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HISTORY OF HANOVER TOWNSHIP AND WYOMING VALLEY

Luzerne County, Pennsylvania
By: Henry Blackman Plumb, 1885, 498 pp.
Robert Baur, Printer and Stationer, Wilkes-Barre, PA

Website Compiled By: James H. Culbert


DESCRIPTIONS OF THE OLD HANOVER HOMES STANDING ABOUT 1840
ALONG THE BACK ROAD, pp. 365-375

This page last updated: 28 Jun 2009

Note: Additions to the information found in Plumb's History of Hanover are shown below in red text.

The Back Road descriptions start with the LUEDER house.  Christian Frederick LUEDER built this house, and lived here, and reared a large family of children, and died in 1832.  The house is situated on a corner - the Back Road at this time beginning here at the cross-road that came from the Middle Road to the LUEDER house.  The Back Road runs from here north-east.  Christian F. LUEDER, the son, resided here - (all the rest of the family having gone away, the most of them to the West) - and also raised a large family of children, and died here in 1873.  It belongs to a coal company and is a tenant farm-house.  This is on Lot No. 22 of the Hanover First Division.

The next house is on the right.  It was the Polly PELL house.  She left it about forty-five years ago and it has since been a tenant-house.  The old house has been replaced by a plank house within the past ten years.  It belongs to a coal company. 

The next is the George KOCHER house on the right.  This has been only a tenant-house for nearly fifty years.  It belongs to a coal company.

Next on the left were some houses built by HOLLAND and HILLMAN for miners' houses, while they were mining here from 1840 to 1847.  One or two of them are still standing and in use.

The next house was on the left on the cross-road leading to the Middle Road, and was the old George SORBER house.  He reared quite a large family here; sold it and died about 1860.  There has been no house there since.  The old Back Road made a turn here to the right, taking this cross-road up a very steep hill to the top of it, then turning again to the north-east.

On the top of the hill on the right was a house belonging to Jacob RUMMAGE.  It was always a tenant-house, but rotted down about 1850.  This is on Lot No. 15, First Division.

The next house was the old Jacob RUMMAGE house on the right.  He reared a family of six children, and died here in 1835.

The next was his son Jacob's, on the same farm on the left.  He had two houses here.  He died here in 1858, leaving only three children that grew to maturity and married.  They sold the farm and left in 1860, and these were only tenant-houses afterward.  This is now part of the Warrior Run Mine property.  The old houses have been replaced by many miners' houses since 1865.  This is the western end of Sugar Notch borough.

The next house is on the right.  It was the old MOCK house, became the property of John ROBINSON, descended to his daughter, Mrs. Hendrick B. WRIGHT.  The WRIGHTs leased it to the Warrior Run Mining Company in 1864.  The old house was replaced by a plank house about 1859, and has now a large number of miners' houses around it, some of them belonging to private parties, but mostly belonging to the company - A.J. DAVIS & Co.  These and those on the RUMMAGE lot constitute the mining village called Warrior Run.

The house next on the right is the Harry BLACKMAN house.  It was built about 1830.  He had a large family of children and died here in 1843.  The widow lived here for many years after.  It is now a miner's tenant-house and belongs to a coal company.

The next is on the left on the cross-road about forty rods from the Back Road, and was the old Elisha BLACKMAN house.  This was about the first house built on or near the Back Road.  He died here in 1845, after rearing six children, four of whom went West.  His daughter, Julia Ann BLACKMAN PLUMB, was born here and always lived here.  The old houses have been torn down and removed, and a new and more modern one erected on the site of the old.  This is the residence of H.B. PLUMB and his mother.  There have been built on this place since 1867 ninety-six dwellings, thirty-six belonging to H.B. PLUMB, thirty-two to Robert BAUR, of Wilkes-Barre, and the remainder to other private individuals.  This place is locally called Plumbtown and Plumbton.  The railroad companies call their depots here Warrior Run.  This is on Lot No. 12, First Division.

The next is on the left, the old John GARRISON house.  He sold out and removed about 1838, and the house became a tenant-house.  The old house was replaced by a new one about 1850.  It is a tenant-house and belongs to a coal company.

The next house is on the right, the Josiah BENNETT house.  He reared a large family of children here, who all left the paternal home as they became of age.  He died here in 1857.  Since then it has been a tenant-house.  It belongs to a coal company.  This is on Lot No. 29, First Division, one of the public lots.

The next house was the BUNNY or BURNEY house on the right.  It went to decay after BUNNY left it, as long ago as 1855.  No house was rebuilt there.  The property belongs to a coal company.  It is on Lot No. 14, Second Division.

The next house is on the left.  This was the Ishmael BENNETT property.  He reared a large family, and removed to Ohio about 1816, when a very old man, after selling the property to James STERLING.  STERLING died in a few years, and about 1838 the property was sold to Samuel HOLLAND, and since then this has been a tenant-house.  It belongs to a coal company.  It is on Lot No. 21, Second Division.

