September 1881 in St. Helena, and was buried the following day in Lot 24, Block 7 of St. Helena Public Cemetery.
 
Military Information:   Union.  He enlisted as a Corporal on 25 September 1861, residence Chicago, Illinois.  He was mustered into Co. H, 9th Illinois Cavalry regiment on 17 October 1861.  He was described at the time of enlistment as age 30, height 5' 8", hair dark, eyes dark, complexion dark, occupation tin smith, residence Chicago.  The regiment was mustered out at an unknown date, however, Haskin's obituary notes that he was discharged in 1863.
 
cavalry
Company H
9th Illinois Cavalry







John Smith Hay
(1833 - 1893)
Rank:  Captain & Assistant Quartermaster
Obituary St. Helena Star newspaper, 7 July 1893):
DEATH OF MAJOR J. S. HAY.
-----
The Old War Veteran Passes Away at His Home on Oak Avenue.
-----
   Wednesday morning death called another of the veterans of the civil war from the earthly battle field, this time selecting Major John Smith Hay, for thirteen years a resident of St. Helena.
   Deceased was born in Norton, Kings county, New Brunswick, May 19, 1833.  He was educated at St. John and resided there until manhood, occupying a position as reporter on the Daily News.  Afterwards he went to St. Stephens and launched upon the journalistic sea the St. Troy [sic - Croix] Herald, which business he followed until 1861, when he crossed the line into Maine and joined the Ninth Maine Regiment, receiving the rank of Major.  He stayed with the boys in blue, fighting for the preservation of the Union until the close of the war, when he went to New Orleans and with others entering into the balloon business.  The venture proving a failure, he sailed for New York, afterwards to Nashville, thence to St. Louis, Mo., where he met a number of war companions, who secured him a position as city editor on the Evening Dispatch.  He held this position for a number of years, here meeting and winning as a wife Sarah E. Williams.  His next move was to Silver City, Idaho, where he purchased the Avalanche.  This paper he conducted for seven years, until failing health prompted him to try life in California.  Upon arriving in this State he settled in Hollister, where he started and published the Pacific Coast.  He remained in that town one year, but as the climate did not seem to agree with him, moved to Napa county, purchasing the farm near Bello station, now owned by C. J. Mosely.  Being unused to farm life he found the work unsuited to him, and in one year sold out and moved to St. Helena, purchasing a home on Oak avenue, and starting the St. Helena Times.  This paper he continued to publish until the Spring of 1887, when his health made it necessary for him to sell out and give up active work.  Since that time he has acted as local correspondent for the San Francisco Examiner and hs written for fifteen or twenty California and Eastern papers.  Fro a number of years he has been compelled to visit mineral springs and each trip undoubtedly prolonged his life.  Long exposure during the war was the cause of the break in his health, and for twenty years he had been failing and for the past few years life has almost been a burden to him, and he has been patiently waiting for the final call to the grand review.
   Deceased leaves to mourn his loss a widow and four children -- Walter, Gertie, Jennie and Violet, besides three brothers, Edward B, of San Francisco, George N., and Thomas, of St. John, New Brunswick.  The first named brother was present at the funeral, the last said effices being performed under the auspices of the F. and A. M., at their hall, at 5 o'clock yesterday, Rev. James Mitchell conducting the services.  Kilpatrick Post, G.A.R., also participated in the funeral exercises and escorted the remains to their last resting place.
 
Notes:  He was a native of Norton, Kings County, New Brunswick, Canada, born 19 May 1833.
   The St. Croix Herald, founded by John S. Hay, held a pro-Union view.  According to the St. John, New Brunswick, website, the office of the newspaper was attacked and looted by a mob on 19 December 1861 because of this stance.
   He died on 5 July 1893, and was buried in Section D (IOOF) of St. Helena Public Cemetery on 6 July 1893.  His grave is marked by a military headstone, which reads:  LIEUT. J. S. HAY, R. Q. M., 9th ME. INF.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted on 13 October 1864 and was commissioned into Field Officers & Staff of the 9th Maine Infantry regiment as 1st Lieutenant, residence Calais, Maine.  He was discharged for promotion on 28 March 1865, entering the U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster Department as Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.  He was mustered out on 6 July 1865.
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 6 April 1889 (application no. 697600, certificate no. 644773).  His wife, Sarah E. Hay, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 29 July 1893 (application no. 580717, certificate no. 402697).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  A.Q.M. U.S. Vols.; 1 Lt. and A.Q.M. 9th Maine Inf.
 
infantry
Field & Staff
9th Maine Infantry


infantry
U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster Department






Edgar Heeman (Herman Edgar?)
(???? - ????)
Rank:
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper Friday, 26 July 1878):
Sudden Death.
-----
   Mr. Edgar, familiarly known about town as "Jersey," a laborer in the employ of Mr. W. W. Lyman, suddenly dropped dead yesterday afternoon while at work.  Mr. Lyman noticed him in distress, and caught him to keep him from falling and found him to be in an insensible condition and bleeding at the mouth and nostrils.  He lived but about five minutes from the time Mr. Lyman's attention was first attracted to him.  He was engaged in picking apples and was in a stooping position.  Death probably resulted from an excessive rush of blood to the head or from heart disease.  We understand that Coroner Colman has been sent for and an inquest will probably be held to-day.
 
Notes:  He was buried in St. Helena Cemetery before 30 May 1887.  He may be the same individual as Herman Edgar, who was buried in the Public Grounds (potters field) of St. Helena Public Cemetery on 26 July 1878.  Cemetery records note that he was single, age unknown, nativity unknown.  Cause of death was noted as heart disease (sudden death), and the place of death, Lyman's place.

Military Information:  Unknown.

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Service unknown






James William Holihan
(1842 - 1910)
Rank:  Lieutenant
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 18 February 1910):
DEATH OF J. W. HOLIHAN.
-----
Retired Naval Officer Passes to His Reward.
-----
   Lieut. James W. Holihan, a retired Naval officer, died at his home at 48 Athol avenue, Oakland, Saturday, the 12th inst., from a stroke of apoplexy sustained only two days before the end.  Lieutenant Holihan had been in poor health for many years, having contracted fever on the Isthmus of Panama while in the naval service.  Notwithstanding his poor health, Lieutenant Holihan was able to be out and around most of the time and his wife and other relatives were entirely unprepared for the sudden termination of his life.
   Deceased was born in County Clare, Ireland, March 8, 1842.  When 4 years of age his parents came to this country and settled in Brooklyn, New York.  After finishing his school course, the subject of this sketch served an apprenticeship at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  Later he entered the naval service and served during the civil war, being in many active engagements.  After the war, and while engaged with a surveying expedition on the Isthmus of Panama, deceased contracted sickness which later caused his retirement.  He came to California about 1883.  On May 12, 1885, he married Miss Mary Fealy, of St. Helena, and resided here for a number of years, and engaged in viticulture.  At the outbreak of the Spanish War Lieutenant Holihan again responded to the call of his country and served at the Mare Island Navy Yard in the engineering department.  In 1903 he took up his residence in Oakland where he resided until his death.  A wife and sister survive him.
   Deceased was a man of splendid attainments.  He was a great reader and student and an entertaining conversationalist, and a patriotic and worth citizen.
   The funeral took place in St. Helena Monday morning upon the arrival of the train from Oakland.  Services were held in the Catholic church, Rev. Father Blake officiating.  A choir composed of Mrs. H. C. Foss, Mrs. O. A. Jursch and Frederick Durant, sang appropriate hymns, Mr. Durant singing as a solo, "Abide With Me."  The pall bearers were J. D. Flynn, A. K. Maguire, W. R. Sheehan, William Kennedy, D. Begley and J. V. Haire.
   A large number of sorrowing friends attended the funeral and accompanied the remains to the Catholic cemetery where they were laid to rest.
 
Notes:  Native of County Clare, Ireland, born 8 March 1842.  He died in Oakland, Alameda County, on 12 February 1910 at the age of 67, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 14 February 1910.  His wife, Mary A. Holihan (nee Fealy), died 8 December 1922.
Military Information:   Union.  No service record found.  According to his obituary, he served in the U.S. Navy before the Civil War as an apprentice in the Brooklyn New York Naval Yard.  Details of his Civil War U.S. Naval service are unavailable.  He continued in Naval service after the war, participating in a surveying expedition at the Isthmus of Panama, and later in the engineering department at Mare Island Naval Ship Yard.

navy
U.S. Navy






G. H. Horn
(1843 - 1888)
Rank:  Unknown
Notes:  Native of Ohio, born about February 1843.
   He may be the same person as George H. Horn, who appears in the 1880 census in Haywards, Alameda County, California.  He was listed as age 36, native of Ohio, occupation town marshall.  Others in the household were his wife, Ellen A. (age 29); sons George H. (age 9), Charles W. (age 3), and Alfred (age 1); and daughters Emma (age 9), and Ella (age 5).  The widow was still living in Hayward in 1900.
   G. H. Horn was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 21 November 1888, in the west 1/2 of Lot 37, Block 1.  Cemetery records note that he was age 45 years and 9 months at the time of death, married, native of Ohio, resident of St. Helena.  Cause of death was noted as bronchitis.  The cemetery lot was purchased by Mrs. G. H. Horn.
Military Information:  He may be the same George H. Horn, whose wife, Hellen, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 20 September 1890 (application no. 479600, certificate no. 314622).  Military service on the pension index card indicates the following:  H, 85 Ohio Inf.

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Service unknown






Elisha Adam Hotz
(1847 - 1916)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 28 January 1916):
Veteran Passes Away.
-----
   After a brief illness Elisha A. Hotz passed away at his home North of St. Helena, Friday morning, January 21st.
   Deceased was born in Harrison county, Ohio, November 7, 1847.  At the age of 10 years he went with his parents to Indiana where he grew to manhood.  Imbued with the spirit of patriotism, he enlisted and served his country during the civil war as a member of the 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry.
  In May 1877 deceased married Miss Florence Belle Potter who survives him.  More than twenty-five years were spent by the object of this sketch in Nebraska, that State being his home until 1910, when he moved to California, locating on a farm on the Sanitarium road, near St. Helena, where he resided up to the time of his death, esteemed and respected by his neighbors and friends for his unassuming and honest traits of character.
   Deceased was a devoted husband and kind and indulgent father.  His loss is mourned by a sorrowing widow, four children and two brothers.
  The funeral was held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the J. S. Noble's undertaking parlors.  The remains were laid to rest in the St. Helena cemetery.
Notes:  Native of Harrison County, Ohio, born 7 November 1847.  He came to Gordon, Nebraska, by train in 1884, being one of the first settlers in the Antelope Valley Colony.  He appears in the 1890 veterans schedule for Gordon, Sheridan County, Nebraska, with disability from war service noted as lung disease (for 20 years).  His wife was Flora B. Hotz.
   He died in Napa County on 21 January 1916 at the age of 69, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 23 January.  His grave is marked by a military headstone.
Military Information:  Union.  His obituary states that he served in the 9th Indiana Infantry (the original 9th was a 100-day regiment, later reorganized as a 3-year).  I can find no record of this service.  An Elisha A. Hotz is also recorded as having served as a Private in an unidentified company in the 143rd Indiana Infantry.  It is possible he served prior to his enlistment in the 137th Indiana Infantry, which was late in the war.  His military headstone notes his service as Co. F, 137th Indiana Infantry.
   He enlisted on 26 May 1864 as a Private.  Residence at the time of enlistment was Martin County, Indiana.  He was mustered into Co. G, 137th Indiana Infantry regiment (for 100 days service) on the same date as enlistment.  Mustered out at Indianapolis, Indiana, on 21 September 1864.  He reenlisted as a Private on 28 January 1865, and was mustered into Co. C, 146th Indiana Infantry on the same date.  His residence at the time of reenlistment was Dover Hill, Indiana.  He was mustered out at Baltimore, Maryland, on 31 August 1865.
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension on 7 April 1882 (application no. 157916, certificate no. 401679).  His wife, Flora B. Hotz, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 11 February 1916 (application no. 1060623, certificate no. 809621).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  F 137 and C 146 Ind. Inf.
 
infantry
Co's F & G
137th Indiana Infantry


infantry
Company C
146th Indiana Infantry






Marcus Fayette Inman
(1839 - 1914)
Rank:  Full Captain

Biography (A Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California, 1891):

    M. F. INMAN, orchardist and nurseryman at St. Helena, was born in Rodman, Jefferson County, New York, June 25, 1839.  His early life until his eighteenth year was passed as a farmer's boy at the paternal homestead.  After attending for two years the Union Academy at Bellevue, in his native county, he became a teacher in the public schools.  In 1860 he began to be occupied in various pursuits in Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin.  In January, 1862, he enlisted as a private soldier at Dubuque, Iowa, in the Thirteenth United States Regular Infantry, commanded by Colonel (now General) William T. Sherman.  This regiment was first stationed at Jefferson Barracks, near St. Louis, and at Alton, Illinois, and then ordered to Covington, Kentucky, to check Morgan in his raid.  In December they moved down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to Memphis on the transport Forest Green, convoyed by gunboats, and led the fleet down the river to break the Rebel blockade.  They afterward engaged in the battles of Chickasaw Bayou and Yazoo Bluffs, camped at Milliken's Bend, assisted Grant in canal digging above Vicksburg, crossed the Mississippi at Grand Gulf, formed a column in the investment of Vicksburg, captured Fort Gibson, Grand Gulf and Jackson, engaged at Raymond, Edward's Station, upper crossing of Black River, Champion Hill and in the advance line at the storming of Vicksburg, May 19, 1863.  In the meantime Mr. Inman passed through the various grades of non-commissioned officers, being Sergeant and Captain, and leading the column of occupation into the city of Vicksburg.  In the summer of 1863 he was attacked by fever and ague, the direct result of exposure and a partial sunstroke, which in course of time developed an affection of the lungs.  In 1864, on the advice of medical authority and on a surgeon's certificate of disability, he resigned and returned to the scenes of his boyhood.
   After partially recovering his health he engaged in the manufacture of lumber for a time; 1871-'73 was in a mercantile business, and, again losing his health, as a last resort he moved to California, with his wife and two sons, arriving in January, 1876, and settling at St. Helena, Napa County.  There he began farming, on thirty acres of land within the corporate limits of the town, with direct reference to his health.  He has planted and developed an orchard and vineyard, and in 1880 he added the nursery business, and now has the leading nursery of the upper valley.  Out-door work and climatic influences have greatly benefited his health; still he does not believe that absolute recovery is possible.  He is now serving his second term as a member of the Board of Education and a fourth term as a Town Trustee, being at this time President of the Board.  He is also serving for the fourth year as Secretary of the Royal Arch Chapter of Freemasons.  He is named by the local paper as a candidate for County Clerk in the coming election, of November, 1890.  He is an honorable, hard-working and public-spirited citizen, and a faithful public servant, a sound business man, able, energetic and reliable.
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 3 July 1914):
LAID TO REST.
-----
Former Resident of St. Helena Brought Here for Burial.
-----
   The funeral of the late M. F. Inman was held from Masonic hall, St. Helena, Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock, under the auspices of S. Helena Lodge No. 93, F. and A. M.  The services were conducted by J. S. Noble, Master of the Lodge, assisted by Rev. James Mitchell.
   As mentioned in last week's Star M. F. Inman, who for many years was a resident of St. Helena, died at Wrangle [Wrangell], Alaska, June 24th.  He had been ill about six weeks, but his condition was not considered critical until about ten days before the end came.  His family was at once notified and his youngest son, Maitland H. Inman, went to Alaska to be with his father, reaching there two days before death ensued.
   M. F. Inman was born in Rodman, Jefferson county, New York, June 25, 1839, and had he lived twelve hours longer would have reached the age of 75 years.  His early life until his eighteenth year was passed as a farmer's boy at the paternal homestead.  After attending the Union Academy at Bellevue for two years he became a teacher in the public schools.  From 1860 to 1862 he followed various pursuits in Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin.  In January 1862 he enlisted as a private soldier at Dubuque, Iowa, in the Thirteenth United States Regular Infantry, commanded by Gen. William T. Sherman.  His regiment was later ordered to Covington, Kentucky, to check Morgan in his raid.  Deceased saw service in many battles and was in the advance line at the storming of Vicksburg, May 19, 1863.  In the meantime he passed through the various grades of non-commissioned officers, being Sergeant and Captain.  He led the column of occupation into the city of Vicksburg.  In the Summer of 1863 deceased was stricken with fever and ague and sunstroke and in 1864 was compelled to resign and returned to the scenes of his boyhood.  After partially recovering his health the subject of this sketch engaged in the mercantile business and continued at the pursuit from 1871 to 1873, when his health again failing he came to California and in January 1876 settled in St. Helena.  Here he purchased a thirty acre farm and later engaged in the nursery business in which he continued until he sold out twenty years ago and, with his family moved to San Rafael.  While in St. Helena deceased took a live interest in public affairs, having served for years as a school trustee and four terms on the Board of Town Trustees.  About fifteen years ago deceased went to Alaska and engaged in mining and other pursuits.  When taken ill he had just resigned as Deputy United States Land Commissioner and was closing up his affairs with a view of returning to spend his declining years with his loved ones.  Deceased was married to Aurelia A. Hart in Copenhagen, New York, December 1866.  The widow and two sons, Pratt C. Inman, of San Rafael, and Maitland H. Inman, a stock man, of Willits, survive.  Mr. Inman was a prominent Mason and a Past Master of St. Helena Lodge.  He also belonged to the Royal Arch Masons and was a Knight Templar.  He was an honorable and upright man and was held in high esteem by all who knew him.
Notes:  Native of Rodman, Jefferson County, New York, born 25 June 1839.  He died 24 June 1914, and was buried on 1 July 1914 in Lot 15, Block C, of St. Helena Cemetery.
   He was a Past Master of St. Helena Lodge #93, F&AM, having served as Worshipful Master of the lodge for five consecutive years starting in 1888.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted at Dubuque, Iowa, as a 1st Sergeant in Co. F, 13th U.S. Infantry regiment (Regular Army) on 14 January 1862.  At the time of enlistment, he was described as age 22, height 5' 7", hair black, eyes black, complexion olive, occupation surveyor.  It is noted on Inman's pension card that he also served in Company H, but there is no other record of this.  He was discharged from Company F as a 1st Sergeant for promotion on 27 July 1863.  Army records indicate that his intended transfer was to the 2nd Mississippi Volunteers as a Captain, but this apparently didn't transpire.  Instead, he was commissioned in Co. C, 52nd U.S. Colored Troops (USCT) Infantry regiment as Full Captain on 1 August 1863.  He resigned from Co. C, 52nd USCT Infantry on 22 May 1864, for medical reasons ("fever, ague and sun stroke").
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 17 October 1889 (application no. 734289, certificate no. 1123607).  His wife, Aurelia A. Inman, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 17 August 1914 (application no. 1032741, certificate no. 787386).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  F & H, 13 U.S. Inf.; C, 52 U.S.C. Inf.
   He is listed on the African American Civil War Memorial as "Marcus F. Inman" on plaque C-65.

Charter member and Past Commander of Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, G.A.R., based in St. Helena.

infantryCo's F & H
13th U.S. Infantry


infantry
Company C
52nd U.S. Colored Infantry






George B. Kennedy
(c.1840 - 1887)
Rank:  Captain
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 19 August 1887):
Sudden Death.
-----
   Tuesday morning about half-past eight Geo. B. Kennedy, the well-known contractor and builder, dropped dead on the street in front of the Palace Hotel, a victim of heart disease, he had just walked down the street, and joking with friends as he passed by.  He had got just below the "Palace," in front of the Bene cie Howe' old saloon, when the attack came and he sank down on the door step, sitting up for a moment then falling over dead without a word.  A crowd soon gathered and medical assistance was summoned, but nothing could be done.  The remaios [remains] were first carried into Howe's vacant saloon building and laid out, and afterwards conveyed to the family rooms back of deceased's shop.  The stricken wife was almost frantic at her sudden bereavement.  Deceased was a native of Pennsylvania, 49 years of age, and leaves a widow and three sons here and a married daughter in the East.  His remains were interred here yesterday under auspices of Kilpatrick Post, G.A.R., of which he was Adjutant.  Rev. E. M. Stuart preached the sermon.  The family have every sympathy in the sudden taking off of their protector and provider.

Article (St. Helena Star newspaper, 19 August 1887):
Card of Thanks.
-----
   Mrs. G. B. Kennedy and family desire through the STAR to express their many friends their sincere thanks and appreciation for the many expressions of sympathy in their late bereavement.  Also to Kilpatrick Post G.A.R. for its aid and sympathy at the funeral.

Notes:  Native of Pennsylvania.
   He died in St. Helena on 16 August 1887, and was buried in Section A, Block 26, of St. Helena Public Cemetery on 18 August 1887.  His wife, Martha A. Kennedy (died 1924), is buried alongside.  George's grave is marked by a military headstone, which reads:  CAPT. G. B. KENNEDY, CO. D, 196TH OHIO INF.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 17 August 1861, and was mustered into Co. D, 2nd Ohio Cavalry regiment on 4 September 1861.  His age at the time of enlistment was 21.  He was discharged for promotion to the 196th Ohio Infantry regiment in March 1865.  Records indicate he was mustered into Co. D, 196th Ohio Infantry on 22 March 1865, and was commissioned Captain, Co. D, on 24 March 1865.  His age at the time was 25.  He was mustered out on 11 September 1865 at Baltimore, Maryland.
   His wife, Martha A. Kennedy, applied for and received a veteran widow's benefit in California on 5 October 1887 (application no. 361687, certificate no. 272090).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  D 196 Ohio Inf., and D 2 Ohio Cav.
 
cavalry
Company D
2nd Ohio Cavalry



infantry
Company D
196th Ohio Infantry







Adam Koch
(1826 - 1903)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 13 February 1903):
Death of Adam Koch.
-----
   Adam Koch, an old veteran, died of apoplexy near St. Helena Tuesday.  Deceased was a native of Germany, aged 76 years.  He served during the civil war as a member of Company F., Second regiment, California Volunteer Cavalry.  The funeral took place from Noble's undertaking parlors Wednesday.

Notes:  Native of Hamburg, Germany, born 1826.  Never married.  He was a book binder by trade, but chose the army life in his twenties.  He first enlisted in the U.S. Army in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in July 1853.  He was stationed as a dragoon in the West on frontier duty, and after his discharge remained on the West Coast.
   Adam Koch appears in the 1880 census in Redwood Township, Sonoma County, California, listed as single, age 54, native of Prussia (as were his parents), occupation book binder.  Others in the household were J. F. Steel (wood chopper, age 40) and John Blair (farmer, age 61).
  
In 1886, he was listed in the G.A.R. register as being a resident of Napa.  His address was listed as St. Helena in March 1891, and Yountville in April 1891, suggesting he may have checked into the Veterans Home for a time, due to failing health.  He suffered from "disease of the heart and general debility" in his later years.
   Adam Koch appears in the 1896 Great Register of Voters in Napa County, listed as a laborer, native of Germany, age 69, occupation laborer, height 5 ft. 11 inches, complexion dark, eyes blue, hair brown, residence Vineland District, St. Helena.  The register further notes that Koch was naturalized on 14 April 1853 in the "criminal court," in Hamilton County, Ohio.
   An Adam "Knock" was enumerated in Vineland District (southeastern St. Helena), Napa County, in the 1900 census as head of a subhousehold associated with the household of Herbert Rahn (Rahn was the son of St. Helena Civil War veteran, Henry S. Rahn).  Rahn and two other residents at the site were butchers, so the place may have been a slaughterhouse (possibly the old one that once existed along the Napa River near Taplin Road).  Adam was listed as single, age 73, born October 1826, native of Canada, parents both born in Germany, occupation laborer.  He was listed as naturalized, year of immigration 1851.  Although the place of birth doesn't match, the other information in this census entry strongly suggests that this man is the same individual as Adam Koch.
   He died near St. Helena on 10 February 1903, and was buried in an unmarked grave in the G.A.R. plot, Block H, of the St. Helena Public Cemetery on 12 February 1903.  Cemetery records note that he was age 70 at the time of death, single, native of Germany, residence near St. Helena.  Cause of death was noted as apoplexy, reported by J. H. Hawkins, M.D.  His grave was unmarked until December 2008, when the installation of a special VA headstone was arranged by Col. Elmer Ellsworth Camp #23, SUVCW, and the 2nd California Cavalry, Company F, reenactment organization.  The inscription on the headstone reads:  "ADAM KOCH | PVT CO F | 2 CALIF CAV | 1826 | 1903"
 
Military Information:  Union.  He saw service in the U.S. Army as a member of the 1st U.S. Dragoons (mounted infantry) before the Civil War.
   He was originally a Private in Company H of the 1st U.S. Dragoons, in which he first enlisted on 7 July 1853 at Philadelphia.  The enlistment record describes him as "Adam Kock," age 26, eyes blue, hair brown, complexion fair, height 5 ft. 8 1/2 inches, born in Hamburg, Germany, occupation book binder.  He was discharged as a Private at Fort Vancouver on 2 December 1857 "by re enlist in Co."  The enlistment record for 1857 confirms that he re-enlisted at Fort Vancouver.  He was described in his re-enlistment record as a native of Hamburg, Germany, age 31, occupation Dragoon, enlisted 7 December 1857 in Co. H of the 1st U.S. Dragoons at Fort Vancouver by Lieut. Gregg, for a period of 5 years.  He was noted as a deserter from Co. H on 7 February 1858.
   During the Civil War, he enlisted as a Private on 6 September 1862 at San Francisco, California.  Records appear to be somewhat confused regarding his service.  NPS data lists him as having served in Co. G, 2nd California Cavalry.  In his pension application, he makes no mention of service in Co. G or any other California regiment, however, his muster into Co. F of the 2nd California Cavalry did not occur until 30 April 1864 (upon the return of the Company to Camp Union, San Francisco, from duty at Camp Bidwell).  He stated that he was under the command of "Col. Gerry."  This would be Col. Edward McGarry, who took command of the 2nd Cal. Cav. in November 1864.  Private Koch was mustered out of Co. F on 6 July 1865 at Fort Crook, Shasta County, California.  The pension application confirms this date of discharge, noting that he was discharged "in obedience to General Orders No. 51, war concluded."
   A Private Adam Koch of Co. B, 2nd California Infantry regiment, is listed as having enlisted on 25 March 1864 at San Francisco, and was mustered into that Company on 30 April 1864.  Company B was assigned to duty at the Presidio at San Francisco at that time.  He reportedly deserted on 22 February 1865 at the Presidio.  This could be the same man, and his desertion may have been a record keeping error between the two regiments.  Further research is needed.
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 16 April 1891 (application no. 1015562, certificate no. 710119).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  F, 2 Cal. Cav.  In his application, dated 30 March 1891, he was described as age 64 1/2, height 5 ft. 9 3/4 in., complexion dark, hair brown, eyes blue.  An accompanying medical certificate, dated 2 October 1891 notes hs weight as 150 pounds, implying that Adam was of slender build.
   Adam Koch was listed as a member of St. Helena's Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, G.A.R., in the 1886 Register of the Department of California.  He was listed as having served in Co. F. 2d Cal. Cav., residence Napa City.
 
cavalry
Company F
2nd California Cavalry

also saw pre-war service in
Company H
1st U.S. Dragoons
(1853-1858)






