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Wadd, Frederick John
[18??-19??] In 1909, a 21-year lease was made between Halifax High School for Girls at Savile Hall, Halifax and Wadd and Arthur Willson Cross.

At the end of the lease, Wadd and Cross considered buying the school

Waddington
[Surname]

There are currently around 24 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Waddington. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Waddington, Albert Remon
[18??-19??] Curate at Saint Thomas the Apostle, Claremount [1898]

Waddington & Bayes
In 1861, Walker Waddington and Albert Benjamin Bayes bought the publishing business Samuel Ward Walton. This included the Todmorden Post.

In 1869, they published the Todmorden & District News

Waddington & Company
Worsted spinners at Stone Dam Mill, Halifax [1905]

Waddington & Haigh
Stone quarrying company at Cinder Hill, Siddal [1880]

Waddington & Sons
Aka W. Waddington & Sons: Printers, stationers, newsagents and publishers established by Walker Waddington.

They were at New Road, Mytholmroyd [1905], 26 Pavement, Todmorden [1905], and 28 Rochdale Road [1917].

They published the Hebden Bridge & District News [1907] and the Todmorden & District News [1917]

Waddington & Woodhead
Worsted spinners at Copley. Partners included Joseph Waddington and William Woodhead.

The partnership was dissolved in November 1881

Waddington's Dress Warehouse
9 Rawson Street, Halifax. Built in 1900 by Joseph Harold Waddington on a plot of land which he bought in Rawson Street.

Since 1951, the Rawson Street building has been occupied by Harvey's of Halifax.

See Renette Studios, Halifax

Waddington, Ely Wilkinson
[1853-1???] Gent. Son of Joshua Waddington.

On 11th March 1875, he married Eliza Ann, daughter of James Farrar

Waddington, Henry
[1580-1640] He lived at Smith House, Brighouse in 1634.

In 1???, he married Mary Brooke at Birstall

Waddington, Henry
[17??-18??] Of Southowram.

He married Unknown.

Children: Mary [1887-1909] who married James Bottomley Watkinson

Waddington, J.
[1855-1927] Todmorden printer and publisher, and newspaper proprietor. The firm published the Todmorden News & Advertiser

Waddington, James
[1717-1784] Manufacturer of Halifax.

Uncle of John and Joseph Watkinson. of Watkinson Hall.

On 27th March 1750, he married Mary Ramsden [1720-1799] from Illingworth.

Children: (1) James [1751-1756]; (2) John [1753-1782].

The family lived at Hope Hall, Halifax [1756].

He died 18th September 1784 [aged 67].

In his will, he bequeathed £50 to the Leeds Infirmary, and

to 84 poor persons the sum of 40 guineas

and left £5 per year for 10 years to purchase books for the Halifax Sunday schools.

The epitaph on the family memorial in Halifax Parish Church is recorded in the book Monumental & Other Inscriptions

Waddington, Jeremiah
[1636-1692] Of Sowerby.

Heywood records that

[he was] buried [at Sowerby] Feb 9 1691/2 and left his son to Josiah Stansfeld

Waddington, Job
[1838-1889] Son of William Waddington, weaver.

Born in Sowerby.

He was a warehouseman [1861, 1871, 1881].

In [Q3] 1861, he married Hannah Kenyon [1842-1890] at Halifax Parish Church.


Hannah was the daughter of Samuel Kenyon, cordwainer.

She was a bobbin winder [1871]

 

Children: (1) Charles [b 1862] who was a mill hand [1871], a woollen under carder [1881]; (2) Mary Ann [b 1864] who was a woollen weaver [1881]; (3) Sarah Ann [b 1865] who was a woollen feeder [1881]; (4) Kenyon [b 1868] who was a worsted doffer [1881], a silk dresser [1891]; (5) Joe; (6) Susannah [b 1874] who was a silk winder [1891]; (7) Selina [b 1878] who was a worsted mill hand [1891], a milliner and living with brother Joe [1901].

The family lived at Sowerby [1871]; Wood Lane, Sowerby [1881]; Sowerby Green, Sowerby [1891]

Waddington, John
[1579-1660] Of Hipperholme.

In 1611, he married Rosamund Watson.

Children: (1) Samuel; (2) Mary [16??-1732] who married Henry Gill

Waddington, John
[17??-18??] On 3rd September 1814, he placed a notice in The Leeds Mercury
Whereas, I, John Waddington of Hipperholme, cordwainer, did on the 22nd day of August 1814, violently assault and abuse Sarah Mallinson, the wife of Stephen Mallinson, of Hipperholme, for which an action was commenced against me, but in consideration of my acknowledging myself a defaulter, and advertising it once in the Leeds Mercury and paying all expenses, has thought proper to shew me this lenity – as witness by my hand

Waddington, John
[18??-18??] Marine store dealer at Bradford Road, Brighouse [1861]

Waddington, Joseph
[1???-1???] Of Bailiff Bridge.

He had a carpet shop on Bradford/Huddersfield Road, opposite the Firth's Carpets, for many years.

His son succeeded him in the business.

Contributor Dave van de Gevel writes

I remember him calling into Firth's on a regular basis to buy roll-ends

Waddington, Joseph
[18??-18??] Licensee of the Punch Bowl, Bailiff Bridge.

In July 1873, he bought the pub from H. W. Ripley for £3,570

Waddington, Joseph
[1872-1???] Son of Job Waddington.

Born in Sowerby.

He was a painter [1891]; a painter & decorator [1901]; a house decorator, sign writer, paperhanger, &c. at Penny Bank Buildings, Tuel Lane, Sowerby Bridge [1905].

In 1898, he married Frances Sarah Hitchen [1873-19??] in Halifax.

Children: Hilda [b 1901].

The family lived at 4 Tuel Lane, Sowerby Bridge [1901]; Penny Bank Buildings, Tuel Lane, Sowerby Bridge [1911]

Waddington, Joseph Harold
[1866-1945] Born at Mile Thorn.

He began work as an apprentice draper. In 1900, he bought a plot of land in Rawson Street where he built Waddington's Dress Warehouse. He was Mayor of Halifax [1924-1925]

In 1939, he published a booklet Essays and Addresses which described shops, shopping and shopkeeping in the town. He was a Methodist lay preacher. He was a long-serving and well-known Councillor and was the Father of the Town Council when he died [16th January 1945].

In [Q2] 1894, he married Mary Dawson [1868-19??] from Brighouse, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Dorothy [b 1896]; (2) Marjory [b 1899]; (3) Hilda [b 1900]; (4) Beatrix [b 1902]; (5) Kathleen [b 1903]; (6) Winifred [b 1906].

The family lived at 22 Palatine Square, Burnley [1911]

Waddington, Joshua
[1???-1???] Gent.

He married Unknown.

Children: Ely Wilkinson

Waddington, Joshua
[18??-18??] In May 1858, he opened a Turkish bath at Boddy's Buildings, Halifax

Waddington, PC Anthony
[1790-1862] Born in Hipperholme.

He was a cordwainer [1841].

In 1854, he became the first policeman in Brighouse with responsibility for the township of Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse.

In 1856, he left the post and was succeeded by PC Greenwood.

He married Lusey [1788-18??]. He was a widower by 1861.

Children: (1) Timothy [b 1821]; (2) Lucy A. [b 1829] who became a dress maker; (3) Mary [b 1830]; (4) Susey [b 1831]; (5) Sarah A. [b 1832] who became a dress maker.

The family lived at Thornhill Briggs, Brighouse [1851]; Brighouse Lane, Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse [1861].

See Towser, Brighouse and Waddington vs Waller

Waddington, Samuel
[1623-1???] Son of John Waddington.

In 1647, he married Unknown

Waddington, Samuel
[1784-1830] He was landlord of the Black Swan, Brighouse [1822, 1829].

In 1807, he married Jane Goldthorp [1779-1860] at Hartshead.

Jane succeeded Samuel at the Black Swan [1834, 1841, 1845].

Children: (1) Sarah Ann [bapt 1809]; (2) Samuel [bapt 1811]; (3) Elizabeth [bapt 1816] who was a farmer [1841]; (4) William Edward [bapt 1818] who was a currier [1841]; (5) Mary [bapt 1821]; (6) John [bapt 1823] who was a corn miller [1851].

The family lived at Daisy Croft, Brighouse [1851].

Living with them in 1841 were Isaac Walker [aged 50] John Sutcliffe [aged 25].

Samuel and Jane were buried at Hartshead Church

Waddington, Sarah
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner at Rudclough Mill, Erringden [around 1800]

Waddington, Thomas
[1797-185?] Born in Sowerby.

He was a cordwainer [1850] [1851].

He married Betty [1799-18??] born in Sowerby.

Children: (1) Susan [b 1830] who was a worsted reeler [1851] and married Joseph Whiteley; (2) Elizabeth [b 1836] who was a worsted doffer [1851]; (3) Sarah Ann [b 1839] who was a worsted doffer [1851].

The family lived at Stansfield Mill, Sowerby [1851].

Living with them in 1851 were daughter Susan, her husband Joseph Whiteley and daughter Hannah.

In 1861, the widowed Betty was living with daughter Susan and her husband Joseph Whiteley

Waddington, Thomas
[18??-19??] Bus proprietor.

He lived at Moorfield House, Wainstalls [1905]

Waddington vs Waller
In July 1854, at the Nisi Prius Court, PC Anthony Waddington of Brighouse claimed that, in 1848, Abraham Waller had begun paying attention to his daughter, Miss Waddington, a milliner. Waller promised marriage until 1850 when the girl became pregnant. The child lived only a fortnight. Waller was forbidden to the visit the Waddington's house, although he was allowed to visit the girl in the hope that they would marry. In 1853, she again became pregnant. Waller refused to marry the girl and claimed that he had supported the children. The jury found for Waddington and awarded £50 damages

Waddington, Walker
[1830-1911] From Bingley. He moved to Todmorden around 1855. He worked for Samuel Ward Walton. He moved to Mytholmroyd [1857]. In 1861, he and Albert Benjamin Bayes bought Walton's business.

He was a Methodist; a teetotaller; a non-smoker.

He was head of Waddington & Sons.

He lived at New Road, Mytholmroyd [1911]

Waddoup
A variant of the surname Widdop

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Waddoups
A variant of the surname Widdop

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Waddup
A variant of the surname Widdop

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Wade...
The entries for people with the surname Wade are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Wade
[Surname]

There are currently around 50 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wade. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Wade family of Halifax
William Wade was an early member of the family.

The family is discussed in the book Yorkshire Pedigrees

The Wade family of Shelf
See High Bentley Hall, Shelf

Wade & McGrath
General pattern makers at Halifax. Recorded in 1905, when they were at Cross Hills, Halifax

Wade Bridge, Luddenden
Bridge over Luddenden Brook. Earlier known as Riding Bridge. Mentioned in 1705. The early wooden bridge was replaced by a stone bridge. There are stepping stones across the brook

Wade's: Fred Wade (Booksellers & Stationers) Limited
Halifax. Established by Fred Wade in 1926.

The shop in Rawson Street was built in 1926, and occupies the southern end of the west wing of Somerset House

Until 19??, the company used to have its own library with

All the latest novels and a courteous staff always willing to help in the choice of a book.

Exclusive service at a low subscription

The business is now run and owned by Wade's daughter, Mrs Jennifer Pell

Wade House, Shelf
Around 1700, the house is mentioned several times by Oliver Heywood in his diaries.

Victoria Mills was built near to the house on its land by Moses Bottomley, across from a mill pond. When the mill was renovated in the late 20th century, much of the mill and the house were knocked down with only the gatehouse remaining. After renovations by Moses Bottomley, the house became known as Norwood House – see Norwood House Gate House.

Owners and tenants have included

The house burned down in the early 1980s and was demolished.

The name is retained in Wade House Road, Shelf

Wade's: Josiah Wade Limited
Printing machine makers at Dunkirk Mills, Halifax. Established in 1862 by Josiah Wade and his brother Edwin. They published the Hebden Chronicle.

In 1867, they moved to premises in Well Lane, Halifax. Their Arab printing machine was used throughout the world.

As business increased, the company's works moved around the district. In 1874, they moved to Crown Works, Halifax. In 18??, they moved to Hope Works, Halifax. In 1903, they bought Dunkirk Mills, Halifax.

The business closed in 1959

Wade Manufacturing Company Limited
Worsted coating manufacturers at Dunkirk Mills, Halifax [1905]

Wade Wood, Luddenden
Kell Brook joins Luddenden Brook here to flow down and join the Calder at Luddendenfoot.

There are remains of charcoal burning circles in the wood.

See Jerusalem Farm, Luddenden and Wade Bridge

Wade Wood Reservoir, Luddenden
On Catty Well Beck, Luddenden

Wade's: Z. & W. Wade
Quarry owners and public works contractors at Trimmingham Quarries, Halifax [1936]

Wades, Metellus
[1848-1929] Born in Warley/Wainstalls.

He was a master tailor [1891].

He married Elizabeth Ann Hall [1849-1???] from Sowerby, in Halifax [Q3 1870].

They lived at 21 Sowerby Street, Sowerby Bridge [1891].

Living with them in 1891 were niece Sarah Hannah Shaw [aged 19] and visitor Mary Edith Gertrude Shaw [aged 7].

He died in Rochdale [Q1 1929]

Wadilove, John
[17??-1796] Hatter in Halifax

Wadsworth
High moorland township north of Hebden Bridge – towards Old Town – lying between the townships of Stansfield and Midgley, and including Crimsworth, Old Town and Pecket Well.

See Population and Parish statistics

Wadsworth...
The entries for people with the surname Wadsworth are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Wadsworth
The surname is recorded in 1274, and Thomas de Waddisworth is recorded at Midgley in 1314.

The name originated in Wadsworth.

There are currently around 72 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wadsworth. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Wadsworth family
Richard de Waddesworth is recorded at Wadsworth in the 14th century.

See Holdsworth House, Holmfield

Wadsworth & Fairbank
Cotton-doublers of Elland. In 1907, they acquired Whitwell Mill, Elland. The firm closed in 1930

Wadsworth Banks Farm, Mytholmroyd
Raw Lane. Timber-framed house cased in stone and extended in the 17th century

The coiner Robert Thomas lived here.

See Old Castle, Wadsworth

Wadsworth Banks, Hebden Bridge
The coiner John Pickles lived here [1769]

Wadsworth's Camera Exchange
In 1919, this was at 65 North Parade, Halifax, and the Principals were J. and W. Wadsworth.

They were also Principals of W. Richardson & Son at the same address

Wadsworth Club Houses
Old Town. A group of 6 early 19th century club houses which were built as an investment by a local funeral club. Some of the houses are 2 storeys, the others are 3 storeys. The upper storey was used as a communal weaving shop and each cottage had an internal communicating door on each floor.

From 1863, services were held here before Old Town Methodist Chapel was built

Wadsworth constables
The Foldout lists some of the people who have served as Police Officers in Wadsworth

Wadsworth Co-operative Store
The Wadsworth branch of the Hebden Bridge Co-operative Society opened in 1868

Wadsworth's: G. Wadsworth & Son
Wholesale and retailer dealers in oils and paints.

Partners included John Wadsworth.

Recorded in 1881 at Portland Street, Northgate, Halifax

Wadsworth's: Henry Wadsworth & Son
Makers of commercial vehicles at Thomas Street, Halifax. Established by Henry Wadsworth and his son Robert.

The property there is dated HW AD 1870.

Recorded in 1878, 1900 and 1923.

An advertisement for the business in 1900 announced

Sole Manufacturers of Wadsworth's Patent

Street Watering, Sanding and Sweeping Machines, Road Scrapers, Snow Ploughs, Tip Vans, Tip, Tumblers and other kinds of Sanitary Carts

Wadsworth's: J. Wadsworth & Sons
Cabinet maker, upholsterers and furnishers at 68 & 70 King Cross Street, Halifax [1934]

Wadsworth's: James Wadsworth & Sons
Joiners and cabinet makers at Southowram and King Cross Street, Halifax. Established in 1875 by James Wadsworth

Wadsworth's: James Wadsworth & Sons
In 1925, they bought land at Bank Top, Southowram from Herbert Mellor and built Bankfield Gardens and The Crescent

Wadsworth's: Jeremiah Wadsworth & Sons Limited
Smiths, screw makers, machinists, wheelwrights and trailer manufacturers. Established by Jeremiah Wadsworth. They were at Oldham Road, Ripponden [1895-1938] and Lower Dyson Lane Mill, Rishworth [1950s]

See Miles Wadsworth

Wadsworth Lanes
A hamlet at Wadsworth.

See Upper Needless, Hebden Bridge

Wadsworth Law
A cairn which marks the boundary of the Wadsworth township.

See High Brown Knowl, Wadsworth

Wadsworth, Manor of
In Domesday Book this was one of the 9 berewicks belonging to the Manor of Wakefield. It appears there as Wadesuurde.

The manor was held by the Earls of Warren, Jordan de Thornhill, the Thornhill family, Sir George Savile, the Savile family, and the Earl of Scarbrough.

See Hebden Bridge Mill and Manor House, Hebden Bridge

Wadsworth's: Mary Wadsworth's Charity
In 1793, Mary Wadsworth gave the rents and profits from land and property at Jack Hey, Sowerby to be distributed on the first Sunday in May and the first Sunday in November to poor residents of Sowerby.

See John Taylor Ramsden

Wadsworth Mill
Area of Todmorden

Wadsworth Mill Lock, Todmorden
Lock #20 on the Rochdale Canal. Built 1798 by William Jessop and William Crossley. It has a double set of bottom gates to take the 57½ ft long vessels of the Calder & Hebble Canal

Wadsworth Moor
Moorland above Hebden Bridge.

Limers' Gate passes across the moor.

In 1750, William Cockcroft obtained rights to bore for coal on Wadsworth Moor.

There are 2 prominent circular ventilation shafts for the underground water conduit linking Widdop reservoir to Halifax. These are about 10 ft high, and were built by John Frederick La Trobe Bateman.

On 12th December 1936, an RAF bomber crashed on the moor, killing three of the crew and injuring the fourth.

Wadsworth Moor Murder

Wadsworth Parish Council
The Parish council has 9 seats.

See Parish of Wadsworth

Wadsworth Post Office
Chiserly

Wadsworth Royd Farm, Wadsworth
Aka Wadsworth Royd.