The next house is on the left, the Peggy STERLING house.  It stood a few rods north of the RUDOLPH house.  This last was burned previous to 1825.  In later times Joseph RINEHIMER owned the property, and then John FREED

The next is on the right.  This was the Ashbel RUGGLES house.  He removed to the West in 1843.  The property belonged to Josiah BENNETT till his death in 1857, then to John FREED.  It still stands, the house and surface owned by private parties, near the present school building at Sugar Notch.  All the property along the road belonged to a coal company.  Their own mine houses are here, and they have sold lots - on the surface only - for building, to many private parties who have built houses on them.  This is the upper or eastern end of Sugar Notch borough as far as to the old Garrison cross-road, and contains in this part a population of probably 1500 people or more.

On the right, some twenty rods up in the woods was a house.  Mr. WRIGHT lived there and probably owned it in 1840.  Afterwards it belonged to Conrad LINE, and then to Henry BURNEY.  It went to decay about 1850 and tumbled down.  It was never rebuilt.  It belongs to a coal company.

The next is on the right.  This is the RIMER house.  RIMER removed to the West about 1843 and it has been a tenant-house ever since.  The property belonged to C.B. FISHER for many years, but has belonged to a coal company since 1855.

The next house is on the right.  It is the old Cornelius GARRISON house.  After GARRISON's death in 1825, this house belonged to his daughter Rachel, afterwards, about 1840, married to William STAPLETON.  The property was divided into lots by STAPLETON and sold, except the small lot on which the old house stood.  This he willed to his niece, the wife of Thomas ROACH.

The next is on the left at the corner of the GARRISON cross-road.  This was the Andrew SHOEMAKER house.  He sold out about 1838 and removed.  The house still stands, with a plank addition to it, is a tenant-house and belongs to a coal company.

On the cross-road to the left some forty or fifty rods was the Jacob GARRISON house.  He removed to the West in 1842, and the house was a tenant farm-house until about 1856, when the shaft at Sugar Notch was begun.  The old house stood and was occupied until within about ten years.  It has been replaced by a large double miners' tenant-house.  It belongs to a coal company.  This is the extreme eastern end of Sugar Notch borough, as the Jacob RUMMAGE property is the extreme western end of it.

On the right, up in the notch of the Little Mountain, was the house of John ROBINS.  He died in 1831.  The family soon after left it, and for many years it was a tenant-house.  Peter MENSCH lived in it.  Elias CAREY lived in it, and many others.  It rotted down about 1855.  It belongs to a coal comapny.  The Sugar Notch reservoir is there now.

The next is on the left.  This was the old Abraham ADAMS house, afterwards known as the KNOCK or KANOCH house.  KNOCK died in 1828, and the property descended to his heirs in Germany, his children here having all died before himself.  The old house and barn were allowed to rot down, a new tenant-house having been built near by.  It is owned in Germany and leased to a coal company.

The next was on the right.  This was the PRESTON house.  Here lived Darius PRESTON until his death about 1842.  His son, Williston PRESTON, lived here till about 1857, when he removed to Wilkes-Barre.  It is now burned down, but it was a tenant-house and belonged to a coal company.

The next house was on the left.  This was the SAUM house and still stands.  The heirs of John SAUM sold out about 1854 and removed to the West.  Since then this has been a tenant-farmhouse and belongs to a coal company.  This is on Lot No. 10, First Division.

The next on the left belonged to SAUM and was a tenant-house from the first.  It still stands, is occupied, and belongs to a coal company.

The next was also on the left.  This was the Comfort CAREY house.  He died about 1837, and his son, John CAREY, lived in this house after him until about 1843 he sold the place to John DAVIS, and removed with his whole family to the West.  The house was then a tenant-house until it was burned down, about 1860.  This is the south-western side of Ashley borough, and now has many houses, built since 1870, on both sides of the road and back to the foot of the mountain.  Many of these houses belong to private parties and not to a coal company.  This was on Lot No. 8, First Division.

The next is on the left of the above, towards the north-west, in the fields on the same lot, No. 8.  It still stands and is occupied as a tenant-house.  John CAREY lived here before his father Comfort died, then soon afterward he sold it to William RICHARDS.  RICHARDS sold out and went West.  Since then it has only been a tenant-house.  It belongs to a coal company.

The next house is on the right.  This was one of three similar houses; the next on the left near Solomon's Creek, and the third one on the road toward the foot of the mountain.  They belonged to the HUNTINGTONs, were just alike in build and were all three painted green.  This was known afterwards as the "COOK Estate," and is held by a benevolent institution in Philadelphia, by the will of the last of the COOKs, with a provision that it shall never be sold.  There are a large number of houses on this property now.  It is within Ashley borough.

The next house was on the left.  It was the old Daniel KREIDLER house.  It has long been torn down and replaced by a better one by hisdaughter, Susan M. (KREIDLER) FREDERICK, and her husband, Charles FREDERICK.  FREDERICK and wife have resided here since 1848.