Charles Kray
(c.1840 - 1899)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 28 July 1899):
   Charles Kray, a veteran of the civil war, and an old resident of St. Helena, died in his little cabin on Main street Monday morning, at 4 o'clock.  Deceased was a native of Germany, aged 68 years.
Notes:   Native of Germany.  There is considerable confusion as to his exact age.  The preponderence of evidence suggests he was born about August 1840.  He was actually age 58 at the time of his death.
   A "Charles Kray" appears in the 1870 census for Miami Township (Cleves Post Office), Hamilton County, Ohio, under the household of G. W. Skidmore.  Kray was listed as age 31, native of Germany, occupation cooper.
   Charles Kray appears in the 1882 Great Register of Voters for Napa County, listed as age 40, born in Germany, occupation cooper, residence St. Helena.  It was noted that he was naturalized on proof of naturalization of his father.  In the 1890 Great Register, he was noted as being age 47 at the time of registration on 30 January 1888.  In the 1896 Great Register, Charles Kray was noted as a native of Germany, age 55, occupation cooper, height 5 ft. 10 inches, complexion light, eyes hazel, hair gray, residence St. Helena.  It was further noted that he was naturalized on 2 August 1866 in the superior court of Hamilton County, Ohio.
   He applied for a Civil War pension while living in St. Helena in April 1892.  In his claim, he noted various disabilities, including an injured left ankle (war injury), an impaired left hand due to the thumb being paralyzed for about eight years, and impaired vision and hearing which had come on gradually over the previous seven or eight years.
   Charles Kray died on 24 July 1899, and was buried in an unmarked grave in the G.A.R. plot, Block H, of the St. Helena Public Cemetery on the same date.  Cemetery records note that he was age 68 at the time of death (he was actually 58), married, native of Germany, resident of St. Helena.  Cause of death was noted as chronic disease of the liver, reported by Hawkins (probably J. H. Hawkins, M.D.).  Arrangements are being made by Col. Elmer Ellsworth Camp #23, SUVCW, to place a military headstone at his grave.
Military Information:  Union.  His name appears as "Carl Kray" on the regimental rosters (Historical Data Systems also lists him as Charles Krag).  He enlisted as a Private in Co. K, 4th Ohio Cavalry regiment on 12 November 1863.  He was probably a regimental transfer or recruit from the 5th Ohio Infantry.  "Carl Kray" enlisted as a Private in the 5th Ohio Infantry on 12 November 1863 (same date as above), but he was noted in the Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War of the Rebellion (published 1895) as not accounted for on the muster-out rolls.  He was listed as age 23 at the time of enlistment (both regiments), and signed up for a service of three years.
   The 4th Ohio Cavalry regiment had organized in Hamilton County, Ohio, in late 1861.  The ranks of Company K appear to have been dominated by Germans.  Kray joined the regiment about the time it was moving from Marysville, Alabama, to Winchester.  The regiment joined the 17th Corps in the Atlanta Campaign in the spring of 1864, and launched numerous raids around Atlanta.  The raids were led by Brigadier-General Judson Kilpatrick against various Confederate supply lines from August 18 to 22, 1864.  According to his pension application, Kray's left ankle was injured during the Kilpatrick raids, three days before the fall of Atlanta.  The injury would have occurred in late August of 1864, shortly before the city surrendered on September 2.  Kray was discharged as a Private at Nashville, Tennessee, on 15 July 1865.
   Charles Kray applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 8 April 1892 (application no. 1103048, certificate no. 969214).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  K, 4 Ohio Cav.
   He was mentioned as a member of St. Helena's Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, G.A.R., in October 1882, but he does not appear on the Department of California roster of 1886.
 
cavalry
Company K
4th Ohio Cavalry






William Alexander Logan
(1826 - 1893)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 24 March 1893):
   William A. Logan died at his home across Napa river near Hudson street, St. Helena, Sunday, the 19th inst., of heart failure.  Deceased was born in Alleghany county, Pa., November 15th, 1826.  He served in the 1st regiment, of Pennsylvania volunteers, in the war with Mexico and in the 9th regiment of Pennsylvania volunteers in the civil war.  He came to St. Helena, April 8th, 1877, and lived here up to the time of his death.  He leaves a widow, son and daughter, to mourn his loss.  The funeral took place Monday and was largely attended.
Notes:  Native of Alleghany County, Pennsylvania, born 15 November 1826. 
   William Alexander Logan appears in the 1882 Great Register of Voters for Napa County in St. Helena, listed as age 54, occupation farmer, native of Pennsylvania.
   He died in St. Helena on 19 March 1893, and was buried on 20 March 1893 in Lot 9, Block 7, of St. Helena Publich Cemetery.  His grave is marked with a military headstone, which reads:  W. A. LOGAN | CO. B | 9TH PA. INF.
Military Information:  Union ("100 Days" service).  He enlisted as a Private on 22 April 1861, and was mustered into Co. B, 9th Pennsylvania Infantry regiment.  He was mustered out on 29 July 1861 at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.  According to his obituary, he served in the 1st Pennsylvania Infantry during the Mexican war.
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 8 November 1881 (application no. 432630, certificate no. 742989).  His wife, Sarah C. Logan, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 27 April 1893 (application no. 575380, certificate no. 403333).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  B, 9 Pa. Inf.
   He was a member of St. Helena's Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, Grand Army of the Republic.
infantry
Company B
9th Pennsylvania Infantry


Also served in 1st Pennsylvania Infantry in the Mexican War






John Lowry
(c.1843 - 1902)
Rank: Landsman

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 5 September 1902):

Found Dead in a Field.
-----

   Monday morning about 9 o'clock William Hudson found the body of a man under a tree in Chris Mills' field adjoining the Dowdell place.
   Officers were notified and the Coroner telephoned for.  From papers in the pockets of the deceased, he was identified as John Lowry, a veteran.
   Lowry had secured a furlough from the Veterans' Home June 2nd for an indefinite period and went to Winters to obtain work in the orchards.  For several seasons he had worked in the Dowdell hop fields and returned to St. Helena Sunday for the purpose of again picking hops.
   Towards dusk he went to the river to get some water and meeting some pickers at camp told them he was not feeling very well.  Securing the water, Lowry laid down under a large oak tree and went to his final sleep -- the sleep that knows no waking.
   Monday Coroner Keyser held an inquest, a verdict in accordance with the above facts being returned by the jury.
   Deceased was about 60 years of age and had been an inmate of the Veterans' Home several years.

 

Obituary (Napa Daily Journal newspaper, 2 September 1902):

DEATH OF A VETERAN.

John Lowrey Lay Down to Sleep Under a Tree and His Spirit Fled.

-----

   John Lowrey, a member of the Veterans' Home, who has been out of furlough since last June, died under a tree on Chris Mills' place, near St. Helena, Sunday night.  He had gone to the Dowdell place, adjoining the Mills place, on Sunday and secured a job picking hops.  He picked out a big tree on the Mills place as the best location for a camp, and Sunday evening made his bed on the ground and lay down to the sleep which was his last.

   He was found dead Monday morning and had evidently died with out a struggle.

   Coroner Kyser and a jury viewed the remains and decided that death came by natural causes.

   Deceased formerly lived on a little farm east of Rutherford.  He was about 60 years old and served, during the Civil War, as a landsman in the navy.

 

Notes:  Native of Ireland.  John Lowrey appears in Yount Township, Rutherford Precinct, Napa County, in the 1900 census.  He was listed as age 52, born November 1847 in Ireland.  Immigrated 1859.  Occupation farm laborer.

   He died on 1 September 1902 in St. Helena, and was buried in an unmarked grave in the G.A.R. plot, Block H, of the St. Helena Public Cemetery on 2 September 1902.  Cemetery records note that he was age 60, marital status unknown, nativity unknown, residence St. Helena.  Cause of death was noted as natural causes, reported by R. M. Keyser, coroner.

 

Military Information:  Union.  U.S. Navy.  He enlisted at Charlestown Navy Yard (Boston) on the USS Potomac on 23 July 1862, serving thereon until 31 July 1862.  He next served on the USS Preble in the blockade off the coast of Alabama until 4 May 1863.  His next duty was aboard the USS Lackawanna until 21 August 1863, and on the USS Princeton until being discharged at Philadelphia on 8 September 1863.

   Lowry returned for a second term of naval duty at Charlestown Navy Yard on 22 May 1877, serving aboard the USS Wabash until 29 May 1877.  He then transferred to the USS Constellation, serving aboard that ship until 13 September 1877.  His next duty was aboard the USS Hartford, where he was discharged at Montevideo (Uroguay), as Quarter Master on 12 July 1879.

   Lowry continued his naval service for a third term on 10 September 1883, when he re-enlisted at League Island Navy Yard (Philadelphia) as a Landsman, serving on the USS St. Louis until 13 September 1883.  He next served on the USS Colorado until 16 October 1883, the USS Wabash until 5 November 1883, the USS Shenandoah until 22 October 1886, on the USS Vermont until 22 November 1886, when he was discharged at Brooklyn, NY, as a C.G.M. (Chief Gunner's Mate).

   On 8 September 1887, Lowry enlisted at Charlestown Navy Yard for his fourth term of naval service as a Seaman, serving on the USS Wabash until 5 May 1887.  He then served on the USS Vermont until 17 May 1887, then the USS Constellation until 21 September 1887, then back to the USS Wabash until 4 October 1887, then back to the USS Vermont until 3 January 1888, then on the USS Trenton until 17 January 1888.  After leaving the USS Trenton, Lowry was assigned to light duty at the US Naval Hospital in Brooklyn, NY, for about two years.  He was then assigned to the USS Vermont where he was discharged as a Seaman on 6 January 1890, after about one week of duty aboard that vessel.

   Lowry attempted to enlist again at Mare Island Naval Shipyard on 5 April 1890, but the naval surgeon (Dr. Stone, who also attended to him in New York) would not certify him fit for duty.  Lowry reportedly pleaded his case to the Commandant, but his request was denied due to his delicate condition.

   Lowry was admitted to the Veterans Home of California at Yountville on 2 February 1902, and was released on furlough in June of that year.  He was still on furlough from the Veterans Home at the time of his death.

   John Lowry applied for and received a Civil War naval veteran's pension in San Francisco on 28 November 1892 (pension no. 23282), claiming disease of the lungs, disease of the eyes, and deafness.  His lung problems he attributed to exposure while serving on the USS Lackawanna in the harbor of Mobile, AL, in June 1863.  He attributed his eye problems to service aboard the USS Shenandoah in March 1884, and his deafness to prolonged exposure to cannon fire on the same ship during "great gun" target practice off the coast of Chile in April 1885.

navy
U.S. Navy

 

USS Potomac

USS Preble

USS Lackawanna

USS Princeton

 

Post-war service:

 

USS Hartford

USS St. Louis

USS Colorado

USS Wabash

USS Shenandoah

USS Vermont

USS Constellation

USS Trenton

 







Martin Maddigan (Madigan)
(1843 - 1907)
Rank:  Private
Notes:  Native of Ireland.  He died in Napa County on 9 October 1907 at the age of 66, and is buried at St. Helena's Holy Cross (Catholic) Cemetery.  His grave is marked with a military headstone.
   Martin Maddigan was enumerated in the 1900 census at the Veterans Home (Yount Township), Napa County, California.  He was listed as married (1st marriage, 33 years), age 56, born November 1843 in Ireland (parents born in Ireland), immigrated 1856, naturalized, occupation baker.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 28 February 1862, and was mustered into Co. A, 3rd Vermont Infantry regiment on 12 April 1862.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Springfield, Vermont.  He was discharged on account of disability on 29 December 1863.
   He reenlisted as a Private on 19 August 1862, and was mustered into an unassigned company of the 1st New Hampshire Cavalry on the same date.  He was 22 years old at the time of reenlistment.  He was discharged on 14 August 1865 at Concord, New Hampshire.
    He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 14 July 1888 (application no. 664481, certificate no. 589070).  His wife, Kate Maddigan, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 5 November 1907 (application no. 879227, certificate no. 659683).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  Unas., 1 N.H. Cav., and A, 3 Vt Inf.
 
infantry
Company A
3rd Vermont Infantry


cavalry
Unassigned Co.
1st New Hampshire Cavalry






Andrew Kendall Maguire
(1843 - 1922)
Rank:  Private
Biography in Records of Members of the Grand Army of the Republic (William H. Ward, 1886, p. 199)
ANDREW K. MAGUIRE.
   Was born in Windsor, Kennebec County, Me, August 23, 1843, and is an operative.  Served for a time in the 1st Maine Cavalry, and after expiration of term in that regiment enlisted in Company D, 21st Maine Infantry; belonged to the 3d Brigade, 3d Division, 19th Army Corps, Department of the Gulf; was at the siege of Port Hudson and in other engagements; is a member of Kilpatrick Post, G.A.R., at St. Helena, Napa County, Cal., of which place he is a resident.

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 22 December 1922):

THE LAST TAPS ARE SOUNDED.
-----
Andrew K. Maguire Summoned to Close of Battle of Life.
-----
   Andrew K. Maguire, a pioneer of St. Helena, died at the home of his son, Frederick A. Maguire, in Oakland Saturday.  The sturdy old soldier of the civil war, although not in vigorous health for some time, was as well as usual until Thursday night of last week when he had a heart attack.  A physician was summoned but no hopes were given for Mr. Maguire's recovery and, although he rallied at times, passed peacefully into that sleep that knows no awakening at 4:40 o'clock Saturday afternoon.
   Andrew K. Maguire was born at Windsor, Maine, in 1843 and had reached the ripe old age of 79 years, 3 months and 23 days.  When 19 years of age deceased joined the 21st Maine Volunteers and for more than three years served in the civil war, seeing a great deal of hard fighting and being in many battles.  At the close of the war he received his honorable discharge and in 1865 came to California.  For awhile he worked in the vicinity of Vallejo and then came to Oakville and worked at To Kalon and also on farms in the vicinity of St. Helena.
   In 1869 he met and married Miss Hedda Brenberg and soon afterwards took up 160 acres of land on Spring mountain, later the Schilling and McPike property.  He continued farming for a number of years and finally, thirty years ago moved to St. Helena, purchasing a home on Charter Oak avenue.  For thirteen years Mr. Maguire was a guard at San Quentin, his family remaining here.  When he retired from the position at the State Prison, deceased returned to live quietly at his home on Charter Oak avenue.  There his wife passed away several years ago, but he continued it as his home until 6 months ago when his children prevailed upon him to go to Oakland and live with his son.
   Deceased was very active in G.A.R. activities and while there were a sufficient number of civil war veterans here to maintain a Post he never failed to attend the meetings.  At Memorial Day services he always took an active part in assisting with the ritualistic services of the Grand Army of the Republic and saw to it that a flag and flowers were placed on the grave of every departed soldier.
   Deceased was an upright, patriotic citizen, a loving husband, indulgent father and kind friend.  He is survived by four children -- Charles J. and Grace Maguire, of San Francisco; George E., of St. Helena; and Frederick A. Maguire of Oakland.  He also leaves one brother -- Mrs. John F. Hottle, of Napa; Miss Letty Maguire, of Napa; August Maguire, of Pasadena; and Mrs. Elizabeth Booker, of St. Helena.
   The remains were brought to St. Helena Monday and the funeral was held at 11 o'clock from the Catholic church, Rev. Father Galvan officiating.  Interment took place in the St. Helena cemetery.
Notes:  Native of Windsor, Maine, born 23 August 1843.
   In the 1896 Great Register of voters for Napa County, he is listed as Andrew Kendall Maguire, occupation prison guard, age 51, height 5' 10", fair complexion, blue eyes, gray hair, native of Maine, residence St. Helena.  He appears in the 1873 Great Register as age 23, occupation laborer, residence St. Helena; and in the 1882 Great Register as age 34, occupation and residence the same as in 1873.
   He died in Oakland, Alameda County, on 16 December 1922, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 18 December 1922.
Military Information:  Union.  Andrew Maguire enlisted as a Private on 13 October 1862, and was mustered into Co. D, 21st Maine Infantry regiment at Bangor, Maine, on the same date.  His age at enlistment was 19, and his residence was Windsor, Maine.  He was mustered out at Augusta, Maine, on 25 August 1863, at the expiration of his term of service.
  Andrew's G.A.R. biography indicates that he served in the 1st Maine Cavalry regiment "for a time" prior to his service in the 21st Maine Infantry.  I could find no record of his service in the 1st Maine Cavalry.  The 1st Maine Cavalry organized in November 1861, so Andrew's service in that regiment would have been for less than one year.  It was a 3-year regiment.  This part of Andrew's service remains a mystery.
   His obituary indicates he served until 1865, so he must have re-enlisted to continue his service from August 1863 until the end of the war.  The regiment in which he continued his service is not known.  One possibility:  Andrew Maguire, Pvt., Co. K, 47th New York Infantry, enlisted 27 October 1863 and served until being mustered out on 30 August 1865.
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 27 September 1892 (application no. 1132694, certificate no. 1134816).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  D, 21 Maine Inf.
 
cavalry
1st Maine Cavalry
(unconfirmed)


infantry
Company D
21st Maine Infantry

Another regiment?
1863-1865






John Campen Mixon
(1840 - 1913)
Rank: Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 5 September 1913):
LIFE WORK IS ENDED.
-----
John C. Mixon Passes Peacefully Away.
-----
DEATH FOLLOWS LONG ILLNESS.
-----
Man Prominent in St. Helena for Nearly Forty Years Removed From Our Midst.
-----
   John C. Mixon is no more.  An illness that covered a period of nearly four years was ended in death last Saturday morning at 4:15 o'clock and St. Helena lost one of its most highly respected pioneer citizens.
  Mr. Mixon was stricken with paralysis October 13, 1909.  For about one year he was almost helpless, having been confined to his bed many months.  Careful nursing and tender care on the part of his devoted wife and daughters caused him to so far recover that he was able to be up and around, occasionally walk or ride out, and enjoy life.  He was even able to do light chores about the home he loved so well until within six months of the Master's call, his condition from that time growing steadily worse.  The hot weather this Summer affected him greatly and doubtless hastened the end.  Wednesday of last week Mr. Mixon seemed to have another stroke and was unable to talk, but on Thursday was better again.  At 4 o'clock Friday morning he sustained a stroke that rendered him unconscious and death followed twenty-four hours later.
   John Campen Mixon was born in Tennessee, January 17, 1840.  His parents died when he was an infant and he was brought up by relatives, accompanying a sister to Illinois when quite a lad.  Deceased was in White county, Illinois, when the war broke out and he enlisted with Company I, Illinois Cavalry.  He was with Grant during the General's famous campaign through the Southwest.  On August 21, 1862, deceased was married to Miss Martha Ewing Ross, also of White county, Ill., and in 1865, after the war was over, the couple went to Iowa to make their home.  After one year in Iowa Mr. Mixon and family went to Kansas and there made their home for eight years, coming to California and direct to St. Helena in 1875.  Deceased built the house which was his home for over thirty years and in which he passed away.
   Mr. Mixon was a carpenter by trade and was a skilled mechanic.  Some of the best business buildings and many of the residences in St. Helena were built by him and are monuments to his honesty and care.  He always took a keen interest in public affairs and as long as he was able to get to the polls cast his vote as he thought was right.  In politics Mr. Mixon was a Republican and he was often honored by representing his party in conventions.  He served the people of St. Helena four years as a Trustee and one term as Justice of the Peace.  He was faithful to every trust and enjoyed the confidence and esteem of his fellow men.  When Mayacamas Tribe No. 97, Imp. O. R. M., was instituted Mr. Wixom became a charter member and was chosen Secretary, a position he held until overtaken by an illness that confined him to his home.  His worth was recognized by the Redmen and their care and sympathy during four years of sickness was greatly appreciated, not only by their brother, but by the loved ones to whom they rendered such timely help in their affliction.  Deceased was a devout member of the Presbyterian church and for many years was an Elder, rendering great assistance to the pastor and to the cause with which both were identified.
   Mr. Mixon was a devoted husband for fifty-one years, and a kind and indulgent father and a friend who was always willing and anxious to extend a helping hand.
   He leaves a widow and six children to mourn his passing away -- W. F. Mixon of Woodland; Mrs. George F. Emery and Mrs. Edward H. Baldwin, of North Yakima, Wash.; J. O. Mixon, of San Francisco; Miss Anna R. Mixon of Woodland, and Miss Ruth Mixon, of St. Helena.  He also leaves nine grandchildren.
   The funeral took place from the family residence Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock, Rev. James Mitchell, who for nearly fifty years had been deceased's pastor and friend, officiating.  The floral tributes were profuse and exceedingly beautiful.  The following acted as pall bearers:  W. H. Smith and A. K. Maguire, representing the G.A.R.; J. H. Steves and F. J. Merriam, the Presbyterian church, and L. D. Wolfe and Theodore Simonsen, the Redmen.  The remains were laid to rest in the family plot in the St. Helena cemetery.
Notes:  Native of Memphis, Tennessee, born 17 January 1840.  He was the son of John Mixon and Elizabeth Campen (source:  Anna Belle Emery, 2000, on GenForum).  He married Martha ("Mattie") Ewing Ross in Illinois on 21 August 1862.  They had at least nine children:  William Franklin, Ella Leonore (Mrs. George F. Emery), Lola Grace (Mrs. Frank Mackinder), Earl Knox, Mary Pearl, John Oliver, Anna Ross, Hettie, and Edna Ruth.
   A John Mixon appears in the 1850 census in Memphis (6th Ward), Shelby County, Tennessee, living in the household of Benjamin (age 32) and Lenora Mochet (age 18).  These may have been the relatives noted in Mixon's obituary.  Benjamin Mochet was a carpenter, which may be how Mixon came to learn his trade.
   John C. Mixon was enumerated in 1870 in the town of Garnett, Anderson County, Kansas.  He was listed as age 30, born in Tennessee, carpenter by trade.  His household included his wife Martha E. (age 26), son Franklin W. (age 7), and daughter Lonora E. (age 3).  A farm laborer named Benjamin Ross (age 22) was also in the household.
   John C. Mixon appears in the 1880 census in St. Helena, where he was listed as married, age 40, born in Tennessee, birth places of parents unknown, occupation carpenter.  His household included his wife Martha E (age 36), son W. Franklin (age 17), daughters L. Ella (age 12) and Lola G. (age 10), and son John Olliver (age 2).
   John C. Mixon appears again in St. Helena in the 1900 census.  He was listed as age 60, born January 1840 in Tennessee, parents born in Tennessee.  His occupation was sexton.  His household included his wife Martha (born Feb. 1844, with whom he had been married for 36 years), daughter Anna (born Sept. 1880), son Oliver (born Feb. 1878), and daughter Ruth (born Feb. 1887).  Martha was noted as being the mother of ten children, six still living.
   Mixon was enumerated in the 1910 census in St. Helena on McCorkle Avenue.  He was listed as age 70, native of Tennessee, father born in Tennessee, mother born in Virginia, living on his own income.  His household included his wife, Martha E. (age 66), and daughters Anne R. (age 27) and Edna R. (age 23).
   He died in St. Helena on 30 August 1913 at the age of 73, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery.  His grave is marked with a military headstone.
Military Information:   Union.  "John Mixon" enlisted on 18 July 1861, for three years of service at Carmi, Illinois.  He was mustered into Co. I, 1st Illinois Cavalry regiment as a Private at Birds Point, Missouri, on 22 July 1861.  He was mustered out on 5 July 1862 at Benton Barracks (St. Louis), Missouri.  Company I was detached from the main regiment.  The 1st Illinois Cavalry participated in the Federal surrender in September 1861, after the first Battle of Lexington, Missouri.  It was to be disbanded as a condition of the parole agreements, however, the implementation of the agreements did not go as planned, and the regiment attempted to reorganize at Benton Barracks in June of 1862.  Disagreements about filling command vacancies culminated in an order from the War Department, which directed that the officers and men be mustered out and sent home in July 1862.  This is why John C. Mixon's service was for only one year.
   John's brother, William A. Mixon, enlisted in the same company on the same date, and was mustered out as a Corporal at Benton Barracks on the same date as John.
    John Mixon applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 21 September 1892 (application no. 1131932, certificate no. 987380).  His wife, Martha E. Mixon, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 6 October 1918 (application no. 1015397, certificate no. 770465).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  I 1 Ill. Cav.
 
cavalry
Company I
1st Illinois Cavalry







Mr. Muldrow
????-????
Rank:
Notes:  He is listed as a veteran on the cemetery burials list of 30 May 1883.

Military Information:  Unknown.

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Service unknown






Charles J. Nesten (Neston)
(1843 - 1929)
Rank:  Full Corporal
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 10 May 1929):
Aged Veteran Dies.
   Charles Nesten, a veteran of the civil war and a resident of St. Helena for the past eight years answered the final summons yesterday afternoon, passing to the Great Beyond about 3 o'clock in the afternoon.  Death was caused by the infirmities of old age, Mr. Nesten having been 85 years, 6 months and 17 days old.
   Charles Nesten was born in Sweden, October 22, 1843.  He came to America at the age of 9 years.  During the civil war he was a member of the 57th Illinois Infantry and served 3 years and 10 months, being a corporal.  He marched with Sherman to the sea and was in Washington at the time of the grand review at the close of the war.  Following the struggle between the States, deceased made his home in Iowa and Nebraska until 1886 when he came to California, locating in Selma, Fresno county.  In 1901 he moved to Healdsburg and one year later to Ukiah where he resided until he came to St. Helena eight years ago.  Deceased was a man of high ideals and Christian principles and was a member of the Seventh Day Adventist church.
   Deceased is survived by his widow and by these children:  Frank Nesten, of Alpaugh, Calif.; Mrs. B. F. Eddy, of Pacific Union College; John Nesten, of Ukiah; and Miss Daisy Nesten, whose home has been with her parents in St. Helena.
   The funeral will be held from the Noble Funeral Home tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock.  Elder Miller of the Sanitarium will officiate.
Notes:   Native of Sweden, born 22 October 1843.  Charles Nesten was enumerated in the 1870 census in Marion Township, Hamilton County, Iowa, where he was listed as age 25, born in Sweden, occupation farmer.  His wife, Clara (age 22), son Frank (age 2), and daughter Louisa (b. Nov. 1869) were also in the the household.
   He was enumerated in the 1880 census in Stromsburg, Polk County, Nebraska, where he was listed as married, age 35, born in Sweden, occupation farmer.  His household included his wife, Clara (age 33, b. in Sweden), son Frank (age 11, b. in IA), daughter Louisa (age 10, b. in IA), and sons John (age 8, b. in NE) and William (age 2, b. in NE).
   In the 1900 census, Charles J. Nesten appears in the household of his son-in-law, Benjamin F. Eddy, in Soquel Township, Santa Cruz County, California.  Charles was listed as age 56, born October 1853 in Sweden, immigrated 1853, naturalized, occupation capitalist.  Charles' wife, Clara H. (b. April 1849), son John A. (b. Nov. 1871), and daughter Daisy M. (b. July 1881 in NE), were also in the household.
   Charles was enumerated in Ukiah, Mendocino County, in both the 1910 and 1920 censuses.  In 1910, he was head of household in a house in Ukiah, with his wife, Clara H., and children John A. and Daisy W. living with him.  His occupation was farmer.  He was not noted as a Civil War veteran in the census.  Clara was noted as being the mother of nine children, four living.  The Nesten household was unchanged in the 1920 census.
   Charles died in St. Helena, Napa County, on 9 May 1929 at the age of 85, and was buried in the G.A.R. plot, Block H, of the St. Helena Cemetery on 11 May 1929.  His wife, Clara, is buried next to him.  Charles' grave is marked with a recently placed military headstone.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted at Bishop Hill, Illinois, as a Private on 25 September 1861, and was mustered into Co. D, 57th Illinois Infantry regiment at Chicago, Illinois, on 26 December 1861.  The name appears on the roster as "Charles Nesten."  He was described at the time of enlistment as single, age 18, height 5 feet 5 inches, hair light, eyes blue, complexion light, occupation farmer.  His nativity was Sweden, and his residence at the time of enlistment was Bishop Hill, Henry County, Illinois.
   He re-enlisted for a 3-year term on 27 December 1863 at Lynnville, Tennessee, and was mustered in at Lynnville on 17 January 1864.  The name appears on the roster as "Charles Neston."  He was promoted to Full Corporal at an unknown date.  He was mustered out on 7 July 1865 at Louisville, Kentucky.
infantry
Company D
57th Illinois Infantry






Nelson E. Nickerson
(???? - ????)
Rank: Unknown
Notes:  Little is known about him.  He died before June 1882.
  An infant "Nickerson" was buried in Lot 5 of Block 4 in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 25 January 1876.  The child was a victim of tuberculosis.  A Jennie E. Nickerson was buried in the same lot on 11 August 1886, listed as a widow, age 42, cause of death tuberculosis.  Elsewhere in the cemetery, a Louise E. Nickerson was buried in the East 1/2 of Lot 19, Block "A," on 26 February 1883.  She was listed as married, age 28, native of Missouri, cause of death heart disease.  She is buried next to her father, John Hall Allison.  According to research by Mariam Hansen (2008), Louisa Allison married D. K. Nickerson in 1879.