Owners and tenants have included

Recorded in 1854

Wadsworth's: Samuel Wadsworth & Son
Joiners and builders established in 1830. They were at Carlton Street and Bull Close Lane, Halifax [1916]

Wadsworth Surveyor of the Highways
Those who held the post of Surveyor of the Highways for Wadsworth included:

Wadsworth's Tea Rooms, Hebden Bridge
In 1906, the Mrs Dyson Wadsworth advertised her Tea Rooms at Gibson Wood Cottages, Hardcastle Crags, offering
picnic and other parties catered for ... home-fed hams

Wadsworth United Football Club

Wadsworth War Memorial
The obelisk remembering those who died in World War I and World War II - a landmark on Smeakin Hill overlooking Hardcastle Crags – is a memorial to those of Wadsworth parish who died in the two World Wars.

Popularly known as Little Stoodley Pike

It was unveiled on 23rd September 1923.

When this site proved to inconvenient and difficult to reach, a second memorial was built at Pecket Well

Wadsworth Workhouse
A workhouse is recorded at Clough Head around 1750. This was discontinued in 1770.

See Todmorden Union Workhouse

Waff'n Fuffen Band
See Faff & Fuffun Band

Wager, Harold
[1906-19??] Son of Morton Wager.

He was a geologist

Wager, Lawrence Rickard
[1904-1965] Son of Morton Wager.

Born in Batley.

He was educated at his father's school in Hebden Bridge and at Leeds and Pembroke College Cambridge.

He married Phyllis Margaret Worthington [b 1912].

Children: (1) son; (2) son; (3) daughter; (4) daughter; (5) daughter.

He was a member of the 1930-1931 Watkins Greenland Expedition which was looking into the feasibility of a Britain-Canada air route. 2 of the 7-man expedition died – including 23-year-old G. H. Watkins, the leader. His wife accompanied on a later expedition in 1935.

In 1933, Wager climbed Mount Everest to a [then] record height of 1000 feet of the summit. On 10th November 1933, The King presented him with a Polar Medal

Wager, Morton Ethelred
[1871-1939] He was the first headmaster of Hebden Bridge United District Secondary School [1909].

He married Adelina Rickard [1876-1939].

Children: (1) Lawrence Rickard; (2) Harold

Waggon Farm, Soyland
Near Greave Head, Soyland.

Owners and tenants have included

Waggott, Gina Louise
[1980-] Amateur poet, dramatist, and screenwriter born in Halifax. In 19??, she founded Seldom Shakespeare, an amateur production company, to encourage British scriptwriters. She lives in Bristol. She has stuttered/stammered since childhood, and sits on the board of the European League of Stuttering Associations [ELSA], and the European Disability forum

Waghorn's: C. Waghorn Limited
Brass manufacturer at Garfield Brass Works, Halifax. In 1925, they were authorised to manufacture and certify standard water fittings

Wagner, Richard
[1813-1883] His son, Siegfried, married Winifred Williams Klindworth [1897-1980] who was a friend of Miss E. M. Scott, headmistress of Brighouse & District Girls' Secondary School. Two daughters of Siegfried and WinifredVerena and Friedelinde – attended the School in the 1930s

Waid, Thomas
[17??-1???] Coiner. He was imprisoned at York Castle [18th October 1769]

Wailes, William
[1???-18??] Newcastle artist who produced some of the stained glass at All Souls', Haley Hill. The west window of the south aisle, which Akroyd gave to his workers, tells the story of the Good Samaritan

Wainhouse
[Surname]

There are currently around 35 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wainhouse. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

See Wainstalls

The Wainhouse family
They lived at Scar Bottom House, Halifax

Wainhouse, Dr Alfred
[1811-1853] Halifax surgeon.

Son of Mr Wainhouse.

He lived at 3 Paradise Street, Halifax [1845]; High Street, Halifax [1853].

In June 1853, he was in a depressed state of mind and bought 2 ounces of tincture of opium from James Bancroft, a druggist. He took all the tincture and went to bed. He died the following day.

On 1st July 1853, an inquest heard that

he was a surgeon but without practice, of somewhat eccentric habits, and a bachelor, and had been had been in a depressed state of mind

No blame was apportioned to James Bancroft as he had quite legally sold the drug, which was commonly administered and used as a remedy for pain and sleeplessness.

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery with Ellen and Amelia, 2 daughters of his brother Thomas Wainhouse

Wainhouse & Rigg
Dyers at Halifax [1809]

Wainhouse Charity
Sowerby. In his will dated 1686, Edward Wainhouse bequeathed the rents from 2 cottages at Style, Sowerby to be given at Christmas to the old and the poor of Sowerby. The will also left money to the poor of Norland

Wainhouse, Edward
[16??-1???] Of Skircoat.

He married Unknown.

Children: Elizabeth [16??-1714] who married Thomas Rigge

Wainhouse, Edward
[16??-16??] He established the Wainhouse Charity.

See Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby: Benefactions

Wainhouse, Edward
[16??-1713] He lived at Willow Hall.

In 1686, he bequeathed land and cottages in Norland for the poor

Wainhouse, Edward
[1715-1746] Of Broadgates. Son of John Wainhouse.

He married Judith.

In his will dated 29th June 1746, he bequeathed

a messuage called Beestingly Lane, in Stainland, to his wife Judith and her heirs for ever, chargeable along with his personal estate with the payment of his debts and funeral expenses. In the event of his wife having a child, he devised to such child his messuage called Broad Gates, a messuage called Mearclough Bottom, with dyehouses, etc., a water corn mill called Mearclough Bottom Mill, Trimmingham, Allan Gate and an old cottage near Broad Gates; but in case he should leave no children, then to his wife for life, subject to certain payments to his sisters Elizabeth, Martha, Ann, and Sarah, and after his wife's decease he disposed of his estates among his said sisters

He was buried in Halifax Parish Church

Wainhouse, Edward
[1774-1852] Son of Mr Wainhouse.

He became a stuff merchant. He had business at Number 1 Horton Street, Halifax.

He lived at Holly House, Ward's End.

On 27th August 1804, he married Frances Anne Nicholson [1782-1829] in Wakefield.

Children: (1) son; (2) William; (3) John Edward; (4) Mary Dorothy who married Rev Samuel Danby; (5) daughter; (6) daughter.

He was a subscriber of Warley Grammar School

Wainhouse, Elizabeth
[18??-18??] Milliner and dress maker.

She lived at Norland Hall [1845]

Wainhouse Folly
Wainhouse Tower is sometimes known by this name because it was never used for its intended purpose – as a chimney

Wainhouse, Herbert
[1851-1863] Son of Jonathan Calvert Wainhouse.

He was a pupil at Rishworth School.

In April 1863, he drowned whilst he and a group of boys were bathing in a dam or pool at Rishworth

Wainhouse, James
[1791-1863] Born in Norland.

He was Overseer of the Poor for Norland; a reed maker [1818]; a farmer [1841, 1851, 1856]; a farmer of 33 acres [1861]; a commission agent for healds and slays.

In 1854, he – along with Ely Smith and Edmund Hallawell – were sued for £43 12/- by William Eagle Bott, a civil engineer, for services rendered to the town of Norland for which Hellawell, as surveyor, and Wainhouse and Ely, as overseers, were liable. They were sent to York Castle, as insolvent debtors, where Ely died [1855].

In April 1856, he was was recorded as out of business and his creditors were paid 1½d in the pound.

In 1818, he married Mary Atkinson of Norland, at Halifax Parish Church.

Mary died between the census of 1831 and 1841.

Children: (1) Elizabeth [b 1819]; (2) John [b 1821]; (3) Harriet [1825-1893] who married James Stafford.

The children were baptised at Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge.

The family lived at Norland Hall [1841, 1845] [1851]; Upper Norland Hall, Norland [1861].


Question: There is a possible confusion of the various halls in Norland here. Please email me if you can clarify where James lived and when

 

His unmarried sister Susey / Susan [1796-18??] was living with James [1841, 1851, 1861]

Wainhouse, John
[1???-1???] He married Ann, daughter of Abraham Crowther

Wainhouse, John
[16??-1692] Yeoman of Pye Nest. He owned Brockwell.

In 16??, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Cockett.

Children: (1) Martha; (2) Mary; (3) Susan; (4) Sarah; (5) John; (6) Abigail.

He was killed by his horses as he was returning from delivering a load of pieces at Leeds

Wainhouse, John
[16??-17??] He married the daughter of Richard Hindley.

On his death, Hindley left Washer Lane House, Halifax to his daughter

Wainhouse, John
[16??-1700] A clothier.

He married (1) Sarah, daughter of Samuel King, or In 1681, he married (2) Sarah Greenwood.

Children: (1) John; (2) Michael; (3) Nathaniel; (4) Mary who married Richard Towne.

His wife brought her family's Trimmingham estate as her dowry. In 1674, he bought Broadgates and Mearclough Bottom Mill from Abraham Crowther. John inherited Broadgates

Wainhouse, John
[16??-1705] There is an inscription in Halifax Parish Church
here lyeth the body of John Wainehouse of Halyfax, who departed this life 7 Jun 1705

Wainhouse, John
[1684-1725] Son of John Wainhouse.

He inherited Broadgates and made alterations to the property.

On 9th September 1714, he married Mary Oldfield [1692-1737].

Children: (1) Edward; (2) Elizabeth [1715-1782] who married Japhet Lister; (3) Mary [1720-1778]; (4) Ann [1723-1797] who married Mr Wood; (5) John [bapt 1724]; (6) Sarah [bapt 1725]; (7) Martha.

Members of the family were buried in Halifax Parish Church

By his will of 12th August 1725, he ordered

that his wife Mary should have her full thirds out of his real estate in lieu of dower. In case his wife should have a son after the date of his will, such son or sons to have a messuage in Warley called The Cliffe, in the possession of Isaac Smith, and one other messuage in Warley in the possession of John Crowther. If no such son be born, then all the said messuages and all other his messuages, as well copyhold as freehold (subject to certain charges), to his son Edward. [Wife Mary and brother-in-law Thomas Oldfield, exors]. If his son Edward and such after-born son died before 21, then he devised his capital messuage called Broadyates to his daughter Elizabeth; His messuage at Mear Clough Bottom, the cottages and mills there, to his daughter Martha; Trimmingham and Allon Gate to his daughter Anne; And all his messuages in Warley to his daughter Mary for life, and after her decease to her eldest son

Wainhouse, John
[1810-1881] Of Halifax.

He married Elizabeth [1808-1855].

John was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 3365] with Nathaniel Wainhouse

Wainhouse, John Edward
[1817-1883] Son of Edward Wainhouse.

Born in Halifax.

After his mother's death [1829], he was raised by his aunt Hannah and uncle Robert Wainhouse. He started work at Robert's dye-works in Washer Lane.

When his uncle died [1856], John Edward inherited the business, becoming owner of the Washer Lane Dye Works. He did not involved himself with the business, but left this to Henry Mossman. He sold the business to Mossman [1873].

He was listed as a proprietor of houses [1851, 1861] and a landowner / following no occupation, and an employer of 60 men and some boys [1871].

An Obituary Notice said

He was well known as a large property owner who paid great attention to the improvement of his tenant's dwellings

He was responsible for the construction of Wainhouse Tower and the houses of Wainhouse Terrace.

He was described as an intellectual and literary, and a noted pamphleteer.

He was well-educated and widely travelled, and he developed a special fondness for decorative architecture. The elaborate cupola of Wainhouse Tower is the most famous example of this.

He was Chairman of the Skircoat Board of Surveyors with responsibility for the highways in the district.

He built his own house West Air on Washer Lane, next to the land of his rival, Sir Henry Edwards – see The Edwards-Wainhouse feud.

He never married. He was the last of the local Wainhouse family. His estate passed to the family of his sister, Mary Dorothy.

He lived at Denton Hall, Otley [1851]; 44 Grove Street, Leamington Priors, Warwickshire (a lodging house) [1861]; West Air.

He died at West Air [26th July 1883].

He was buried at Holy Trinity Church, Halifax.

See Scarr Bottom Cottages, Pye Nest

Wainhouse, Jonathan Calvert
[1816-1885] Son of John Wainhouse, stuff manufacturer. Born in Warley.

He was a bookkeeper of Duke Street [1839]; a book keeper / a warehouseman [1841]; a clerk (spinners & manufacturer merchants worsted) [1851]; a clerk at worsted factory [1861]; a clerk (worsted manufactory) [1871]; a retired book keeper [1881].

In 1839, he married Fanny Giles [1815-1876] at Saint Peter's, Leeds.


Fanny of Bowman Lane, was the daughter of Aaron Giles, a clothdresser
 

Children: (1) Sarah Hannah [b 1841]; (2) Elizabeth [1844-1902] who married Henry Calvert; (3) Herbert; (4) Walter [b 1852] who was a clerk (worsted manufactory) [1871], a commercial clerk (worsted) [1881].

The family lived at Acorn Street, Leeds [1841]; 42 Green Hill, Halifax [1851]; 7 Mount Pleasant, Halifax [1861]; 54 Alma Street, Halifax [1871, 1881].

Living with them in 1841 were Elizabeth Nussey [aged 30] (dressmaker) and Henry Nussey [aged 5].

Jonathan died 6th April 1885.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £2,433.

His will was proved by son Walter

Wainhouse, Mary
[17??-174?] She was the first wife of William Walker

Wainhouse, Michael
[1???-1684] Owner of Binroyd, Norland. He cased the timber farmhouse in stone and decorated it with fine plasterwork.

He was buried at Halifax Parish Church

Wainhouse, Michael
[17??-1???] In 1767, a letter to him told of the arrest of coiner Daniel Greenwood in Germany.

In November 1769, he attended the enquiry which had been called by the Marquis of Rockingham to discuss the problem of the coiners and the murder of William Deighton.

Wainhouse, Michael
[17??-17??] He married Martha [1719-1797].

Children: (1) Richard [1749-1750]; (2) Edward [1755-1756].

Members of the family were buried at Halifax Parish Church

Wainhouse, Mr
[17??-1???] He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Edward; (2) Robert

On 26th April 1772, Robert son of John Wainhouse was baptised at Sowerby Bridge and on 4th October 1772, Robert son of Nathaniel Wainhouse was baptised at Sowerby Bridge


Question: Does anyone know whether this man was John or Nathaniel?

 

Wainhouse, Mr
[17??-18??] He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Thomas; (2) Alfred

Wainhouse, Nathaniel
[1???-18??] He was landlord of the White Hart, Halifax [1822, 1829] and the Upper George Hotel & Posting House, Halifax [1834]

Wainhouse, Nathaniel
[1802-1872] Of Halifax.

He was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 3365] with John Wainhouse

Wainhouse, Richard
[1???-1760] Of Halifax.

In 1745, he inherited property in Rawdon, Leeds, from his uncle Christopher Emmott. He changed his name to Emmott.

He married Unknown.

Children: Richard [17??-1819] who never married.

A niece of Richard (junior) - called Susannah Emmott – married George Green of Harley street, and assumed the name Green-Emmott. They had a son: Alfred Edward Green-Emmott

Wainhouse, Richard
[16??-17??] Of Pye Nest.

On 10th May 1704, he married Mrs Power

Wainhouse, Richard
[17??-17??] Of Halifax.

In November 1769, he attended the enquiry which had been called by the Marquis of Rockingham to discuss the problem of the coiners and the murder of William Deighton.

Wainhouse, Robert
[1???-18??]

Recorded in 1822, when he was an ironmonger at Northgate, Halifax

Wainhouse, Robert
[1773-1856] Son of Mr Wainhouse.

He was a Commissioner of the Court of Requests [1828]; Surveyor of the Highways for Skircoat [1835]; a merchant [1841]; a Commissioner of Land & Assessed Taxes [1845]; a Commissioner of Property & Income Tax [1845]. He owned the Washer Lane Dye Works.

On 2nd June 1795, he married Hannah Emmet [1771-18??] in Halifax.

They had no children.

The family lived at Sapling Grove, Halifax [1849].

On his mother's death in 1829, his nephew John Edward Wainhouse went to live with the couple.

John Edward inherited Robert's business.

He was one of the subscribers to John Horner's book Buildings in the Town & Parish of Halifax [1835].

See Wainhouse Road School, Halifax

Wainhouse's: Robert & William Wainhouse
Cotton spinners at Wharf Mill, Sowerby Bridge [1806]. The mill at that time was known as Wainhouse Mill. They were still at the mill in the 1830s

Wainhouse, Son & Sutcliffe
Dyers at Washer Lane, Halifax [1809]

Wainhouse Terrace, Halifax
King Cross. A terrace of small back-to-back houses built by John Wainhouse [1876]. The square tower housed a spiral staircase to link the upper and lower levels. There is an elaborate 200 ft long balcony at the rear.

Although unoccupied, the terrace was saved from demolition when surrounding terraced houses made way for redevelopment and road-widening in November 1972.

The terrace was cleaned in 1973.

The building is still unoccupied.

In March 2008, the property was sold to developers for £76,000

Wainhouse, Thomas
[18??-18??] He was a nominee for the Northowram Board of Guardians [1869].

He lived at Lee House, Shibden [1869].

See The Halifax Courier

Wainhouse, Thomas
[1815-1886] Son of Mr Wainhouse.

In [Q4] 1839, he married Ellen Appaulina Lewthwaite [1818-1885] in Halifax.


Question: Does anyone know whether Ellen Appaulina was related to other Lewthwaites in Halifax?

 

Children: (1) Julia [1842-1907] who married Alexander Blackwood Boal; (2) Robert [1843-1877]; (3) William [1845-1848]; (4) William [1848-1877]; (5) Ellen [1850-1932]; (6) Amelia [1852-1937]; (7) Nathaniel [1854] who died aged 7 days.

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery. Daughters Ellen and Amelia are buried with their uncle Alfred Wainhouse

Wainhouse Tower, Halifax
The 280 ft high tower built by J. E. Wainhouse in 1871 dominates the Halifax skyline

Wainhouse, William
[1807-1825] Eldest son of Edward Wainhouse.

He died at Frankfurt-am-Main in Germany, and was buried at the Peterkirche there

Wainhouse, William Henry
[18??-19??] Councillor for Halifax Pellon ward [1894]

Wainman, Mary
[1707-1788] On 10th October 1769, she became the first Halifax postmistress at an annual salary of £60 3/4d.

