Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   
My BEECHER pages Pedigrees ODTs Sources Celebs Annex Gallery
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

My Celebrity Relations

STOWE, Harriet Beecher [1811-1896] -- American abolitionist author

Relationship to me: 3C7
BEECHER family Outline Descent Tree(s) ODT
Contents:

HARRIET BEECHER STOWE is a name that will live as long as there are lovers of freedom and haters of slavery in our broad land or the world. She is the third daughter and sixth child of Rev. Dr. Lyman Beecher and Roxanna Foote, and was born in Litchfield, Conn., 14th of June, 1812. Her mother died when she was but four years old. Two years more, and her father brought a gentle step-mother, whose influence was excellent upon the future writer. Harriet was sent to a famous academy in her native place at the age of seven, and continued there till twelve. She was a diligent reader, even at that early age, and the novels of Sir Walter Scott were among her favorite books. She profited greatly by the instruction given in the art of composition, and in her twelfth year was appointed one of the writers for the annual exhibition. "The question proposed was, 'Can the immortality of the soul be proved by the light of nature?' in which she took the negative. 'I remember,' says she, 'the scene, to me so eventful. The hall was crowded with all the literati of Litchfield. Before them all our compositions were read aloud. When mine was read, I noticed that father, who was sitting on the right of Mr. Brace, brightened, and looked interested; and at the close I heard him say, "Who wrote that composition?"—"Your daughter, sir," was the answer. It was the proudest moment of my life. There was no mistaking father's face when he was pleased; and to have interested him was past all juvenile triumphs.'" [Twentieth Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans]

During residence in Cincinnati (1833-50) she became an ardent abolitionist; encouraged by her brother and her husband, she wrote Uncle Tom's Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly, first serialized (1851-52) in the antislavery paper, the National Era, Washington, DC, and in book form in 1852. The book became an important factor in solidifying sentiment in the North against slavery and making the issue a moral one; It had much to do with precipitating the Civil War.

Among her other works:

Dred, A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp
1856
The Minister's Wooing
1859
The Pearl of Orr's Island
1862
Oldtown Folks
1869
"The True Story of Lady Byron's Life"
Atlantic Monthly Sept 1869. She aroused much criticism with this article, in which, based on information provided her by Lady Byron, she charged Lord Byron with incest with his sister Augusta.

The links below are but a small sampling of the huge number of references on the web.  -30-
 

Bookmarks (off-site links)

Bookmarks:2002-10-12 11:16:08

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
image related to subject

Services

visitors /~dav4is/people/BEEC114.htm
Uploaded: 2014-09-05 22:44 
data errors | external links | FAQ | Celebs help
site help
Colophon description
-fin-
© 1998, 2017
Roderic A. Davis, 2nd
All Rights Reserved
Email: Rod Dav4is
 dav4is@YAHOO.com
Snail:
 Celebrities, et Cetera
 c/o Rod Davis
 The Manor at Woodside
 168 Academy St. #221
 Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
 USA
Search celebrities pages
[HOME]
[INDEX]
(to this folder)

[TOP]
(of this webpage)
Monitor page
for changes

it's private
powered by
ChangeDetection