Military Information:  Unknown.  He appears on the cemetery list of June 1882 as a veteran.

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Service unknown






John Niman
(c.1827 - 1878)
Rank: Unknown
Obituary (Napa Register newspaper, Saturday, 3 August 1878):
[Letter from St. Helena, dated 1 August 1878, signed X.B.C.]
   A man by the name of John Nyman died, last night, at the house of Auguste Maguire, about six miles from town.  He was a native of Pennsylvania, 53 years of age.
Notes:  Native of Pennsylvania.  John Niman is listed in the 1873 Great Register of voters for Napa County.  He was registered in St. Helena, age 45, native of Pennsylvania, occupation farmer.
   He died on 30 July 1878, and was buried in the Public Grounds (potter's field), number 21, of St. Helena Public Cemetery on 2 August 1878.  The original burial site is now part of the Serenity Garden.  Cemetery records note that he was age 51 at the time of death, single, native of Pennsylvania.  Cause of death was noted as paralysis of the brain, dying on a "Mt. near Maguire's."  He is most likely the same individual as "Henry Niemann" or "H. Nimmo," who was reported as a veteran in a list of burials compiled for Memorial Day 1882.  When the G.A.R. plot was dedicated at the cemetery on that Memorial Day, the following was noted: "
One grave was already there, that of some friendless man who long ago had been interred in the Potters' field and the Post had removed to this honorable resting place."  In the sexton's list of 30 May 1887, Niman was noted as being buried in the G.A.R. plot, rather than the potter's field.  This affirms that Niman was the "friendless man" noted in the 1882 dedication.
Military Information:  Possibly a Mexican War veteran, based on his age.  May also have been Civil War.

flag
Service unknown






Joseph O'Leary (Leary)
(c.1847 - 1886)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (The Independent Calistogian newspaper, 24 November 1886):
Death of Joseph Leary.
   Yesterday at about 12 o'clock m., Joseph Leary, who has been afflicted several months past with consumption, quietly passed away at his home in Calistoga, aged forty years.  Previous to the attack of the disease, he was, and had been for years, an active business man in Calistoga; and among other things had the agency here of the Puget Sound Lumber Company.  He was constant in his duties, and a hard worker; with these and good management he enjoyed a very fair degree of prosperity financially.  During several weeks previous to his death, his strength had so far failed that he was obliged to remain in bed, and for several days he could make his wants known only by whispering.  He received kind attention throughout his sickness -- such in fact as only a loving wife can give a husband.  With her, he leaves six children, four boys and two girls, the oldest of whom is Mamie, twelve years of age, and the youngest, a boy, aged six months.  The family, so long in the enjoyment of good health, happiness and prosperity, has been sorely afflicted within a comparatively short time.  It will not be a year until the middle of December since Katie, a pretty, bright and interesting girl of eight summers, passed away; October 27th, a son aged about four years followed the sister; and now the father also is gone.  What a reminder of the weakness of mankind and the uncertainty of life!  The widow, who has passed through a year of the greatest anxiety and of sadness, has the sympathy of all who are acquainted with the circumstances.
Death Notice (The Independent Calistogian newspaper, 24 November 1886):
DIED.
LEARY.-- In Calistoga, Nov. 23d, Joseph Leary, aged about 40 years.
   The funeral will take place from the family residence Thursday (to-morrow) morning at 9 o'clock, and from the Catholic church in St. Helena at 11 o'clock.
Notes:  Native of Canada.  He died in Calistoga on 23 November 1886, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 25 November 1886.  His grave is marked with a military headstone.
   Jos. Leary appears in the 1880 census in Calistoga, living on Main Street (now Foothill Boulevard).  He was listed as married, age 32, born in Canada, father born in Canada, mother born in Ireland, occupation drayman.  His household included his wife Mary (age 31, native of Ireland), daughter Mary (age 5), son James (age 4), daughter Kate (age 3), and son Jos. (age 1).  All the children were listed as California natives.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 31 August 1864 at Schroeppel, New York, and was mustered into Co. F, 184th New York Infantry regiment.  He was 19 years old at the time of enlistment.  He was mustered out at City Point, Virginia, on 29 June 1865.  His military headstone and pension file note service in Co. G of the same regiment as noted above,
   His wife, Mary Leary, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 27 October 1890 (application no. 471932, certificate no. 350353).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  G, 184 NY Inf.
infantry
Co's F & G
184th New York Infantry






Nelson Theodore Outwater (Outwaters)
(1848 - 1924)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 10 October 1924):
AGED CITIZEN IS SUMMONED.
-----
Nelson T. Outwaters Served His Country Loyally and Is Now at Rest.
-----
   The Silent Reaper has again visited St. Helena and has removed from our midst one who has bene prominent in business circles for the past forty years.
   Nelson Theodore Outwaters passed from this life at his home on Main street Tuesday afternoon at 2:15 o'clock.  He had been in failing health for about one year and had been confined to his bed most of the time for six weeks before the end came, at times suffering greatly.  His devoted wife who had shared his joys and sorrows for almost fifty-seven years, was his constant attendant during his last illness, only consenting to a trained nurse when her strength became unequal to the administering of the comforts her love one should have.  Several weeks ago Mr. Outwaters submitted to an operation but the relief obtained was only temporary, the great strength he had enjoyed in early manhood and through the prime of his life gradually failing until the faint spark was extinguished, and end coming peacefully.
   Nelson Theodore Outwaters was born in Ontario, Canada, January 18, 1848, and had reached the good old age of 78 years, 8 months and 19 days.  He was the son of Thomas Morgan and Elicia Outwaters and was one of seven children.  While the civil war was at its height and President Lincoln was calling for volunteers the subject of this sketch, then only sixteen years old, and his brother, Miles Shorey Outwaters, fifteen months younger, crossed the border to New York State and went to the home of a brother-in-law at Pilar Point.  From there the two brothers went to Sackitt's Harbor, Lake Ontario, and enlisted in Company B, 186th Regiment.  The younger brother was taken ill shortly after entering the army and upon his recovery was made an orderly, but Nelson Outwaters continued with his company until peace was declared and he was mustered out, receiving his honorable discharge.  His military duties ended at Sackitt's Harbor where they began, and once more in civil life Mr. Outwaters went to Rome, New York, where he learned the blacksmith's trade.  On October 28, 1867, he was married to Miss Margaret Mooney at Watertown, New York, and had he lived three weeks longer they would have celebrated the fifty-seventh anniversary of their marriage.  After his marriage Mr. Outwaters took his bride to Copenhagen, New York, and engaged in blacksmithing, meeting with success, and remaining there until March 1884, when, with Mrs. Outwaters, he came to California, settling in St. Helena.  Here he engaged in the blacksmith business and was known as a skilled workman.  Twenty-six years ago he quit blacksmithing and, with Mrs. Outwaters, opened Hotel Gray Gables.  In this venture Mr. and Mrs. Outwaters were very successful, apparently being peculiarly fitted to cater to the public.  Hotel Gray Gables became known far and wide as a house for travelers.  Advancing age caused them to several times lease the hotel, but they would get back in the harness again and it was not until three years ago that they retired and settled down quietly in a comfortable home on Main street they had purchased several years previously.
   Deceased was loyal to the country for which he had fought during its darkest days, and was devoted to the one who had been his companion for more than half a century.  When the end was near his whole thought was of his faithful wife and, with tender solicitude and in many ways, by counsel and through wishes expressed, prepared her for the change both realized must soon come.
   Besides his heartbroken widow, deceased leaves one sister and two brothers -- Mrs. Delbert Payne, of Watertown, New York, Wellington Outwaters, of South Rutland, New York, and Wilmot Outwaters, of Buffalo, New York.
   The funeral was held this morning at 10 o'clock, and according to the expressed wishes of the deceased, was from the Masonic hall under the auspices of St. Helena Lodge No. 93, F. and A. M., to which order he belonged.  Also at his request, the ritualistic service was performed by Past Master Spencer Mastick, and Mrs. Mastick sang, "Shall We Meet Beyond the River?"  Rev. Irving E. Baxter pronounced a brief eulogy.  The floral tributes were very beautiful, many pieces coming from distant friends who had, in years gone by, enjoyed the hospitality of the Outwaters that was proverbial.
   The pallbearers were F. L Alexander, G. P. Benvie, O. A. Jursch, F. B. Rossi, Capt. G. Rossi and A. A. Ives.
   After the services the remains were taken to Oakland for cremation.
Notes:  Native of Canada, born 18 January 1848 in Fredericksburg Township, Addington, Ontario.  He was the son of Thomas Morgan and Alicia Maria Outwater (mother's maiden name was also Outwater).  Source:  Kenneth Outwater submission, Ancestry World Tree, 2003.
   Nelson was enumerated in the 1870 census in the town of Denmark (Copenhagen Post Office), Lewis County, New York.  He was listed as age 22, born in Canada, occupation blacksmith.  His household included his wife, Margaret (age 17), and they were noted as having been married in October of the previous year (1869).  Nelson was still listed in the town of Denmark (village of Copenhagen) in the 1880 census.  Others in his household included his wife, Maggie, and brother-in-law, William J. Mooney.  Nelson was listed as age 32, born in Canada, occupation blacksmith.  In the 1900 census, Nelson was in St. Helena, Napa County, California, listed as married, born January 1848 in Canada, age 52, emigrated 1864, occupation blacksmith.  His household included his wife, Margaret, born April 1853 in New York.  Outwater was also enumerated in the 1910 and 1920 censuses in St. Helena.
   In the 1920 census, Nelson was enumerated on Adams Street in St. Helena, operating a hotel.  He was listed as age 72, born in Canada, emigrated 1865, naturalized in 1886.  His household included his wife, Margrete, and a servant.
   He died 7 October 1924 in Napa County at the age of 76, was cremated, and the cremains buried in St. Helena Cemetery.
Military Information:  Union.  Noted as veteran in 1910 census.  Nelson Outwaters enlisted as a Private at the age of 17 in Lewis County, New York, on 26 August 1864, and was mustered into Co. B, 186th New York Infantry regiment at Sackett's Harbor on 5 September 1864.  He was mustered out on 2 June 1865 at Alexandria, Virginia.
  Nelson Outwater was reportedly a member of Guilford D. Bailey Post, No. 200, G.A.R., located in Lowville, Lewis County, New York, chartered in September 1882.  He was possibly a charter member.
 
infantry
Company B
186th New York Infantry






Charles Pratt Pritchard
(1829 - 1905)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 17 February 1905, pg. 3, col. 3):
CHARLES PRITCHARD IS DEAD.
-----
Aged and Respected Citizen Passes From This Life.
-----
    Charles Pritchard, for nearly forty years a resident of Napa county, passed away Saturday morning, the faint spark of life being extinguished just fifteen minutes past the midnight hours.
   Mr. Pritchard sustained a stroke of paralysis in October, 1903.  Last March a second stroke came and on Wednesday night he sustained the third and fatal stroke.  He was not confined to his bed but little of the time and his last illness only dated from the 8th inst.
   Charles Pritchard was born in Oswega [sic] county, New York, August 21, 1829.  When 12 years old he went to Indiana and six years later to Wisconsin.  At Friendship, Fondulac county, Wis., he was married in 1853 to Julia Elizabeth Payne, and in 1857, with his family, moved to Kansas.  In 1862 deceased came to California, locating first in Placer county where he lived two years.  He then came to Napa county, settling in Chiles valley, and after a residence there of four years, moved to Pritchard hill, which was his home for thirty-three years and until ill health caused him to come to St. Helena to be close to his physician.  Two years ago the 30th of last month Mr. and Mrs. Pritchard celebrated their golden wedding in the Presbyterian church here and the occasion will be remembered as a very pleasant affair.
   Deceased spent his life on the farm.  He was honest and kind and had many warm friends.
   He leaves to mourn his death a widow and one son, Frank, besides other relatives.  The funeral took place Sunday at 12:30 o'clock from the Presbyterian church, Rev. James Mitchell officiating.
Notes:   Native of Oswego County, New York, born 21 August 1829.
   He died at St. Helena on 11 February 1905 due to apoplexy, and was buried on 12 February 1905 in Lot 51, Block 2, of St. Helena Public Cemetery.

Military Information:  Union  He enlisted on 23 August 1862, and was mustered into Company F of the 11th Kansas Cavalry regiment as  Private on 11 September 1862.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Garnett, Kansas.  He was discharged on account of disability at Springfield, Missouri, on 11 February 1863.
   Charles Pritchard applied for and received a veterans disability pension in California on 21 February 1893 (application no. 1146319, certificate no. 933820).  His wife, Julia E. Pritchard, applied for a widows benefit on 8 March 1905 (application no. 823614, certificate no. 596938).
Charles P. Pritchard
Charles Pratt Pritchard
courtesy Diane Dillon
cavalry
Company F
11th Kansas Cavalry







Henry Sigmund Rahn
(1842 - 1911)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (Napa Daily Journal newspaper, 19 December 1911):
HENRY H. [S.] RAHN
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Well Known Resident of St. Helena Passed Away Sunday Evening.
-----
   Henry S. Rahn, for many years a well known resident of Napa county, died at his home on the Chiles Valley road, about two miles from St. Helena, Sunday evening at 5 o'clock.  Death was due to apoplexy.  He was sick about 24 hours.
   Mr. Rahn was a native of Switzerland and 68 years of age.  He had been a resident of St. Helena and vicinity for forty years, and was an active, enterprising citizen in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the community.  He was the leading spirit in the St. Helena Turn Verein Association when that organization erected the Turner Hall in that town.  He was one of the Napa county representatives sent to the Chicago World's Fair to look after the California wine exhibit at the exposition.
   Deceased leaves a widow and two sons -- Herbert and Henry Rahn -- residing in St. Helena; also two married daughters in San Francisco.
   The funeral will be held to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock from the family home.  Jas. Mitchell will officiate.
Notes:  Native of Switzerland, born December 1842.  He came to California after July 1872, settling in St. Helena around 1873.  Henry was a charter member of St. Helena's Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, G.A.R., (organized 1881) and served in a variety of offices during the life of the post.  He was described in the 1896 Great Register of Voters for Napa County as Henry Sigmund Rahn, hotel keeper, age 34 [?], height 6 ft. 0 in., complexion fair, eyes gray, hair brown, native of Switzerland, residing in St. Helena, naturalized 29 April 1879 in the County Court, Napa County.
   Henry appears in the 1870 census (listed as "Henry Rantz") in Ward 8, Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts.  He was listed as age 28, born in Switzerland, occupation paper hanger.  The household included his wife "Elianor" (age 25) and son "Louie" (age 1).
   Henry Rahn appears in the 1880 census in the Town of St. Helena, Napa County, listed as married, age 38, born in Switzerland (parents born in Switzerland), occupation paper hanger.  His household included his wife Lena (age 35), and sons Louis (age 11), Henry (age 9), Herbert (age 5), and William (age 2).  The latter two sons were born in California, while the former were born in Massachusetts.
   Henry was enumerated in the 1900 census in Yount Township, Napa County, listed as married, age 57, born December 1842 in Switzerland, naturalized, immigrated 1864, occupation hotel keeper.  His wife, Lena L. (born March 1852 in Germany), and daughters Alice L. (born March 1885) and Sophie L. (born July 1889), were also in the household, along with several servants.  Henry was enumerated in the 1910 census in St. Helena, married (42 years), age 66, born in Switzerland, farmer, Union army veteran.  His household included his wife, Lena, age 62, born in Massachusetts, mother of 6 children (4 still living).
   Henry died in Napa County on 17 December 1911, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 20 December 1911.  His grave is marked with a military headstone.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 22 December 1864, and was mustered into Co. K, 7th New Hampshire Infantry regiment on the same date.  He was 22 years old at the time of enlistment.  He was discharged at Wilmington, North Carolina, on 15 June 1865.
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 19 October 1891 (application no. 1069099, certificate no. 798409).  His wife, Lena Rahn, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 24 February 1912 (application no. 981105, certificate no. 749751).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  K 7 N.H. Inf.
infantry
Company K
7th New Hampshire Infantry






Henry Conrad Rammers
(1828 - 1908)
Rank:  Sergeant
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 27 March 1908):
AGED CITIZEN PASSES AWAY.
-----
H. C. Rammers Answers Final Summons.
-----
NEARLY FOUR SCORE YEARS.
-----
Served His Country During Civil War and was an Upright Citizen and Kind Friend.
-----
   Death has removed from our community one who had for many years been a familiar figure.
   Saturday morning at 7:45 o'clock Henry Conrad Rammers finished his course and joined the silent majority.  While he had been feeble for several years his last illness was of brief duration and was brought on by catching a severe cold while working at his trade as a painter.
   Henry Conrad Rammers was born in Osanabruck, Hannover, Germany, September 11, 1828, and had therefore reached the ripe old age of 79 years, 6 months and 10 days.  When but eighteen years of age he came to the United States, settling in Kentucky, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits in Louisville.  Here on August 24, 1850, he married Miss Amelia Meyers.  As a result of this union five children were born, two of whom, H. George and Richard F., survive their father.  The subject of this sketch moved to Missouri in 1860 and engaged in the mercantile business at Kirkwood, near St. Louis.  Later, he moved to Kansas City.  While this country was engaged in civil strife deceased answered his country's call, serving two and one-half years in the army, being principally engaged in the guerrilla warfare carried on in Missouri during the rebellion.  He was present at Raleigh, Missouri, when General Lyons [Nathaniel Lyon] was killed, and held that officer in his arms when he expired.  After receiving his honorable discharge Mr. Rammers returned to Kansas City where he remained in business until 1874 when he moved to California.  In this State he first engaged in stock raising near Los Angeles but one year later moved to San Francisco where he found employment at painting and frescoing which business he learned when a boy in the Fatherland.  In 1882 Mr. Rammers and family moved to St. Helena and went into the painting business, pursuing that vocation with but brief interruptions until within about one week of his death.
   Deceased was a man of sturdy character whose word was as good as his bond.  He was a Democrat in politics and, until a few years ago, frequently represented his party at county conventions.  He was of quiet and retiring disposition and was held in high esteem throughout the community.  In addition to being a member of the Catholic church, Mr. Rammers was, for many years, a member of St. Peter's Unter-St. Verein in San Francisco.
   An aged widow, herself in very poor health, two sons and several grandchildren, war left to mourn the death of one near and dear to them.
   The funeral, which took place Monday morning at 10:30 o'clock from the Catholic church, was largely attended.  Rev. Father Blake officiated.  A choir composed of Miss Julia Rampendahl, Mrs. A. M. Kennelly, G. B Anderson and A. J. Mitchell sang appropriate selections, Miss Dowdell presiding at the organ.  The pall bearers were J. L. Beringer, A. N. Bell, C. H. Greenfield, J. H. Stevens, H. Schram and H. Jelinsky.
Obituary (Napa Daily Journal newspaper, 27 March 1908, pg. 1, col. 7):
H. C. RAMMERS.
-----
Well Known Resident of St. Helena Passes Away At Advanced Age.
-----
St. Helena Sentinel, Mar. 26.
   H. C. Rammers, a well known and highly respected citizen of St. Helena, who had been a resident of this place for a quarter of a century, died last Saturday at his home, corner of Spring and Stockton streets.  His illness was of brief duration, it being less than a week from the time he was taken with pneumonia until the final summons came.
   Henry Conrad Rammers was a native of Osanabruck, Hanover, Germany, and was aged 79 years, 6 months and 10 days.  He came to America at the age of 18 years, locating in Kentucky, where he learned the painting trade and followed it for several years.  He was married in Louisville, Ky., to Miss Amelia Meyers.  Later they moved to Missouri, where for a number of years Mr. Rammers was engaged in the general merchandise business.  During the Civil War he served for two years under General Lyon.
   About 1880 Mr. and Mrs. Rammers came to California, and Mr. Rammers engaged in the stock business for a short time in the southern part of the State.  They came to St. Helena in 1882 and here remained, Mr. Rammers following his old trade of painting and decorating.
   Deceased was a member of St. Peter's Unterstitzung [sic] Verein, a German fraternal organization of San Francisco.
   The surviving members of his family are the widow and two sons, R. F. Rammers of Vacaville and H. G. Rammers of St. Helena.
   The funeral took place form the Catholic Church, Monday morning, and was attended by a large number of friends and relatives of the family.
   The pallbearers were:  J. L. Beringer, J. H. Steves, A. N. Bell, H. C. Jelinsky, Henry Rahn and C. H. Greenfield.
   A choir composed of Miss Julia Rampendahl, Mrs. A. M. Kennelly, G. B. Anderson and A. J. Mitchell, rendered appropriate hymns.
   There were many beautiful floral tributes from relatives and friends.
   The remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery.
Notes:  Native of Osnabrueck, Hanover (Germany), born 11 September 1828.
   He died 21 March 1908 at the age of 79, and was buried in St. Helena's Holy Cross (Catholic) Cemetery.
Military Information:  He was probably Henry Remers, who enlisted as a Private in Co. K, 1st Missouri U.S. Reserve Infantry regiment.  The same man appears as Henry Remmers, listed as a Sergeant in Co. F, 1st Missouri U.S. Reserve Infantry regiment.  The 1st Missouri Infantry was a three-month outfit, organized in St. Louis 7 May 1861, and mustered out on 20 August 1861.  The regiment was under the command of Gen. Nathaniel Lyon at the Battle of Wilson's Creek, near Springfield, Missouri, where Lyon was killed by enemy fire on 6 August 1861.  So, it is quite possible that Rammers was present when Lyon died, possibly assisting Lyon's orderly, Albert Lehman, who reportedly attended to Lyon as he died from his gunshot wound to the chest.  Rammers claimed to have served two and one half years, so he must have had service in another regiment besides the 1st Mo. Reserve Corps Infantry.
   On a side note, Gen. Nathaniel Lyon (1818-1861) also had ties to this area.  In early 1850, while serving as Bvt. Captain, he led a detachment of dragoons of the 2nd U.S. Infantry into what is now Lake County to suppress an native uprising.  The uprising -- known as the Kelsey & Stone incident in reference to two murdered settlers -- began in late 1849, near what is today called Kelseyville.  A company of dragoons, led by Lieut. Davidson from Sonoma in 1849, had determined that the natives had established a defensible position on an island near the north shore of Clear Lake.  The task of sending a retaliatory expedition to attack the island was originally assigned to Maj. Seawell.  Seawell was unexpectedly called to Oregon to preside over a court martial, causing Lyon to be placed in command.  Lyon, who had been at winter quarters in Monterey, arrived at Benicia on 4 May 1850, and immediately prepared for departure to Clear Lake.  He resolved to take the island using a combined assault from land and water, and equipped the expedition accordingly.  The detachment left Benicia on 6 May 1850, hauling three whale boats and "two small brass field pieces" up the Napa Valley, crossing into the Guenoc area via Howell Mountain  Capt. Lyon's force engaged the natives (numbering about 200) on 15 May 1850, using a diversion tactic in which infantrymen pelted the island with musket and cannon fire from the shoreline, while the troops aboard the whale boats secretly moved into position to engage the natives on their flanks with close-range musket fire.  The result was an almost total slaughter of the natives on the island.  Those who fled into the tule marshes were followed and shot or bayoneted, in a purposeful and heavy-handed demonstration of the consequences of attacking white settlers.  The adjacent rancheria was also destroyed by the troops, before they moved on to engage other native bands in the Russian River area.  The incident is known today as the Battle of Bloody Island.
   Henry Rammers' wife, Amely Rammers, applied for a widow's pension benefit on 31 August 1911 (application no. 972634, California).  No certificate was issued, suggesting that the application was denied, possibly due to confusion over the spelling of Rammers versus "Remers" and "Remmers" in his service record.  Military service on the index card was noted as:  Unknown Mo. Vols.
 
infantry
Co's K & F
1st Missouri Reserve Corps Infantry







Jared G. Richards
(c.1840 - 1900)
Rank:  2nd Lieutenant
 
Notes:  Native of New York.  He was enumerated in the 1880 census as J. G. Richards, living in Marshfield, Coos County, Oregon.  He was listed as a millwright, age 40, born in New York.  His household included his wife Oliva A. (age 35), son Willie E. (age 12), daughter Olive A. (age 3), and an unnamed one-month old baby son (probably Samuel).  Jared G. Richards was listed on the 1890 Oregon veterans schedule, living in Marshfield Town, Coos County.  His widow, Olive A. Richards, appears in the 1900 census in South Marshfield Precinct, Coos County.  She was listed as widowed, age 55 (born June 1844 in New York).  Two children, Samuel (b. 1880) and Luvonia (b. 1883), were in the household.
   He was buried in grave 43, Block 25, in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 5 February 1900.  His grave is marked with a military headstone.  Cemetery records indicate that he was age 60, married, and a resident of St. Helena.  Cause of death was cancer of the liver.
Military Information:  Union.  He saw service as a Private in Co. G, 1st New York Infantry regiment, but the details of his service in that regiment are not known.  The 1st N.Y. Infantry was organized at New York City, and mustered into service on 22 April 1861.  The regiment was mustered out on 25 May 1863 on the expiration of term.
   He enlisted as 1st Sergeant at Avon, New York, on 16 September 1964, and was mustered into Co. I, 188th New York Infantry regiment on 22 October 1864.  He was 24 years old at the time of enlistment.  He was promoted to Sergeant Major and transferred to regimental Field & Staff on 10 March 1865.  On 22 April 1865 he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant, and on 17 May 1865, was assigned to Company A of the regiment.  He was mustered out at Washington, D.C., on 1 July 1865.
    His wife, Olive A. Richards, applied for and received a widow's benefit in Oregon on 19 April 1900 (application no. 717485, certificate no. 528720).  Military service noted on the index card was:  Sgt. Major, A & I, 188 N.Y. Inf. & C 1 N.Y. Inf.
 
infantry
Company C
1st New York Infantry


infantry
Co's I, A, and
Field & Staff
188th New York Infantry






William Rossman
(c.1825 - 1883)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 16 November 1883):
   MEMORIAL SERVICE. -- Kilpatrick Post G.A.R. of this place will hold a memorial service Sunday, at 3:30 P.M., at the Methodist church, in honor of the memory of the late Wm. Rossman, a member of the Post, who died last Thursday at Napa.  Mr. Rossman's home was on Howell Mountain, and his comrades here were in ignorance of this illness until they heard of his death at the county infirmary.  He had on a former occasion gone there for treatment in preference to staying here, and it is presumed that the same choice led him there this time.  During his first stay there the Post attended upon him, but the last time they did not know of his being there until it was too late, the first intimation his comrades having of his condition or whereabouts being the news of his death and burial, when they at once sent and had the remains disinterred, removed here, and re-interred in the Post's cemetery lot.  The memorial service will consist of that laid down in the ritual of the Order, including an address by Post Chaplain E. H. King.  The Post are requested to meet at headquarters at 3 o'clock.
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 19 November 1883):
Memorial Services.
-----
   Sunday, at 3:30 P.M., according to announcement in the STAR, Kilpatrick Post, G.A.R., of this place, held services at the Methodist church in memory of their late comrade, Wm. Rossman, whose death and burial have been recorded in these columns.  The occasion attracted a large number of our citizens, and at the appointed hour the Post appeared, 26 strong, in marching order, preceded by the drum beat of George Chase.  Their march through the streets was a novelty for St. Helena and attracted the attention of all who were out.  A voluntary, beautifully led by Miss Josie Risley, organist, preceded the service.  It was finely sung and much enjoyed.  When the Post had entered the church and were seated, at three raps they rose and listened to a chant by the choir, consisting of Mrs. Inman, Miss Westfall, Miss Cook, Miss Josie Risley (organ), and Mr. Cook.
   The Commander (Col. Carr) then called upon the Adjutant (Frank M. Vanderlip) for a record of the deceased, upon which that officer read the following:
   "William Rossman, the deceased, was a native of Germany.  He entered the service of the United States as a private of Company I, in the 83d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, August 19, 1862, and was discharged from the service Jan. 18, 1865, after a service of twenty-nine months.  Joined the Grand Army of the Republic February 22, 1882.  At the time of his death was about 57 years of age."
   Upon this the drum rolled, the record was pronounced an honorable one, and was ordered deposited in the archives of the Post.  Re-sponsive reading of the Scriptures then followed, after which the hymn, By Cool Siloam's Shady Rill, by the choir; prayer by the Chaplain, ending with the Lord's Prayer; singing by the choir, reading  of the 90th Psalm, singing by the choir and the address by Post Chaplain, Rev. E. H. King.  This was a brief and sensible reference to the life and honorable record of deceased, and the duty of the organization in paying this last tribute to his memory.  At the conclusion the Doxology was chanted, and after thanks to the pastor and choir for kind assistance the Post was declared dismissed and all retired, the boys in blue again forming in double ranks and marching to beat of drum back to their quarters in Masonic Hall.
 