Her nephew, William Bagnold, became postmaster around 1788.

She was buried inside Halifax Parish Church

Wainsgate, Old Town
Area of Wadsworth.

Wainsgate Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge and Wainsgate Lane, Hebden Bridge

Wainstalls
District of Calderdale to the north-west of Halifax

Wainstalls Cricket Club
Established in 1050.

Their grounds were near the Cross Roads pub, Mount Tabor.

The club closed in 2005.

See Halifax Cricket Association

Wainstalls House
Aka Wainstalls Lodge. Originally called simply Wainstalls, the property gave its name to the area.

The name means a place where wagons are kept

Owners and tenants have included

Wainstalls Industrial Co-operative Society
The headquarters at Castle Carr Road were built in 1881

Wainstalls Library
Recorded in 1929 as Wainstalls Branch Library. At that time, it was only open on Wednesday evenings.

Recorded in 1936

Wainstalls Orphanage, Warley

Wainstalls Post Office
Recorded in 1905 at 23 Kell Butts, Wainstalls when Stephen Greenwood was sub-postmaster

Wainwright & Son
Wholesale confectioners and paper bag merchants.

Established by Ernest C. Wainwright.

They were at 2 Saint James's Street, Halifax [1905] and Gladstone Road, Halifax.

The Gladstone Road premises burned down in 19??

Wainwright & Turner
Sugar boilers at Todmorden [1905]

See Turner & Wainwright

Wainwright, Ernest Clair
[1873-1942] Born in Halifax.

He was a wholesale confectioner and paper bag merchant at 2 Saint James's Street, Halifax [1905]; a wholesale confectioner & dealer [1911]. He established Wainwright & Son at Gladstone Road, Halifax.

In [Q3] 1898, he married Sarah Elizabeth Priestley [1874-19??] from Halifax.

Children: (1) Percy Clair [b 1901]; (2) Marjorie E. [b 1905]; (3) Geoffrey [b 1908]; (4) Ernest Kenneth [b 1910].

The family lived at 10 Saint James's Road, Halifax [1911].

He died in Bradford [Q3 1942]

Wainwright, George
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner at Kebroyd Upper Mill [around 1800]

Wainwright, George
[18??-19??] JP. In the 1930s, he gave Ellen Royd, Elland for use as Elland Library

Wainwright, George
[1871-1952] Son of Mr Wainwright.

Born in Southowram.

He was employed at the Halifax Co-operative Society; a Brighouse councillor.

In 1896, he met John Henry Turner, and they established Turner & Wainwright

In [Q4] 1892, he married Lilly Culpan [1871-19??] from Halifax.

Children: (1) Lillian [b 1900]; (2) Edward [b 1904]; (3) John [b 1907].

The family lived at 16 Halifax Road, Brighouse [1911].

Living with them in 1911 was widowed father-in-law John Culpan [aged 75].

George died in Huddersfield.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at more than £54,000

Wainwright Hall, Elland
Jepson Lane. Public hall used for social and other functions

Wainwright, Job
[18??-1851] In 1846, he married Mary Ann, daughter of John Skelton, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Jane [b 1847]; (2) Thomas [b 1849].

In 1851, Jane and Thomas were living at their grandparents' home in Skircoat.

Job died in 1851.

In September 1855, Mary, Jane and Thomas, together with Mary's mother and other members of the family, sailed from Liverpool to New York aboard the Albert Gallatin.

In 1870, they were living in Chicago

Wainwright, John William
[1921-] Born in Leeds. After World War II, he joined the Police and served for 20 years in Elland, Brighouse and Clifton before becoming a writer

Wainwright, Mr
[1???-18??] He was a waggonman for Pickford's.

On 30th June 1844, he was injured when a coach in which he was travelling, driven by William Smith, overturned as it entered Brighouse. He was unable to work for 13 weeks and brought a case against Mr Mallinson and Isaac Walker, who had been involved in organising the coach and the excursion. The case was tried at the Spring Assizes at York in March 1845, and the jury found for Wainright, awarding him 40/- damages

Wainwright, Mr
[18??-1???] He married Unknown.

Children: (1) George; (2) Louisa [1874-1946] who married Joseph William Bushell [b 1879]

Wainwright, Sally
[1964-] Writer. She grew up in Sowerby Bridge and went to Sowerby Bridge High School.

She has produced, devised and written scripts for many TV dramas.

Some of these have been set and filmed locally, including Unforgiven, Last Tango in Halifax, The Last Witch, Dead Clever: The Life and Crimes of Julie Bottomley, and Sparkhouse.

She now lives in Oxford

Waite, Miss E.
[18??-19??] She and Miss A. Schelp ran Halifax Girls Grammar School in the early 1900s

Waite, John
[16??-16??] Aka Wayte. Vicar of Halifax around 1645. He complained about the poor infecting the town during the bubonic plague in 1645.

See Mr Cranidge

Waite, Joseph Thorp
[1870-19??] Elder son of Dr William Waite.

On 1st February 1899, he married Hilda Mary, daughter of Frederic Smith, at Lightcliffe Congregational Church

Waite, William
[1829-1907] Medical practitioner in Halifax [1895].

He married Ellen Elizabeth [1840-19??] from Halifax.

Children: (1) Sarah Gertrude [b 1867]; (2) Ellen Clare [b 1868] who married Dr John Frederic Gill; (3) Joseph Thorp; (4) William Herbert [b 1874].

The family lived at 1 Park Road, Halifax [1887, 1891, 1901, 1911]

Waites, Joseph
[1827-1898] Son of John Waites [1801-1???] from Richmond, Yorkshire.

Born in Richmond, Yorkshire.

He was a vault man [1871]; landlord of the Bridge Tavern, Halifax [1874, 1881]; landlord of the Stafford Arms, Halifax [1891, 1894].

In 1855, he married Isabella Armstrong [1831-1892] born in Leek, Westmorland, in Halifax.

Children: (1) John William [b 1855] who was a rag stitcher [1871]; (2) Margaret Isabella [b 1857] who was a worsted spinner (operative) [1871] and married [1878] Frederick Newsome; (3) Elizabeth [b 1867]; (4) Clara [b 1870].

The family lived at 3 Schofield's Court, Halifax [1871].

Living with them in 1881 was Joseph's widowed father John Waites

Wake, Father Bernard J.
[18??-1???] Parish priest at Saint Mary's Catholic Church, Gibbet Street [1882-1892].

In 1891, he recommended that a Catholic branch mission be established for Hebden Bridge and Luddendenfoot. Father Maximilian Tilliman was appointed as the first parish priest for Hebden Bridge and Luddendenfoot

Wakefield, A. B.
[18??-1???] Of Hipperholme. Recorded in December 1888, when he delivered a series of lectures at the Brighouse & District Radical Association. His topics included

  • The Hereditary Landed Aristocracy [4th December 1888]

  • The State Church [11th December 1888]

  • The Franchise & Taxation [18th December 1888]

  • The Unemployed & Emigration [8th January 1889]

  • Our Colonies: Their Climate, Soil, Produce & Emigrants [15th January 1889]

The Wakefield & Halifax Journal
The name of the Halifax Journal from 1811. Mr R. Hurst was the publisher [1814]

Wakefield Bank, Southowram
Another name for Old Bank, Southowram

Wakefield Court Rolls
The court rolls for the Manor of Wakefield.

These are published by the Yorkshire Archæological Society

Wakefield, Rev G. T.
[18??-1914] Born in Sheffield.

Minister at Cross Lanes United Methodist Chapel, Hebden Bridge [1884-1891]. He left in July 1891.

He married Hannah Mary [1859-1931].

Rev Wakefield died in Leeds [4th September 1914].

Hannah Mary died 26th July 1931 (aged 72).

The couple were buried at Cross Lanes United Methodist Chapel, Hebden Bridge

Wakefield Gate
Ancient packhorse route from Wakefield passes Bailiff Bridge, Lightcliffe, Hipperholme, Watergate, over Place Bridge, through Mytholm, along Halifax Old Road, left up Dark Lane, over Beacon Hill, Whiskam Dandy down Old Bank, across Clark Bridge, around Halifax Parish Church, up Causeway and Woolshops, and into Halifax.

The road then continues west out of Halifax, up Gibbet Street to Highroad Well, Newlands, Luddenden, Midgley, Mount Skip, The Lanes, Hebden Bridge and on towards Burnley as the Long Causeway.

Daniel Defoe wrote:

We quitted Halifax not without some astonishment at its situation, being so surrounded with hills, and those so high as makes the coming in and going out of it exceedingly troublesome, and indeed for carriages hardly practicable, particularly the hill which they go up to come out of the town to the east towards Leeds, which is so steep, so rugged, and sometimes so slippery, that, to a town of so much business as this, it is exceedingly troublesome and dangerous

The route was superseded by the Halifax Old Road / Shibden Hall Road and the Wakefield & Halifax Turnpike of 1741, and then by the road through Godley Cutting which was constructed in 1824-1830, now the A58

Wakefield, Gilbert
[1912-19??] of Hipperholme.

He served as a driver in North Africa during World War II, delivering ammunition to the front line.

After the war, he and his brother ran a light haulage business.

He lived with his elder sister Anne, neither ever having married, behind Lee's Buildings at Hipperholme.

He was a well-known and much-loved character in the village

Wakefield, Manor of
Around 1121, the Manor of Wakefield was granted to the Earls of Warren – possibly because of The First Earl's support for William Rufus in 1088.

The Manor was very large and comprised 11 graveships: Wakefield, Stanley, Alverthorpe, Thornes, Sandal, Ossett, Horbury, Sowerby, Holme, Hipperholme, and Rastrick.

Consequently, parts of what is now Calderdale belonged to the Manor of Wakefield, and people and places from Calderdale are recorded in the Wakefield Court Rolls and other documents.

In 1362, the Manor was granted to Edmund de Langley, 5th son of Edward III.

In 1461, the Manor reverted back to the Crown.

From 1554, it was administered for the Crown by the Duchy of Lancaster.

In 1629, Charles I gave it to settle a debt to the Earl of Holland. In 16??, he gave it to his son-in-law. In 16??, he sold it to Sir Christopher Clapham.

In 170?, it passed to the Duke of Leeds.

See Viscount Irwin, Savile family of Thornhill, Wakefield Court Rolls and Wakefield-Pontefract feud

Wakefield-Pontefract feud
Feud between Sir Richard Tempest of the Manor of Wakefield, and Sir Henry Savile of the Honour of Pontefract.

Roger Tempest killed Thomas Longley who was holding court at Brighouse on 21st April 1518, and then fled to seek sanctuary in Durham Cathedral.

Richard Tempest's followers killed Gilbert Brooksbank, a Heptonstall priest who had displeased Tempest.

At the Halifax Fair on Midsummer Day 1533, Gilbert Hanson, deputy bailiff of Halifax, and one of Savile's men, William Riding of Elland, fought a duel in which both received fatal wounds.

A supporter of Savile, Robert Holdesworth was drawn into the troubles, and on 8th May 1556, he was murdered – possibly a mob protesting against the Pilgrimage of Grace and the Wakefield-Pontefract feud for remarks which Holdesworth made about Henry VIII.

The dispute continued when the Pilgrimage of Grace – in which the Tempests and the Saviles took opposing sides – spread into Yorkshire and Lancashire.

See Other feuds

Wakefield Road Toll Gate, Sowerby Bridge
Aka Clap Lane Toll House. A toll gate for the Sowerby Bridge Turnpike Road.

Built in 1824.

The toll gate was taken down in 1870.

The toll house was demolished in 19??.

Wakefield, Samuel
[1680-1719] Halifax attorney

Wakefield, Thomas
[16??-16??] Around 1675, he was accused of not attending church, of calling Thomas Bentley
a fforsworne rogue

and saying the King's precept was

a ffratching paper

Wakes
The traditional annual summer holiday when all Halifax businesses, shops, factories, mills and industries closed.

Workers' annual holidays were introduced towards the end of the 19th century.

Originally, the local holiday was held in August – the first being a 4-day holiday in 1896 instituted by the Halifax Chamber of Commerce. This first holiday was widely observed by most firms and industries in the district, one of the few exceptions being Dean Clough.

The holidays were discontinued during World War I. They resumed on 7th August 1919.

From 1945, a group including T. W. Cordingley fixed the holiday at the two weeks commencing the second Saturday in July.

The name is used for the annual holiday in several northern towns, and derives from the wake, the traditional ritual of keeping vigil over a corpse on the eve of the funeral, or on the eve of any festival. The local usage of the term to mean a holiday is said to have come from Lancashire. There was some initial local opposition to the holiday being called The Wakes because this was the name adopted by the Lancashire cotton mills.

The Wakes holiday was abandoned in 1995, although there are a few local businesses which still retain the traditional July holiday.

See Blackpool Illuminations, Brighouse holiday week, Brighouse Rush, Half-day closing, September Break, Teacher's Rest and Thump Sunday

Walbank, Richardson
[1792-1848] He married Frances Bradley [1796-1851].

Children: (1) Ann [1814-1875] who married (1) Thomas Longbottom, and (2) Charles Ambler; (2) Frances [1816-1860] who married Charles Ambler

Walco
Trade-name of Waltons of Halifax

Walden, Rev Keith
[18??-19??] Minister at Stannary Congregational Church, Halifax [1881-1893]

Wale, Freddy
[19??-19??] He married Dorothy, daughter of Alfred Edward Sykes.

Children: (1) David; (2) Patrick; (3) Sally.

They lived for some time in Africa before settling in New Zealand

Waleys, Philip le
[12??-1???] In the 13th century, he and Alan del Rodes were charged at Rastrick with taking a stag and a kid. They were found Not Guilty by the jury, and were acquitted and considered
to be in all things good and true men towards the Earl of Warren

Walkden, John
[1???-16??] Vicar of Saint Bartholomew's Church, Ripponden [1633-1643]

Walker...
The entries for people with the surname Walker are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Walker
An occupational surname meaning someone involved in walking or fulling cloth. This is common in the north and west of England.

See Fuller

There are currently around 115 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Walker. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Walker family of Lightcliffe
The family originated in Scholes, near Cleckheaton. They went on to become important in the Lightcliffe district. Their property included Crow Nest Mansion and Cliffe Hill Mansion.

The family's motto was

Justum perficito nihil timeto

William Walker is one of the first recorded members of the family

The Walker family of Sowerby Bridge
From 1789, they owned the Mearclough estate. They lived at Mearclough House and had a mill at Mearclough Mills, Sowerby Bridge.

Members of the family included John Walker.

Walker Lane, Sowerby Bridge is named for the family

Walker & Appleyard
Halifax photographers

Walker & Brook
Quarry owners and stone merchants at Five Acre Quarry, Elland [1905]

Walker & Company
Stone quarrier at Hill Top Quarry, Hipperholme, Park Quarry, Lightcliffe, and Rough Hey Quarry, Lightcliffe [1896].

In October 1899, a widow, Mrs Marsden, brought an action against the company for compensation for the loss of her son who had died from injuries received whilst working for the company. The arbitrator decided that, since the son was illegitimate, the mother could not recover damages

Walker & Edmondson
17th/18th-century worsted-spinning partnership established by Mr Walker and Thomas Edmondson with mills at Mytholmroyd.

They had a bad child labour record. In factory returns of the 1830s, they employed 17 children aged between 6 and 8 years old, and 50 aged between 8 and 10. If children arrived 3 or 4 minutes late, they were beaten with straps.

Some of the their workers were interviewed during Crabtree's Tour of Calder Dale of 1832

Walker & Hamer
Stone merchants at Stainland. Partners included S. Walker and B. Hamer.

The partnership was dissolved in May 1876

Walker & Throp
Patent tram seat manufacturers at Bell Hall Yard, Halifax [1905]

Walker Bingo Hall, Brighouse
See Albert Theatre

Walker Brothers
Worsted spinners at Halifax. Partners included Benjamin Walker, Samuel Walker and Ely Walker.

The partnership was dissolved in October 1839

Walker's: C. H. Walker & Company
19th/20th century Halifax draper with a large store on Northgate.

See John Walker

Walker's Coke
A coke-manufacturing company with ovens near Brighouse Station. Mr Walker used coal from Low Moor to produce the coke. In 1840, he obtained a contract to supply the railway company – at 14/- per ton at a rate of 50 tons per day – for 5 years

Walker Continuous Loom Syndicate Limited
Bradford company with business premises at Norwood Green [1904]

Walker's: Ely Walker & Sons
Established by Ely Walker.

In 1835, the firm was one of the subscribers to the Halifax Dispensary, giving 1 guinea

Walker's: Frederick Walker, Son & Dickie
Halifax solicitors.

Partners included Frederick Walker.

See Finn Gledhill & Company

Walker's: Fredrick Walker & Son
Legal firm established by Frederick Walker. They had business at 2 Harrison Road, Halifax.

See Finn Gledhill & Company and Charles Selborne Walker

Walker's: H. Walker & Sons
Manufacturers of serges and druggeting established by Haigh Walker at Perseverance Mill, Elland [1905]

Walker's: J. Walker & Company
Worsted manufacturers with business at Norwood Green Mill. Recorded 1820-1949

Walker's: J. Walker Clark
(Possibly) drapers at Crown Street, Halifax [1911]

Walker's: James Walker & Sons
Stone merchant at Clock Face Quarry, Barkisland. The partnership was dissolved in 1864. The business was carried on by John Walker

Walker's: John Walker & Son
Corn merchants and millers at Mearclough Bottom [1809]

Walker's: John Walker & Sons (Halifax) Limited
Drapers.

See Denton Walker and John William Walker

Walker's: P. M. Walker & Company
Ventilating engineers and sheet metal workers at Bedford Terrace, Halifax [1905].

In 1887, P. M. Walker took out a patent for

improvements in ventilators

Walker's: Walter Walker & Company
Worsted spinners established by Walter Walker. Partners included Samuel Walker Highley.

They had business at Mile Thorn Mills, Halifax [1???], Ryburne Mills, Halifax [1887], and Union Mills, Halifax [1905].

In 1910, there was a court case in which Samuel Walker Highley tried to stop Douglas, son of Walter Walker being brought into the business. Samuel lost and the partnership was dissolved in 1913; he established Samuel W. Highley & Company in the same year.

See Walter Brenard

Walkley Clogs
One of the last surviving clog manufacturers in Britain was founded as F. Walkley (Clogs) by Frank Walkley in Huddersfield in November 1946.