On the right, up the mountain on the Hazleton Road, there was a tavern in the gap at the head of the lower plane.  This was the house of Israel INMAN.  He reared a very large family of children here, and sold out and went West about 1840.  The house was famous in its time - during the building of the L. & S. railroad, and during the existence of turnpike travel to the cities by way of Hazleton and Tamaqua, all after 1840.

The first old house across the railroad or foot of the plane on the right was Christian KEYSER's.  He built it and lived there till about 1855, when they went West.  The house belongs to the heirs of Robert H. JOHNSON.  JOHNSON lived in it until his death, about ten years ago.

The next was on the right of the Main Road where the Hazleton Road turns off up the mountain.  This was built by Valentine KEYSER, the father of the former, on land leased of Joseph DAVIS.  KEYSER and his wife both lived and died here in 1847. [Note: Valentine's wife, Catherine SAUM KEYSER, died in 1859.]

On the left on the cross-road, the first house was Joseph BARNES'.  This house had replaced an older log-house on the same site about 1823.  About 1867, the hill to the south of this house (on the side of which the house stood) was partly cut down or off for the Ashley shops, and the house was soon afterwards torn down to be out of the way.  BARNES and his family went West about 1850.  This is on Lot No. 6, First Division.

The next beyond on the same cross-road is John A. CAREY's house.  He built it about 1835 or 1836, reared a large family of children, and still lives here with his wife.

The next also on the cross-road, and on the left across the creek was Isaac FREDERICK's house.  He sold out and went West, about 1855.  This has been a tenant-house since.  The Lehigh Valley railroad runs almost over it.

Beyond the above-mentioned house to the left but back in the fields probably more than forty rods from the cross-road is the old HANNIS house.  It was built by John HANNIS, and he and his wife both died here.  The sons and daughters, all grown up and married, sold out and went West about 1855.

The next house on the main road was on the left and was Fritz DIETERICK's tavern.  He kept the tavern many years and left it about 1847.  Then it was a store and dwelling for many years.  E.P. LYNCH had a store there from 1847 to 1849.  Lewis LANDMESSER had a store there in 1855 to 1859, and others afterwards until it was burned down in 1880.

The next was on the left, being the Samuel PEASE house.  PEASE died in 1846, a very old man over 86 years of age.  The house stands there yet and has been a tavern since about 1855.

The next on the left was a log-house, built about 1838 by Nicholas LANDMESSER.  He went West about 1850, and afterwards the house stood there as a tenant-house, until it was torn down a couple of years ago.

The next was on the right, just beyond the road that goes to the BLACKMAN Mines - the Back Road here - stood the house of Daniel HARTZELL.  This was part of Lot No. 3, First Division.  It stood back a little in the field, but has been moved to the street and repaired and still stands, now quite a respectable looking house.  This was the last house within Ashley borough on this road or street.  This street and others parallel, to the right and left and numerous cross streets all the way from Comfort CAREY's and further, to Daniel HARTZELL's and the line of the lot beyond it, are now quite closely built up with houses - all along the streets and hills and hollows on either side, and filled with a population of some four thousand now - 1885.

The next is nearly opposite the GILBERT house, and is on the left.  It is Daniel FREDERICK's house.  He built it about 1834, and has lived there ever since.  It at first stood back some rods from the road, but it has been moved to the road and enlarged and is now a pretty house.  The old people lived here in their old age very comfortably.

The next house was on the right.  This was Luman GILBERT's.  It was a log-house and stood till within a few years past.  The old people and the young ones went West about 1860.  It was a tenant-house after the GILBERTs left.

The next house was on the left.  This was the cabin of Phebe WILLIAMS.  She died about 1849 or 1850, and then the log cabin was about ready to fall down from age and decay.  It has long ceased to exist.

Nearly opposite on the right was the house of William ASKAM.  He left it and went West long ago.  As early as 1854, Lewis KOONS owned it.  It still stands, and was long a tenant-house, but it is not inhabitable now and is ready to be torn down, to make room for a better one.

The next house was Thomas BROWN's, on the right.  BROWN built a house on the Back Road that goes to the BLACKMAN or FRANKLIN Mines, and left this, and soon after sold out, and about 1855 went West with his whole family.  Anthony SCHAPPERT bought this old house about 1855, and added to and improved it, and lived there till his death in 1872.  His son, Michael SCHAPPERT resides there now.  This house adjoins the Wilkes-Barre line, and is on Lot No. 1, First Division.

Robert KILMER had a house and cabinet shop on the left, opposite the BROWN house about 1847 or earlier.  He sold out and left about 1861-2.  The house and shop were used for the same business for some years after, but the property has long since been cut up into building lots, and the old house and shop are gone.

Almost all of the land along the Back Road from Sugar Notch - and below - up to the Wilkes-Barre line belongs to a coal company, but the company has sold off building lots on the surface and now from the lower or south-westerly line of Ashley borough to the north-easterly line of Hanover township is now filled with houses, on the hills and hollows on each side, with parallel and cross streets.  From the north-eastern line of Ashley to the north-eastern line of Hanover (the Wilkes-Barre line) is called Newtown.  This is a thickly populated part of Hanover township.


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