Notes:   Native of Germany.  He died at the County Infirmary in Napa on 8 November 1883.  He was initially buried in a Napa cemetery, but was reinterred in the G.A.R. plot of the St. Helena Public Cemetery on 11 November 1883.  According to the cemetery records, he was the first burial in G.A.R. plot, however, the newspaper article describing the cemetery's dedication in 1882 indicates that one soldier burial in the plot took place shortly before the dedication.  His grave is marked by a military headstone.
  His name was mistakenly published as "Jacob Bannan" in the St. Helena Star newspaper on Memorial Day 1895.  The original hand-written list in the cemetery records (from which the above was taken) lists his name as "Jacob Rasman."
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 19 August 1862, at the age of 37.  He was mustered into Co. I, 83rd Ohio Infantry on the same date.  On 17 January 1865, he transferred from Co. I to Co. G, same regiment, and was mustered out of Co. G. on 24 July 1865 at Galveston, Texas.
 
infantry
Co's I & G
83rd Ohio Infantry






George Valentine Rutherford
(1830 - 1876)
Rank: Colonel/Quartermaster (Brevet Brigadier-General)
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 1 September 1876):
"MUSTERED OUT."
DEATH OF GENERAL RUTHERFORD.
-----
   It is our sad duty to chronicle this week a death we have long felt to be imminent, and whose inevitable approach has long cast a shadow over the heads of all who have known an esteemed and valued citizen -- General G. V. Rutherford.  He died at the residence of his friend, Dr. Melvin, Monday evening at eight o'clock, and his remains were followed to the grave Wednesday by a long concourse of sorrowing and sympathizing friends.  The General came here with his family last November, and was the business associate of Dr. S. H. Melvin in the Glendale Ranch.  He was a man of bright intellect, genial nature and kindly heart, and in his death St. Helena has lost a citizen who was calculated to have done her much good.  Owing to feeble health and consequent retirement, he was but little known to the general public here, but those who have made his acquaintance have "known him but to love."  An obituary notice below -- the tribute of a loving and sorrowing friend -- furnishes some account of his life and public services:
-------------------------------------
(OBITUARY)
General George V. Rutherford.
-----
   Death has again visited our quiet village, and on this occasion chose for the victim of his dart, one who, although but a brief sojourner here, had endeared himself to many of our citizens by his genial manners and gentlemanly deportment.
   Gen. George V. Rutherford died at his late residence on Main street, Monday evening, 28th inst., in the 47th year of his age.
   His remains were accompanied to their last resting place in our beautiful cemetery Wednesday morning, by a large number of sorrowing friends and neighbors.
   General Rutherford was born in Rutland, Vermont, in 1830.  He received a liberal education in his native State, and subsequently fitted himself for the practice of law.  Having executive abilities of a high order, he was appointed in 18-- Superintendent of the Construction of Telegraph lines in the Southern States, and was prominently identified with the telegraph interests of that section for several years.  Subsequently he engaged in the practice of his profession in Tuscumbia, Alabama, where he remained about two years, and then removed to Quincy, Ill's, a short time before the breaking out of the late war.
   In 1861 Gov. Yates appointed him Asst. Quarter Master General of the State, which position he filled with marked ability until a similar position was tendered him in the United States service under Gen Meigs.  He was placed in charge of the "Bureau of Inspection" of the Q.M. Dept'mt, with head-quarters at Washington, where he remained until the cease of the war.
   As an evidence of the appreciation of his official service and personal esteem in which he was held by his commanding officer, Gen. Meigs, I quote from a letter addressed to Gen R., dated May 13, 1866:
"DEAR GENERAL; -- I must not say to you, how hard I shall feel the separation which I apprehend your application for leave of absence foreshadows.  We have had a pleasant intercourse for more than three years of great events, the most industrious period of the national history, and have, I believe, never had a moment's uncomfortable intercourse or want of confidence and sympathy.  I shall cherish the recollection of our intercourse and association, and count you among my friends for life. *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *
I am Truly Your Friend
M. C. MEIGS."
   There are also numerous letters in the possession of his family from Sec'y Stanton and others, attesting their high appreciation of his official ability and private worth.  After his resignation he returned to his home in Quincy, Ill.  In 1872 he removed to Northampton, Mass., to accept a responsible position with a manufacturing company there.  Close confinement to business and the severity of New England winters, caused disease of the lungs, and he determined to remove to this coast, with the hope that our mild and equable climate would restore his enfeebled health.  He arrived here with his family last November, but, alas! he came too late to derive any lasting benefit.
   In all the relations of life; as a citizen, soldier, husband, father, friend and neighbor, he possessed in high degree the love, confidence, and esteem of all who knew him, and last but not least, Gen. Rutherford gave an unmistakable evidence that he was a Christian, in the highest sense of that term.  The closing scene of his life was very happy and peaceful.  He looked forward with bright anticipations to a blissful communion with his risen Redeemer throughout an endless eternity.  He leaves a wife and three children to mourn their irreparable loss.
Requiescat in Pace.
S.H.M.
Notes:  Native of Rutland, Vermont, born 1838.  He married Lucy Emily Keyes, daughter of Deacon Willard Keyes -- one of the founders of Quincy, Illinois -- and Mary Clark, on 19 October 1870 (Source: A Genealogy of the Folsom Family, by Jacob Chapman, 1882).  Rutherford died in St. Helena on 28 August 1876, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 30 August.  Cause of death was reportedly tuberculosis.  His widow, Lucy Rutherford, returned to her hometown and birthplace in Quincy, Illinois, shortly after George died.  She remained there until her death in May 1887.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted on 2 April 1863, and was commissioned the same day into the U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster Department, as Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.  He was promoted to to Colonel/Quartermaster on 2 August 1864.  He was breveted through the ranks of Major, Lieutenant Colonel, Colonel, and Brigadier-General on 13 March 1865.  He was mustered out on 11 October 1866.  George's brother, Reuben Clifford Rutherford, also served in the U.S. Vol. Q.M. Department.  Both Reuben and George received their brevet rank of Brigadier-General on 13 March 1865, for services rendered during the war.
   Rutherford was in attendance at the Petersen House on 15 April 1865, where the mortally wounded President Lincoln was taken after John Wilkes Booth's attack at nearby Ford's Theatre.  At the request of Secretary of War Stanton, Rutherford allegedly placed a coin on each of Lincoln's closed eyes immediately after his death.  The custom dates back to ancient times, signifying the payment to the mythical boatman to convey the deceased's spirit across the river Styx to the realm of the dead.  This symbolic act was traditionally done with pennies.  One story relates that Rutherford had no pennies in his pockets, so he used silver half dollars to comply with Secretary Stanton's order.  Another version states that Rutherford initially placed pennies on the eyes, but immediately substituted the silver half-dollars.  The seated liberty half-dollar coins -- one dated 1854 and the other 1861 -- are now preserved in the collections of the Chicago History Museum.
  The coins are accompanied by signed affidavits from QM General Montgomery C. Meigs and Major General Christopher C. Augur, both eye witnesses, who affirmed that Rutherford was the man who placed the coins.  The issue of who actually placed the coins remains a matter of some dispute.  Others who claimed to have placed the coins were Maunsell B. Field, Col. Thomas McCurdy Vincent, and Dr. Charles A. Leale.
G. V. Rutherford
George Valentine Rutherford
Image reproduced with permission of
Cmdr. Fred Stevens
Massachusetts Commandery, MOLLUS

 
infantry
U.S. Volunteers Quartermaster Department






John Richie Rutherford
(1842 - 1936)
Rank:  Locomotive Engineer
Obituary (The Napa Journal newspaper, 26 June 1936):
John Rutherford, 93, Veteran of Civil War, Dies
-----
   John Richie Rutherford, former Mayor of Calistoga and the father of former District Attorney Wallace Rutherford of Napa, passed away yesterday at his home in Calistoga from the infirmities of old age.  He would have reached his 94th year next December.
   Mr. Rutherford, a pioneer railroad man and a veteran of service in the Civil War, had been ill for about six months, but not critically so until a week ago when he lapsed into a comatose state.  Five years ago, he recovered successfully from a leg amputation with a vitality for a man of 88 that amazed physicians.
   The funeral rites will be held Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the McArthur Chapel in Calistoga with burial following in the St. Helena cemetery.  Members of the family have asked that flowers be omitted.
BORN IN SCOTLAND
   Born in Scotland Dec. 16, 1842, he came to the United States as a boy of 12 years, and the family settled in Chicago where he grew to manhood.  He was the youngest child of a family of three sisters and three brothers.
   At the outbreak of the Civil War, Mr. Rutherford, then a locom[o]tive engineer at Chicago, enlisted with the union forces, serving in the railroad corps throughout the war.
   He came to California in 1868 and married Mary Taylor, daughter of pioneer stock, who had come to this state by way of the Isthmus of Panama in the early fifties.  Mrs. Rutherford died at Calistoga in 1893, a year after their arrival to make their home there, and several years later he married Mary Guild, who survives.
   For many years, Mr. Rutherford lived in Vallejo where he was employed on the Vallejo-Calistoga run as an engineer for the Southern Pacific.  He is credited with making the first passenger run between Vallejo and Calistoga when the line was opened.  He retired from the rail service in 1903 when he reached 60 years.
   Since 1893, Mr. Rutherford lived in Calistoga where he had purchased a ranch in the '80's.  He owned considerable business property in Calistoga, served on the city council, and was an active member of Calistoga Lodge F. and A. M. and Calistoga Chapter, O. E. S.
   Survivors include his son Wallace, two other sons, Roy Rutherford, San Francisco manufacturer and Marshall Rutherford, Oakland Attorney, a daughter by his second marriage, Mrs. Ruth Newsome of Berkeley, and six grandchildren,  Attorneys Wesley and Sheldon Rutherford of Napa, Eugenia Rutherford Sammis of Berkeley, Lowell Rutherford of Oakland, Marguerite Rutherford and Donald Newsome of Berkeley.  He also leaves a great grandchild, John Wesley Rutherford of Napa.  A daughter, Margaret, died several years ago.

Obituary from The Weekly Calistogan newspaper, Friday, 26 June 1936):
JOHN R. RUTHERFORD HAS PASSED AWAY
-----
Venerable Respected Gentleman Lived to Extreme Age Of 93 Years
-----
   The community was deeply grieved yesterday morning when the news spread that John R. Rutherford had passed away.  While he has not been in the best of health for the past few years, still he has held up remarkably well.  About five or six years ago, at the age of 88 or 89 years, it was necessary to amputate one of his lower limbs, and he withstood this ordeal in a miraculous way.  Not so very long ago he was stricken with pneumonia, but again he recovered far beyond human understanding.  A few weeks ago he began to fail perceptibly and the end came yesterday morning at the age of 93 years, 6 months and 9 days.
   John R. Rutherford was born in Scotland on December 16, 1842, and when a small child, came here with his parents.  In his early manhood he joined the Illinois state militia during the Civil War.  He came to California in 1870 and went to San Francisco, where he worked in machine shops.  He afterward became an engineer for the Southern Pacific Company, for which he worked over thirty-two years, and until he retired in 1904.  He was reliable, honest, trustworthy and in every way an excellent citizen.  He moved from Vallejo to Calistoga in 1890, and has resided here ever since.  At one time he served as a member of the Board of Town Trustees, and always had the interest of the town at heart.  He was a member of Calistoga Lodge, No. 233, F. and A. M., St. Helena Chapter, No. 63, R. A. M., and Calistoga Chapter, No. 189, O. E. S.
   Besides his sorrowing wife, he is survived by the following children:  Wallace T., Roy and Marshall Rutherford and Mrs. Ruth Newsom, and the late Margaret Rutherford.
   The funeral will be held at the McArthur funeral home tomorrow at 2 p.m., and friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend the last sad rites.
   The Calistogan sends the most sincere sympathy to these bereaved ones.

Article from The Weekly Calistogan newspaper, Friday, 3 July 1936):
THE FUNERAL OF J. R. RUTHERFORD HELD SATURDAY
-----
Stalwart Scotsman of Many Years Has Gone to His Just Reward
-----
LEAVES WIFE, THREE SONS, ONE DAUGHTER
-----
Highly Respected Throughout Community for His Honesty and Integrity
-----
   The funeral of the late John R. Rutherford was held from the McArthur Funeral Parlor last Saturday afternoon, and the service was conducted by Rev. C. E. Polhemus of the Community church.  It was well attended by old-time friends and a large number of relatives.  Heber Newsom, a soninlaw of the deceased, sang "No Night There" in a very touching manner.  He was accompanied by Mrs. C. A. Carroll on the organ.  He was laid to rest in the St. Helena cemetery, and his grave was covered with the many beautiful floral pieces.
   John R. Rutherford was born in Scotland on December 16, 1842 and was, therefore, 93 years, 6 months and 9 days of age at the time of his death.  He arrived in the United States when a lad of 12 years, coming with his parents, three sisters and three brothers, he being the youngest child.  The family settled in Chicago, where he grew up and became a locomotive engineer.  He enlisted in the Union army on the outbreak of the Civil War, being transferred to the railroad corps, when it was learned he was a train engineer.
   In 1868, following the termination of hostilities, he came to California, where he met and married Mary Taylor, who had traveled to California some years earlier by the Isthmus of Panama route.  From this marriage, there were four children, three of whom survive -- Attorney Wallace T. Rutherford of Napa, Roy Rutherford, a member of the firm of Rutherford & Hood, mattress manufacturers of San Francisco, and Marshall Rutherford, an attorney in Oakland.  A daughter, Margaret, preceded her father to the grave.  Mary Taylor Rutherford died in Calistoga in 1893, and a number of years later he married Mary Guild, who survives him.  There is a daughter, Mrs. Ruth Newsom of Berkeley, from the latter marriage.
   Mr. Rutherford was employed as an engineer on the Southern Pacific from 1872 to 1903, when he retired on his sixtieth birthday.  His home was in Vallejo from the time of his first marriage until 1892, when he and his family moved to Calistoga, and here they have resided since.  After his retirement from the railroad service, Mr. Rutherford devoted his attention to large property holdings, which he acquired in the Calistoga business district, and to a small ranch on the outskirts of town.
   His death came on Thursday morning of last week and his mind continued clear up to about ten days before passing away, when he passed into a comatose condition, and it was realized then by members of the family that the end was near.  His faithful wife was always in close attendance, and for all these years, when he has suffered more or less from an operation, in which one of his limbs was amputated, she has waited upon him hand and foot.  No one could be more thoughtful and patient, and she knew how to do it, as she is a graduate nurse.
Notes:  Native of Moneydie Parish, Perthshire, Scotland, born 16 December 1842.  He was the son of David Rutherford and Isabella Richie/Ritchie (John W. Vail research, FamilyTreeMaker online).
   He died in Calistoga on 25 June 1936, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 27 June 1936.
Military Information:  Union.  According to his obituaries, John Rutherford enlisted in the Union army, and because of his railroad engineering skills, was mustered into the U.S. Army Military Railroad (USMRR) Corps at Chicago early in the war (probably 1862).
 
flag
U.S. Army
Military Railroad Corps







Oliver Howe Saunders
(1843 - 1913)
Rank:  Corporal
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 12 December 1913):
ANSWERS FINAL SUMMONS.
-----
O. H. Saunders, a Respected Citizen, Gone to His Reward.
-----
   O. H. Saunders a well-known and highly respected resident of this place, passed away, December 6th, at his home near Crane Station, after a brief illness caused by a complication of ailments and a general break down.
   Deceased was born in Salem, Mass., in 1843, and there spent his early childhood.  At the age of 18, when the civil war broke out he joined the 23rd Mass. Infantry of volunteers, serving faithfully to the close.  In 1866 he was married to Miss Alice B. Allen.  To this happy union there were fifteen children born, of whom nine, with twenty-three grandchildren remain to mourn the loss of a loving and faithful father and grandfather.
  Mr. Saunders was a kind neighbor and friend, forgetting self in seeking to help others.  Those who knew him best loved him most.  His cheerful face will be missed among his many friends.  Services were held at the S.D.A. Church Tuesday the 9th, Elder Hair from the Sanitarium officiating.
   The surviving children are Mrs. George Strout, of Sebastopol; Mrs. Lon Cookson, of St. Helena; Mrs. Ray Hurd, of St. Helena; Mrs. Chris Hansen, of Napa; Mrs. Nathan Otterbeck, of Redlands; Eugene Saunders, Paul Saunders and Mildred Saunders, of St. Helena.
 
Notes:   Native of Salem, Massachusetts.
   He died near St. Helena on 7 December 1913 (according to the CDI) at the age of 70, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 9 December.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 14 October 1861, at the age of 19.  His occupation was listed as farmer, residence Hamilton, Massachusetts.  He was mustered into Co. F, 23rd Massachusetts Infantry regiment on 4 December 1861.  He was wounded at Kinston, North Carolina, on 14 December 1862, and was medically discharged at Boston, Massachusetts, on 16 March 1863.  He reportedly lost the trigger finger of his left hand.
   He re-enlisted and was mustered back into his company on 31 December 1863.  His record shows a promotion to Corporal, but no date is given.  He was mustered out on 25 June 1865.
   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension on 23 May 1863 (application no. 23511, certificate no. 26936).  Military service noted on the index card was: F 23 Mass. Inf.
infantry
Company F
23rd Massachusetts Infantry






Frances "Fanny" Pritchard Owens Schneider
(1820 - 1906)
Army Nurse
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 25 May 1906):
AN AGED LADY PASSES AWAY.
-----
Death of Mrs. Schneider, a Government Nurse During Civil War.
-----
    Mrs. Fanny Schneider, beloved wife of Henry Schneider, died at her home on Adams street, St. Helena, Thursday morning at 7:30 o'clock, after an illness that covered a period of five months.  Her death was hastened by an accident that occurred on the 4th inst., the aged lady falling and breaking a thigh bone.
   Deceased, whose maiden name was Fanny Pritchard, was born in Wales, April 9, 1820, and had therefore reached the age of 86 years, 1 month and 15 days.  When still in her teens she married William Owens and in the Fall of 1844 came to the United States, residing for a short time in New York.  The family then moved to Pennsylvania, where Mr. Owens engaged in mining, later moving to Wisconsin and from there to Kansas in 1854.  When the civil war broke out Mr. Owens enlisted and two of his sons followed his example, and Mrs. Owens nursed smallpox at Fort Leavenworth, for the Government.  In 1869 Mr. Owens died and one year later the widow married Henry Schneider, also a veteran of the civil war.  In 1875 the family moved to California, residing for a time on the Sacramento river and then moving to Rio Vista.  On September 2nd, 1880, the family moved to St. Helena, where deceased has since made her home.
   Deceased was a devoted member of the Methodist church and a true Christian woman.  She was the mother of ten children by her first husband, six of whom with her aged companion, survive her and are to-day mourning her loss.  The children are William Owens, of Shellwood [Sellwood?], Oregon; Mrs. John Topin, of Howell mountain; Mrs. W. R. Falwell and David R. Owens, of St. Helena; Mrs. Sarah Bilderback, of Vallejo; and John R. Owens, of St. Helena.
   The funeral will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Methodist church.
 
Notes:  Native of Conway, Caernarvonshire, Wales, born 9 April 1820.  She married William W. Owens on 6 July 1840 at Liverpool, Lancashire, England.  She reportedly immigrated withWilliam and family to the United States from Wales in 1844, first settling in New York, then Pennsylvania.  By 1850, the family had settled in Wisconsin.  Fanny appears as "Frances Owens" in the 1850 census in the town of Dodgeville, Iowa County, Wisconsin, under the household of her first husband, William Owens.  Fanny was listed as age 28, born in Wales.  Children in the household included William (age 8), Mary A. (age 6), Owen (age 3), and Elizabeth (age 1).  Fanny's husband was listed as a miner, age 30, born in Wales, real estate valued at $150.
   While at Dodgeville, William worked as a miner, presumably in the lead/zinc mines in that district.  According to Fanny's obituary, the family moved from Wisconsin to Kansas in 1854.  According to the 1859 Kansas census, they settled in Marion Township in Douglas County in 1857, where William took up farming..
   Fanny was enumerated as "Francis Owen" in the 1860 census for Marion Township (Willow Springs Post Office), Douglas County, Kansas.  She was living in the household of her husband (a farmer), Wm. Owen, and was listed as age 39, born in Wales.  Children in the household included William (age 18, born in Wales), Mary (age 16, born in Wales), Owen (age 13, born in WI), Elizabeth (age 11, born in WI), Sarah (age 3, born in KS Territory), and David (age 1, born in KS Territory).
   Fanny appears a Frances Owens in the 1865 Kansas state census in Marion Township, living under the household of her husband "Wm. W. Owens."  The household included sons William (age 23) and Owen (age 18), who were both still serving in the Union Army.  William was listed as serving in Co. B, 12th regiment (Kansas infantry) as a "surgeon assistant."  Owen was listed as serving in Co. G, 16th regiment (Kansas cavalry) as a "soldier."  Other children in the household were Elizabeth (age 15), Sarah (age 7), David R. (age 5), and Robert J. (age 8/12).  Fanny's husband, William W. (age 45), was no longer in the service on 31 May 1865 (when the census was taken).  He had returned to his life as a farmer.
  William W. Owens served in the Union Army in the Civil war, as did two of his sons (William Richard and Owen).  William W. died on 20 November 1869, reportedly from complications suffered during the war, and was buried in Twin Mound Cemetery in Marion Township, Douglas County.  His headstone inscription notes that he was age 50 yrs, 3 mos and 5 days at his death (source: KSGenWeb).  Fanny married four months later to Henry Schneider in Douglas County, Kansas.  The marriage was performed on 1 April 1870 by Justice of the Peace Charles Chadwick and recorded in the county marriage records in book 3, page 39.
   Fanny was living under the household of her new husband when the 1870 census was taken.  She was enumerated in Marion Township (Clinton Post Office), Douglas County, KS, under the household of Henry "Snyder."  She was listed as age 48, born in Wales, keeping house, unable to read or write.  The farm they were living on was apparently Fanny's, as all of the family's wealth was in her name.  Her real estate was valued at $2,600, and her personal estate at $1,525.  The household also included several of Fanny's children by her first marriage, namely, Mary (age 26), Sarah (age 12), David (age 10), Robert J. (age 5), and William (age 2 months).  Mary and Sarah were listed as being born in Wales.  The other children were born in Kansas.
    According to Fanny's obituary, the family moved to California in 1875, first residing somewhere along the Sacramento River.  By 1880, they had settled in Rio Vista, where Henry was working as a laborer.
   "Fannie" was enumerated in the 1880 census in Rio Vista, Solano County, CA, keeping house in the household of her husband Henry "Snider."  She was listed as married, age 60, born in Wales (as were her parents).  The household also included her sons David O. (age 20, born in Kansas) and John O. (age 15, born in Kansas).
   Later in 1880, the family moved to St. Helena, Napa County, where Fanny and Henry lived the remainder of their lives.
   Fanny appears in the 1900 census in Hot Springs Township (St. Helena), Napa County, in the household of her husband, Henry Schneider.  She was listed as age 80, born April 1820, married 30 years, mother of 11 children (6 still living).  She was listed as a native of Wales, immigrated 1843.
   Fanny was the mother of eleven children.  Eight are known:  William, Mary A., Owen, Elizabeth, Sarah, David Richard, Robert J., William, and John R. Owens.  Fanny died in St. Helena on 24 May 1906, at the age of 86, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery.

Military Information:  Union. Volunteer Nurse (then known as Frances "Fanny" Owens), serving at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.  Her husband and two of her sons were serving in the Union Army at the time.
   Fanny's obituary notes that she "nursed smallpox at Fort Leavenworth for the Government" during the Civil War.  According to Fort Leavenworth post historian Kelvin D. Crow (command historian for the Combat Institute), smallpox cases at the time of the Civil War were handled by a three-fold treatment involving isolation, inoculation and vaccination.  Isolation involved removing patients to a facility deemed to be at a safe distance from the concentrated population of the post.  Mr. Crow notes:

Fort Leavenworth established a dedicated “small pox hospital” in an isolated part of the post, at least a mile from any concentration of soldiers.  It is indicated on an 1865 map created by COL J. A. Potter, Chief Quartermaster for the Ordinance Depot on post.  A map that more clearly shows the location of the isolation hospital and the main hospital is attached.  One smallpox casualty has been identified, Private Jesse Gregg, a confederate prisoner who died 3 January 1865 and is buried in the main post cemetery.
Leavenworth smallpox hospital
  Thanks goes to Charles L. Christian of Col. Elmer Ellsworth Camp #23, SUVCW (Santa Rosa, CA) for relaying the above information from the U.S. Army personnel at Fort Leavenworth.