The company later moved to Hebden Bridge where they took over James Maud & Sons in 1972. Their main factory was at Canal Wharf Saw Mills.

In 2010, they were at Mount Pleasant Mill, Mytholmroyd

Walkley, Frank
[19??-] Started a repair shop and made clogs at Huddersfield.

See Walkley Clogs

Walks & walking

Wall, Abraham
[15??-1638] Born in Heptonstall. He went to live in London.

He established Wall's Charity

Wall's Charity
In his will of 1638, Abraham Wall gave an annual sum of around £8; to provide bibles to poor men's children once every 3 years, £4 to teach the poor children in Heptonstall, and £3 to provide an apprenticeship for one child to a trade in London. The money was to come from the rental of property in Ironmonger Lane, London. The sum provided for the apprentice was too small and none was sent. Using figures for average earnings, £1 in 1638 is roughly the equivalent of £1,590.00 today, and £8 is roughly the equivalent of £12,700.00

Wall, George
[1776-18??] 1841

He was an Independent minister; a retired Minister of the Gospel [1841].

He married Ann Leatham [1781-18??] from Snaith.

Children: (1) Ann [b 1806]; (2) Alice [b 1807]; (3) Mary [b 1811]; (4) Thomas [b 1816]; (5) Eliza [b 1818] who married Mr Shillitoe; (6) George [b 1820]; (7) Susanna [b 1821].

The family lived at New Cottage, Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse / Yew Cottage, Lightcliffe [1837, 1841, 1845]

His daughters ran Misses Wall School from their home

Wall, Misses
The daughters of George Wall ran schools for ladies in Halifax, Soyland and Lightcliffe

Wall Royd, Ovenden
Recorded on maps produced in 1854

Wallace, Joseph
[1858-19??] Halifax law-stationer.

He married Hannah [b 1855].

They lived at 33 Aked's Road, Halifax [1891].

See Halifax Incorporated Law Society Limited

Wallace's Limited
The People's Grocers opened a new store at 52 Wharf Street, Sowerby Bridge on 17th October 1902. This was their 60th branch

Wallace, Mr
[17??-18??] Halifax law-stationer.

He lived at the Square, Halifax

Wallace, Mr
[18??-1???] JP. Partner in Wilkinson & Wallace. He was Chairman of the Northowram Local Board

Wallace, William
[1837-1916] He was Mayor of Halifax [1907-1908].

See William Wallace's Charity

Wallace's: William Wallace's Charity
Northowram. Established by William Wallace

Waller, Abraham
[1834-1887] Son of Michael Waller.

Born in Mirfield.

He was a bookkeeper [1851]; a textile manufacturer / cotton spinner at Brighouse [1871, 1881].

He was a defendant [?] in the case of Waddington vs Waller [1854].

In 1857, he married (1) Martha Ann Crossley [1822-1874] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Edith Hannah [b 1858]; (2) Clare Elizabeth [b 1860]; (3) Henry; (4) Charles; (5) Mary Frances [b 1864] who married Joseph Richardson

In 1875, he married (2) Mary Jane Winterbottom [1839-1???] from Oldham, at Prestwich.

The family lived at Waterloo, Brighouse [1861]; Spring Terrace, Waterloo Road, Brighouse [1871]; Oakroyd, Brighouse [1881]

Waller & Son Limited
Of Bradford.

On 29th August 1916, they bought the brewery and public houses of Brear & Brown Limited for £95,150, beating Whitaker's brewery in their bid.

They subsequently moved their Trafalgar Brewery operations to Hipperholme.

In November 1916, they sold 22 premises in Halifax area formerly belonging to Brear & Brown's to Whitaker's brewery

Recorded in 1922.

In 1935, the business was bought by Melbourne Ales of Leeds and Wakefield. Brewing at Hipperholme ceased soon after. They continued to use the Maltings at Hipperholme.

The business was eventually absorbed into the Bass Charrington group who continued to use part of the site as a maltings until 1973

Waller Brothers
Cotton spinners at Onecliffe Mill, West Vale [1905].

Partners and other involved in the business included Charles H. Waller and Henry Hirst Waller

Waller, Charles Herbert
[1863-1???] Son of Abraham Waller.

He was a director of Waller Brothers, West Vale; a director of the Bank of Liverpool & Martins Limited; a director of the Amalgamated Paper Mills Limited of Glasgow and Manchester [1920].

He lived at Glenholme, West Vale

Waller, Daniel
[1865-19??] Son of William Waller.

He was a Brighouse architect and partner in Sharp & Waller.

In 1895, he married Lucy Anne Collins in Halifax.

The family lived at 10 Bute Terrace, Smith House Lane, Brighouse [1911]

Waller, Gary Peter Anthony
[1945-] Conservative MP for Brighouse & Spenborough [1979-1983]

Waller, Henry Hirst
[1861-1949] Son of Abraham Waller.

Born at Waring Green, Brighouse.

He was a partner in Waller Brothers.

He was one of the founders of Brighouse Rangers. He played until 1894 when he received 4 broken ribs.

He became a well-known rugby administrator.

In 1895, he chaired the meeting at the George Hotel, Huddersfield at which 22 northern clubs voted to leave the Rugby Football Union and establish the Northern Rugby Football Union, later the Rugby Football League. He was the First President of the Northern Rugby Football Union.

On 25th July 1900, he performed one of the opening ceremonies of the World's Fair Exhibition

In 1886, he married Louisa Worsnup [1863-19??] from Leeds, in Leeds.

Children: (1) Henry Norman; (2) Dorothy Louise [b 1892]; (3) child.

The family lived at Rookeries, Bradford Road, Brighouse [1891]; Glenholme, West Vale; Lyndhurst, Greetland [1901, 1911, 1917].

He died at Lyndhurst.

He was buried at Brighouse Cemetery

Waller, Henry Norman
[1890-1917] Son of Henry Hirst Waller.

He was educated at Charterhouse.

He joined the family business – Waller Brothers – at Onecliffe Mill, West Vale.

During World War I, he served as a Captain with the 2nd/4th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He was killed at Bullecourt, France [3rd July 1917].

He was buried at the Noreuil Australian Cemetery [H 4].

He is mentioned on the Clay House Park War Memorial, and remembered in Brighouse Cemetery

Waller, Lydia
[1832-1883] Born in Wilsden.

She married (1) James Barraclough.

She married (2) her brother-in-law William Robinson.

She died in Brighouse [24th January 1883].

Lydia and other members of her family were buried at Brighouse Cemetery

Waller, Marshall & Lockwood
Cotton warp manufacturers at Thornhill Briggs Mill, Brighouse [1840].

See Michael Waller

Waller, Michael
[1793-1870] Son of John Waller.

Born in Kirkheaton.

He introduced cotton spinning to Brighouse.

In 1851, he was a cotton spinner and employed 41 hands.

He established Michael Waller & Sons at Thornhill Briggs, Brighouse [1858, 1874].

On 12th December 1813, he married Hannah Hirst [1796-1854] from Mirfield, in Mirfield.

Children: (1) Ann [b 1816] who married [1859] Joshua Dyson of Elland; (2) Miles [b 1823]; (3) William; (4) Lydia [1826-1850]; (5) Michael [b 1829] who was an engine tenter [1851]; (6) Abraham.

The family lived at Thornhill Briggs, Brighouse [1841, 1851, 1861].

See Waller, Marshall & Lockwood

Waller's: Michael Waller & Sons
Cotton spinners at Thornhill Briggs, Brighouse [1858, 1874]. Established by Michael Waller

Waller, William
[1825-18??] Son of Michael Waller.

Born in Mirfield.

He was a butcher [1851]. Like his father, he became a cotton spinner. He was a cotton spinner and band maker employing 14 men, 30 girls and 8 boys [1871].

In 1854, he married Jane Dyson [1834-1912] from Brighouse.

Children: (1) Frederick William [b 1858]; (2) Dyson Hirst [1859-1913]; (3) Teresa [b 1861]; (4) John Edward [1863-1905]; (5) Daniel; (6) Arthur Herbert [b 1867]; (7) Hannah Jane [b 1870]; (8) Alfred Theodore [b 1873]; (9) Cunliffe Charles [b 1876].

The family lived at Thornhill Briggs, Brighouse [1861]; Old Lane, Brighouse [1871]; 1 Crooked Ridings [Terrace], Brighouse [1881, 1891]

Walling's: H. A. Walling
Retailers specialising in fitted carpets, linoleum and carpets. They were at 12 Cheapside and 25 Old Cock Yard, Halifax [1937]

Wallis, Canon J.
[19??-19??] Vicar of Hartshead [1968]

Wallis, John
[1812-1858] Born in Warley.

He was a manufacturer [1841]; a merchant & oil cloth manufacturer [1851]; tarpaulin manufacturer [1858]. He established John Wallis & Company.

On 15th November 1832, he married (1) Elizabeth Walton [1815-1835] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Sarah Ann [1833-1903]; (2) Joseph Walton.

On 1st December 1835, he married (2) Ann Todd [1811-18??] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (3) Mary Alice [b 1838] who married George Holdsworth Crossley; (4) Emily [1839-1894]; (5) Alfred [1838-1865]; (6) Emala [b 1840]; (7) Sophia [1841-1937].

The family lived at Rose Hill, Warley [1841, 1851].

John died 7th September 1858.

Members of the family were buried at Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge

Probate records show that he left effects valued at under £12,000. Probate was granted to his sons Joseph Walton. and Alfred, and Abraham Clay and Daniel Clay

Wallis's: John Wallis & Company
Oil cloth and tarpaulin manufacturers at Rose Hill Works, Sowerby Bridge [1874, 1905]. Established by John Wallis

Wallis, Joseph W.
[1834-1878] (Possibly) son of John Wallis.

He was Chairman of the Sowerby Bridge Local Board [15th April 1868-15th April 1869]

Wallis, Samuel
[18??-18??] Of Lister Lane, Halifax.

He exhibited his carving at the Great Exhibition of 1851. A review of his work in the ecclesiastical section said

A more than ordinary vigour is apparent in the grapes which form the decoration of a sideboard

Walmsley, 1910 Rupert Henry
[1910-1959] Son of Arthur 1885 Walmsley.

On 11th July 1932, he married Dorothy Kitty Jackson [1911-1974] from Halifax.

Rupert Henry died in Burnley [23rd November 1959].

Dorothy Kitty died in Hailsham [1974]

Walmsley, Arthur
[18??-19??] Born in Triangle.

He was a railway clerk [1908].

On 21st April 1908, he married Edna Hollas in Sowerby.


Edna was the daughter of
Watson Hollas
 

Children: (1) Alice [b 1909] who married Thomas Harold Wilcock; (2) Rupert Henry.

Walmsley Brothers
Wholesale druggists and drysalters at Back Gerrard Street, Halifax [1905]

Walmsley, Rev E.
[18??-18??] Priest at Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, Halifax [1874]

Walmsley, George
[1856-1919] Singer.

Recorded on 11th November 1900, when he sang the bass solos in a performance of Mendelssohn's Elijah.

He lived at Halifax Road, Todmorden

Walmsley, James
[1836-1???] Born in Ovenden.

He was a pit linker [1871].

He married Margaret [1838-1???].

Children: (1) Asa [b 1862] who was a worsted factory spinner [1871]; (2) Joseph [b 1864]; (3) Mary H [b 1867].

The family lived at Bradshaw Lane, Ovenden [1871]

Walmsley, Rev L. E.
[18??-19??] He was at Haydon Bridge before moving to Luddendenfoot Congregational Church [1929]

Walmsley, Robert
[1808-1878] He was a confectioner and bread baker living at Pavement in Todmorden. In 1851, he employed 2 men.

In 1856, he bought Newbridge Mill, Walsden and employed 36 hands.

In the 1860s, he returned to his old trade of grocer, confectioner and baker.

In 1830, he married Sarah [18??-1845].

Children: (1) Ann; (2) Robert; (3) child who died young; (4) child who died young; (5) child who died young; (6) child who died young; (7) child who died young; (8) child who died young.

In 1845, 2 months after Sarah died, he married Mary, widow of Robert Law.

They had no children.

Mary died in 1868.

He married Mary Sutcliffe.

They had no children.

The family lived at Pavement, Todmorden; Rose Cottage, Walsden [1860s].

He and his 2nd and 3rd wives were buried at Saint Peter's Church, Walsden

Walmsley, Stephen
[1840-19??] Born in Ovenden.

He was a coal miner [1871]; a yeast hawker and landlord of the Junction, Bradshaw [1881]; a poultry dealer [1901].

In [Q2] 1863, he married Emma Slater [1844-1???] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Ellen Jane [b 1868]; (2) Alice [b 1870]; (3) James [b 1873] who was a boiler maker's labourer [1871]; (4) Emily [b 1875] who was a worsted twister [1901]; (5) William [b 1877] who was a general labourer [1901]; (6) Lydia [b 1880] who was a worsted twister [1901]; (7) Fred [b 1883] who was a carter on a farm [1901]; (8) Joe [b 1883] who was a carter on a farm [1901].

The family lived at Bradshaw Lane, Ovenden [1871]; Bradshaw [1881]; 265 Shay Lane, Illingworth [1901]

Walnut Cottage, Brighouse
Bonegate.

Owners and tenants have included

Walpole, Thomas
[17??-1???] Of Sowerby and Sowerby Bridge Wharf. Agent for the Aire & Calder Navigation Company [1809]

Walsden
District of Calderdale south of Todmorden.

It was in the parish of Rochdale and a part of Lancashire until the late 19th century.

See Todmorden & Lancashire

Walsden Bleaching & Dyeing Company Limited
Of Todmorden-cum-Walsden. Recorded in 1938

Walsden Conservative Club
Recorded in 1888, when Samuel Fielden of Stansfield Cottage was President, Henry Chadwick was Secretary, and John Dawson was Treasurer.

Recorded in 1912, when the membership was 80.

Recorded in 1917, when James Barker was secretary

Walsden constables
The Foldout lists some of the people who have served as Police Officers in Walsden

See Todmorden & Walsden constables and Todmorden & Walsden Select Vestry [1838]

Walsden Co-operative Society
A meeting to address the formation of a Society in Walsden was held in December 1849. The Society opened in 1850.

The Hollins Branch store stood opposite the Hollins Inn.

In 1873, they had premises at Providence Street / Beswick Street, Walsden.

In 1897, they opened a reading room at Lanebottom.

In 1900, they opened the Copperas House Branch.

In 1936, it merged with the Bridge End Equitable & Progressional Society. The Society closed in 1966.

See Co-operative Street, Walsden, Pioneer Mill Company and Robert Jackson

Walsden Cricket & Bowling Club
The cricket club was established in 1870.

In March 1913, a bazaar to clear off the Club's debts raised £220.

Their home ground is at Stott Street, Todmorden, on the site of the former Inchfield Mill Dam.

Sydney Starkie played for the club.

The Club plays in the Central Lancashire League.

See Thompson Helliwell and Charles Dugdale

The Walsden Highway
The packhorse route from Rochdale to Walsden and Todmorden.

It was superseded by the Todmorden Turnpike through Steanor Bottom.

See Ragby Bridge, Walsden

Walsden Institution & Working Men's Club
Recorded in October 1880.

See Walsden Working Men's Club & Institute

Walsden Liberal Club
Recorded on 1st August 1888, when William Ormerod was President.

Recorded in 1893 and 1917, when Arthur Fielden was secretary.

On 1st February 1908, it reopened after extensive renovation and decoration

Walsden Library
Inchfield Road, Walsden, Todmorden

Walsden Mill Company Limited
Cotton spinners and manufacturers established in 1905. The company occupied Alma Mill, Walsden

Walsden Moor

Walsden Oddfellows
See Bottoms School, Walsden and Oddfellows

Walsden Parochial Sick & Burial Club
Recorded on 22nd February 1913, when the disbursement of their funds was reported. 603 members' shares were paid out, the highest amount being over //22

Walsden Post Office
Rochdale Road

Walsden Printing Company
Textile printers at Ramsden Wood Mill

Walsden Railway Station
Opened in 18??

A boy was killed crossing the line in 1864.

A girl was killed on the level-crossing on 20th October 1864.

One man was killed and two injured by an express train on 3rd October 1896.

Closed on 6th August 1961 and demolished shortly afterwards. The footbridge dated 1890 is still used.

A new station was opened on 10th September 1990.

See Thomas Hinchcliffe, Robert Knott, Railway Hotel, Walsden, Todmorden Station and Winterbutlee Tunnel

Walsden Temperance Brass Band
Recorded on 12th May 1900, when the won a prize in a contest at Bamber Bridge.

See Thompson Helliwell

Walsden Toll Bar
See John Midgley

Walsden War Memorial
There is a memorial plaque remembering those who served in World War I and World War II at Trinity United Methodist Free Church, Walsden

Walsden Ward, Todmorden
One of the Electoral Wards of Todmorden. Recorded in 1905

Walsden Water
Stream which joins Ramsden Clough at Bottoms above Walsden, and runs down to join the Calder at Todmorden.

See Alma Road (river) Bridge, Walsden

Walsden Working Men's Club & Institute
Recorded in 1872, when they met at the Hollins Assembly Rooms.

Robert Law studied here.

Recorded in 1912, when the membership was 60.

See Walsden Institution & Working Men's Club

Walsh
[Surname]

There are currently around 33 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Walsh. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Walsh & Brierley
Brace stiffener and stock manufacturers [1851].

Partners included Samuel Walsh and John Henry Brierley

They had business in Halifax and at 25 Noble Street, Cheapside, London [1855].

They had business in Pellon Lane, Halifax [1883] where they are mentioned for committing a smoke nuisance

Walsh & Maddock
Architectural partnership established by J. F. Walsh and George Maddock.

William Henry Wilkinson joined the partnership, becoming Walsh, Maddock & Wilkinson.

After Maddock's death in 1939, the partnership became Walsh & Wilkinson.

Some of their work included:

Others are listed under J. F. Walsh

Walsh & McCrea (Coatings) Limited
Manufacturers of plain and fancy damasks and worsted coatings. Partners may have included Thomas Selby Walsh and John Lane McCrea.

They had business at Archer Street Mills [1874, 1895] and Union Mills [1895].

In 1915, the Council served a notice which required the company to provide sufficient means of escape in case of fire.

See Edwin Booth Stott

Walsh & Nicholas
Architectural partnership established by J. F. Walsh and Graham S. Nicholas.

The partnership was dissolved in 1910 when Nicholas's health forced him to move to the south of England.

Some of their work included

Others are listed under J. F. Walsh

Walsh & Wilkinson
Architectural partnership established by J. F. Walsh and H. W. Wilkinson after the death of George Maddock.

George Alan Coutts joined the partnership, becoming Walsh, Wilkinson & Coutts.

Some of their work is listed under J. F. Walsh

Walsh & Wrigley
Architects. Partnership established in 1894 by Joseph Frederick Walsh and Willie Wrigley. The business lasted 16 months

Walsh, Asquith & Company Limited
Boiler-makers at Empire Works, Holmfield.

A 1900 advertisement for the business announced

Walsh, Asquith & Company Limited

Makers of every description of Welded and Riveted Iron and Steel Boilers, Copper Boilers and Cylinders, Brass Work, Lead Lined Flushing Cisterns, Sanitary Appliances, Engineers Fittings.

EMPIRE WORKS, HOLMFIELD, HALIFAX
Telegrams: "Sanitary" Halifax
Telephone No. 474 Halifax

Walsh, Charles
[17??-18??] In 1???, he married Mary, daughter of James Emmet.

Children: Robert

Walsh, Edward
[18??-18??] Architect who designed Saint George's Church, Sowerby

Walsh, George
[1850-1909] He was a joiner [1871].

On 24th May 1871, he married Emma, daughter of Herbert Hadley, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Herbert William [b 1874] who married [1896] Martha Ann Lockwood; (2) Maud [b 1876] who married [1900] Walter Allan Mitchel; (3) Emma [b 1880] who married [1901] Sam Smith

Walsh, George Edward
[18??-19??] Of 24 Craven Terrace, Hopwood Lane, Halifax.

In 1904, he was one of the first people to be granted a motor cycle registration

Walsh, Henry
[18??-19??] Lodging house keeper at Smithy Street [50 lodgers in 1903]

Walsh, Ishmael
[1823-1891] Of Halifax.

In [Q4] 1846, he married Mary Ann Ramsbottom [1823-1903] in Halifax.

Children: (1) John William [1853-1854] who died aged 13 months; (2) Robert Arthur [1855-1856] who died aged 9 months; (3) Harry [1863-1940].

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 3278]

Walsh, J.
[17??-17??] Curate at Halifax [1757]

Walsh, James
[1???-1???] Born in Halifax.

He was a newsagent and tobacconist at 12 Woolshops, Halifax [1851].

He married Sarah [1824-1???]

Walsh, James
[17??-1833] He married Susannah [1761-1846].

Children: (1) Susannah [1794-18??] who married Rev Henry Watts; (2) David; (3) Richard.

The family lived at Stannary House, Halifax [1797-1826].

The couple were buried at Salem Methodist New Connexion Chapel, North Parade

Walsh, James
[1789-1878] Of Ovenden. A spinner.

He married Martha Crossley [b 1788].

Children: (1) John [1821-1824]; (2) John; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child; (6) child; (7) child; (8) child; (9) child; (10) child; (11) child; (12) child

Walsh, James
[1861-1928] Son of John Walsh.

He was manager in a printing office [1891]; a lithographic printer [1901]; a printer's manager [1911].

In [Q3] 1886, he married Hannah Matilda Turner [1865-1941], from Halifax, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Edith Anne [1887-1964] who married Caleb Parkinson; (2) John [1889-1962]; (3) Edwin [1891-1916] who was killed in action in World War I; (4) Walter Turner [1892-1972].

The family lived at 12 Cromwell terrace, Halifax [1891]; Park Lodge, Lee Mount [1901, 1911]; Quarry House, Ovenden [1928].

James died in the Royal Halifax Infirmary [1st February 1928].

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £200. Probate was granted to his widow Hannah Matilda

Walsh, James
[19??-] He stood unsuccessfully as the Conservative candidate in the Election for MP for Halifax [2001]

Walsh, John
[18??-19??] Or possibly John Walsh Barker.

Of 22 Park Street, Sowerby Bridge.

He was injured – about the back, neck and knee, and his arm was badly injured, with a long lacerated wound requiring 8 or 9 stitches – in the Pye Nest Tram Disaster of 15th October 1907, but was treated at home

Walsh, John
[1807-1873] He married Mary [1812-1884].

Children: (1) (possibly) Thomas; (2) John.

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery

Walsh, John
[1813-1870] Of Coley.

Son of James Walsh.

He was a solicitor's clerk.

He married Anne Horsfall in Halifax [Q1 1846].


Anne was the daughter of daughter of Luke Horsfall
 

Children: (1) Lucy Anne; (2) George; (3) Thomas Luke; (4) Emma Frances who married Thomas Whitaker; (5) John Edward; (6) James Hall; (7) William Robert; (8) Mary Ann; (9) Joseph Frederick

See Partners in Halifax Commercial Banking Company

Walsh, John
[1830-1912] Son of James Walsh.

Born in Wheatley.

He was a letter press printer [1851]; a printer & bag maker employing 10 men, 8 boys & 3 girls [1861]; a printer & councillor [1871]; a printer [1879]; an Alderman & paper bag maker [1881]; a printer & councillor [1891]; an Alderman for Halifax Ovenden ward [1894]; a printer & paper merchant [1901].

He established John Walsh Printers.

In [Q1] 1851, he married (1) Ann Normanton [1828-1867].

Children: (1) Sarah [b 1853]; (2) James.

On 22nd October 1872, he married (2) Selina, daughter of William Brear, at Halifax Parish Church.

They had no children.

The family lived at Ovenden [1851]; Eastgate, Ovenden [1861]; Ovenden [1871]; Quarry House, Ovenden [1881, 1891, 1901, 1911].

Living with them in 1891, was Sara M. Walsh [aged 40] (paper bag maker) 

Walsh, John
[1847-1897] Son of John Walsh.

In [Q2] 1867, he married (1) Sarah Ann Moss [1849-1872] in Halifax.

In [Q1] 1873, he married (2) Nancy Nuttall in Halifax.

Children: John [1873-1877] who died aged 3 years & 10 months.

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery

Walsh's: John E. Walsh & Company
Patent agents by John Edward Walsh [1879]. The business was at Hind's Chambers, Halifax [1937]

Walsh, John Edward
[1852-1921] Son of John Walsh.

He became a patent agent in Halifax. He established John E. Walsh & Company [1879]. In 1887, he had offices at Crossley Street, Halifax, Swan Arcade, Bradford, and 11 New Market Street, Blackburn.

He died of a heart attack in George Square, Halifax, as he was on his way home from work.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £6,197

Walsh's: John Walsh Printers
Established by John Walsh in 18??.

The business closed in 2005.

See Thomas Brenard

Walsh, Jonathan
[1741-1823] Son of Jeremiah Walsh. Baptised in Halifax [26th November 1741].

He was a landowner, a money lender, a textile manufacturer and notorious for his eccentricity, meanness and temper.

Caroline Walker referred to him as an old usurer and extremely importunate.

He rode around on a mule bearing a whip which he used on anybody who displeased him.

The Clergy were apparently a favourite target for Walsh's ire.

His speech was so uncouth and haranguing that Dr Henry Coulthurst used to hide if he saw Walsh coming.

Walsh spent hundreds of pounds in litigation against his neighbours and said that he would

rather spend a pound for law than a penny for ale

He owned Dove House, Shibden. He lived at Coldwell Hill Farm, Southowram.

He died at Horton Street, Halifax [11th February 1823].

Walsh's wife had been buried in one corner of a field on his land at Southowram, and he gave instructions that he was to be planted in the other corner. He was buried on the land, by candlelight at midnight.

The burial was rediscovered 73 years later

Walsh, Joseph Frederick
[1861-1950] Architect born at Thornhill, Hipperholme. He designed many local buildings

See Turned stone

Walsh, Maddock & Wilkinson
Architectural partnership established by J. F. Walsh and George Maddock and W. H. Wilkinson.

After Maddock's death in 1939, the partnership became Walsh & Wilkinson.

Some of their work includes

Other examples are listed under J. F. Walsh

Walsh, Richard
[17??-18??] Son of James Walsh.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Samuel; (2) Hannah who married John Henry Brierley

Members of the family were buried at Halifax General Cemetery

Walsh, Robert
[17??-1???] Coiner

Walsh, Robert
[17??-18??] Junior. Cotton and wool card maker at Blackwall, Halifax [1809]

Walsh, Robert Selby
[1???-18??] Textile manufacturer. He took Henry Charles McCrea as a partner.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Thomas; (2) Esther Jane [1817-1885] who married Henry Charles McCrea

Walsh's: Robert Walsh & Son
Cotton and wool card makers at Aked's Road, Halifax [1809]

Walsh, Samuel
[17??-18??] A Halifax cropper.

On 30th May 1804, he married Sarah Walker in Leeds.

Children: (1) Sarah [1812-1891]; (2) Lydia [1815-1844].

Both daughters married James Gaskarth Dalzell

Walsh, Samuel
[1815-1904] Son of Richard Walsh.

Partner in Walsh & Brierley.

He is listed as a manufacturer [1861], a master cotton spinner and corn dealer [1871], brace and umbrella manufacturer [1891].

He lived at Trinity Road, Halifax [1904].

Family stories tell that he contracted pneumonia after attending a funeral and died on 8th December 1904.

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1904

Walsh, T. S.
[18??-18??] Chief Constable for Halifax [1910].

He lived at West Hill [1845]

Walsh, Thomas
[1839-1867] Of Halifax.


Question: Does anyone know how he relates to John Walsh who is buried in the grave where Thomas is remembered in Lister Lane Cemetery?

 

In [Q2] 1857, he married Agnes Montague [1840-1864] in Easington, County Durham.

Children: (1) Henry [1858-1866]; (2) (possibly) child [d 1864]; (3) Mona [1861-1864] who died at the age of 2 years & 10 months; (4) Walter Thomas [1863-1864] who died at the age of 6 months.

He was a Bandsman with the 107th Royal Sussex Regiment. Following the Indian Mutiny, he was sent to Calcutta. He served in India for 10 years.

His wife went to the East Indies (India) with him. The children were all born there.

While the regiment were stationed in Fyzabad, his wife and all the children died and were buried in India.

He died of cholera at Allahabad [5th August 1867], just 3 months before the Regiment was due to return to England. There is a memorial to him in Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 1729]

Walsh, Thomas Luke
[18??-1???] Son of John Walsh.

He married Annie Elizabeth.

Children: (1) Jack; (2) Arthur; (3) Lucy [1876-1945] who married Canon George Watkinson

Walsh, Thomas Selby
[1805-1879] JP. Son of Robert Selby Walsh.

He was a member of Halifax Town Council [1850-1877]; Mayor of Halifax [1857-1860]; Alderman for Central Ward [1866].

He (possibly) owned Dam Head Mill, Shibden. He was recorded at West Parade, Halifax and at Shibden Hall [1874], and had business at Arches Street, Halifax. He may have been a partner in Walsh & McCrea (Coatings) Limited.

He died 23rd September 1879.

See Halifax, Huddersfield & Keighley Railway

Walsh, Rev Timothy
[1???-19??] Priest at Saint Mary's Catholic Church, Gibbet Street [1935]

Walsh, Wilkinson & Coutts
Architectural partnership established by J. F. Walsh, H. W. Wilkinson, and George Alan Coutts.

Some of their work included

Others are listed under J. F. Walsh

Walsh, William
[18??-18??] Corn miller at Mixenden Corn Mill [1845]

Walsh, William
[1823-1905] Of North Bridge, Halifax.

In [Q2] 1859, he married (1)  either Elizabeth Akroyd or Elizabeth Whiteley [1838-1865] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Mary [1861-1864]; (2) Emily [1863-1864].

In [Q3] 1867, he married (1) Martha Swallow [1823-1884] in Halifax.

Martha died 25th February 1884.

William died 13th March 1905.

Members of the family were buried at Christ Church, Pellon [1/W13]

Walshaw
Hilltop hamlet above Hardcastle Crags. A part of the township of Wadsworth First mentioned in 1277, the name uses the element Welsh and may mean copse of the Welsh, or, copse of the strangers. There is a hunting lodge built for Lord Savile.

See King's Walshaw, Erringden and Walsden

Walshaw
[Surname]

There are currently around 15 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Walshaw. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Walshaw, Absalom
[1835-1878] Of Halifax

Walshaw & Son
Legal firm at Crown Street Chambers, Halifax.

Partners included Joseph Walshaw and Saxon Walshaw

Walshaw & Stott
Bottlers/brewers in Halifax. Partners included John William Walshaw and James Stott.

Walshaw, Arthur
[1862-1???] In [Q3] 1885, he married Emma Senior [1863-1937] in Halifax.

Children: Tom.

The family lived at 9 Park Place, Parkinson Lane, Halifax [1919].

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery

Walshaw Bridge, Hardcastle Crags
Footbridge across Hebden Water at Hardcastle Crags

Walshaw, David
[1836-1914] Butcher, auctioneer and cabinet maker of 61 Commercial Street, Brighouse.

The notorious bad meat case is discussed in the Foldout

Walshaw Dean Footpath Dispute
Since time immemorial, there had been public right of way on Walshaw Dean Moors, going up Walshaw Dean and across to Haworth.

When work on the Walshaw Dean Reservoirs was taking place [1900-1907], the path was cut and contractors and Lord Savile's staff turned people away. This caused strong protests and great bitterness.

On 27th July 1907, there was a demonstration over the alleged closing of the path.

On 25th May 1908, Lord Savile accepted terms and the path was re-established on the present line

Walshaw Dean Middle Reservoir
Aka Walshaw Intermediate Reservoir. One of the Walshaw Dean Reservoirs. It covers 38 acres and has a capacity of 244 million gallons

Walshaw Dean Moors
Moorland between Hebden Bridge and Haworth.

See Walshaw Dean Footpath Dispute

Walshaw Dean Railway
See Hardcastle Crags Railway

Walshaw Dean Reservoirs
Hebden Bridge.

Built by Enoch Tempest for Halifax Corporation under an Act of Parliament passed in 1868. Widdop Reservoir [of 1878] was built under the same Act, and provided sufficient supplies for a time.

Halifax Corporation obtained parliamentary approval for the reservoirs in 1898.

The first sod was cut by the Mayor of Halifax, William Brear, on 17th September 1900.

The valves and ironwork were supplied by Glenfield & Kennedy of Kilmarnock, and the cast iron pipes were supplied by Staveley Coal & Iron Company Limited of Chesterfield.

The cost of construction was £170,000.

The first reservoir opened on 1st October 1907.

There are 3 reservoirs: Walshaw Upper Reservoir, Walshaw Intermediate Reservoir, and Walshaw Lower Reservoir.

The drainage area was around 2,300 acres and the combined capacity was 610 million gallons.

The reservoirs did not come into full use for about 10 years.

See Back Shaw, Blake Dean railway bridge, City in the Hills, Hardcastle Crags Railway, Navvyopolis, Paddy Mails and Walshaw Dean Footpath Dispute

Walshaw Dean stone circle
On 21st July 1902, a water engineer, Mr W. Patterson, announced the discovery of a Bronze Age stone circle at Walshaw Dean Reservoir.

The circle had 10 irregular stone uprights measuring 36 ft in diameter, with an inner horseshoe-shaped stone wall-like feature which was 12 ft across. One of the uprights was 6 ft 3 in long. The stones were of the local millstone grit. Remains of a cremation were also found.

The circle is now submerged beneath Walshaw Dean Middle Reservoir and only visible in times of severe drought

Walshaw, Drake & Company Limited
Slubbing dyers.

They had a dyeworks – Walshaw & Drake's Mill – at Rosemary Lane, Rastrick.

Walshaw Drake & Company is now a division of the Bulmer & Lumb Group

Walshaw, Edwin
[18??-1???] Chairman of the Halifax Omnibus & Cab Company Limited [1867]

Walshaw Falls, Hardcastle Crags

Walshaw, Helen Mollie
[1912-1952] Daughter of Saxon Walshaw.

She married Edmund Hodgson [1899-1961] from Blackpool.

Children: (1) Christopher; (2) Ann; (3) Michael; (4) Joan Margaret.

Edmund was a missionary and served in the Congo under the Congo Evangelistic Mission. He and a colleague were hacked to death by Baluba tribesmen in North Katanga in 1961

Walshaw, Irving
[1???-1957] Managing Director of Drake & Company Limited

Walshaw, J.
[18??-19??] Newsagent, stationer and bookseller at 7 Northgate, Halifax [1900]

Walshaw, John William
[18??-19??] Mineral water manufacturer at Savile Park Road, Halifax [1893].

By 1897, the business had become Walshaw & Stott.

He lived at 1 Perseverance Terrace, Halifax [1905]

Walshaw, Joseph
[18??-19??] He qualified in January 1872.

He was Grand Marshall of the Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Good Templars [1882]; Clerk to Rishworth UDC [1905]; a solicitor with Walshaws in Halifax [1934].

In 1875, he married Lydia Annie Wilson in Oakham, Rutland/Leicestershire.

His wife was also an official of the Grand Lodge of the Independent Order of Good Templars

See Christopher Tate Rhodes

Walshaw, Joshua
[18??-1???] Halifax solicitor.

Recorded in July 1873, when he was appointed one of the Secretaries of the British Temperance League at Halifax

Walshaw, Joshua
[1835-1904] Born in Heckmondwike.

He was publican at Heckmondwike [1891]; innkeeper of the Bridge Hotel, Greetland [1901, 1904].

In 1859, he married Eliza Pickles [1838-1917] from Heckmondwike, in Dewsbury.

Children: (1) Tom [b 1865] who was an indigo dyer [1891]; (2) Alfred Henry [b 1871] who was an apprentice [1891], a woollen dyer [1901]; (3) Florence [b 1874] who was a dress maker [1901]; (4) Emma [b 1876]; (5) Annie [b 1882].

The family lived at Market Place, Heckmondwike [1891].

Living with them in 1891 was grandson Ernest Whitley [aged 10].

Living with them in 1901 was sister-in-law Constance Pickles [aged 50] (dry cleaner) and grandson Arthur Pick [aged 11].

Joshua died on the 16th August 1904. Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £288. Probate was granted to to his widow Eliza, his son Alfred Henry Walshaw (dyer)  and Frederick Arthur Bottomley, (book-keeper).