   The military service of Fanny's sons is known.  William (a resident of Twin Mounds) enlisted as a Private on 15 August 1862, and was mustered into Co. B, 12th Kansas Infantry on 25 September.  The 1865 Kansas census lists him as a surgeon's assistant.  He was mustered out with the regiment on 30 June 1865.  The other son, Owen, enlisted as a Private on 13 December 1864, and was mustered into Co. G, 16th Kansas Cavalry on the same date.  He was a resident of Leavenworth at the time of enlistment (probably there with his mother).  He was mustered out on 6 December 1865.
Fanny Schneider
Fanny Pritchard Owens Schneider
Courtesy Guy Cockerum, Fanny's great-great-grandson
 
army nurse







Henry Schneider
(1835 - 1906)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 7 December 1906):
Death of Henry Schneider.
-----
   Henry Schneider, who last week fell from a ladder and sustained a fracture of the right wrist, and severe bruises on the head, died Monday, the 3rd inst.
   Deceased was born in Germany in 1812.  He came to California as a sailor in the early days and concluding to quit the sea went to farming.  He continued this occupation on Grand Island for some years when, in the midst of the civil war, the State called for volunteers.  The subject of this sketch went to Sacramento and enlisted and served in the army three years and five days.  He was honorably discharged in New Mexico and from there went to Kansas.  There he became acquainted with, and in 1870, married Mrs. Fannie Owens.  In 1874 he returned to Grand Island, this State, where his family joined him in 1875.  In 1878 he moved, with his family to Rio Vista and in 1880 to St. Helena, where his home has since been.
   The funeral took place from the Methodist church, Tuesday afternoon, December 4th, at 10 o'clock and was largely astended [sic].
Notes:  Native of Germany, born 1812.  Henry "Snyder" was enumerated in the 1870 census in Marion Township (Clinton Post Office), Douglas County, Kansas.  He was listed as age 55, born in Germany, occupaton farmer.  His household included his wife Fanny, and five step-children:  Mary, Sarah, David, Robert J., and William Owen.
   Henry "Snider" was enumerated in the 1880 census in Rio Vista, Solano County, CA.  He was listed as married, age 48, native of Germany, occupation laborer.  His household included his wife Fannie (age 60), and sons David O. (age 20) and John O. (age 15).  The older son was working as a laborer.  The younger son was still in school.
   Henry appears in the 1900 census in Hot Springs Township (St. Helena), Napa County, living on his own farm with his wife, Fanny (see above).  He was listed as age 64, born July 1835 in Germany.  He was listed as naturalized, having immigrated in 1857.  His occupation was farmer. 
   He died in St. Helena on 3 December 1906, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private in Sacramento on 7 September 1863, and was mustered into Co. F, 1st California Cavalry on 26 September 1863.  He was mustered out on 12 September 1866 in Santa Fe, New Mexico, when his services were no longer needed.
  He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 12 July 1890 (application no. 850897, certificate no. 908098).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  F 1 Cal. Cav.
 
cavalry
Company F
1st California Cavalry






Christian H. Schnoor
(1841 - 1914)
Rank:  Musician (Bugler)
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 25 September 1914):
ANSWERS THE CALL.
-----
Christian Schnoor Passes to His Reward.
-----
VETERAN OF THE CIVIL WAR.
-----
Served his Country Faithfully and Was An Honored Pioneer Citizen of the State.
-----
   Christian Schnoor, who for nearly thirty years was an honored resident of St. Helena, and a pioneer citizen of California, answered the final summons Wednesday night, and passed on to his reward.  Mr. Schnoor has been in feeble health much of the time for several years and had suffered from pneumonia and bronchitis.  For several months during the Summer he felt better and was happy in the thought that on August 28th he and his good wife would celebrate their golden wedding.  The date came and the aged pair was able to receive their many friends at their home, corner Stockton and Tainter streets.  It was a happy time for both Mr. and Mrs. Schnoor, a happiness shared by a large number of relatives and others near and dear to them.  That evening Mr. Schnoor was compelled to take to his bed and failed rapidly in the end.  His life work having been finished he calmly awaited the final summons and when it came was ready to meet his Heavenly Master.
   Christian Schnoor was the son of Christian and Catherine Schnoor and was born in Zafin, Hanover, Germany, January 22, 1841, making him 72 years, 8 months and 2 day[s] old.  When a lad of 16 years, deceased came to the United States, landing in New York in November 1857.  He remained in that city one year and then enlisted in the United States Army, Ninth Infantry, being assigned as bugler.  He was sent at once to Vancouver on the Pacific Coast and in January 1859 his regiment was ordered to San Francisco to embark on a vessel soon to leave that city.  The ship was late reaching San Francisco, so the regiment was stationed at the Presidio to guard the forts as times in California were then very critical.  Deceased served in the army for five years, all but one year of that time as musician.  On August 28th, 1864, deceased was married to Anna Barbara Klein, the ceremony taking place in the little Presidio chapel.  In November 1864, Mr. Schnoor retired from the army and engaged in business for himself as a locksmith and bell hanger, he having served an apprenticeship in those trades in the old country.  In 1882 he entered the employ of the Southern Pacific Company as a machinist, working there until injured in 1884, when, on June 22nd of that year, he moved to St. Helena.  On May 3, 1889, he returned to work for the Southern Pacific Company, continuing in his position until failing health caused him to resign and in 1907 return to St. Helena.  Here he and his devoted wife lived happily.  Neither was well much of the time, but both were of such cheerful natures that they bore up bravely, assisting each other over the trying times of life, truly devoted in sickness and in strength.
   Deceased was a splendid musician and many years ago was leader of a band in St. Helena.  Some of our best citizens were members of his band and received many courtesies from their leader and his good wife.  He was a patriotic soldier and citizen, loyal to his country, neighbors and friends.
   Besides his sorrowing widow, deceased leaves one daughter -- Mrs. Charles Troppmann, of San Francisco; one brother at Port Natal, Africa; and one brother and one sister in New York.  He also leaves two nieces, Mrs. Kahrs and Mrs. Meyers, of East Oakland, and one nephew, H. L. Schnoor of Berkeley.
   Funeral services will be held at the family residence this afternoon at 2 o'clock and will be conducted by Rev. James Mitchell.  Tomorrow the remains will be sent to Oakland for cremation.
Notes:   Native of Zeven, Hanover, Germany, born 22 January 1841. 
   Christian Schnoor was enumerated in the 1870 census for San Francisco (4th Precinct, Ward 10), California.  He was head of household, listed as age 28, born in Prussia, occupation lock smith, personal estate valued at $600.  His household included his wife Anna B. (age 32, born in Bavaria).
   Christian Schnoor was enumerated in the 1880 census in San Francisco (Enumeration District 135), California.  He was listed as head of household, married,age 39,  born in Baden (as were his parents), occupation locksmith.  His household included his wife B. Anna (age 42, born in Baden), and daughter B. Anna (age 16, born in Baden – error?).
   In the 1910 census, Christian H. Schnoor appears in St. Helena, Napa County, California (enumeration district 83), as head of household in his own home on Stockton Street.  He was listed as married (1st marriage 46 years), age 68, born in Germany (as were his parents), immigrated 1859, naturalized, working on his own account as a mechanic in the gunsmith trade.  He was noted as being a veteran in the Union army.  His household included his wife Anna B. (age 71, born in Germany).  Anna was noted as being the mother of zero children.  Her year of immigration was listed as 1852, status petitioning alien.
   Christian Schnoor died in Napa County on 23 September 1914 at the age of 73, was cremated, and later buried in the G.A.R. plot, Block H, of the St. Helena Cemetery on 17 March 1915.  His wife, Anna B. Schnoor, is buried next to him.  Christian's grave is marked by a military headstone set in a concrete slab.
 

Military Information:  Union.  Christian Schnoor enlisted in the 9th U.S. Infantry (Regular Army) at New York City on 30 November1859 for a period of 5 years, and served as a musician (Field & Staff) in the 9th U.S. Infantry regiment.  He was described at the time of enlistment as age 21, native of Hanover, Germany, occupation locksmith, eyes blue, hair brown, complexion fair, height 5' 6".
   According to his obituary Schnoor was sent to Fort Vancouver after enlistment.  Fort Vancouver became the regimental headquarters (succeeding Fort Walla Wall) in July 1860.  The regimental headquarters transferred to the Presidio at San Francisco on 1 August 1862, where they remained stationed through the war years.  Schnoor served as a musician (bugler) in the regimental band, and would have been stationed at the various regimental headquarters during his term of service.  His obituary notes that one of his four years of service was in a capacity other than musician, but his service record does not note this.  He was discharged as a "1st Class Musician" (Musician First Class) at the Presidio at San Francisco on 13 November 1864 upon expiration of his term of service.

   He applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California on 19 December 1888 (application no. 682197, certificate no. 467542).  His wife, Anna B. Schnoor, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 5 November 1914 (application no. 1036574, certificate no. 787116).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  Mus. Band, 9 U.S. Inf., and Old War.

infantry
Field & Staff
(Band)

9th U.S. Infantry






John Winfield Scott
(1842 - 1940)
Rank:  Corporal
Obituary, The Weekly Calistogan newspaper, Friday, 24 May 1940:
John W. Scott, Beloved Citizen Of Calistoga, Has Passed Away
-----
Town Mourns Death of Well-Known Civil War Veteran Who Died Tuesday
-----
HE KNEW MR. LINCOLN
-----
Was One of the Oldest Veterans of the Civil War Left in The United States
-----
   Calistoga lost one of its oldest and most revered citizens Tuesday, when John W. Scott passed away at the Calistoga Hospital.
   Born in Belleville, Illinois, February 12, 1842, Mr. Scott spent his growing years in his native state.  Joining the 9th Illinois Regiment, he saw early service in the Civil War with that regiment, and later with the 117th Illinois.  His Civil War service saw him in action at the battle of Fort Donaldson and the Battle of Shiloh.
   Following his discharge from the army at the cessation of hostilities, he followed stock buying up to the time of his marriage in 1889.  On August 29th of that year he married Frances A. Wolcott, who survives him.  They celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary last year.
Came Here in 1921
   Until 1911, Mr. Scott engaged in Farming in Illinois and Kansas.  In that year he left White Hall, Illinois, and moved with his family to Willows, California, where he spent the next ten years at ranching.  In 1921 the family moved to Calistoga, where they have resided ever since.
   To know John W. Scott was to love him.  His long life, crowded with a wide variety of experiences, was one of which any man could be proud.  Keen and alert of mind up to the very moment of his passing, he was one with whom it was a pleasure to talk, for he was not only full informed upon present day happenings, but also had a mine of interesting stories of the days prior to and during the Civil War and the years that followed.
Knew Lincoln
   As a boy in 1850, he met Lincoln, who was a friend of John's father, and his keen mind retained every detail of the meeting.  His experiences during the Civil War included being captured three times and escaping each time.  He was actually present when General Sherman made his famous remark that "War is Hell."  More than all else, he cherished the fact that his birthday, like Lincoln's, was on February 12th.
   Life had taught him tolerance and kindness toward his fellow men and he followed the precepts of that teaching in all his contacts.
Widow and Son Survive
   Surviving Mr. Scott are his widow, Frances A. Scott; a son, Chester W. Scott; and three nieces, Mrs. C. J. Bragg, Mrs. G. W. Loomis and Nellie Hahn, all residing in the east.  Two brothers and a sister passed away several years ago.
Funeral Services
   Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon from the Calistoga Methodist church.  Rev. B. Barnum Conner of Sacramento, an old friend, officiated at the services in accordance with the wishes of Mr. Scott.  Services at the grave were attended by a firing squad from the Veterans' Home, arranged for by Calistoga Post, No. 231, American Legion.
   All of Calistoga extends condolence to the family and sincerely mourns the passing of the fine gentleman and a good citizen.
 
Notes:  A native of Belleville, St. Clair County, Illinois, he was born on 12 February 1842.
   A John W. Scott was enumerated in the 1880 federal census working as a laborer under the household of a farmer named James Davis in Whitehall Precinct, Greene County, Illinois.  John was listed as single, age 37, born in Illinois, as were his parents.
   John married Frances Amelia Wolcott on 29 August 1889, and the following year (15 June 1890) their only son, Chester Winfield Scott, was born at Whitehall.
   John W. Scott was enumerated in the 1900 federal census as head of household in a house located in Wright Township, Wrightville Village, Greene County, Illinois.  He was listed as married (11 years), age 58, born February 1842 in Illinois, father born in Illinois, mother born in Ireland, occupation Day Laborer.  His household included his wife "Frances E." (b. Feb. 1853 in Wisconsin, mother of one child still living), and son "Chester C." (b. June 1890 in Illinois).
   Jno. W. Scott was enumerated in the 1910 census as head of household in Wright Township, Greene County, Illinois, living on his own farm.  He was listed as married (20 years), age 68, born in Illinois (as were his parents), occupation farmer on general farm.  He was not marked as being a Civil War veteran.  His household included his wife Frances A. (age 56), and son Chester W. (age 19).  John and his family left Whitehall, Illinois, in 1911 and relocated to California, where they first settled near Willows, Glenn County.
   John W. Scott was enumerated in the 1920 census as head of household on a farm in Township 4, Glenn County, California.  He was listed as married, age 77, born in Illinois, parents both born in Illinois, occupation farmer on general farm.  His household included his wife Frances A. (age 66), son Chester W. (age 29), and daughter-in-law Minnie L. (age 24).  John moved to Calistoga the following year.
   John W. Scott was enumerated in the 1930 census as head of household in Calistoga, Hot Springs Township, Napa County, California, renting a house for $16 per month.  He was listed as married (when he was 47), age 88, born in Illinois, parents both born in Illinois, occupation "none."  His household included his wife Frances A. (age 76).
   John W. Scott was enumerated in the 1940 census in Healdsburg Township (Knights Valley), Sonoma County, California, under the household of his son, Chester W. Scott.  John was listed as married, age 98, born in Illinois, sixth grade education, unable to work.  Besides Chester, others in the household included Chester's wife Sadie A. (age 40), John's wife Amelia (age 86), a servant named Millie McGee (age 48), and a lodger named Ross Fox (age 30).
   John died shortly after the 1940 census was taken.  He was the last surviving Civil War veteran in Calistoga (and the upper Napa Valley).  He died in Calistoga on 21 May 1940, and was buried at of St. Helena Public Cemetery in Lot 23, Block 22 Extension, on 23 May 1940.  His wife, Frances (died April 1946), and son Chester (died May 1978), daughter-in-law Minnie L. (died Oct. 1936) and other family members are buried next to him.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He reportedly first served in the 9th Illinois Infantry, but his service is unconfirmed.  John W. Scott enlisted at O'Fallon, Illinois on 12 August 1862 for a period of 3 years.  He was mustered in as a Private in Co. I of the 117th Illinois Infantry regiment at Camp Butler, Illinois, on 19 September 1862.  He was described at the time of enlistment as a resident of Belleville, St. Clair County, single, age 19, height 5' 11", hair black, eyes blue, complexion dark, occupation farmer, native of Belleville. He was later promoted to Corporal.  He was mustered out on 5 August 1865 at Springfield, Illinois.
   John Scott was active in the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), and was the last member of Calistoga's Gov. Morton Post, No. 41, GAR.  He was Jr. Vice-Commander of the Post from 1923 to 1928.  He attended the Department of California-Nevada Encampment in Santa Rosa in 1927, and is pictured in the Calistoga delegation near the center of the group photo.  He was Sr. Vice-Commander from 1929 to 1931.  John assumed the office of Post Commander in February 1931 with the passing of Robert A. Tyson, continuing in that office until his death.
 
John W. Scott
John W. Scott
(courtesy Al Derrick)

 
infantry
9th Illinois Infantry
(unconfirmed)


infantry
Company I
117th Illinois Infantry







Edwin P. Simmons
(1828 - 1894)
Rank:  Captain
Biography (History of Napa and Lake Counties, California, 1881):
   SIMMONS, CAPTAIN EDWIN P.  Whose portrais [portrait] appears in this history, was the son of John and Nancy Ann Pitcher Simmons.  He was born in Athens County, Ohio, May 5, 1828.  When but one year of age he, with his parents, moved and settled in Greene County, Illinois, where he resided until 1850.  During that time he received a common school education in Green County, and also attended a select school for eighteen months in Athens County, Ohio.  In 1850 he began life for himself, and going to Quincy, Illinois, he embarked in the mercantile and hotel business, in which he continued until 1852.  May 1st of that year he started across the plains for California, arriving September 10th of the same year.  He first went to Soscol Valley, Solano County, and worked by the month for a short time, and then went to Tuolumne County and embarked in mining, which he followed until October, 1854, when he returned to Quincy, Illinois, by way of the Isthmus and New Orleans.  He once more engaged in the mercantile business, and continued till the summer of 1855, when he moved and settled in Perry County, Illinois, where he continued in the mercantile business.  United in marriage October 12, 1855, to Miss Ann E. Rogers, who was born in Greene County, Illinois, December 31, 1835.  He continued in business until the breaking out of the war in 1861, and August 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company "H," 81st Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel J. J. Dollins, and served three years.  He was honorably discharged as Captain of Company "H," at Chicago, August 11, 1865.  He participated in the campaign against Vicksburg, in the Red River campaign, the two day's battle at Nashville, Tennessee, the forty-seven day's siege against Vicksburg, the thirteen days' siege of Spanish Fort, which was the defense of Mobile, and participated in all other battles in which the regiment was engaged.  At the fatal charge on the enemy's works at Vicksburg on the 22d of May, his regiment and the 7th Missouri Volunteer Infantry were selected as the assaulting column, and provided with ladders for scaling the works, moved forward under the murderous fire, with fixed bayonets and orders not to fire but use the steel.  Almost immediately the Adjutant of his regiment was mortally wounded.  He received the compliment of being detailed to the adjutantcy by Colonel Dollins, who in a moment after was shot dead.  In this charge the right wing of his regiment, which was the most exposed, lost in killed or wounded their commissioned officers -- both field and line, but he came out himself without a scratch worth mentioning.  In the campaign of Nashville he had the honor of serving as Acting Inspector-General of the second brigade of the third division of the 16th Army Corps.  After being discharged he returned to Perry County, Illinois, and engaged in the produce business, which he followed until 1868.  In connection with this business he moved to St. Louis and opened a commission house under the firm name of Dodson, Simmons & Wood, which he continued until 1876.  He then sold his interest and returned to California, this time settling on his present farm of one thousand two hundred acres, where he is engaged in general farming.  He has three living children, Carrie A. (now Mrs. Booth), born August 18, 1856; Frederick J., born July 27, 1859, and Julia E., born December 4, 1868.

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 18 May 1894):

FATAL ACCIDENT.
-----
Captain E. P. Simmons Thrown From a Wagon and His Neck Broken.
-----
   Captain Edwin P. Simmons, for many years a resident of Chiles valley, met with an accident Monday afternoon that caused his immediate death.  The Captain left his home in the morning en route to Napa and when at Union station his team became frightened and shied, tipping the wagon over and throwing the gentleman out, striking on his head.  A stranger, who was riding with Mr. Simmons, was also thrown out, but landed on his feet.  The horses broke loose and ran down the road two or three hundred years and stopped.  Alex. Gridley witnessed the accident and soon reached the injured man, whom he still found conscious.  Simmons gave his name and said he thought himself badly hurt.  He lived about twenty-five minutes.  A physician was at once summoned from Napa, but when he arrived found the Captain dead, his neck having been broken by the fall.
   The Coroner was sent for and after viewing the surroundings had the remains conveyed to Napa, where an inquest was held and a verdict rendered in accordance with the above facts.
   Deceased was born in Athens county, Ohio, May 5, 1828.  At the age of one year his parents moved to Green county, Illinois, where he resided until 1850, receiving a common school education and a term in a select school in Ohio.  In 1850 he began life for himself, and going to Quincy, Illinois, he embarked in the mercantile and hotel business, continuing therein until 1852, when he crossed the plains to California.  He first settled in Soscol valley, Solano county, and worked on a farm.  In a short time he went to Tuolumne county and engaged in mining.  In 1854 he returned to Illinois, engaging in the mercantile business.
   On October 12, 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss Ann E. Rogers.  In 1862 he enlisted in Company H, Eighty-first Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and in 1866 was honorably discharged as Captain of the company in which he enlisted.  He participated in the campaign against Vicksburg, at Red River, the two days' battle at Nashville, the forty-Fort, which was the defense of Mobile, and all other battles in which his regiment was engaged.  His bravery and ability to command was tested numerous times and lead to his promotion to Captain.  At the close of the war he returned to Perry county, Illinois, and engaged in the produce business.  In 1868 he moved to St. Louis, Mo., and opened a commission house.  In 1876 he left Missouri, coming to California and settling in Chiles valley, this county, where he has since resided almost continuously, spending a short time in Oakland and on his ranch near Napa.
   Captain Simmons leaves a wife and three children -- Mrs. Fred Booth, of Chiles valley, Mrs. Milton Martin and Fred Simmons, of Oakland.  Captain W. T. Simmons, of Calistoga, is a nephew of the deceased.  The funeral took place in St. Helena Wednesday morning upon the arrival of the 10:47 train, under the auspices of St. Helena Lodge, F. & A. M.  Services were conducted in the Masonic hall by Rev. James Mitchell, after which a large number of friends paid their last tribute of respect to deceased by following the remains to their final resting place.
 
Notes:  He died near Union Station (northwest Napa) on 14 May 1894, was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 16 May 1894.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a 1st Sergeant on 12 August 1862, and was mustered into Co. H, 81st Illinois Infantry regiment on 26 August 1862.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Tamaroa, Illinois.  He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on 28 January 1863, and to Captain (not mustered) on 18 July 1865.  He was mustered out on 5 August 1865.
 
Edwin P. Simmons
Edwin P. Simmons
(From History of Napa and Lake Counties, California, 1881)

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infantry
Company H
81st Illinois Infantry






William Thomas Simmons
(1843 - 1908)
Rank:  1st Lieutenant
Biography in Records of Members of the Grand Army of the Republic (William H. Ward, 1886, pp. 331-332)
W. T. SIMMONS.
   Of St. Helena, Cal.; was born in Green County, Ills., January 29, 1843; has been a contractor and builder; is a carpenter by trade; at present a dealer in furniture and undertaker.  Enlisted at Springfield, Ills., in a company which finally formed a part of the 11th Missouri Infantry; held position of regimental adjutant and quartermaster, and was aid-de-camp on General Hubbard's staff:  was commissioned 1st lieutenant of Company C, 11th Missouri Veteran Infantry, in December, 1864; served with Pope's Army of Mississippi; Rosecrans' Army of Tennessee, Sherman's Corps, and A. J. Smith's 16th Corps; was engaged in battles of Fredericktown, New Madrid, Island No. 10, Farmington, Miss., siege of Corinth, Iuka, Waterford, Battle of Corinth, Jackson, Big Black, Vicksburg, Tupelo, Nashville, and Spanish Fort; was wounded in right shoulder by fragment of shell at Battery Robinet [Robinett], Corinth; captured battle-flag at battle of Nashville; after which he was, by order of the Secretary of War, sent to Washington, where he received a medal of honor and thirty days' leave of absence; rejoining his regiment at Spanish Fort, he was in command of his company until the close of the war; after the war, was made provost marshal at Marion, Ala.; was detailed by General Hubbard to collect corn, in the vicinity of Demopolis, Selma, and Tuscaloosa; collected about 100,000 bushels, which had been sold to the Confederate government and paid for before the collapse of Lee's army.  Comrade Simmons was officer of the day of Lincoln Post, No. 2, at Springfield, Ills., in July, 1866, the time of the first department convention of the G.A.R.; was the first commander of Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, department of California, of which he is at present a member.  Comrade Simmons has been a member of the Board of Trustees of St. Helena for five years in succession; was chief of fire department for eight years, and is a director in the Veterans' Home Association.

Obituary, The Weekly Calistogian newspaper, Friday, 1 January 1909:

W. T. SIMMONS PASSES AWAY
WELL-KNOWN BUSINESS MAN SUCCUMBS TO AN ATTACK OF PARALYSIS
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Had Been a Highly-Respected Resident of Calistoga for Nearly a Quarter of a Century.
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   In the death of Captain W. T. Simmons, Calistoga has lost another of its oldest and most highly-respected citizens, and the entire community mourns the loss of one of its best known residents.  Death was due to slow paralysis, of which he had been a sufferer for about three years, although he had only been confined to his bed for three weeks.
    The deceased located here nearly twenty-three years ago and engaged in the undertaking and furniture business, which he conducted up to the time of his death.  He was appointed agent for Wells-Fargo & Company over fifteen years ago and continued in that capacity also up to the time of his demise.  He also served several terms as justice of the peace and town recorder a number of years ago, and was later a director of the Veterans' home at Yountville.  He was a candidate for sheriff of the county in 1898, but failed to receive the nomination at the hands of the Republican Party.
   William Thomas Simmons was a native of Newport, Ills., and was aged 65 years, 10 months and 29 days.  He had been a resident of California for almost forty years, and in addition to the widow, Mary J. Simmons (nee Risley), is survived by three children -- Mrs. R. C. Wilson of San Francisco and E. W. and W. F. Simmons of this place.
   Captain Simmons served throughout the civil war and was a lieutenant of Company C of the Eleventh Missouri Volunteer Infantry.  He enlisted at the age of eighteen years as a private in Springfield, Ills.  The quota of that state being full, he went to St. Louis, Mo., where he mustered into the above-named company.  His first engagement was at Frederickstown, Mo.; he served with Pope at the siege of New Madrid and Island No. 10, with Grant at the siege of Corinth, with Rosecrans at the battles of Iuka and Corinth, and with Sherman at Jackson and the series of engagements culminating in the siege and capture of Vicksburg.  He re-enlisted for the war with A. J. Smith at Tupelo, and under Rosecrans followed Price into Missouri in his last raid on that state.  The deceased received a commission as first lieutenant at that time; was under Thomas at Nashville, captured the rebel battle flag, and was sent by order of Secretary of War Stanton to Washington, where he received a medal for meritorious service, being one of only thirty-five of that class issued during the war.  He served with Canby at Spanish-Fort-Blakely and the surrender of Mobile; at Montgomery, Ala., at the time of Lee's surrender, and was discharged on January 11, 1866, at St. Louis.  Mr. Simmons was wounded only once -- at Corinth, Miss., October 4, 1862, although he was under fire in thirty-six engagements.
   The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon from his late home on Cedar street and was attended by a large number of friends  and acquaintances of many years standing.  The services were held under the auspices of the Governor Morton post, No. 40 [sic -- 41], G.A.R., and Rev. U. E. Partridge was the officiating clergyman, assisted by Rev. James Mitchell of St. Helena.  The remains were taken to San Francisco Wednesday morning for incineration at the Odd Fellows' cemetery.
The many friends and acquaintances of the deceased join The Calistogian in extending its sincerest sympathy to the stricken relatives in this, their hour of bereavement.
Obituary, St. Helena Star newspaper, Friday, 1 January 1909:
W. T. SIMMONS PASSES AWAY.
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Pioneer Resident Crosses the Divide.
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END COMES AT CALISTOGA.
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Had Lived in St. Helena and Calistoga Nearly Forty Years and Was Prominent.