After Joshua's death, Eliza took over at the Bridge Hotel [1905, 1911]

Walshaw Lane Bee Boles
A set of 7 mid-18th century rectangular bee-boles in a wall east of Overwood Farm

Walshaw Lodge, Heptonstall
A hunting lodge for the Savile family.

In 2010, Lord Savile sought permission to convert the lodge into a hotel

Walshaw Lower Reservoir
The southern-most of the Walshaw Dean Reservoirs.

During construction, the reservoir developed a fault – a consequence of the geology – and Enoch Tempest went bankrupt trying to rectify the fault.

This is 1050 ft above sea-level. It covers 24 acres and has a capacity of 160 million gallons Much of the water is used for compensation of the other Walshaw Dean Reservoirs, with the top 40 feet [146 million gallons] being used for supply

Walshaw Mechanics' Institute
A Mechanics' Institute recorded in 1910

Walshaw, Robert
[19??-19??] Motor-racing driver from Lightcliffe. In 1952, he was one of a 3-man team which made a record-breaking drive from London to Cape Town in 13 days, 9 hours, 6 minutes. He retired after a 20-year career when he completed the 25th Grand Prix at Le Mans in 1957

Walshaw, Saxon
[18??-19??] Halifax solicitor with Walshaws [1934]. He qualified in August 1903 He was Deputy Clerk to Rishworth UDC. He was Honorary Treasurer to the Halifax Incorporated Law Society.

He married Norah, daughter of Edward Richardson.

Children: Helen Mollie

Walshaw, Stott, Storey & Company
Logwood grinders at Lower Shaw Mill, Halifax [1861] and at Grove Ware Mills, Halifax [1874].

The partnership – listed as Stott, Storey & Walshaw – was dissolved in November 1881

Walshaw, Thomas
[18??-1868] Landlord of
a hotel near Bailey Hall, Halifax

On 30th April 1868, there was a fire at the adjoining Albion Mill. Walshaw went to the scene and was walking along the roof of a shed, when he fell through a sky-light into a dyer's vat and drowned

Walshaw, Tom
[1899-1918] Son of Arthur Walshaw.

He served with the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers.

He was killed in action

somewhere in France

[18th April 1918].

He is mentioned on the Loos Memorial, France, and on the family grave at Lister Lane Cemetery

Walshaw Upper Reservoir
The northern-most of the Walshaw Dean Reservoirs. This is 1100 ft above sea-level. It covers 24 acres and has a capacity of 205 million gallons

Walshaw vs Walshaw
A legal dispute in 1873.


Question: Can anyone tell me anything about the case?

 

In settlement of the case, land and property was sold – at the Brown Cow, Halifax on 2nd July 1873 – and included Alma Cottage, Claremount, land and 8 cottages in Alma Road, Dale Street, John Street, Primrose Street, land and 6 cottages and 2 cellar cottages in Sanderson Street, Walshaw Street, and Thomas Street.

See Norris, Foster & England and Robson & Suter

Walt Royd Farm, Wheatley
Upper Wheatley Valley / Crag Road. Late 17th century / early 18th century aisled house.

In the 18th century, it was the home of Cornelius Ashworth.

In Ashworth's time, the ministers from Square Independent Chapel, Halifax and Pellon Lane Baptists came once a month to preach at the house

This is discussed in Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions, In & About Our Old Homes and Our Home & Country

Walter, Hubert
[1160-1205] Aka Hubert Walters. His family came from Norfolk.

He was Absentee Rector of Halifax [1185].

He travelled to the Holy Land with Richard the Lion-Heart on the Third Crusade [1190] and, when Richard was taken prisoner by emperor Henry VI, Walter brought the army back to England and raised a ransom of 100,000 marks for the king's release.

He was Dean of York [1186-1189], then Bishop of Salisbury, and he became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1193. On Richard's death in 1199, he was appointed Chancellor.

He may have introduced the concept of feet of fines

Walterclough Gardens, Southowram
An advertisement of 17th May 1879 announced

WALTERCLOUGH GARDENS, Southowram

TEAS provided for parties upon notice being given
Swings for the use of visitors
15 mins from Hipperholme Railway Station

Hay & Rhubarb for Sale

WILLIAM WOODHEAD, Proprietor

Walterclough Hall, Southowram
Aka Upper Walterclough. 14th century hall which overlooked the land which was to become Sunny Vale Pleasure Gardens.

The Hall was built by the Hemingway family.

Owners and tenants have included

Caroline Walker was born here.

This is discussed in Ancient Halls in & about Halifax, Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions and In & About Our Old Homes

There was some work by Harry Percy Jackson: carved panelling to head height incorporating botanical details and masonic symbols, door-frames with fluted pilasters topped by protruding capitals, and doors with decorated centre panels. In 1919, the woodwork was acquired by the Lady Lever Art Gallery, Port Sunlight. Some sources say that the woodwork came from Langley Hall, Hipperholme.

Walterclough, Southowram
See Little Walterclough, Lower Walterclough, Upper Walterclough, Walterclough Hall School, Southowram, Walterclough Hall, Southowram, Walterclough Lane, Southowram, Walterclough Mill, Southowram, Walterclough Pit, Hipperholme and Walterclough Valley

Walterclough Valley
Valley at Hipperholme leading down to the Shibden valley.

Walterclough Gardens and Sunny Vale Pleasure Gardens were here.

On 24th August 1940, seven bombs fell here when a German bomber dumped his payload as he escaped from searchlights. There was minimal damage beyond a severed overhead power cable and some broken windows. It was said that the German pilot had been attracted by a searchlight at Hove Edge. The farmer charged 10d to go the site. He gave the money to the Red Cross.

See Little Walterclough, Lower Walterclough, Upper Walterclough and Walterclough Mill, Southowram

Walters & Samuels
They had a 2½d Bazaar at 56 Northgate, Halifax [1905] and a 3½d Bazaar at 104 Borough Market, Halifax [1905]

Walters, Rev George
[18??-19??] Minister of Trinity United Methodist Free Church, Walsden. In 1914, he joined the Royal Army Medical Corps and went to France. He was awarded the Military Cross for his bravery and services

Walters's: John Walters & Company
Tanning business established in 1835. The business was acquired by Mark Wilcock [1877]

Walters, W.
[18??-19??] Woolstapler at Halifax.

In December 1884, he was declared bankrupt

Walters, Rev William
[18??-18??] Of Camberwell.

He was the first permanent Pastor at Trinity Road Baptist Church, Halifax [July 1853].

He left in May 1860

Waltham, George Galtress
[18??-18??] He was head master of Saint Luke's School, Leeds before becoming Master of the Bell School, Harrison Road [1853]

Waltham, Rev Joshua
[18??-18??] BA. Educated at Saint John's College Cambridge. He was Usher at Heath Grammar School [1841]

Walton...
The entries for people with the surname Walton are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Walton
[Surname]

There are currently around 63 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Walton. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Walton-Allen, Richard
[19??-] Head Chef at Harvey Nicholls in Leeds. He grew up in Brighouse

Walton & Helliwell Limited
Transport company founded by Fred Walton and Newton Helliwell in 1928. They operated from Station Garage, Burnley Road, Mytholmroyd.

In January 1929, they acquired the Cragg Vale to Mytholmroyd bus service of J. A. Halliday and later extended it to Hebden Bridge. They also started running from Hebden Bridge to Sowerby Bridge.

In July 1931, they began operating excursions and tours.

The bus services were taken over by the Halifax Joint Omnibus Committee in June 1935, along with two buses. They continued to operate excursions and tours, and also goods vehicles.

The company was incorporated in 1938.

In 1946, the business was bought by O. & C. Holdsworth Limited who operated it as a subsidiary company, registered at their 9 Harrison Road, Halifax offices.

The O. & C. Holdsworth coach operation and vehicles were transferred to Walton & Helliwell ownership in 1958, and shortly after the latter was sold to Hebble Motor Services.

In 1958, Directors were Charles Holdsworth [Chairman], M. Holdsworth, D. Holdsworth, J. Gomersall [General manager], and E. Jeffrey [Secretary]. These were the same as those for O. & C. Holdsworth.

They had 6 coaches

Walton & Hemingway
Stocks & shares brokers. Partners included John Thomas Walton and Edward Manks Hemingway.

They were at 28 George Street, Halifax [1912].

In April 1912, the business was mentioned in bankruptcy notices

Walton Cross, Hartshead
Only the base remains of this preaching cross – possibly a Saxon or Anglian signpost – dated to the 10th century. On old documents, it is identified as a wagestan, a way stone or way marker. It stands near Walton Farm, Hartshead.

A 15 ft high cross is recorded in the 18th century. The base was excavated in 1867 and stands 4 ft 9 ins high, 3 ft 6 ins wide.

The West Yorkshire Archæology Service logo – a circle and rosette knot – is taken from the interlaced design on the face of the cross.

See Crosse Hall, Clifton

Walton Farm, Hartshead
Celtic or Anglian settlement.

The name may be derived from Weala-tun [settlement of the Welsh, or settlement of the strangers]

See Walton Cross, Hartshead

Walton's: Henry Walton & Company
Dyers and finishers established in 1890 by Henry Walton at Slead Mills, Brighouse

Walton's: John Henry Walton Limited
Cotton manufacturer established by John Henry Walton at Vale Mill, Todmorden [1905]

Walton's: M. F. Walton
Pharmaceutical chemist established around 1850 by J. H. Walton.

It passed to S. Walton and then to M. F. Walton.

Around 1885, the business moved to Sowerby Bridge.

They were at Town Hall Street, Sowerby Bridge – selling whisky, gin, rum & brandy [January 1896].

They produced a range of products, including

Walton's Brunswick black,
Walton's furniture cream,
Walton's hair restorer,
Walton's insect powder,
Walton's marking ink,
Walton's red currant cough elixir,
Walton's vermin killer

In 1887, Major Foulds Walton was listed as a pharmaceutical chemist, and agent for Scottish Equitable Assurance at Town Hall Street, and Ryburn Buildings, Sowerby Bridge

Walton's: Thomas & John Walton
Picker makers at Stoneswood Mill, Todmorden [1905]

Walton's: William Walton & Sons
Halifax woolstaplers and wool merchants. Established at Halifax around 1850 by William Walton. They were at Square Road, Halifax.

His sons joined the business.

After the deaths of his father and brother, Frederick William Walton became sole proprietor

Waltons of Halifax
Leather goods and clog-making business founded at Siddal in 1910. The business moved to North Parade. The trade-name was Walco.

In 1974, the company had 44 retail shops in Yorkshire and Lancashire. The company closed in 199?

Wanklyn, Vernon William
[1871-1942] Of Holly Bank, Halifax

Born in Forehoe, Norfolk.

Around 1930, Jocelyn Horner made a sculpture of Vernon William.

In [Q3] 1906, he married Mary Gladys Howarth [1785-1856] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Joan Mary Hibbert who married Charles Patrick Crossley; (2) a daughter.

He died in Bucklow, Lancashire/Cheshire [Q2 1942]

Wanstead, Warley
In the 1920s, Lower Hoyle Green, Warley was renamed Wanstead for a brief period

Wapping, Hebden Bridge
A popular 19th century name for Buttress Brink

War Heroes

War Horse Day
A World War I initiative. On 28th July 1917, £860 was raised

War Memorials

War Weapons Week
A national fund-raising scheme of 1940-1941. A total of £5,334,931 was raised throughout Calderdale

Warburton, Sir Geoffrey de
[13??-13??] He became the second husband of Alice de Radcliffe, widow of Sir John Elland

Warburton, John
[1???-18??] BA.

He was educated at Pembroke Hall Cambridge; Assistant Curate at Holy Trinity, Halifax [1823].

Warburton, Rev John
[17??-1860] MA. Headmaster of Hipperholme Grammar School [1835, 1841].

He was one of the subscribers to John Horner's book Buildings in the Town & Parish of Halifax [1835].

On 1st October 1835, he married Mary Anne Willmott, at Halifax Parish Church.


Mary Anne was the eldest daughter of the Rev William Willmott
 

He died by his own hand on 20th November 1860, having been found

suspended by a cord to his bed

although other reports say that

he was seated with the cord tied loosely round his neck

He had been depressed during his last few months, a consequence of family disquietudes, and this had been aggravated by the death of his wife earlier in the year

Warburton, W.
[18??-19??] Luddenden millwright. He worked with Ebenezer Hargreaves. The 2 men left to go into business on their own. Around 1890, he established W. Warburton & Company at Turbine Works, Halifax. When Warburton died, a descendant of Hargreaves bought the business

Warburton's: W. Warburton & Company
Electrical engineers and millwrights established by W. Warburton around 1890 at Turbine Works, Halifax. The business closed in 1993

Ward, A. A.
[18??-1???] Ran Ward's Commercial School, Brighouse in the late 19th century

Ward & Lambert
Business at Ripponden. Partners included J. Ward and R. Lambert.

The partnership was dissolved in November 1816

Ward & McRea
Cloth manufacturer of Cross Hills, Halifax. At the Great Exhibition of 1851, they exhibited many of their products

Ward & Tate
Grocers at West Vale. Partners included William Ward and Thomas Tate.

The partnership was dissolved in November 1881

Ward, Artemus
[18??-1???] The American showman presented his wax-work show at Halifax Drill Hall in 1881.

See Madame Tussaud

Ward, Rev Arthur William
[18??-19??] Wesleyan Minister.

He lived at 1 Savile Road, Halifax [1905]

Ward, Ben
[1877-1950] On 6th June 1908, he married Hannah Isabella Hollas in Barkisland.


Hannah Isabella was the daughter of
Harry Hollas. Before the marriage, Hannah had a illegitimate son Edwin Hollas [1901-1963], father unknown
 

Children: (1) twins Lawrence [b 1909]; (2) Percy [b 1909]; (3) Donald [b 1911]; (4) Albert [b 1913]; (5) Cecil [b 1915]; (6) Mary [b 1918]; (7) Phyliss [b 1921]

Ward, Bernard
[1913-1996] JP. Born in Elland. Brother of Clifford Ward.

He had TB as a child.

He was an engineering apprentice. After gaining his qualifications, he was elected into the engineering union. He was District Secretary of the AEU [Amalgamated Engineering Union] at Halifax until retirement. As various Unions merged, his scope increased to cover Calderdale, and later Bradford and area.

In 1938, he married (1) Hilda Jowett [1916-1964]. The couple ran the local AEU club.

In 1965, he married (2) a widow, Mrs Mildred Cook [née Fearnley]. Mildred died in 2007

Ward, Christopher
[1835-18??] Son of James Ward.

He was an apprentice damask manufacturer [1851]; a worsted manufacturer [1861, 1871]; a worsted manufacturer employing 1000 people [1881]; partner in J. W. & C. Ward.

In 1863, he married Annie Collier [1846-1???] from Barnsley, in Halifax.

Children: (1) George Whiteley; (2) Margaret Ann [b 1868]; (3) Jessie [b 1874].

The family lived at 21 Savile Place, Halifax [1871 with 5 servants, 1881]; Nether Bank, Kendal [1891].

Annie was widowed by 1901

Ward, Clifford
[1911-1985] Born in Huddersfield. Brother of Bernard Ward.

He married Mary.

Children: (1) Colin – who died in the Moorgate train disaster; (2) Sandra.

He was active in local affairs, and an active member of the Labour Party from early days, a councillor for the Boothtown area, Secretary of the Party Office until he retired, he helped to get Dr Shirley Summerskill elected as local MP, he was active with the Co-operative movement and served upon its board, and he was keen on water supply issues.

He lived at Chevinedge Crescent, Exley

Ward's Cottage Homes
Washer Lane, Halifax. An estate of 24 cottages – rent and rates free – endowed by Richard Dearden Ward for people over 60 years of age who were unable to work. The cottages opened on 11th May 1907. The cottages were
built of best Accrington brick

and comprised a living room with an adjoining bedroom, and a small scullery. The communal toilets were outside.

One set of cottages was at street level, another was below, in the style of up-and-over houses, and looked across to the Norland hillside.

They closed in the 1960s, and were demolished in 1982.

My paternal grandmother, Ada Mary Bull [née Snowball], lived here

Ward, D'Arcy
[18??-19??] Curate at Brighouse [1919-1920]

Ward, David
[1801-1884] (Possibly) born in Bradford.

He founded the Halifax Temperance Hotel and Ward's Temperance Hotel.

In 1823, he married Elizabeth Ingham [1803-1???] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) son; (2) son; (3) son; (4) son; (5) daughter; (6) daughter; (7) daughter; (8) daughter.

The family lived at (possibly) 27 Green Terrace, Skircoat [1871]

Ward, Edward Oates
[1882-1960] Born in Elland.

He was a bearer (quarry) [1911]; a labourer [1936].

In [Q1] 1909, he married Lottie Mitchell [1880-1959].

Children: (1) Florence [1912-19??] who married Frederick S. Hart; (2) Herbert who married Rosie Priestley.

The family lived at 2 The Square, Bank Top [1911]; 9 Battinson Street, Southowram [1936]

Ward, Mrs Elizabeth
[19??-] Councillor and Mayor of Hebden Royd [2006-2007]

Ward's End, Halifax

Ward's End Hall, Halifax
Aka Ward's Hall. The house stood at Ward's End on the site of what was later the Bus Station and the Regal Cinema.

Judge Stansfeld lived here. His son, Sir James Stansfeld was born here.

The hall was demolished in the early 1900s to make way for the bus station.

Owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in Sketches of Old Halifax

See Webster's School

Ward, Ernest
[18??-19??] Player with Halifax RLFC [1909]. He won caps for England while at Halifax

Ward, George Whiteley
[1866-1???] Son of Christopher Ward.

He was educated at Rugby School [1881]

Ward, Henry
[18??-18??] In April 1853, he was imprisoned for 1 month for stealing a coat, the property of F. E. Rawson of Halifax


Question: Could the victim of the theft be Frederick Edward Rawson?

 

Ward's: J. W. & C. Ward
They were

They were taken over by Courtaulds.

Partners included John Whiteley Ward and Christopher Ward.

The father of Hugh Campbell was chief carpet designer here [1880]

Ward's: J. W. Ward & Sons Limited, Halifax
Dyeing company established in 1880. They had business at Walnut Street, Halifax [1881].