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   Captain William T. Simmons, one of the best known citizens in Napa county, died at his home in Calistoga Sunday, December 27th, after an illness of several weeks although he had been in failing health for a number of years.
   Captain Simmons was born in Illinois and upon coming to California nearly forty years ago settled in St. Helena, engaging in carpentering and contracting.  Among the buildings he erected here was the Presbyterian church on Spring street and he occupied a comfortable home on Oak avenue at Madrona.
   About twenty-five years ago the Captain moved to Calistoga and there engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, being also agent for Wells, Fargo & Co., in which lines he continued until the end.
   Deceased served through the civil war and was Lieutenant of Company C of the Eleventh Missouri Regiment.  He was an active member of the Grand Army of the Republic and served as Commander of the Northern California branch of the order.  Deceased was an active Republican, taking a great interest in the welfare of his party.  He served as Justice of the Peace of Hot Springs township and was at one time an unsuccessful candidate for the nomination of Sheriff.
   When the end came Captain Simmons had reached the age of 65 years, 10 months, 29 days.  He leaves a widow and is survived by the following children:  Mrs. Harry C. Wilson, of San Francisco, and Edwin W. and William F. Simmons of Calistoga.
   Captain Simmons was a genial whole-souled man who had a wide circle of friends and acquaintances.
   The funeral took place Tuesday from the family residence under the auspices of Governor Morton Post No. 40 [sic - 41] G.A.R.  Rev. James Mitchell, of St. Helena, assisted at the services.  Wednesday the remains were taken to San Francisco for cremation.

Notes:  Native of Greene County, Illinois, born 29 January 1843.
   He died in Calistoga on 27 December 1908.  The St. Helena Cemetery reports that they have no record of his remains being buried there, however, two military headstones (one for his Medal of Honor) memorialize him in the Simmons plot.
  There is a wealth of published information regarding William Thomas Simmons and his Medal of Honor.  Further biographical details on him can be found on my Calistoga Civil War Veterans website.
   He was a Past Master of St. Helena Lodge #93, F&AM, having served as Worshipful Master in 1876.
Military Information:  Union.  He originally enlisted at Springfield, Illinois, as a 2nd Lieutenant in a newly-formed company, but because the state quota had been met, the company could not serve the State of Illinois as planned.  Instead, Simmons' Illinois company joined the 11th Missouri Infantry regiment, which was raised in June and July, 1861.  The regiment was mustered in at St. Louis arsenal on 1 August 1861, with Simmons' company assigned as Company C.  Simmons was mustered in as a Private. 
   William  Simmons was promoted to 6th Corporal at Hamburg, Tennessee, on 23 April 1862.  He was wounded in the right shoulder by a shell fragment while stationed in defense of Battery Robinett at the second battle of Corinth on 4 October 1862.  The medical report notes that it was a slight wound to the arm and back.  He was treated at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, and returned to duty by November 1862.
   Simmons was mustered out at La Grange, Tennessee, on 31 December 1863, to reenlist as a "Veteran Volunteer" in his regiment on 1 January 1864.  By April of that year, he had been promoted to Sergeant in Company C.  A carte-de-visite photograph of Simmons sporting his sergeant's chevrons exists in a family collection (Dennis W. Belcher, pers. comm., 2010).
  On 24 November 1864 at St. Louis, Missouri, William received and accepted a commission as 1st Lieutenant in Company C.  His Company was stationed at Memphis, Tennessee, at the time, and he was discharged on 4 November to travel to St. Louis to receive the commission.  Less than a month after his promotion, while at the Battle of Nashville, Simmons assumed command of the Company when his commanding officer fell in battle.  Simmons led a charge and personally captured the colors of an Alabama infantry regiment (officially noted as the flag of the 34th Alabama Infantry, but more likely that of the 19th Alabama).  The incident occurred at the Battle of Nashville on 16 December 1864.  The capture of the flag was noted in Maj. M. J. Green's after-battle report, dated 21 December 1864, and his act was commended by Maj. Green in a brief, dated 20 January 1865 (Source:  Historical Data Systems, Inc.).  For this act of courage, Simmons was awarded the Medal of Honor in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., held in February 1865.  In order to receive the honor, Simmons took a short leave from his duties starting on 8 February 1865.  He was then granted thirty days leave of absence by Special Order No. 87, issued by the Adjutant General's Office of the War Department on 22 February 1865.  Upon returning to Company C after his month of special furlough, Simmons was reportedly placed in command.  Although his service record is silent on this, it is probably this stint that earned him the honorary title of "Captain," which he used in his later years as a civilian.
   For several periods (one beginning 28 July 1865, the other beginning 30 September), Simmons was assigned to detached service at the division headquarters at Demopolis, Alabama, where he served in the Quartermaster Department.  It was probably during this time that he reportedly served as regimental adjutant and quartermaster, and aide-de-camp on General Hubbard's staff.
   Post-war (probably beginning in late 1865), Simmons was assigned to a detachment at Marion, Alabama, where he reportedly served as Provost Marshal.  He continued to serve until the regiment was mustered out on 15 January 1866.
W. T. Simmons
William Thomas Simmons
(from Deeds of Valor, by Beyer and Keydel, 1907 edition)

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infantry
Company C
11th Missouri Infantry



medal of honor
Medal of Honor






Oliver Smith
(1839 - 1909)
Rank:  Seaman/Gunner's Mate (Navy), Sergeant (Army)
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 7 May 1909):
IN THE ARMY AND NAVY.
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Capt. Oliver Smith Passes to His Reward.
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SERVED HIS COUNTRY WELL.
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Was Pioneer in Alaska and Established Great Enterprises in Northwest.
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   Death has removed from our midst another prominent citizen.  Captain Oliver Smith passed to his reward Monday evening at 7:50 o'clock.  A long and useful life and one that had endured many hardships and much suffering, came peacefully to an end.
   About three weeks ago Captain Smith was cutting a tree down in his yard and got very warm.  The wind was blowing and he caught a cold which brought on an attack of asthma, a disease from which he had suffered for many years.  Mrs. Smith was away from home at the time and as he grew worse he decided to join his wife at Newark.  When crossing the ferry on his way to San Francisco, a physician on board, noticing his condition, advised him not to stop in the city but to return home.  This advice was taken and Mrs. Smith was notified of her husband's condition, she returning to St. Helena as soon as possible.  The cold developed into bronchial pneumonia and although Captain Smith had rallied from similar attacks in former years, and was given every care, he gradually grew weaker until the faint spark of life was extinguished.
   Captain Oliver Smith was born April 7, 1839, and lived to reach the age of 70 years and 26 days.  When between 13 and 14 years old the subject of this sketch left his home and went to sea, following that vocation until the age of 22 years when, on July 10, 1861, he entered the United States Navy from New York City, as seaman on the Frigate Potomac.  Deceased served on the Potomac for one year and was then transferred to the U.S. Sloop of War, Vincennes, stationed at Ship Island for two years, doing blockade duty.  Captain Smith volunteered for the taking of the forts of Mobile Bay, Fort Gaines and Fort Morgan, but reached there too late, the fleet having already run by the forts and was at anchor in the bay.  The Captain was then ordered to the Selma, a small steamer and did duty as gunner's mate.  While on the Selma Captain Smith was in several engagements with the forts and batteries and remained at Dog River Bar until the surrender of the confederates to General Canby.  The fleet was then ordered home and at Boston, Mass., deceased received his honorable discharge on the U.S. Receiving Ship Ohio, September 30, 1864.
   Captain Smith decided to change from the Navy to the Army and in March, 1865, enlisted in Battery F, U.S. Artillery, 2nd Regiment, and came to California via Panama.  While on the way with troops to Alaska in 1868 the Revenue Cutter was wrecked in Bristol Bay.  The troops were picked up and reached the barracks at Vancouver, Wash., where Captain Smith received his honorable discharge from the Army, his time of enlistment having expired.
   Late in 1868 Captain Smith reached Alaska and became one of the originators of the Alaska Commercial Co., assisting in laying the foundations of an enterprise that has grown to vast proportions.  Deceased was one of the Company's first store keepers in Alaska remaining in the business about twelve years.  In 1880 Captain Smith came to St. Helena and purchased property on Main street.  The same year, in company with Senator George Hearst, the Captain established the first salmon packing company in Alaska, the enterprise being known as the Kariuk Packing Co.  In March, 1882, Captain Smith married Miss Eva Augusta Ely and established a home for his bride in the residence where, since his retirement, he has lived and where on Monday he entered his final sleep.  Captain Smith continued in business in Alaska for many years.  In 1887 he started the Kodiak Packing Co. and continued that until all the salmon packing establishments were absorbed by the Alaska Packers' Association, Captain Smith for years being a stockholder in that enterprise.  From 1885 to 1887 deceased was engaged in the general merchandise business in St. Helena, selling out to D. S. Gallatin in order to again go to Alaska.  In 1892 Captain Smith leased the Uyak Island from the United States Government and decided to engage in the fur fox industry.  The Government gave him ten foxes and he purchased twenty-six more.  He continued this industry for six years, finally selling to the North American Commercial Co.  While engaged in raising foxes Captain Smith started two stations for salting salmon -- one at Eagle Harbor and the other on Red River and continued this line of work until 1898.  Captain Smith owned several vessels with which he did freighting and for several years owned and commanded the steamer Kodiak which plied between the Alaskan Islands.  For twenty years after first going to Alaska Captain Smith did not leave that country.  After his marriage in 1882, however, he would spend his Summers in Alaska, returning to St. Helena in the Fall.  Seven years ago he retired from active business and returned to St. Helena, where he lived quietly.  Two years ago his only child, Oliver Nelson Smith, born April 28, 1883, passed away while in the United States Transport service and en route from San Francisco to Manila.  From this blow the Captain never recovered, his whole life having been wrapped up in the promising career of his son.
   Deceased was a very kind and generous man.  He had traveled all over the world and was a most entertaining conversationalist.  The years he had spent in Alaska had made him a master of the Russian language and he spoke the dialects of the Aleutian tribes fluently.  He was considered one of the best posted men on all topics pertaining to Alaska, the Bering sea or Aleutian Islands.  Captain Smith had made and lost several fortunes and at one time was very wealthy.  He never became discouraged at misfortunes but was always optimistic and of a cheerful disposition.  When he had money he was always ready to share it with his friends or with the needy, and it is said of him that he had many times loaned money to friends to put them on their feet and that few ever appealed to him in vain.  He was generous to a fault, faithfully served his adopted country when she was in need, was a devoted husband and father and a good man.  He has gone to his reward and the sorrowing widow who survives him can find consolation that the life of her departed loved one was not lived in vain but was filled with loyal and devoted service to his God, his country, his family and friends.
   The funeral took place Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the family residence.  Rev. W. H. Johnstone officiated, assisted by Rev. James Mitchell.  Appropriate hymns were sung by a choir composed of Mrs. Metzner, Mrs. Kettlewell, Mrs. Otto Jursch, G. B. Anderson and A. J. Mitchell.  The pall bearers were G. B. Anderson, J. O. Garnsey, J. A. Nowland, W. A. Bingham, M. C. Cook and S. S. Shook.

Notes:  Born 7 April 1839.  He died on 3 May 1909, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 6 May 1909.

Military Information:  Union.  Served in the U.S. Navy for most of the war.  Enlisted in New York City on 10 July 1861.  His first service was as seaman aboard the frigate Potomac, stationed for most of this time with the West Gulf Blockade Squadron off the coast of Vera Cruz.  After one year of service, he was transferred to the sloop of war USS Vincennes, doing blockade duty at Ship Island, Mississippi, for two years.  He next served aboard the steamer USS Selma (the former CSS Selma) as gunner's mate, participating in the bombardment of Fort Morgan, Alabama, and in the reconnaissance expedition up the Dog River in Alabama.  He was discharged aboard the receiving ship (training vessel) Ohio at Boston on 30 September 1864.
   He enlisted as a Sergeant in the Regular Army in March 1865, and was mustered into Battery K, 2nd U.S. Light Artillery.  He was later transferred to Battery F, same regiment.  He was discharged at Vancouver, Washington, in 1868.
 
navy
U.S. Navy
Potomac
USS Vincennes
USS Selma


artillery
Batteries K &  F
2nd U.S. Artillery







William Henry Harrison Smith
(1840 - 1933)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 22 September 1933):
W. H. H. SMITH PASSES AWAY.
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Was Veteran of Civil War and Had Passed His 93rd Birthday.
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   The expected has happened.  William Henry Harrison Smith, aged and prominent citizen, passed peacefully away at his St. Helena home Wednesday afternoon at 4;15 o'clock.  Death was the direct result of an accident with which Mr. Smith met while, with Mrs. Smith and his daughter, Mrs. Walter Metzner, he was spending a vacation in Berkeley.  On Saturday, July 29th, Mr. Smith was about to enter the house he was occupying in Berkeley when he suddenly fell to the cement landing in front of the steps leading to the entrance.  Examination led to the discovery that Mr. Smith had fractured a hip.  He was taken to the Alta Bates Hospital, where he was given the best care.  His rugged constitution overcame in large degree the handicap of old age and he improved so nicely that after a few weeks he was brought home.  After a week or two Mr. Smith was so much better that his son-in-law, Mr. Metzner, would daily lift him to a wheel chair and take him on to a sun porch.  There Mr. Smith visited members of his family or callers and enjoyed the view and sunshine until Mr. Metzner would return him to his bed.  This was a daily routine and Wednesday he was again taken to his accustomed corner on the porch.  He was in particularly good spirits and about 3 o'clock enjoyed a call from Paul R. Alexander, manager of the Bank of America, Mr. Smith being a member of the advisory board of the bank.  After being placed in bed again Mr. Smith chatted with his family for a little while, appearing particularly well and happy and free from pain.  Suddenly he gave a slight gasp and the faint spark of life was extinguished.
   William Henry Harrison Smith was one of eleven children born to Thomas and Catherine Smith.  He was born on a farm near Bluffton, Indiana, March 12, 1840, and had he lived until next March 12 would have reached the extraordinary age of 94 years.
   Mr. Smith and a younger brother, the late Judge Lucas F. Smith, of Santa Cruz, enlisted in the Civil War in August 1862 as members of Company B, 101st Indiana Infantry.  Lucas Smith was too young to enlist as a soldier but did so as a drummer boy.  Both served through the war and were in the grand review on Pennsylvania avenue where they saw the kindly face of President Abraham Lincoln.  Mr. Smith received his discharge in April 1865.
   After the war the subject of this sketch returned home and became a pharmacist.  He came to California in 1889 and located in San Rafael, purchasing a drug store and other property.  In 1893 Mr. Smith traded his San Rafael property for the 40-acre St. Helena farm of the late M. F. Inman.  In 1894 Mr. Smith was pharmacist for the late S. C. Davidson, who some time before had purchased the pioneer Bussenius drug store.  This arrangement continued about a year, when Mr. Smith purchased the drug store from Mr. Davidson.  It was then located where the Wright Sweet Shoppe is at present.  In 1895 Smiths Pharmacy was moved to its present location.
   During the Civil War Mr. Smith fought in many engagements, the most notable being the Battle of Chicamauga [sic]; Battle of the Wilderness; Battle of Lookout Mountain; and the Battle of Missionary Ridge.  Mr. Smith was also with Sherman on his march from Atlanta to the sea.  His service to his country was marked with valor and faithfulness.
   Mr. Smith was very successful in business in St. Helena, but there came a time when he felt he should take life easier.  He sold his drug store to his son-in-law, Walter Metzner, and retired to his farm, portions of which he had sold, but had retained his home and four acres.  He also purchased the olive oil plant from David Martinelli and manufactured olive oil for several years.  Upon his retirement to his home he made raising bees and producing honey a hobby, but the weight of years caused him to give up all activities except his membership on the Advisory Board of the Bank of America.  For many years Mr. Smith was an officer and director of the old First National Bank.  When that was sold and became a branch of the Bank of America Mr. Smith was appointed a member of the Advisory Board, a position he held when his long life ended.
   Mr. Smith never held a public office, but his entire life was marked by a keen interest in all civic matters.  In politics Mr. Smith was an ardent Republican.  While he never ran for office, he was interested in every political contest.
   Mr. Smith was twice married and by his first wife he leaves one son, Frank A. Smith, who resides at Bluffton, Indiana.  His widow, Mrs. Nellie G. Smith, and one daughter, Mrs. Walter Metzner, are left to mourn the loss of a devoted and loving husband and father.  He is also survived by a daughter-in-law, Catherine Smith, widow of the late A. W. Smith, of Port Chicago, Contra Costa county.  Deceased is also survived by two brothers, the only ones left of the family of eleven of which deceased was one -- Zac Smith, of Bonham, Texas, and Joseph Smith, of Pampa, Texas.
   Mr. Smith was a man characterized by his uprightness, honesty and strict integrity, also loyalty to his country.  He revered the stars and stripes and had intense love for America.  He had no use for a slacker.  Mr. Smith was devoted to his friends of whom he had many.  It was one of his great pleasures of late years to have his daughter bring him to the business part of town and many of his friends would go to his automobile to chat with him.  He was always kind and courteous to all and it was a real pleasure to visit with him and draw him into conversation about his experiences.  With a life full of service and patriotic devotion to country, family and friends, he passed to the Great Beyond at the ripe old age of 93 years, 6 months and 8 days.
  The funeral will be held from Harry P. Ward's funeral home this afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Irving E. Baxter officiating.  Mrs. Booth will sing.  Interment will take place in the family plot in the St. Helena Cemetery.
   The following friends, all members of the Advisory Board of the Bank of America, will serve as pallbearers:  Frank L. and Paul B. Alexander, Charles A. Davis, William M. Wheeler, Andrew McNair and Alber Carpy.
 
Notes:  Native of Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana, born 12 March 1840.  He died on 20 September 1933, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery.
 
Military Information:  Union.  William H. H. Smith enlisted as a Private on 18 August 1862, and was mustered into Co. B, 101st Indiana Infantry regiment.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Bluffton, Indiana.  He was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, on 24 June 1865.
   His brother, Lucas J. Smith, served in Co. G of the same regiment.  He enlisted on 20 August 1862 as a Musician (drummer boy), and was mustered into Co. G on 20 August 1862.  He was mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, on 24 June 1865.
 
Smiths Pharmacy Logo
Smith's Pharmacy logo, as it appears on company stationary, 2012.
The pharmacy is now located at 1390 Railroad Avenue in St. Helena.

William Henry Harrison Smith
(courtesy St. Helena Historical Society)

infantry
Company B
101st Indiana Infantry







John Richard Spiers
(1844 - 1920)
Rank:
Obituary from The Weekly Calistogian newspaper, Friday, 2 July 1920):
John R. Spiers Succumbed to Heart Failure Wednesday
   John R. Spiers died at his home on Wednesday evening at about 6 o'clock very suddenly of heart failure.  He submitted to a capital operation several years ago, and has really not been very well since that spell of illness.
   Mr. Spiers has been a resident of this section for more than a quarter of a century and was a successful and prosperous farmer.  He was an honorable and highly-respected man and enjoyed the confidence and friendship of all those who knew him.  He was a member of the local Presbyterian church and will be greatly missed.
   The deceased was a native of Kentucky, and was aged 75 years, 8 months and 15 days.
   Besides the widow he is survived by several children, namely:  Mrs. Lulu Williams, Mrs. Anna Lhuillier, William Spiers, John Spiers Jr., Mrs. Grace Newton and Mrs. Nellie Read.  He also leaves a brother, William Spiers, owner of the Clear Lake Stage Line, and a brother in Lake county, Joshua Spiers.
  The funeral was held this afternoon from the Presbyterian church, Rev. J. C. Bolster officiating, and interment was made in the St. Helena cemetery.
   The sympathy of the community is with these people so suddenly bereaved.
 
Notes:  Native of Owen County, Kentucky, born 3 September 1844.  He was the son of William Joshua Spiers and Louisa Smith.  The father, William Spiers, was an affluent man, owning a plantation of 4,000 acres near Monterey, Kentucky, which included a race track for thoroughbred horses.  The family left Kentucky about 1868, settling in Cass County, Missouri, where they remained five years.  While living in Missouri, John Spiers married Nellie Cornelia Ruman in Kansas City, Missouri, on 14 July 1873.  John and his family came to California about 1875, and were living on Navarro Ridge in Humboldt County when their daughter, Lulu Louise, was born there on 27 October 1875 (Source: Shasta Historical Society).  John settled in Calistoga around 1900.  His brother, William "Bill" Spiers, operated a stage line between Calistoga and Lake County for decades.
   John appears in the 1850 census in District No. 2, Owen County, Kentucky, under the household of his parents, William and Louisa "Spires."  John was listed as age 5, born in Kentucky.  His father, William, was listed as a miller.  Others in the household included Jeremiah Spires (age 9), Sarah (age 7), Lucy (age 3), Taylor (age 2), and Elgiva Spiers (age 1 month).
   John was again enumerated in Owen County, Kentucky (District 1, Monterey Post Office), in the 1860 census, under the household of his parents, W. J. and Louisa "Spieres."  John was listed as age 15, born in Kentucky.  In addition to his parents, others in the household included Jerry Spiers (age 19), Sarah (age 17), Lucy T. (age 12), Elgiva (age 10), William (age 8), Reubin (age 5), Joshua (age 3), Mary (age 1 month), and Ann T. Spiers (age 13).
   In 1870, the Spiers family was enumerated in Big Creek Township (Pleasant Hill Post Office), Cass County, Missouri.  John was living in the household of his parents, William J. and Louisa Spiers, and working as a farm hand with his father, who was listed as a farmer.  John was listed as age 24, born in Kentucky.
   John was enumerated as J. R. Spiers in the 1880 census in Tehama Township, Tehama County, California.  He was listed as age 35, born in Kentucky, occupation farmer.  His household included his wife Cornelia (age 24. native of New York), and daughters Annie (age 5, native of Kansas), Lula (age 4, native of California), and Augusta (age 2, native of California), and son William (born January 1870 in California).  His parents, W. J. and Louisa Spiers were living nearby.
   John R. Spiers and his family were enumerated in the 1900 census in South Fork Township, Trinity County, California.  John was listed as a farmer, with other details too faint to read on the census form.  His household included his wife, Cornelia, sons William J. and John R., and daughters Grace and Nellie.  John appears in the 1910 census in Hot Springs Township on a farm in the vicinity of Calistoga, listed as married (first marriage, 37 years), native of Kentucky, occupation farmer, Union army veteran.  His household included his wife, Cornelia (age 54, mother of 8 children, 6 living), son John (age 24), and daughters Grace (age 17) and Nellie (age 13).
   John R. Spiers was enumerated in the 1920 census in Hot Springs Township on a farm near Calistoga (probably Pickett Road area).  He was listed as married, age 75, native of Kentucky (as were his parents), occupation farmer.  His household included his wife, Cornelia (age 64, native of New York), daughter Grace Newton (age 27, native of California), and grandsons George, Richard, Alfred and Sam Newton (all natives of Washington state).  Grace Natalia Newton (nee Spiers) married George Sidney Newton in 1912.
   John died 30 June 1920 in Napa County at the age of 75, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery.
Military Information:  Confederate (based on family lore).  He was noted as a Union Civil War army veteran in the 1910 census, however, family lore combined with military records suggests this is not the case.   Both "John Spires" and "Jerry Spires" are listed in the Report of the Adjutant General for the State of Kentucky, Confederate Kentucky Volunteers, published in 1915.  Both served as Privates in Company G of the 4th Kentucky Cavalry, which was made up of men from Grant and Owen Counties.  The official report does not list their enlistment particulars, which is interesting.  These two are unique in the rolls for this company, as all the other men listed in the rolls for Company G have full details of the enlistment date and place.  This leads me to suspect that John and Jerry enlisted under the same circumstances, and for whatever the reason, the details of their enlistment were not recorded by the regimental command.  Jerry (Jeremiah) would have been about 20 years old when the war broke out in 1861.  John was about 17.  Their brothers William, Reuben and Joshua Spiers were too young to enlist, so we wouldn't expect to find their names.
   He is not the same person as John R. Spiers who served as a Private in Co. C, 2nd Kentucky Cavalry regiment.  That John R. Spiers was admitted to the National Disabled Soldiers Home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1881.  The service record on the Home's papers indicates that he served in Co. C of the "2 Ky. Vols.," enlisted 13 August 1861 and was discharged at Nashville on 24 October 1864.  His wife was Georgia Spiers, of Stamping Ground, Scott County, Kentucky.
   He may be the same soldier as "John Spires," who transferred into Independent Battery A, 1st Kentucky ("Stone's") Light Artillery, on 15 June 1862 (during Buell's campaign in northern Alabama and middle Tennessee).
 
flag
Service unknown






Benjamin Franklin Standiford
(1843 - 1920)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 31 December 1920):
RESIDENT FOR MANY YEARS.
-----
B. F. Standiford Called to His Reward After Much Suffering.
-----
   Benjamin Franklin Standiford for forty-four years a resident of Napa county, died at his home on F street, Napa, Monday morning at 4 o'clock.  Mr. Standiford had been in failing health for two years and his illness extended over a period of a year.  For two weeks prior to the end he failed very rapidly and his death was not unexpected.
   Benjamin Franklin Standiford was born in Moundsville, West Virginia, in 1843, and his 77th birthday was the day before he passed away.  He came to Napa county in 1876 and was one of its best known and most highly esteemed citizens.
   Mr. Standiford was a veteran of the civil war.  He enlisted in West Virginia and served in the army throughout the entire struggle.
   Deceased had been married fifty-two years and with his family and grandchildren, among whom were three great grandchildren, celebrated his golden wedding anniversary two years.
   Besides a widow, these five daughters and one son are left to mourn their loved one:  Mrs. C. J. Sunkler, of St. Helena; Mrs. L. F. Sunkler, Mrs. E. R. Apperson, Mrs. G. H. March and Mrs. T. Mendoza, of Napa; and Leslie Standiford, of Vallejo.  There are also several grandchildren, two nephews, W. M. and W. W. Coffield, and a niece, Miss Silas Shook, of Napa.
   The funeral services were held in Treadway's chapel in Napa Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock and the remains were brought to St. Helena for interment in the family plot.  Six grandsons acted as pall bearers.
 
Notes:  Native of Moundsville, Marshall County, West Virginia, born 26 December 1843.  He was the son of William Standiford and Elizabeth (Eliza) Wellman.  Benjamin married Susan Amanda Eckles (Eckels/Echols) on 12 November 1868 in Marshall County, WV.  Susan (a.k.a., Susanna) was the daughter of James Drum Eckles and Elizabeth Ann Whitsel, born February 1847 in West Virginia.  Benjamin and Susan had eight children.
   Benjamin F. Standiford was enumerated in the 1880 census in Yountville, Napa County, listed as married, age 30, born in West Virginia (as were his parents, occupation laborer.  His household included his wife Amanda (age 32, born in West Virginia), daughter Dora (age 10, born in West Virginia), son "Ulissus" (age 6, born in West Virginia), daughter  LaNoma (age 5, born in Texas), daughter Laura (age 4, born in California), and daughter Carrie (age 1, born in California).
  Susan Standiford, Benjamin's wife, appears in the 1900 census as head of household in Salvador Precinct, Napa.  She was listed as married (31 years), born February 1847 in West Virginia.  Her household included her daughter Della, born September 1881 in California.  Susan was noted as being the mother of 8 children, 6 still living.  Benjamin was not in the household, possibly working elsewhere in California at the time.
   In 1910, Benjamin F. Standiford was an inmate at the Veterans Home in Yountville, Napa County.  He was listed as married (1st marriage, 42 years), age 46, born in West Virginia, no occupation, Union army veteran.  Benjamin's wife, Susan, was still living in northern Napa (Trancas Precinct).  She was listed as married (1st marriage, 41 years), age 41, born in West Virginia.  It was noted that she was the mother of 8 children, 7 still living.  A son, Ulysses (age 39) was living with Susan.  He was a widower, occupation painter.
   Benjamin appears in the 1920 census in Spencer Precinct, City of Napa area, Napa County, living at 411 West F Street.  He was listed as age 76, born in West Virginia, occupation laborer.  His wife, Susan A., was also in the household, listed as age 73, born in West Virginia.
   He died 27 December 1920 in Napa at the age of 77, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 29 December.  Spouse's initials "S.A."