They were one of the original companies which formed the Bradford Dyers' Association.

See John Whiteley Ward

Ward, James
[17??-18??] Maltster from Elland.

On 5th December 1821, he married Grace Whiteley [1803-1???] from Halifax, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Mary [b 1822] who married [1850] Frederick Augustus Tamplin; (2) John Whiteley; (3) Emily [b 1831]; (4) Christopher.

All the children were baptised as Square Independent Chapel.

The family lived at Range Bank, Halifax [1841]; Upper Ellen Royde, Halifax [1851]; 21 Horton Street, Halifax [1861]

Grace is a widow by 1861

Ward, James
[1825-1???] Born in Stockport.

He was a (private family) gardener [1861]; a Methodist preacher [1861].

He married Ellen [1817-1???] from Wellington, Lancashire.


Ellen was a dress maker [1861]
 

Children: (1) John [b 1848]; (2) James [b 1853].

The family lived at Willow Hall Yard, Skircoat [1861]

Ward, James
[1875-1940] The 65-year-old was one of the 11 civilian casualties of the Hanson Lane bomb which fell on 22nd November 1940. He died on 24th November 1940

Ward, John
[1???-17??] Halifax attorney

Ward, John
[17??-18??] Of Basinghall Street, London.

On 27th November 1806, he married Jane Frances, daughter of Robert Lambert at Elland

In 1823, the couple bought Holwood House, Surrey from William Pitt the younger.

See Robert Lambert

Ward, John
[1842-1907] He was farmer of 25 acres [1871]; farmer [1875-1886]; landlord of the Griffin, Barkisland [1875-1886]; brewer [1891]; spinner (own account) [1901].

On 22nd May 1865, he married (1) Ruth Lumb [1845-1883] of Sowerby, at Elland Parish Church.

They had no children.

On 24th January 1884, he married (2) Mary France [1854-1912] from Barkisland, at Christ Church, Barkisland.

Children: (1) John France [1887-1963]; (2) Maud [1888-1964].

The family lived at Little Haven, Barkisland [1871]; Griffin Inn, Barkisland [1875-1886]; Marsden [1891, 1901]; The Dean, Marsden [1907]

John & Mary were buried at Christ Church, Barkisland

Ward, John Miller
[1868-1928] Born in Chatham, Kent.

He was a Methodist New Connexion minister – (possibly) Ambler Thorn New Connexion Church [1901].

In 1895, he married Gertrude Twyford [1872-1943] born in Stoke-in-Trent, in Stoke-in-Trent.

Children: John Twyford (Miller) [b 1896].

The family lived at The Manse, Ambler Thorn [1901] and Hillcrest, Leigh, Stoke-on-Trent [1928, 1943].

The couple died in Leigh

Ward, John Whiteley
[1826-1914] JP. Son of James Ward.

He was a well-known local figure.

See Mary Bracken, Elizabeth Bracken and George Whiteley

Ward, Michael
[1???-1???] Of Halifax.

He married Hester Drake

Ward, Peter
[1829-1863] Of Brighouse.

He was buried at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse

His headstone records that he was

Interred by his Lodge No. 151 of the Bolton United Order of Odd Fellows

Ward, Richard Dearden
[1845-1931] JP. Of Sapling Grove, Halifax.

He was Mayor of Halifax [1905-1907].

He was a master dyer.

He became sole proprietor of Ingham Brothers.

He endowed Ward's Cottage Homes in 1907.

He was made an Honorary Freeman of the Borough in 1925.

In [Q2] 1868, he married Hannah Kenyon in Halifax.

Children: Ethel Phoebe [b 1879] who married Samuel Hodgson.

He died 26th Sep 1931.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £61,781

Ward, Robert
[19??-] Mayor of Hebden Royd [1992-1993]

Ward, Sheppard & Company Limited
Dyers and finishers at West End Dye Works, Halifax [1905]

Ward, Thomas
[17??-17??] Hatter in Halifax [1771]

Ward, Rev William
[1???-18??] Missionary and oriental scholar who translated the scriptures into several eastern languages. He was well-known for his missionary work in Serampore.

He was a pupil of Dr John Fawcett's academy

Ward, William
[18??-19??] Plumber and engineer with business at Victoria Street East, Halifax [1905]

Warden, Joseph
[1817-1879] Landlord of the Northgate Hotel, Halifax [1874, 1879].

He married Elizabeth [1815-1899].

The couple were buried at Christ Church, Pellon

Wardle
[Surname]

There are currently only around 7 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wardle. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Wardle, David
[1835-1884] Son of Joseph Wardle.

Born in Bradford.

He was a slater & plasterer [1871]; beerhouse keeper at the Claremount Inn, Halifax [1875]; a slater [1881]; a contractor [1893].

In May 1879, he was declared insolvent with liabilities of around £3000

In He married Dinah [1841-1???].


Dinah was born in Rochdale
 

Children: (1) Hannah [b 1859]; (2) Harriet [b 1860] who was a woollen weaver [1881]; (3) Selina [b 1863]; (4) Albert [b 1864] who was a general labourer outdoor [1881]; (5) Samuel [b 1867]; (6) Thomas [b 1869] who was a plumber turner [1891]; (7) Elizabeth [b 1871] who was a cotton twister [1891]; (8) Harry Wallace; (9) Arthur [b 1878] who was a butcher [1891]; (10) Ada Ann [b 1880] who was a worsted spinner [1891]; (11) Willie [b 1884].

In 1871, the family were living with David's father Joseph at the Claremount Inn.

The family lived at 6 Earl Street, Northowram [1881]; 12 Horsfall Yard, Northowram [1891]

Wardle, Harry Wallace
[1873-1???] Son of David Wardle.

Born in Halifax.

He was a carpet dresser [1891]; a warehouseman [1893]; a woollen yarn scourer [1901]; a collector for the Union Clothing Company of Todmorden; a weaver cotton [1911].

In 1906, he was charged with embezzling 5/- from the Union Clothing Company of Todmorden, at Halifax Borough Court. He was acquitted.

In [Q2] 1893, he married Maria Duckworth [1873-19??] at Heptonstall Church.


Maria of Old Town, Wadsworth, was the daughter of Thomas Duckworth, engineer.

She was a woollen weaver [1901] and a woollen drawer [1911]

 

Children: (1) Thomas [b 1894] who was a weaver cotton [1911]; (2) Clara [b 1902].

The family lived at Range Bank, Halifax [1893]; 67 Hollins Mill Lane, Sowerby Bridge [1901]; Hollins Mill Lane, Sowerby Bridge [1906]; Rock, Wadsworth, Hebden Bridge [1911]

Wardle, Henry
[1823-1???] Superintendent of Police at Halifax [1861].

He lived at 5a Harrison Road, Halifax [1861]

Wardle, John
[1???-1???] Son of Matthew Wardle.

He was an Ag Lab [1851].

In 1855, a public notice in a local newspaper announced

PARDON ASKED

I, JOHN WARDLE of Skircoat Green in the parish of Halifax, in the County of York, labourer, having on the 1st day of February instant been detected in committing a TRESPASS in PUDDING PARK WOOD, Southowram, the property of Hugh Francis Ingram do hereby publicly express my sorrow for the same and have this day agreed to pay TWO POUNDS for damages done and towards the Expenses incurred by this notice being advertised and posted in such a manner as said Hugh Francis Ingram or his Agents shall think fit.

As witness my hand 2nd February 1855.

JOHN WARDLE

Witness: Robert Parker, Solicitor, Halifax

Using figures for average earnings, £2 in 1855 is roughly the equivalent of £1,320.00 today

Wardle, Joseph
[1801-18??] Born in Halifax.

He was beerhouse keeper at the Claremount Inn, Halifax [1871].

He married Unknown.

Children: David.

Living at the Claremount Inn with the widower Joseph in 1871 were son David and family

Wardle, Matthew
[1782-1???] Of Skircoat Green.

He was a pauper and labourer in a chemical works [1855].

He married Sarah [1788-18??]. Sarah was a school mistress at Skircoat Green [1851].

Children: John

Wardle, Matthias Harris
[18??-18??] Aka Matthew. Architect. In 1865, he was engaged as assistant to Richard Horsfall. He became a partner in Horsfall, Wardle & Patchett and Horsfall's architecture practice.

See Horsfall & Wardle and Horsfall & Williams

Wardman, Samuel
[16??-16??] He married Martha, widow of Richard Best

Wards End Chambers, Halifax
Office premises at the top of Horton Street.

The building was formerly Bentley's Commercial Hotel

Ware, Rev Samuel
[18??-19??] Curate at Todmorden [1861]

Ware, William
[1707-17??] Apprentice with Robert Kitson of Upper Brear, Northowram.

In July 1721, at the age of 14, he married 13½-year-old Sarah Edwards

Wareham, Rev J. E.
[18??-19??] MA. Curate at Todmorden Parish Church [1909]

Wareing Green
19th century spelling of Waring Green

Warenne
In mediæval literature, the family name is spelled variously Warren and Warenne. We shall use the form Warren

Warenne, Gundrada de
[1063-1085] Aka Gundred, Gundrada de Flanders. Daughter of William the Conqueror and Matilda. She was born in Normandy. She married William, the 1st Earl in Normandy around 1077, with whom she founded the Priory of Saint Pancras at Lewes.

Children: Rainald, Edith, and William, the 2nd Earl.

Gundrada died in childbirth at Castle Acre, Norfolk and was buried at the Priory of Lewes

Warenne, Isabel de
[1???-1???] Daughter of the 8th Earl and Isabel de Houland. She became a nun at Sempringham

Warenne, Isabel de
[1???-1???] Daughter of Isabel de Warenne.

She married (1) Robert de Laci.

She married (2) Gilbert de L'Aigle [11??-1231]

Warenne, Isabel de
[1137-1199] Only daughter and heiress of William, the 3rd Earl and Adelia de Talvas.

In 1153, she married (1) William, the 4th Earl.

William died in 1159. In 1164, she married (2) Hamelin de Warenne, the 5th Earl in Surrey.

Children: (1) Isabel; (2) William, the 6th Earl.

She was buried in the Chapter House at Lewes

Warenne, John de
[1???-1???] Son of the 8th Earl and Maud de Neirford

Warenne, Sir William de
[1256-1286] Son of John, the 7th Earl.

He was knighted in 1285.

He married Joanna de Vere.


Joanna was the daughter of Robert de Vere, 5th Earl of Oxford
 

Children: (1) Alice who married the Earl of Arundel; (2) John, the 8th Earl.

He was killed in a tournament at Croydon, whilst his father John, the 7th Earl was still alive, and never obtained the title Earl of Surrey

Warham, Dr John
[1919-1???] Born in Halifax. [11th October 1919].

He became a photographer and ornithologist, and was well-known for his research on seabirds in Australia and New Zealand.

He was educated at King Edward VI Grammar School in Retford, Nottinghamshire.

In 1953, he moved to Australia. He was a reader in zoology at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Waring, Edward
[16??-17??] Curate at Rastrick [1713]

Waring Green
Local band comprising brothers Jon and Tom Kulczycki, Shaun Mallia and Jared Bowers [2005]

Waring Green
Area of Brighouse, lies along Bonegate

See Richard Jessop and The Gill family of Brighouse

Waring Green Co-operative Store
Branch of the Brighouse District Industrial Society.

This stood at the crossroads, diametrically opposite Waring Green Congregational Church.

Opened on 4th January 1875.

Closed in the 1960s. Demolished in 19??. The site is currently empty

Waring Green Players
Amateur dramatic group established in the 1950s. They were based at the Community Centre at the former Waring Green Congregational Church.

Because of falling membership, the group decided to disband in 2009. Their last production was J. B. Priestley's play When We Are Married in February 2009

Waring, Rowland
[1856-19??] Born in Darton, Yorkshire.

He was a licensed victualler at the Golden Lion, Ripponden [1905, 1911, 1912].

In [Q1] 1877, he married Alathea Sugden [1858-19??] from Bradford.

Children: (1) Annie [b 1880] who was assisting in the business [1911]; (2) Caroline [b 1888] who was assisting in the business [1911]; (3) Gladys [b 1895] who was assisting in the business [1911]


Question: A Roland Waring is recorded at the Royal Hotel, Brighouse [1912] and at the Railway Hotel, Rastrick [1922].

A Rowland Waring died at North Bierley [1924] (aged 68).

Does anyone know whether this is the same man?

 

Waring, Rev W. H.
[19??-19??] Of Rishworth School.

He married Melita Nicholls.

Children: son [b 1947]

Warland
Area of Calderdale south of Walsden

The name comes from Warland House

Warland Commercial Company Limited
Quarry Mill. Walsden. The company was registered in January 1878

Warland Drain, Todmorden
A conduit which feeds Warland Reservoir

Warland Farm, Walsden
Aka Warland House.

Dated 1655 I F. The house gives its name to the Warland district

Owners and tenants have included

  • John Hamer [owner 1799]

  • John Fielden [tenant 1799 when he paid 9/11d tax]

Warland Lower Lock, Todmorden
Lock #34 on the Rochdale Canal. It has a double set of bottom gates to take the 57½ ft long vessels of the Calder & Hebble Canal

Warland Reservoir, Walsden
The reservoir is shown on maps of 1851. It is fed by Warland Drain, and collects much of the water that had previously fed Gaddings Dam.

In 1897, Thomas Fielden died after falling down a shaft at the reservoir.

It was acquired by Rochdale Corporation in 1927.

See Light Hazles Reservoir

Warland Upper Lock, Todmorden
Lock #35 on the Rochdale Canal.

See Quarry Cottages, Walsden

Warley
District of Calderdale to the west of Halifax.

See Population and Parish statistics

Warley Board of Guardians
A part of the Halifax Poor Law Union.

Those who have served on the Board of Guardians for Warley township have included

Warley Cemetery Board
Recorded in the 19th century.

See Warley Town Cemetery

Warley Clough
Stream which flows from Highroad Well Moor to join the Calder near Sowerby Bridge

Warley Community Association
The Society is currently [2013] seeking volunteers to help in the project to digitise the burial records for Warley Cemetery and make them available online

Warley constables
The Foldout lists some of the people who have served as Police Officers in Warley

Warley Co-operative Store
Recorded as 30 Warley Town [1911]. Stood next to the Maypole pub, Warley Town.

It was formerly the Old Dungeon.

The building is now known as Town House

Warley Cottage
The house stands next to Warley Institute and Town House. Originally called Newhouse.

Owners and tenants have included

Warley Cricket Club
Recorded in the 19th century. The grounds are a part of the Warley Grange Estate.

See John Sutcliffe

Warley Croft
This was originally the stables and workers' cottages for Warley House. Rupin Riding School stabled their horses here for a time

Warley Edge
See Warley Edge, Warley

Warley Edge Close, Warley
12 Warley Edge Lane. 17th century house

Warley Edge Farm, Warley
11 Warley Edge Lane. 17th century house. A doorway is dated 1633 ASMC.

It was rebuilt in 1903

Warley Enclosure Act
In 1852, Saltonstall and other land in the area was enclosed under the Act.

At that time, Captain Joseph Priestley Edwards bought land to build Castle Carr

Warley Exhibition Foundation
A charity associated with Warley Grammar School of which the income helped students to obtain advanced education

Warley Fountain
In 1900, A. S. McCrea donated an ornate drinking fountain to replace the Maypole at Warley which had been blown down and damaged in March 1899.

This is discussed in Our Home & Country.

Warley Gaol
See The Old Dungeon, Warley

Warley Grange

Warley Hall
In 1760, the Old Hall, Saltonstall was known as Warley Hall when it was owned by Daniel Greenwood

Warley House
Stock Lane. House designed by Thomas Bradley and built by Mr Cook in 1769.

Owners and tenants have included

During a lecture tour in 1857, the explorer, David Livingstone, stayed here with Thomas Milne.

It was the home of H. C. McCrea, who bought the house in 1866, and left it to his son, A. S. McCrea, in his will.

In his will, A. S. McCrea left Warley House and its grounds to the Royal Halifax Infirmary. There was a plan for it to become a geriatric unit for Saint John's Hospital.

After World War II and the advent of NHS, the building was found to need too much adaptation for modern use and was demolished.

In 1953, there were proposals to demolish the house and build a home for the sick on the site.

In 1955, the Ministry of Health pronounced that Warley House was not suitable for hospital use and the future of the building was left in the hands of the Leeds Regional Hospital Board.

In 1961, the Earl of Rosse, of the Standing Commission on Museums and Galleries, said that Warley House was

... a beautiful building and I would like to see it restored

The building was allowed to rot and decay, and it was finally demolished on 21st October 1964.

Around 11 acres of the site were sold off as grazing land. In 1994, the central 2½ acres of the site were purchased by Drs Paul and Catherine Hinton of Sowerby Bridge who recreated a garden. Following problems with vandalism, planning consent for a new Warley House was obtained and this was completed in 2006.

This is discussed in Ancient Halls in & about Halifax.

See Warley Croft

Warley Institute
Built for A. S. McCrea. Designed by J. F. Walsh It was formally opened on 12th November 1904.

The building had a public library, reading room, newsroom and kitchen on the ground floor, and a billiard room and slipper bath on the first floor. It was a men-only facility until 1951, when women were allowed in.

This is discussed in Our Home & Country.

See Warley Cottage

Warley Library
Recorded in 1929 as Warley Branch Library. At that time, it was only open on Saturday evenings.

Recorded in 1936

Warley Lodge
Later name for Warlings

Warley, Manor of
In Domesday Book this was one of the 9 berewicks belonging to the Manor of Wakefield. It appears there as Werla feslei.

The manor was held by the Earls of Warren, the Duke of Leeds, and S. W. L. Fox [1850].

See Saltonstall

Warley Moor
Moorland near Midgley Moor.

See Blackfield Dam, Warley Moor, Cold Edge Dams, Warley Moor, Heys Clough, Warley, Leadbeater Dam, Warley Moor, Rocking Stone, Warley Moor, Sleepy Lowe, Warley Moor and Warley Moor Reservoir

Warley Moor Reservoir
Aka Fly Flatts Reservoir

A phase of the Halifax Waterworks Extension Scheme built around 187? by J. F. Bateman. On 20th May 1864, the first sod was cut by the mayor, William Irving Holdsworth Bateman presented the Mayor with a silver-headed spade inscribed

Halifax Corporation – The first sod of the Warley Moor Reservoir was turned with this spade, on Friday, the 20th May, 1864, by William Irving Holdsworth, Esq., Mayor of Halifax; J. F. Bateman, Engineer; John Parkinson and Joseph Mann, contractors; J. E. Norris, Town Clerk

On 19th December 1867, water was turned on for the first time after Bateman had reported that this might be safely done. The depth of the reservoir when full is about 45 feet.