 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 14 August 1862, and was mustered into Co. C, 12th West Virginia Infantry regiment on 30 August 1862.  His surname on the roster is spelled "Stanaford."  While on duty at Buckhannon, Virginia, in early October of 1862, he reportedly contracted measles, resulting in partial loss of his eyesight and a loss of hair.  He was hospitalized at Buckhannon for three months.  According to his pension affidavit, he was honorably discharged at Wheeling, West Virginia on 20 June 1865.  His initials appear as "E.L." on the 1886 roster for St. Helena's Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, G.A.R.  This may have been a misprint.
   Benjamin applied for and received a veteran's disability pension in California in 1889 (application no. _________, certificate no. 1055537).  His wife, Susan, applied for a widow's benefit in California in 1921.
 
infantry
Company C
12th West Virginia Infantry







Augustus Washington Starr
(1834 - 1907)
Rank:  Brevet Major & Captain
Biography (A Memorial and Biographical History of Northern California, 1891):
    CAPTAIN A. W. STARR, Superintendent of the Star Mills at South Vallejo, has been a resident of the Golden State since 1853, and has lived in Vallejo for the past nineteen years, and in charge of the mills for the past ten years.  He was born in Huron County, Ohio, in 1834, his parents being Orange and --- [Mercy Dubois] Starr, natives of New York State, who were among the early settlers of Ohio.  At the age of fourteen years he entered business life as a clerk in a country store in Plymouth, Ohio, and continued there until he was eighteen years old; then he came to California, by way of Panama, arriving in San Francisco in February, 1853.  Proceeding at once to the mining district, he kept a store there ten months, and then was clerk in a store in Sacramento until 1861.  In September, 1861, he assisted in raising a company of cavalry, was appointed Second Lieutenant and served during the war in different portions of the State, part of the time in Northern California against the Indians.  His was Company F, Second Regiment of California Volunteer Cavalry.  In the spring of 1853 [sic - 1863] he was promoted to First Lieutenant and a few months afterward Captain.  June 6, 1866, he was mustered out, in command of his company.  In February, 1867, he entered the regular army as Second Lieutenant, attached to the Eight United States Cavalry, and remained in service until 1871, meanwhile, in 1868, being promoted First Lieutenant, and in December, 1869, to Captaincy, and during this period of service he was in Nevada and New Mexico.
   Becoming tired of the inactivity of the military service, he took charge of the mills at Vallejo, and has since remained as their manager.  Their capacity is 2,000 barrels per day, 250 tons of wheat, 1,300 bags of bran, 500 bags of middlings.  It has two engines:  one, of 600 horse-power, was manufactured by the Union Iron Works in San Francisco and called the O'Neil engine, and the other is a 300-horse-power Corliss engine.  Coal from Pittsburg mine in Mt. Diablo is used.  The mills are six stories high, each floor fully occupied.  The market is principally in Great Britain and Europe, the main office in Liverpool.  This mill has been running since 1869.
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 28 June 1907):
   Capt. A. W. Starr, at one time owner of the Starr flour mills at Vallejo, died at the Napa Asylum Wednesday, after having been an inmate of that institution eleven years.  Deceased was a native of Ohio, and was 72 years of age.  The remains were brought to St. Helena Thursday and were laid beside those of his brother.  Services were conducted by Rev. James Mitchell.
Notes:  Native of Greenfield, Huron County, Ohio, born 28 November 1834.  He died 26 June 1907 in Napa County at the age of 72, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 27 June.  His grave is marked by a recently installed (2007) military headstone, placed by the modern Civil War reenactment organization which portrays Co. F, 2nd Cal. Cav. (commanded by Capt. Donald Treco).
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant on 29 August 1861 at Sacramento, California, and was commissioned in Co. F, 2nd California Cavalry regiment.  He was promoted to Full 1st Lieutenant in Co. H, 2nd Calif. Cavalry on 23 July 1862.  Promoted to Full Captain in Co. F, 2nd Calif. Cavalry on 10 February 1863.  Promoted to Brevet Major on 13 March 1865.  He was mustered out of Co. F, 2nd Calif. Cavalry on 27 June 1866 at Sacramento.

Augustus W. Starr

cavalry
Co's H & F
2nd California Cavalry


Post war service:
cavalry
8th U.S. Cavalry






Edward Thompson Starr
(1841 - 1887)
Rank:  2nd Lieutenant
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper supplement, 4 March 1887):
DEATH OF E. T. STARR.
-----
A Brief Sketch of His Life -- A Citizen Universally Esteemed.
-----
   Another highly esteemed citizen of this vicinity has passed over to the silent majority.  The sad news of the death of E. T. Starr was chronicled on our streets Saturday.  Mr. Starr had been in ill health for several years past, having seriously impaired his health by close application  to business in Vallejo before coming up here.  For a number of weeks past he had been failing rapidly and loved ones had given up all hopes of his recovery for several days prior to the final dissolution.  Death, resulting from a combination of diseases, came to his relief at 11:15 a.m. of Saturday, the 26th ultimo.  The funeral took place Sunday from the family residence on the east side of Glass Mountain, services being held at 11:45 a.m.  Rev. Jas. Mitchell conducted the services in an impressive manner.  The funeral cortege when it reached the town was joined by members of St. Helena and Vallejo Lodges of Masons and also by a number of the employees of Starr's Mills (Vallejo) who on foot escorted the remains to their last resting place.  The ceremonies at the cemetery were in charge of the Masonic order, B. S. Ward, Master of this lodge, officiating.
   E. T. Starr was born at Greenfield, Huron county, Ohio, August 15th, 1841, and was consequently nearly 46 years of age at the time of his death.  January 1st, 1861, he started for California and settled at Vallejo, Solano county, going into business as a wholesale and retail dealer in groceries and provisions.  He became prominently identified with the interests of that city and was for two terms a member of its Board of Trustees.  He entered the service of his country March 6th, 1864, and was commissioned Second Lieutenant of Company "A," 4th Regiment California Volunteers; was appointed A.A.G., Humboldt District, where he served until his discharge, Nov. 30th, 1865.  He was offered a position in the regular army, but declined.  After his return to Vallejo, he was prominently connected with the great milling firm of Starr & Co.  He moved to St. Helena in April, 1881, purchasing and improving a fine property about two miles above town, where he resided to the time of his death.  He leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss, also four brothers, A. D., A.W., Wm. M and Geo. F. Starr, and other more distant relatives.  All have the sympathy of the community in their great loss.  Mr. Starr was one of nature's noblemen; quiet and unassuming, he possessed a character for sterling honesty and uprightness, and was universally loved and respected by all who knew him.  His loss will be deeply felt by this community.
Notes:  Native of Greenfield, Huron County, Ohio.  Born 15 August 1841, to Orange and Mercy (nee Dubois) Starr.  He was a younger brother to Augustus Washington Starr (see above).  He married Jennie Huldah Green (1847-1941) on 6 March 1867.
   He died 26 February 1887, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 27 February 1887.
 
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant on 17 April 1865 at San Francisco, and was commissioned in Co. A, 4th California Infantry regiment on 22 April 1865.  His obituary notes that he was appointed A.A.G. (Assistant Adjutant General), and spent most of his period of service in Humboldt District.  Mustered out of Co. A, 4th Calif. Infantry on 30 November 1865 at the Presidio at San Francisco, California.
 
infantry
Company A
4th California Infantry



Thomas Stone Stephens
(c.1835 - 1898)
Rank:  Junior Second Lieutenant

Death Notice (Weekly Calistogian newspaper, 29 July 1898, p.3, col. 1):

   T. S. Stevens, a Confederate soldier, died in Pope Valley Wednesday morning.  He was a native of Kentucky, aged 63 years.

 

Death Notice (Napa Daily Journal newspaper, 29 July 1898, p.3, col. 3):

   Thomas S. Stephens, a cousin of J. S. Hardin of Pope Valley, died at the latter's home Wednesday.  Deceased was a native of Kentucky, aged 63.  The cause of death was paralysis.

 

Obituary (St. Helena Sentinal, reprinted in the Napa Daily Journal newspaper, 29 July 1898, p.3, col. 2):

Death of a Pope Valley Pioneer

   Thomas Stone Stephens died at the home of his cousin, R. S. Hardin, in Pope Valley Wednesday morning.  Mr. Stephens was born in Kentucky sixty-three years ago.  He came to California in the early fifties, but returned East at the breaking out of the Civil war.  He enlisted on the Confederate side and was promoted to Captain, serving the greater part of the war under General Price.  After the war he again came to California, settling in Pope valley.  He has made his home for the last fifteen years with R. S. Harding.--St. Helena Sentinel.


Notes:  

   Stephens was born about 1835 in Breckinridge County, Kentucky.  He came to California during the Gold Rush, and is probably the "Thomas Stephens" who appears in the 1860 census as a miner in Washington, Plumas County, CA.  He returned to the South during the Civil War to enlist.  By 1871, he was back in California, listed as a surveyor in San Francisco.  He was a cousin of Robert Stephens Hardin (1822-1899) of Pope Valley, and lived with Hardin from about 1883 to the time of his death.  The family connection was probably through Robert S. Hardin's mother, whose name was Harriet Stone (daughter of Benjamin Stone).
  He died on 28 July 1898 in Pope Valley, Napa County, CA, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery in Lot 25, Block 25.  His grave is unmarked.  


Military Information:  Confederate.  His obituary states that he served the greater part of the war in a unit commanded by Major-General Sterling Price.  This suggests that Stephens may have served in operations in Missouri and Kansas.  He was most likely the same man as Thomas S. Stephens, who served in Capt. R. S. Cumby's Co., South Kansas Texas Regiment, Mounted Volunteers.  This regiment became the 3rd Texas Cavalry in May 1862, and Stephens was assigned to Company B.  The 3rd Texas Cavalry was part of the 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, Army of the West, commanded by General Sterling Price.

   Stephens enlisted as a Private on 13 June 1861, listed as a native of Kentucky, age 29, a resident of Brownsville, TX.  He was elected 3LT on 8 June 1862, serving as Acting Adjutant of the 3rd Texas Cavalry regiment.  He was appointed Junior 2LT on 10 June 1862, listed as 27 years old.  He was captured near Jackson, MS, on 11 July 1863, and was eventually sent to Johnson's Island, OH, as a prisoner of war.  He was transferred to Point Lookout, MD, in 1864 and was exchanged on October 11th of that year.  His parole certificate was dated 13 May 1865.

   In his sworn statement, dated at Gratiot Street Prison (St. Louis) on 8 August 1863, he noted that he was age 29, occupation farmer, resident of Yazoo County, MS, born in Breckinridge County, KY, and that he had 3 or 4 cousins serving in the CSA.  He also stated that he had served under Generals Price, Van Dorn, Beauregard and Johnson, and Pemberton.

 

Return to Quick Index

cavalry

Company B

3rd Texas Cavalry

C.S.A.

(presumed)




James Stillman
(???? - ????)
Rank:  Unknown

Obituary:


Notes:  He is named on the cemetery burial list of 30 May 1883.

Military Information:  Unknown

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Service unknown






Alonzo B. Swartout
(1843 - 1910)
Rank:  4th Corporal
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 12 August 1910):
LAID TO REST.
-----
Funeral of the Late Alonzo B. Swartout.
-----
   The funeral of the late Alonzo B. Swartout, whose death was announced in last week's STAR, was held in St. Helena Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock under the auspices of Pluto lodge No. 130, K. of P.
   The ritualistic service of the order of Knights of Pythias was read by Chancellor Commander, W. D. Mooney, and Prelate, W. J. Blake.  Rev. James Mitchell assisted the order with the last sad rites and spoke feelingly of deceased and his long life of usefulness.
   Alonzo B. Swartout was born at Sanford, New York, April 5, 1841 and spent his boyhood there.  When the war broke out he was living in Iowa and on August 11, 1862, enlisted in the army, being enrolled in Company H, Twentieth Iowa Infantry Volunteers.  He engaged in the following battles:  Prairie Grove, Arkansas, December 7, 1862; siege of Vicksburg, June 11th to July 4, 1863; siege of Fort Morgan, Alabama, from August 10th to 23rd, 1864; siege of Blakely, Alabama, April 2nd to April 9, 1865.  He served under George A. Gray, captain of Company H, and was honorably discharged at Mobile, Alabama, July 8, 1865.  Five months after his discharge deceased crossed the plains with a family by the name of Coons and, upon reaching California, settled in Conn valley, on the old Musgrave place in the Spring of 1866, engaging in farming.  On September 30, 1869, deceased married Miss Martha E. Chord, of Conn valley, and as a result of this union three sons were born -- Charles L. Swartout, of Richmond; Orville F. and Roy J. Swartout, of Oakland.  In the Fall of 1881 deceased moved with his family to St. Helena and bought a home on Charter Oak avenue, now owned by Mrs. M. G. Richie, and resided there 21 years.  Most of the time while a resident of St. Helena he worked at carpentering, but four years he served as Marshal, having been elected to the position twice.  He was a charter member of Pluto lodge, K. of P., also a member of George H. Thomas Post, G.A.R.  For many years he was a member of the local Board of Health and was a charter member and for years captain of St. Helena Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1.
   In October 1906 failing health caused deceased to leave St. Helena and since that time he has made his home with his son Charles, at Richmond, where he passed away August 4, 1910, the immediate cause of his death being Bright's disease.
   Besides his three sons deceased leaves to mourn his loss an only sister, Mrs. Frances E. Drake, of Myrtle Creek, Oregon, and one granddaughter, Ruth Ellen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Swartout.
   Deceased was a kindly man and had many friends.  He was very active in the order of Knights of Pythias and took a great interest in municipal and political affairs during his long residence in St. Helena.
 
Notes:  Native of New York.  He was a resident of Hot Springs Township (St. Helena), Napa County, in the 1900 census.  He was listed as married (22 years), age 56, born June [1843] in New York, parents both born in New York, occupation carpenter.
   He died 4 August 1910 in Contra Costa County at the age of 69, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 7 August.  His grave is marked by a military headstone.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a 4th Corporal on 11 August 1862, at the age of 24.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Jackson, Iowa.  He was mustered into Company H, 20th Iowa Infantry regiment on 22 August 1862.  Mustered out of Co. H, 20th Iowa Infantry on 8 July 1865 at Mobile, Alabama.
   He applied for and received a veterans disability pension in California on 12 April 1895 (application no. 1166523, certificate no. 965827).  His wife, Martha E. Swartout, applied for a widow's benefit in California on 13 March 1911 (application no. 960430, certificate no. 725700).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  H, 20 Iowa Inf.
 
infantry
Company H
20th Iowa Infantry






James Franklin Toland
(1836 - 1881)
Rank: Unknown
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 18 November 1881):
Death of Mr. Toland.
-----
   Mr. Frank Toland died at his home on Howell Mountain at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon, of consumption.  He went there many years ago, an invalid, for his health and has ever since resided at the place well known by his name at the head of the Howell Mountain grade.  The change was too late to restore his health, though his life was undoubtedly much prolonged by the pure air of that healthy locality.  He leaves a wife and several small children.  He was a relative of the noted Dr. Toland of San Francisco.
Notes:  Native of Alabama, born about 1836.  He was the son of Joseph Toland and Mary M. McGee.  Frank's father was a prominent slave holder in Chappell Hill, Texas, before the Civil War.
   Frank J. Toland was enumerated in the 1850 census in Lowndes County, Mississippi, under the household of his father, Joseph Toland.  Frank was listed as age 14, born in Alabama.  Other Tolands in the household were Emily (age 26), Sarah A. (age 17), Robert (age 11), Mary (age 9), Martha (age 9), and Alfred W. (age 1).  A teacher named John Richards (age 22) was also in the household.  J. F. Williamson Toland (age 21) was living in an adjacent hosuehold.
   Frank Toland was enumerated in the 1860 census in Chappell Hill, Washington County, Texas, under the household of his father Joseph Toland.  Frank was listed as age 24, born in Alabama, occupation farmer.  Joseph Toland was listed as age 55, born in South Carolina, occupation farmer.  He was quite wealthy, with real estate valued at $124,000 and personal estate valued at $100,000.  Others in the household were Emily Toland (age 38, born in AL), Mary Toland (age 18, born in MS), Martha Toland (age 18, born in MS), Albert Toland (age 11, born in MS), Emily Toland (age 9, born in MS), Laura Toland (age 6, born in MS), Irene Toland (age 3, born in MS), and Anna Toland (age 6/12).
   Frank Toland married Mary F. Thomas on 21 November 1867 in Clifton, Bosque County, Texas, and by her had the following children:  Robert, Mary Eva, Jesse Thomas, Margaret L., James William, and Julia.  Frank's brother, John F. W. Toland, also married in Bosque County in 1871.
   By 1870, James F. Toland had moved to California where he was enumerated in the census in Rio Vista, Solano County.  He was listed as age 34, born in Alabama, ocucpation superintendant of a grain warehouse.  His household included his wife Mary F. (age 21, born in MO), four white laborers, and three Asian (Chinese) laborers.
   James F. Toland appears in the 1880 census in St. Helena, Napa County, California (Hot Springs Township), listed as married, age 44, born in TN, birthplace of parents not stated, occupation rancher.  His household included his wife Mary (age 31, born in MO, parents born in KY), son Robert (age 9, born in CA), daughter Mary Eva (age 6, born in CA), son Jesse (age 5, born in CA), daughter Margaret (age 4, born in CA), and daughter Julia (age 1, born in CA).  Living nearby was Edwin Angwin, suggesting that Toland was living in the Howell Mountain area, as the obituary indicates.
   J. Frank Toland died in the Howell Mountain area (near Angwin) on 14 November 1881, and was buried in Block E, Lot 4 of St. Helena Public Cemetery.
 

Military Information:  Probably Confederate.  His name appears on the St. Helena Cemetery sexton's list of veterans, dated 30 May 1887.
   His brother, John Francis Williamson Toland, served in Company E "the Dixie Blues" of the 5th Texas Infantry regiment.  The family's history is discussed in the book, "The Confederates of Chappell Hill, Texas" v. 2004, by Stephen Chicoine.

 
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Service unknown







James Ellis Tucker
(1844 - 1924)
Rank:  Color Sergeant
 
Notes:  He died on 24 February 1924 in San Francisco at the age of 79, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 7 November 1947 (over twenty years after his death).  His cremated remains had reportedly been placed in the barrel of a Confederate cannon on a Bourn estate at Broadway in San Francisco over that period of time.  The remains were discovered in a closet or storage room and subsequently buried in St. Helena Cemetery with other family members.  The remains of many members of the Bourne family who are buried at St. Helena were originally interred at Laurel Hill Cemetery in San Francisco.  The were reburied at St. Helena when the Laurel Hill was developed for other uses.
 
Military Information:  Confederate.  He enlisted as a Private at Guinea Station, Virginia, on 17 January 1863, and was mustered into Co. K, 2nd Virginia Cavalry on the same date.
Service information from Historical Data Systems:
Residence was not listed; an 18 year-old Student.
Enlisted on 1/17/1863 at Guinea Station, VA as a Private.
On 1/17/1863 he mustered into "K" Co. VA 2nd Cavalry
He was Surrendered' on 4/9/1865 at Appomattox Court House, VA (Claimed he carried the Regimental Flag at Surrender.)
He was listed as:
* Wounded 6/17/1863 Aldie, VA (In leg while serving as Color Bearer)
* Hospitalized 6/18/1863 Richmond, VA
* Furloughed 8/14/1863 Buckingham County, VA (For 40 days)
* Returned 11/15/1863 (place not stated)
* On rolls 12/31/1863 (place not stated) (Present)
* Hospitalized 3/24/1864 Richmond, VA (With "furnucles on feet and legs")
* On rolls 4/30/1864 (place not stated) (Present)
* Horse killed 5/7/1864 Spotsylvania Court House, VA
* Wounded 5/7/1864 Spotsylvania Court House, VA (In left thigh)
* Hospitalized 5/15/1864 Richmond, VA
* Father requested 7/26/1864 (place not stated) (He be appointed Cadet at Large)
* Returned 9/6/1864 (place not stated)
* Wounded 12/15/1864 (place not stated) (Estimated day, sabre cut on rt shoulder)
* Hospitalized 2/1/1865 Charlottesville, VA (Wounded)
* Hospitalized 2/15/1865 Richmond, VA
* Returned 3/21/1865 (place not stated)
* Oath Allegiance 5/20/1865 Lynchburg, VA (Paroled as Sergt)
Promotions:
* 2nd Lieut (Claimed he was promoted)
* Color Sergt 12/15/1864
Other Information:
born 10/25/1844 in Winchester, VA
died 2/24/1924 in San Francisco, CA
Buried: Episcopal Chap of St Mary Cemetery, San Francisco (Attnd School in Liverpool, England and Switzerland.
Ran Blockade and returned to enlist. Customs Appraiser  San Francisco.)

cavalry
Company K
2nd Virginia Cavalry
C.S.A.







A. W. Wahl
(???? - 1878)
Rank:
Notes:  Same as Louis Wahl?  He was buried in Lot 14 (Potters Field) in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 28 April 1878.
Military Information:  None.  He was noted as "A. W. Wall" in the list of veterans buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery, published in the St. Helena Star newspaper on 6 June 1887.
 
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Service unknown






Aaron W. Waller (Woller)
(1847 - 1886)
Rank:  Musician
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 20 August 1886):
   The funeral of A. W. Waller took place yesterday under the auspices of Kilpatrick Post, G.A.R.

Notes:  Native of Monroe County, Ohio, born October 1847.  Aaron was the son of John Waller and Cynthia Smith (later Burroughs).  The father, John, died in Wayne County, Indiana, in 1857.  Aaron married Amanda C. Allen in Salem, Marion County, Illinois, on 23 January 1869.
   Aaron was enumerated in the 1850 census in Bethel Township, Monroe County, Ohio, under the household of his parents, John and "Cinthe" Waller.  Aaron was listed as "Amer," age 3, born in Ohio.  Aaron appears in the 1860 census in T1S, R7E (Jeffersonville Post Office), Wayne County, Illinois, under the household of his mother, Cynthia "Burris" (age 32, native of Pennsylvania).  Aaron was listed as age 13, born in Ohio, attending school.  The other Waller children (all boys) in the household were Manassa (age 12), Ephraim (age 9), Amos (age 7), and George (age 4).  The household also included 1 year old Mary Burris (Burroughs), Cynthia's daughter by her second marriage.
   Aaron W. Waller  was enumerated in the 1870 census in Lamard Township (Jeffersonville Post Office), Wayne County, Indiana.  He was listed as age 23, born in Ohio, occupation farmer.  His household included his wife Amanda (age 17), and son John D. (age 1 month, born May 1870).
   Aaron Waller was enumerated in the 1880 census in Oakland, Alameda County, California.  He was listed as married, age 33, born in Ohio, parents born in Pennsylvania, occupation carpenter.  His household included his wife Amanda (age 29, native of Tennessee), daughter Evline (age 12), and sons John (age 10), Herbert (age 4), and George (age 1), all natives of Illinois.
   He died 19 August 1886, and was buried in the G.A.R. plot in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 20 August.  Aaron is also known as Louis Waller in some of the St. Helena veteran's lists.  His military headstone lists his name as "Woller," with service noted as Co. K, 120th Ill. Inf.

Military Information:  Union.  Aaron W. Waller enlisted as a Private at Springfield, Illinois, on 24 October 1863, and was mustered into Co. K, 113th Illinois Infantry regiment at Camp Yates, Illinois, on 3 November 1863.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Jeffersonville, Wayne County, Illinois.  At the time of enlistment, he was described as age 17, height 5 ft. 1 1/2 in., hair light, eyes blue, complexion light, occupation farmer, nativity Monroe County, Ohio.  His name appears in the roster for the 113th Infantry as "Aaron W. Walter."  During most or all of Aaron's service with the 113th, his company was assigned to prisoner escort and guard duty.  He later transferred into Co. K, 120th Illinois infantry regiment, where his name appears as "Aaron W. Waller."  He was promoted to Musician during his service.  The 113th Illinois Infantry saw combat in numerous engagements.  It may have been his interest in seeing combat, rather than guard duty, that prompted Aaron to transfer to the 120th.  He was mustered out of Co. K, 120th Illinois Infantry on 10 September 1865 at Memphis, Tennessee.
    Aaron W. Waller's wife, Amanda C. Waller, applied for a veteran's widow's benefit in California on 24 December 188_ (application no. 386066).  No certificate was issued, so the application was apparently rejected.  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  K, 113 Ill. Inf.  Amanda C. Bishop (Aaron's widow) applied as a guardian for a minor's benefit on 6 October 1898 (application no. 683676).  No certificate was issued, so the application was apparently rejected.  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  K, 113 Ill. Inf.  If the applications were rejected, it may have been because of confusion over the spelling of Aaron's name or because of the transfer in his service history.
 
infantry
Company K
113th Illinois Infantry


infantry
Company K
120th Illinois Infantry






Thomas Davis Waller
(1845 - 1917)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 3 January 1918):
VETERAN IS SUMMONED.
-----
Thomas D. Waller Called to His Reward.
-----
   A very sudden death occurred in St. Helena last Saturday morning, when, almost without warning, Thomas Davis Waller, an aged and highly respected citizen, was called to his reward.  Mr. Waller had been in frail health for a number of years and a year and a half ago was compelled to have one of his legs amputated.  In spite of his affliction he was very cheerful, had been able to get about in a wheelchair and was just learning to walk about by using an artificial limb.  Friday afternoon he attended the wedding of a friend near the Sanitarium and enjoyed the occasion greatly.  During the night he was quite restless and complained of pains in his heart, but Saturday morning appeared in his usual health and got out of bed and was lying on the sofa in his home when he suddenly expired.  His devoted wife, his companion of more than half a century, was at his side when the end came.
   Thomas Davis Waller was the son of David Waller, a Wesleyan Methodist minister.  He was born in Hocking county, Ohio, February 23, 1845, having reached the age of 73 years, 10 months, and 5 days.  When 8 years old the Waller family moved to Wisconsin, settling near La Crosse.  In 1864, when 19 years of age, the subject of this sketch went to Madison, Wisconsin, and enlisted in the Federal army.  He served in Company I, 6th Wisconsin Volunteers, until the end of the war.  He suffered severe wounds while in the war and was for eighteen months confined in an army hospital.  At the close of the war deceased returned to Wisconsin and at Victory met Miss Mary N. Wilcox, who a year later became his wife.  For twenty years this estimable couple resided in Wisconsin where five children were born to bless their home.  In 1887 the family moved to California and settled in Fresno.  In 1870 deceased was converted to the Seventh Day Adventist faith and became a most devout Christian and in earnest working member of the church.  In 1880 he entered the ministry in Wisconsin and the remainder of his active life was devoted to preaching the gospel.  Since his retirement deceased and his good wife have resided in St. Helena, near their daughter, Mrs. E. W. Alsberge.  On May 12, 1817, Mr. and Mrs. Waller celebrated their golden wedding anniversary and the many friends of the couple assembled to extend their best wishes and shower congratulations upon them.
   Deceased was a man of splendid traits of character and lived a long life of usefulness.  He will be greatly missed.  Deceased is survived by his widow and two children -- Ernest H. Waller and Mrs. Lotta Alsberge, and three grandsons.  He also leaves one brother, Listen B. Waller and one sister, Mrs. Anna Shishler, who are residents of Wisconsin.
   The funeral, which was largely attended, was held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the Adventist church, Elders S. T. Hare and W. C. White officiating.  The pall bearers were A. W. Gibson, I. James, A. Marolf, T. Rushe, L. Rockwell, and F. O. Pearson.


Notes:  Native of Hocking County, Ohio, born 23 February 1845.
   He died in St. Helena on 29 December 1917, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 30 December 1917.

Military Information:  Union.  Thomas D. Waller enlisted as a Private on 16 February 1864, and was mustered into Company I, 6th Wisconsin Infantry regiment on the same date.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Merton, Wisconsin.  He was mustered out on 10 May 1865.
   Thomas D. Waller applied for and received a veterans disability pension on 28 February 1871 (application no. 163360, certificate no. 153073).  His wife, Mary N., applied for a widow's benefit in California on 28 January 1918 (application no. 1135068, certificate no. 369139).  Military service on the pension index card notes the following:  I, 6 Wis. Inf.
 
infantry
Company I
6th Wisconsin Infantry






Maria (Mrs. Charles M.) Warner
c.1824 - 1888
Rank:  Army Nurse
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 13 April 1888):
Death of Mrs. Warner.
-----
   Mrs. Maria Warner, an old resident of St. Helena, died Tuesday night at 11 o'clock, of dropsy, after a lingering and painful illness.  Mrs. Warner was a lady highly respected, a prominent member of the Relief Corps of this place, and her death is mourned by all who knew her.  The funeral took place on Wednesday at 4 P.M., from the Presbyterian church, Rev. James Mitchell delivering a touching address.
Notes:  Native of New York City, born circa 1824.  Maria and her husband, Charles M. Warner, were enumerated in St. Helena in the 1880 census.  Maria was listed as age 55, born in New York, parents born in New York, occupation "keeping house."  Her husband, "Chas. M.," was listed as age 57, born in New York, father born in Vermont, mother born in New York, occupation painter.
  Maria's husband, Charles, died in Napa at the County Infirmary on 20 January 1892, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery.
   A benefit was given for her in St. Helena on April 6, 1888, by Kilpatrick Corps, No. 12, W.R.C.
   She died on Tuesday, 10 April 1888 in St. Helena, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery.

Military Information:  She was noted on the list of veterans buried in St. Helena Cemetery, compiled on Memorial Day 1887.  Described as St. Helena's "much loved and honored army nurse" in April 1888.
 
army nurse






Conrad Herman Weisker (Weitzker)
(1844 - 1925)
Rank:  Private
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 23 January 1925):
AGED VETERAN ANSWERS CALL.
-----
Conrad Weisker Passes Away After Long Residence in St. Helena.
-----
   Taps have been sounded for Conrad Weisker.  The aged veteran of the civil war and a resident of St. Helena for forty-seven years, passed to the Great Beyond Sunday night.  Mr. Weisker had been in failing health for several years and his death was not unexpected.
   Conrad Weisker was born in Germany, October 5, 1844, and had reached the advanced age of 80 years, 3 months and 13 days when he entered his eternal sleep.  When but eighteen years of age he came to America and found this country in the midst of the great civil war.  On June 8, 1864, this sturdy German lad, less than 20 years old, enlisted in the New York Cavalry, serving until the end of the war, receiving his honorable discharge from the army September 24, 1865.  After the war deceased went to Pennsylvania and in Philadelphia, on November 26, 1870, married Emilie Klett.  To bless this union eight children were born, five of whom have answered the Master's call.  After marriage Mr. Weisker engaged in farming and that has ever since been his vocation.  The family came to California in 1878 and settled in St. Helena and here viticulture engaged the attention of deceased until the infirmities of old age caused him to lay aside the cares and responsibilities of his vineyard.  Deceased was a member of the G.A.R.  He was a quiet, retiring man, but a most honorable and upright citizen, a kind neighbor and friend.  He was honest and industrious and a home-loving man and was held in high esteem by all who knew him.
Notes:  Native of Tanna, Thuringia (Thüringen), Germany, born 5 October 1844.  He was the son of Otto Clement Weisker (Weißker).  His birth name was "Herman Konrad Weissker."
   Conrad appears in the family history, "Beiträge zur Geschichte und Genealogie der Familie Weißker," by Max Adolf Weißker (thanks goes to Jared Weisker for sharing this information with me).  An English translation of the section pertaining to Conrad is presented below (words in italicized text are annotations by D. Enderlin, 2012):

   Herman Konrad (son of 497 [(Otto Clement)])
   A farmer ("Winegrower and manufacturer") in St. Helena, Napa County, California.  Born October 5, 1844, in Tanna.  Married since November 26, 1870 (Philadelphia) with Amalie, born September 19, 1851, in Philadelphia, second daughter of the farmer Friedrich Klett in Philadelphia, later in Santa Rosa, California, who had immigrated from Würtemberg, and Anna Martha, nee Hering.
   After being educated at the "Möllersche Knabeninstitut" (Möller's Boys' College) in Ebersdorf, he became a farmer and worked on some farms as a manager, finally in Schulzendorf in the Neumark.  Because of the imminent levying for military service, he emigrated in 1863 secretly and without the knowledge of his father to the United States of North America and agreed immediately after his arrival to be enlisted in the 13th New York Cavalry Regiment for the war against the southern states.  He took part in two skirmishes at Aldy [Aldie, Virginia] and Fort Slemer [Fort Slemmer, Washington, DC] and in the Battle of Ceaderbreek [Battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia, fought 19 October 1864] and was wounded at the first mentioned place and kept prisoner for 12 hours.  After the end of the war, he first worked in New York and Broklyn (sic) as a cigar maker, was in the milk and grocery business in Philadelphia, but moved to Chicago in 1873, where he was an express wagoner and a gardener.  In 1877 he went to California together with his family, acquired, step by step, a larger tract of land in St. Helena, Napa County, on which he grows wine rather extensively and also presses and cultivates it himself and lives in favorable conditions.  During the Chicago World Fair, he visited Germany.  His wife is a member of the sect of the Baptists.  His children:
a) Frank Henry (701), born October 5, 1871, in Philadelphia; died December 23, 1875, in Chicago;
b) Anna Luisa (702), born January 5, 1874, in Chicago*; died June 29, 1899, in St. Helena of typhoid fever;
c) Edmund Lincoln (703);
d) Rynold Fred Konrad (704), born October 29, 1878, in St. Helena; died there March 3, 1897, of typhoid fever;
e) Lisette ("Lizzi") Wilhelmine (705), born November 2, 1880, in St. Helena.  Maried the "Naturheilarzte" (nature cure practitioner) ... Burke [Benjamin M. Burke].  By summer of 1909, had two daughters, one 3 and the other 1-1/2 years old;
f) Wilhelm Bl... [William Clemens, b. May 1883] (706), construction joiner in Sacramento;
g) Emil R.... [Emil Richard, b. Oct. 1885] (707), wholesale dealer, San Francisco;
h) Francis Henriette (708), born March 1, 1890, in St. Helena, married since July 6, 1909, to Elmer Cox, electro-technician of the "elektrischen Kraft- und Licht- Gesellschaft (electrict power and light company) in St. Helena.

* Cook County Illinois birth registers list the following:  Emma, b. 12 January 1874 in Samuel, mother Amelia Weisker nee Kettel, mother's residence Samuel, father Conrad Weisker occupation peddlar.
   Conrad was a farm manager in Schulzendorf, Brandenburg, Germany, before deciding to secretly leave Germany to come to America.  His decision to leave was probably inspired by growing Prussian expansion and military build-up under Prime Minister Otto von Bismarck.
   According to census records, he immigrated to the United States early in 1864.  He was described in the 1896 Great Register of Voters for Napa County as a farmer, age 51, height 5' 6", complexion dark, eyes blue, hair color mixed, native of Germany, naturalized in the Superior Court of Kings County, NY, on 24 October 1866.
   Conrad Herman Weisker married Emilie (Amelia) F. Klett, daughter of Friedrich Klett and Anna Martha Hering, in Philidelphia on 26 November 1870.  They had eight children:  Edmond Lincoln (b. August 1870), Anna "Annie" Luisa (b. 5 Jan. 1874, d. 29 June 1899), Reynold Fred Conrad (b. 29 Oct. 1878, d. 3 March 1897), Lisette "Lizzie" (b. 2 Nov. 1880, d. 1966), William Clemens (b. May 1883, d. 1977), Emil Richard (b. Oct. 1885, d. 1915), and Frances Henriette (b. 1 March 1890).
   "Conrad Weisker" was enumerated in the 1880 U.S. census in "St. Helena Vicinity," Hot Springs Township.  He was listed as age 36, born in Saxony (as were his parents), occupation farmer.  His household included his wife "Emily" (age 39), daughter Annie (age 6), son Edmond (age 3), and son Reynold (age 1).
   "Conrad Weisker" was enumerated in the 1900 U.S. census in St. Helena, Hot Springs Township.  He was head of a household of seven individuals on his own farm.  Conrad was listed as age 55, born October 1844 in Germany, parents both born there also, occupation farmer.  He was noted as being naturalized, with his year of immigration being 1864.  His household included his wife Amelia (b. Sept. 1851 in PA), son Edmond (b. Aug. 1870 in IL), daughter Lizzie (b. Nov. 1880 in CA), son William (b. May 1883 in CA), son Emil (b. Oct. 1885 in CA), and daughter Frances (b. Mar. 1890 in CA).  Amelia was noted as being the mother of 8 children, 5 still living in 1900.
   Listed as "Conrad H. Weisker," he was enumerated in 1910 census in St. Helena, living on Sulphur Spring Avenue, with wife Emily L.  Conrad was listed as married (1st marriage, 39 years), age 65, born in Germany, parents both born in Germany, immigrated 1864, occupation farmer in a vineyard.  Emily was noted as the mother of 8 children, 4 still living in 1910.
   He died in Napa County on 18 January 1925 at the age of 81, and was buried in Lot 1, Block 21 of St. Helena Public Cemetery on 20 January 1925.  His grave is marked with a military headstone and a family headstone.  The inscription on the military stone is as follows:  CONRAD WEISKER | CO. K | 13 N.Y. CAV.
Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as "Conrad Weitzker" on 8 January 1864 in the 5th Congressional District in the State of New York, at the age of 20.  He was mustered into Co. K, 13th New York Cavalry on the same date.  On 17 August 1865, he was transferred to Co. K, 3rd New York Provisional Cavalry.  He was mustered out on 21 September 1865 at Camp Barry, Washington, D.C.
   According to his obituary, he was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR).  He was most likely a member of St. Helena's Kilpatrick Post, No. 38.  Conrad's original GAR badge (serial number W4575) is still in the family's possession, as well as a Civil War service badge awarded to Conrad by the City of Brooklyn, New York, dated 1866.
 
Conrad Weisker

Conrad Herman Weisker
(
courtesy Jared Weisker)
 
cavalry
Company K
13th New York Cavalry


cavalry
Company K
3rd New York Prov'l Cavalry






Charles Frederick Wentzell
(c.1819 - 1895)
Rank:  Unknown
Notes:  Native of Germany.  He appears in the 1890 Great Register of Voters as Charles Freder. Wentzell, age 68 as of 9 April 1888, native of Germany, residence St. Helena.  He was a member of St. Helena's Kilpatrick Post, No. 38, G.A.R.
   He was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on 5 October 1895.
Military Information:  U.S. Navy.  The index card for his military headstone order indicates that he served aboard the sloop of war U.S.S. Saranac.  The Saranac saw service on the Pacific Coast during the Civil War, protecting commerce along the coast of California.
 
navy
U.S. Navy
U S S Saranac






William W. White
(1834 - 1894)
Rank:  Ship's Mate
Obituary (The St. Helena Star newspaper, 19 January 1894):
Death of William White.
-----
   William White, a sufferer with dropsy for many years, died at his home on Spring street Thursday morning at 5:30 o'clock.
   Deceased was born in Solon, Courtland county, New York, and was 59 years of age last October.  In 1857 he entered the United States Navy as yeoman on the ship, John Adams, being assigned to the East India squadron for three years.  At the end of his service, February 1862, he left the Navy for a little more than a year.  In May 1863, he reenlisted as mate on the U.S. Ship Mahaska, assigned to the North Atlantic squadron resigning his place at New York November 2nd, 1867.  He resided in St. Helena for about fifteen years, following his occupation as house painter until about a year or more ago when he was stricken with inflamatory [sic] rheumatism.  This disease developed into dropsy and through a long illness he suffered great pain.  He leaves a widow to mourn his loss.  The funeral will take place today at 3 o'clock under the auspices of Kilpatrick Post, G.A.R., of which he was a charter member.  Rev. James Mitchell will conduct services at the residence on Spring street at 2:30 o'clock.
Notes:   He died in St. Helena on 18 January 1894, and was buried in the G.A.R. plot of the St. Helena Public Cemetery on 19 January 1894.  His wife, Lucy, is buried in a nearby grave in the same plot.  William's grave is marked with a military headstone.
Military Information:  U.S. Navy.  Service as follows:
John Adams 1857 - Feb. 1862 (Pacific and Far East until outbreak of Civil War).  White left the service about the time that the ship became a training vessel for midshipmen at Newport, R.I., in 1862.
U.S.S. Mahaska May 1863 - 2 Nov. 1867.  White joined the crew of this vessel about the time it left Chesapeake Bay to begin blockade duty at Charleston, S.C.  The ship took part in the bombardment of Fort Wagner, Morris Island, and Fort Sumter in August 1863.  Overhauled in Boston in 1865, then spent the remainder of the war in Florida and Gulf waters.
 
navy
U.S. Navy
John Adams
U S S Mahaska







George W. Williams
(c.1838 - 1887)
Rank: Unknown
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 9 December 1887):
Death of G. W. Williams.
-----
   Last Saturday's train brought the remains of George W. Williams, who died at Turlock, December 1st., to be interred in the cemetery here.  Deceased will be remembered as the conductor of the passenger train, on the Napa valley road several years ago.  He had been running on a train from Needles, and having been taken sick was on his way to San Francisco in company with his wife, when he died.  Deceased was aged forty-eight years and leaves a wife and son.
Notes:  He died at Turlock, California, on 1 December 1887, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 3 December 1887.
Military Information:  Listed as a pensioner (cert. no. 49176) in St. Helena in 1883, wound to the right hand.

flag
Service unknown






Henry Peter Wilson
(1829 - 1905)
Rank: Unknown
Obituary, The Weekly Calistogian newspaper, Friday, April 14, 1905
H. P. Wilson Answers Final Call.
   H. P. Wilson, the well-known harness maker, died at his home in Calistoga about noon Monday after a brief illness of two days' duration.  He was taken ill Saturday night and a physician was summoned early Sunday morning, and while everything was done that possibly could be, death was inevitable, the end coming peacefully and quietly.  Death was due primarily to gastric ulcer and secondarily hemorrhage of the stomach.
   Henry Peter Wilson was a native of Ontario, Canada, and was aged 74 years, 9 months and 29 days at the time of his death.  He first came to California at the age of 19 by way of the isthmus, but shortly returned home and then went to Massachusetts, where he enlisted with the Twenty-second Massachusetts cavalry [error?], serving three years in the civil war.  At the close of the war he returned to Canada, where he married, and then moved to Texas, where he engaged in business.  Three children were born to them -- namely, Anna, Harry and John.  His wife died when the latter was about two years old, and he immediately came to this state and made his home until death.  He located in Calistoga four years ago last December.  He was an industrious, hard working man, and enjoyed the esteem and confidence of the entire community, and his death came as a sad shock to all.
   The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the Methodist church, Rev. O. E. Steward officiating, and the attendance was large.  Interment was made in the St. Helena cemetery.
Notes:   Native of Ontario, Canada.  Information in his obituary indicates he was born 11 June 1830.  More likely, he was born in June 1829.  His wife, who was Canadian-born (maiden name Bonham), moved with him to Texas, where she reportedly died about 1882.
   A Henry Wilson appears in the 1860 census in Tuolumne County (Columbia Post Office).  He fits the description of Henry P. Wilson, so may be the same name.  He was listed as age 30, born in Canada, occupation miner.  He may be the same Henry Wilson who also appears in Tuolumne County at Chilean Camp in the 1850 census, listed as age 21, born in Massachusetts, occupation miner.
   Henry does not appear in the 1880 census, but he was probably in the vicinity of Denison, Grayson County, Texas at the time.  His son, John Clarence Wilson was born there in March of 1880.  Henry's wife reportedly died about 1882 in Texas, prompting Henry to move to California.
   A Henry Peter Wilson appears in the 1890 Great Register of Voters at Mono Lake, Mono County.  He was listed as age 55 as of 9 June 1890, native of Canada.  He is possibly the same man.
   Henry P. Wilson was enumerated in the 1900 census in the Russian River Township (probably Healdsburg), Sonoma County, California, listed as widowed, age 70, born June 1829 in Canada, father born in England, mother born in Scotland, occupation harness maker.  He was naturalized, year of immigration 1850.  Henry's son, John, was also in his household, listed as age 20, born March 1880 in Texas, also working as a harness maker.
   He died on 10 April 1905, and was buried in the G.A.R. plot, Block H, of the St. Helena Public Cemetery on 12 April 1905.  Cemetery records note that he was age 74, a widower, native of Canada, residence Calistoga.  Cause of death was noted as gastric ulcer, physician W. H. Porter.  Henry's son, John C. Wilson, continued to live in Calistoga for a time.  He and his wife were enumerated there in 1910.  By 1918, they had moved back to Healdsburg.
  Henry's son, John Clarence Wilson, was a resident of Healdsburg in 1918, when he registered for the draft.  His occupation was harness maker, working for the firm of Wilson & Maher, residence 333 Johnston Street.  John indicated he was born 18 March 1880.  His wife was Susie Jane.  John also registered for the World War II draft.  He was living in Vallejo, Solano County, at the time, working as an auto trimmer.  He listed his date of birth as 3 March 1880, and birthplace as Denison, Grayson County, Texas.  John died in Napa County on 31 July 1955.  The CDI indicates John was born in Texas on 3 March 1880, mother's maiden name was Bonham.

 

Military Information:  Union.  His obituary states that he served in the 22nd Massachusetts Cavalry, but there was no such regiment (the reference may have been to the 22nd Corps, to which the 2nd Mass. Cav. was attached).  A Peter H. Wilson enlisted as a Private on 9 March 1863, and was mustered into Co. L, 2nd Massachusetts Cavalry on 11 March 1863.  His residence at the time of enlistment was California, occupation Saddler.  He was reportedly 25 years old at the time, which is inconsistent with the estimated year of birth from the obituary.  He was promoted to Saddler Sergeant on 7 December 1863.  Co. L was one of several companies in the California Cavalry Battalion that followed the "California 100" (Co. A) into service at Massachusetts.  The description fits well with Henry Peter Wilson, except that Peter H. Wilson was reported as "killed accidentally in camp at Vienna, Va., May 2, 1864" (source: Records of California Men in the War of the Rebellion, 1861 to 1867).  Other reports list him as a deserter.
 
cavalry







Christopher Columbus Wooldridge
(1840 - 1914)
Rank:  Private

 

Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 22 May 1914):
Death Claims Veteran.
-----
   Christopher Columbus Woolridge [sic], a veteran of the civil war and a pioneer resident of St. Helena, died suddenly at his home on Kearney street Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock.  Mr. Woolridge, or "Doc," as he was familiarly called, had not been well for about two weeks.  Tuesday afternoon he was sitting in his favorite chair when the call came without warning and he closed his eyes in death.
   Deceased was a native of Missouri, aged 73 years, 9 months and 10 days.  He served throughout the civil war.
   He leaves a brother, G. R. Woolridge, and four sisters -- Mrs. A. M. Peyton, of St. Helena; Mrs. M. C. Davis, of Oakland; Mrs. Sarah Rains of Los Banos; Mrs. Elvina Boyton, of Marysville.
   The funeral took place from the residence of Mrs. Peyton Thursday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, Rev. James Mitchell officiating.
Notes:  Native of Missouri.  He was enumerated in the 1910 census in St. Helena on Kearney Street, widowed, age 70, born in Missouri, parents both born in Kentucky, living on his own income.
   He died in Napa County on Tuesday, 19 May 1914, at the age of 73, and was buried in the G.A.R. plot of the St. Helena Cemetery on 21 May 1914.  His calculated date of birth (based on the obituary) was 9 August 1840.

Military Information:  Union.  He enlisted as a Private on 9 August 1862, and was mustered into Co. A, 107th Illinois Infantry regiment on 4 September 1862.  His residence at the time of enlistment was Wapella, Illinois.  He was mustered out on 21 June 1865 at Salisbury, North Carolina.
 
infantry
Company A
107th Illinois Infantry







William H. Worrell
(1842 - 1886)
Rank:  Unknown
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 28 May 1886):
Death of Wm. H. Worrel. [sic]
-----
   A second sudden death, occurring within the week, shocked our community yesterday morning.  Wm. H. Worrell, whose vineyard home is located on Madrona avenue, was apparently as hale and hearty a man as could be found in St. Helena two days ago.  He sat in executive session with the Board of Trustees Tuesday evening, and on Wednesday did a hard day's work in his vineyard.  About nine o'clock in the evening he was taken suddenly ill, and medical assistance was called in.  Everything possible was done to relieve him, but he breathed his last about six o'clock Thursday morning.  Deceased was a native of Ohio, about 44 years of age.  He moved to St. Helena in January, 1885, purchased a vineyard on Madrona avenue and built an elegant residence.  He was an active member of the Board of Trustees and prominently connected with several fraternal societies, among them the Knights Templar.  He was a citizen honored and respected by all, and his death causes a sadness to pervade our whole community.  The Board of Trustees have ordered a flag placed at half-mast over the Town Hall out of respect to his memory.  Mr. Worrell leaves a loving wife and one child -- a daughter; also a brother, Geo. B. Worrell, long a resident of this place, and other relatives, all of whom will find the deepest sympathy in their bereavement.  The funeral takes place to-morrow.  Services at the residence by Rev. W. L. Stephens at 3:30 P.M., and from thence to the cemetery by way of Hudson avenue, in charge of the Masonic fraternity.  Truly, "in the midst of life we are in death."
Notes:  Native of Ohio, born 23 August 1842.  He died on 27 May 1886 in St. Helena, and was buried in St. Helena Public Cemetery on 29 May 1886.
Military Information:  Listed as a veteran in the sexton's list of 30 May 1887.
flag
Service unknown







OTHERS DETERMINED NOT TO BE VETERANS OF THE CIVIL WAR
In the course of researching suspected Civil War veterans at St. Helena, I have discovered that some were not veterans as originally thought.  Those named below fall into this category.  Because the research has been done, I feel that it is worth presenting the results of the research for public benefit.






Bernhard Frederick Winkler
(1847 - 1941)
Rank:  Unknown
Obituary (St. Helena Star newspaper, 11 July 1941):
Passes Away at Age 94
   Funeral services were held Monday afternoon from the Morrison Funeral Home for Bernard F. Winkler, retired Napa jeweler and former St. Helena Sanitarium employe, who died at the age of 94, at a St. Helena convalescent home Friday.  Winkler, who succumbed to a heart attack, had participated in the Pioneer Day celebration at the Sanitarium on June 15, and his picture, with a group of other former Sanitarium employes, was published in the Star a couple of weeks ago.
   A native of Switzerland, he had lived in the Napa valley for 41 years, first in Napa, later in the upper part of the valley.  His wife died in 1915.  He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Ada Randall, of Portland, Oregon, and a son, Ernest F. Winkler, of Kerrville, Texas.  There are 4 grandchildren, and 3 great grandchildren.  Mrs. Randall visited her father several weeks ago.
   Interment was in the St. Helena cemetery.

Notes:  Native of Wuerttemberg (Germany), born 20 April 1847 (according to the CDI).  He was enumerated in the 1870 census in Napa City, Napa County, under the household of Swiss watch maker, Henry S. Amstets.  Bernhard was listed as a jeweler, age 20, born in Switzerland.  Bernhard Frederick Winkler appears in the 1873 Great Register of voters of Napa County, described as age 24, native of Switzerland, occupation watch-maker, residing in Napa.
   Bernhard married Mattie (Martha) A. Nash about 1871 in Napa County.  Their marriage was recorded in Marriage Book A, page 286.  By March 1877, they had moved to Oregon, where their first child, Ada E., was born.
   In the 1880 census, the Winkler family had removed to the City of Walla Walla, Washington.  Bernhard F. Winkler was listed there as a watch maker, age 33, born in Prussia, father born in Prussia, mother born in Switzerland.  His household included his wife Mattie A. (age 28), son Earnest F. (age 6), and daughter Ada M. (age 3).  The household also included a guest named Lilla Savage (age 19).
   B. F. Winkler and his family appear in the 1885 and 1887 Washington Territorial censuses in Walla Walla.  He was listed a jeweler, born in Germany.  His household included his wife Mattie, daughter Ada, and son Ernest.
    In 1900, the Winklers had moved backed to California, and were living in the City of Healdsburg, Sonoma County.  Bernard F. Winkler was listed as age 53, born April 1847 in Germany, father born in Germany, mother born in Switzerland.  He had been married for 29 years.  His year of immigration was listed as 1864.  His occupation was jeweler.  His household included his wife Martha A. (born November 1851 in California).
   Winkler was enumerated in the 1910 census in St. Helena Sanitarium (St. Helena Township), Napa County -- listed as Ben. F.  He was listed as married (for 36 years), age 63, born in Germany, immigrated 1862, occupation clerk in a general merchandise store, civil war veteran.  His household included his wife, Mattie (age 58), who was a California native (parents born in Missouri), mother of 3 children (2 still living).
   Martha A. Winkler died in Napa County on 24 November 1915, at the reported age of 64 (source:  CDI).
   In 1920, he appears in the census living on the Sanitarium road in Lodi Precinct, St. Helena Township (Napa County), with wife (?), Almira.  He was listed as age 72, immigrated 1864, naturalized 1870, born in Wuerttemberg, father born in Saxony, mother born in Switzerland, working as a salesman in a grocery store.  Almira was listed as age 68, born in New Hampshire.
   In 1930, he was again enumerated at the Sanitarium in St. Helena Township, listed as a widower (married when he was 25), age 82, born in Germany, father born in Germany, mother born in Switzerland, immigrated 1864, naturalized, occupation retired jeweler.  He was listed as not being a veteran, which contradicts the information supplied in the 1910 census.
   Bernhard died on 4 July 1941 at St. Helena, and was buried in St. Helena Cemetery on or about 7 July 1941.
Military Information:  He is noted as a Civil War veteran in the 1910 census.  According to Winkler's descendant,  Mrs. G. Jenkins, "as far as the family knows, [Bernhard Winkler] has never been a military veteran.  None of the family stories tell of any such thing and, since many stories were passed along through the family, it is highly unlikely."  Given the information provided by Mrs. Jenkins, I am convinced that the notation made in the 1910 U.S. census was made in error and that Winkler did not serve in the Civil War.






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Dean A. Enderlin
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