It was completed in 1872. It covers 68 acres and has a capacity of 193 million gallons

On 14th June 1923, it was revealed that upper side of the Reservoir was being undermined and would cost between £30,000 and £50,000 to repair.

On 5th August 1930, it was announced that the Reservoir was to be repaired at a cost of £33,014 after being described as dilapidated and fast becoming derelict.

The Halifax Sailing Club is here.

The Luddenden Brook rises here.

See Reservoir, Fly Flatts

Warley Prosecution Society
A prosecution society recorded in 1772

Warley Road Junior School Baths
Opened in 1897. The baths at Warley Road School are still in use

Warley School Board
School Board set up in 18??.

See Wainstalls Board School and Warley Town Board School

Warley Springs
Area of Burnley Road, Halifax.

See Old Warley Springs Brewery, Warley Springs Brewery and Warley Springs Dye Works, Halifax

Warley Surveyor of the Highways
Those who held the post of Surveyor of the Highways for Warley included:

Warley Town Farm
The original name for Old Hall Farm, Warley

Warley Town Post Office
Recorded in 1861 at Cross Road, Warley when Samuel Rothera, a schoolmaster, was postmaster.

Recorded in 1874, when James Smith, a grocer, was postmaster.

Recorded in 1905 at 25 Warley Town when H. C. Starr was sub-postmaster

Warley Urban District Council
Created in 1894.

Absorbed into the County Borough of Halifax in 1900.

See Luddendenfoot Urban District Council

Warley Vale Co-Op
A branch of the Sowerby Bridge Industrial Society opened in 1???.

It closed in the 1960s.

It is now a private house: Town House

Warley War Memorial
The memorial was stands near Warley Congregational Church in the centre of Warley village

Warley Ward, Halifax
One of the Electoral Wards of Halifax.

See John Hardy and Jennie Latham

Warley Wood, Warley
17th century house

Warley Workhouse
In 1777, this accommodated 30 inmates

Warlings, Warley
Dated 1633. It is now known as Warley Lodge

Warm Withens
An area of moorland about ½ mile south of the A58 on Rishworth Moor, and around ¾ mile SE of the road junction near Blackstone Edge Reservoir

Warman, Rev Francis Octavius
[1860-1932] Born in Kent.

He was the first Vicar at Siddal [1915].

He was a lodger at 33 Browning Avenue, Siddal [1911].

She died in Docking, Norfolk

Warneford, Chrissie Dora
[1864-1900] Born 8th January 1864. Daughter of Rev Canon John Henry Warneford.

She died [25th March 1900] at 7 Maison-Dieu Place, Dover, where she had been staying for some time.

She was buried at All Saints' Church, Dudwell

Warneford, Rev Harry Lancelot
[1860-1???] Son of Rev Canon John Henry Warneford.

Born in Halifax.

He was Clerk in Holy Orders [1891]; Church of England clergyman [1901].

In 1881, he married Augusta Lechmere [1868-1???], born in France, at Kensington.

Children: (1) John Henry [b 1888]; (2) Dorothy [b 1893].

The family lived at Langdown Lawn, Dibden, Hampshire [as visitors of Thomas B. S. West 1891]; 2 New Church Road, Aldrington, Hove, Sussex [as visitors of his mother-in-law, Mrs Caroline Lechman, and Sarah Sophia Lechman, and Alice Maud Lechman 1901]

Warneford, Henrietta Warneford
[1853-1912] Daughter of Rev Canon John Henry Warneford. Born in Halifax.

She married William Henry Foster.

From 1891, she lived at Lunesdale, Lancashire and, for a time in the early 1900s, in Marylebone. She died at Warneford Place, Dorset

Warneford, John Charles Keymes
[1852-1893] Son of Rev Canon John Henry Warneford.

Born 25th February 1852, and baptised 28th March 1852.

He may have been named after Charles Keymes who was at College with Rev Warneford.

He was a Lieutenant in the West Yorkshire Militia.

On 10th December 1880, he married Emily Augusta Burton [1852-1???] at Saint John's Church, Monkstown, Ireland.


Emily Augusta was the youngest daughter of Robert William Burton
 

Children: (1) John Robert Keymes [1881-1960] he married [1904] Isabel Laura Howland [1880-1970]; (2) Esme Mary E. [1883]; (3) Henry Walter B [1884]; (4) Emily Olive [1888].

The family lived at Oakley, Newton Abbot, Devon [1891]; Teignmouth [1899].

When his father died, he succeeded to the property at Warneford Place, and the Irish estate.

He died in Devon

Warneford, Rev Canon John Henry
[1818-1899] MA. First Vicar of All Saints' Church, Salterhebble [1846-1899].

See All Saints' Sunday School, Salterhebble, John Lister and Reginald Alexander John Warneford

Warneford, Minnie Laura
[1856-1923] Daughter of Rev Canon John Henry Warneford.

She never married.

She lived at 35 Cambridge Street, Kensington, London [1901] and Heath Royd, Francis Street, Halifax [1923].

She died at 39 Aked's Road, Halifax. She was buried at All Saints' Church, Dudwell.

A local newspaper described her as

a great friend of the Halifax Corps Saint John's Ambulance Brigade.

At the commencement of the great war she was instrumental in preparing nurses and VADs, a great number of these being sent away and many going to Saint Luke's Military Hospital.

She collected a large amount of money to provide beds for the Saint John Ambulance Association in Étaples, France where there is a big Saint John Ambulance Hospital and, by her efforts, was able to provide three beds

Warneford, Reginald Alexander John
[18??-1915] RNAS, VC. Grandson of Rev Thomas Lewis Warneford who was the brother of Rev Canon John Henry Warneford.

During World War I, he served with the Royal Naval Air Service. He was awarded the Victoria Cross

Warneford, Walter Keymes Francis Goodall
[1895-1919] Son of Walter Wyndham Hanbury Warneford.

Born in Crewe.

He set a British record crossing the Atlantic in an airship. He disappeared in an airship accident

Warneford, Walter Wyndham Hanbury
[1866-1???] Son of Rev Canon John Henry Warneford. Born in Halifax.

He was educated at Saint Mark's School, Clewer, Berkshire [1881].

He became a railway engineer. He was an apprentice at Miles Platting [1882]; at Crewe [1883]; Works Manager – a dapper little man [1910-1916]; Wagon Superintendent at Earlestown [April 1916].

On 19th August 1894, he married Mary Elizabeth [1874-1???] of Salterhebble, daughter of Alfred Goodall, at All Saints Church.

Children: Walter Keymes Francis Goodall.

The family lived at Lansdowne House, Huyton, Lancashire [1919]

Warner Swasey Asquith Limited
The Warner Swasey company was established in Cleveland, USA in 1880. In 1957, they decided to manufacture their lathes in Europe. They teamed up with Asquith Machine Tool Company at Canal Works, Halifax.

When Staveley's took over Asquith's, Warner Swasey pulled out and became a part of the Bendix Group of America. The company became Warner Swasey Turning Machines Limited.

The business closed in 1983

Warren, E. W.
[18??-19??] Partner in Edwards & Warren.

He lived at 10 Emscote Grove, Halifax [1905]

Warren, Earls of

Warren Shield
The coat of arms of William, 2nd Earl of Surrey, the Earls of Surrey and Lords of Halifax includes a chequered shield. The square of the pattern are alternating or [gold] and azure [blue].

The design has been incorporated into the Halifax coat of arms.

This may be linked to pubs with the names such as Checkers

Warren, Thomas de
[1???-1???] Son of the 8th Earl and Maud de Neirford

Warriner & Taylor
19th century carriage builders of Brighouse who built the body of the New Century motor car

Warrington, Charles Herbert
[1876-1893] Cistern maker at Halifax. Son of Ralph Warrington of 5 Daisy Street, Hopwood Lane.

He was said to be a sharp and intelligent youth and

fond of trapeze exercise, and frequently used to swing and perform feats on the hammock ropes in the attic

On 20th August 1893, he went to the attic to make his brother's bed. His mother later found his lifeless form dangling from a rope attached to the hammock

Warrington's: G. & B. Warrington
Wool dealers at Lambert Street, West Vale. Partners included George Warrington and Benjamin Warrington.

The partnership was dissolved in October 1893

Warrington, Iredale & Tattersall
Woollen manufacturers at Marshall Hall Mills, Elland.

Partners included Samuel Warrington, Edwin Iredale, and Thomas Tattersall.

The partnership was dissolved in 1868, so far as regards E. Iredale. Iredale then went into the earthenware trade

Warrington, Samuel
[18??-1???] He was a Methodist preacher, and went on to become one of founders of the Temperance Methodist Church, Elland.

He was in partnership with life-long friend Edwin Iredale at Mayfield Mill, Elland, and later he was a partner in Warrington, Iredale & Tattersall at Marshall Hall Mills, Elland [1868]

Warship Week
A national fund-raising scheme which ran from 7th to 14th February 1942.

A total of £3,888,038 was raised in Calderdale, of which Halifax raised £2,077,565 and Brighouse raised £507,006.

See HMS Ajax, HMS Convolvulus, HMS Eclipse, HMS Saint Pancras and Spitfire

Wash White
A washing liquid produced and sold by Harry LundHarry Washwhite – in Brighouse in the 1930s

Washer Lane House, Halifax
16th century house, aka Old Hall, Washer Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in Sketches of Old Halifax

Washer Lane Steps, Halifax
Lead down from Washer Lane to Wakefield Road

Washington & Company Limited
Engineers and manufacturers of electric cables and machinery at 1 Old Causeway, Sowerby Bridge.

In 1900, there was a dispute between the partners, Mr Washington and Mr Barraclough, in the High Court. The Sowerby Bridge Chronicle of 22nd June 1900, reported

The parties had separately purchased certain patterns drawings, etc, and agreed to work jointly, but dispute arose the plaintiff contending that the defendant had failed to produce proper accounts, and the defendant alleging that the plaintiff had never paid him the proper proportion of the profits due to him. His Lordship held that the plaintiff's version of the agreement was the correct one, and directed an account to be taken on that basis. He also held that the defendant had failed in his counter-claim for damages for alleged negligence alleged by the plaintiff in manufacturing certain machines. Judgment for the plaintiff accordingly with costs

Washington, Charles William
[1867-19??] Born in Sowerby Bridge.

He was a mechanical engineer manager with Thomas Barraclough & Company Limited, Manchester [1891]; a wire manufacturer in Sowerby Bridge; a mechanical engineer (employer) [1901]; a mechanical engineer, wire and cable machine maker (employer) [1911]; a partner in Washington & Company Limited.

He was known for his developments in the construction of cable machinery for boring steel shaft.

In 1890, he married Mary Hannah Walsh [1866-19??], from Littleborough, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Ernest C [b 1894] who was studying farming at a farm in Driffield [1911]; (2) Albert Cecil [b 1898].

The family lived at 53 Park View, Manchester [1891]; Shroggs House, Halifax [1901]; Shroggs House, Lower Skircoat Green, Halifax [1911]

Living with them in 1901 were mother-in-law Ellen Walsh [aged 65] and sister-in-law Lillie Walsh [aged 31].

Mother-in-law Ellen Walsh was living with them in 1911

Washington, Frederick
[1850-1910] Landlord of the Woodland Hotel, Boothtown [1891].

In 1878, he married Ann Copley [1857-1???] in Halifax.

Children: (1) daughter; (2) daughter

See Alfred Morris

Washington, General George
[1867-1909] Son of Henry Washington.

Born in Halifax.

He was a grocer's assistant [1881]; a grocer of Gibbet Street, Halifax [1889]; a grocer of 37 Old Lea Bank [1890]; a woolsorter [1901].

In 1889, he married Beatrice Shaw [1871-1???] at Halifax Parish Church.


Beatrice of Lee Bank, Ovenden, was the daughter of James Shaw, wool sorter.

Beatrice was a worsted mill hand [1891]

 

Children: (1) Harry; (2) Fredrick George [b 1896] who was a woollen piecer [1911]; (3) Vernon [b 1897] who was a cotton piecer [1911]; (4) Albert [b 1906]; (5) Winnifred [b 1900] who was a scholar at the Blue Coat School, Halifax [1911].

The family lived at 19 Manor Street, Ovenden [1891]; 5 Water Hill, Luddendenfoot [1901]; 16 Bank Buildings, Luddendenfoot [1911].

George died 1909 (aged 42).

Washington, Harry
[1890-1???] Son of General George Washington.

Born 20th May 1890.

Baptised at Saint George's Church, Ovenden [June 1890].

He was a cotton gasser [1911]; a member of Luddendenfoot Congregational Church.

When he was a member of the Luddendenfoot Boys' Brigade, he received the Brigade Distinguished Conduct Medal after rescuing a child from the river.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 1st/4th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

Whilst he was in the trenches, he was shot and killed by a German sniper [16th June 1915].

He was buried at the Y Farm Military Cemetery, Bois-Grenier [D 42]

Washington, Henry
[1836-1???] Born in Halifax.

He was a butcher [1881].

In [Q3] 1861, he married Grace Pickles [1837-1???] in Halifax.


Grace was born in Wadsworth
 

Children: (1) Clara Hetta [b 1862] who was a factory operative [1881]; (2) General George; (3) Edith Grace [b 1870].

The family lived at 119 Gibbet Street, Halifax [1881]

Washington House, Greetland
Rochdale Road.

There is a datestone WIW 1704 over the front door.

In 1854, property called Spring Head stood on the site

Washington, Samuel
[17??-18??] Of Lightcliffe. One of Anne Lister's stewards.

In 1819, he was engaged to produce a map and field book of Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse.

See Major E. P. Chambers

Washington, Thomas
[18??-1???] Opened the Market Place Turkish Baths, Halifax

Waske Hall, Skircoat Green
50 Skircoat Green. 17th century house

Wason, Captain E. S.
[18??-1880] He served with the 33rd Duke of Wellington's Own Regiment. He was an Adjutant of the 6th West Yorkshire Militia. He died in England.

There is a memorial to him and other members of the regiment in Halifax Parish Church

Wass, George
[1818-1883] Born in Leeds.

He was a bookkeeper at Brighouse [1847]; a horse keeper with the Midland Railway Company [1851]; a canal agent for the Aire & Calder [1861]; a canal agent [1871]; a canal agent (inland navigation) [1881].

In 1847, he married Hannah Booth [1823-1895] at Halifax Parish Church.


Hannah, from Northowram, was the daughter of mason Joseph Booth
 

They had no children.

They lived at 9 Ashley Street, Hunslet, Leeds [1851]; Phoenix House, Bridge Street, Wakefield [1861]; Calder Wharf, Mirfield, Dewsbury [1871]; Navigation Yard, Halifax [1881]; Osborne Grove, Hipperholme [1891].

Staying with them in 1861 were visitors Elizabeth Smithies [aged 26] (dressmaker), and Mary Smithies [aged 9].

Living with the widowed Hannah in 1891 was boarder John Shafte Barry.

Hannah is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1885

Wat Ing, Norland
See Lower Wat Ing and Upper Wat Ing

Water Lane well
A water well at Caddy Field, Halifax. The ownership of the well was disputed: some – supported by Christopher Rawson – claimed it was a public well, whilst others – primarily Anne Lister and Ann Walker on whose land it lay – claimed it was private property. In March 1836, Anne Lister's journals mention an incident where the well was poisoned when gas tar was thrown into the well by a group of men employed by Ann Walker. It was judged to be a public well and Ann Walker had to pay damages and costs

Water Molly
[18??-18??] A 19th century character in Elland. She fetched and carried water for people. On Good Friday 18??, a wet day, she sat near to the fire to dry her clothes. The garments caught fire and she was burned to death

Water Scout, Shibden
House. Built in 1??? Abandoned in 1???

See Scout Hall, Shibden

Water Siphon, Old Lane
19th century water siphon on overflow sump. This is a deep, stone-lined, circular shaft fed by Ovenden Beck – the Hebble Brook – and south of Old Lane Mill

Water supply

Water Trough, Bell House Moor
Bell House Moor, Cragg Vale

Water Trough, Carr Hall Lane
Stainland.

Water Trough, Cross Stone
Opposite Saint Paul's Church, Cross Stone

Water Trough, Greetland

Water Troughs, Mankinholes
18th century water trough with 6 linked tanks. These were used for cooling milk churns.

Waterfall, John
[1847-19??] Born in Ironville, Derbyshire.

He was an iron founder [1881, 1891]; innkeeper at the Sportsman Inn, Soyland [1901, 1905]; a grocer (retail) [1911].

In 1905, the Sowerby Bridge Chronicle reported that he had been a cricket professional and groundsman to the Greenock Club, Scotland, for 14 years.

In [Q2] 1874, he married Clara Smith [1855-1???] in Belper.


Clara was born in Birmingham. She was assisting in the grocery business [1911]
 

Children: (1) Florence A [b 1875] who was a woollen weaver [1891], employed in public house [1901]; (2) Mary Eliza [b 1876] who was a cotton operative [1891]; (3) Joseph [b 1878] who was a cotton operative half timer [1891], a brewer's labourer [1911]; (4) John Pearce [b 1883]; (5) Doris [b 1895] who was assisting in the grocery business [1911].

The family lived at 105 Fletchers Row, Alfreton, Derbyshire [1881]; Broadcarr Terrace, Elland [1891]; 78 Gibbet Street, Halifax [1911].

Living with them in 1911 was granddaughter Marther Waterfall [aged 4]

Waterfalls
There are several waterfalls in the district, including Carr Hall Falls, Stainland, Fisherman's Hut Falls, Hebden Bridge, Horseshoe Cascade, Hardcastle Crags, Jumble Hole Falls, Todmorden, Kester Hole, Shelf, Lumb Hole Falls, Rough Hey Wood, Triangle, Saltonstall Falls, Walshaw Falls, Hardcastle Crags and Wheatley Falls

Waterhouse...
The entries for people with the surname Waterhouse are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Waterhouse
The local occurrence of the surname may have originated in Lincolnshire. John Waterhouse is recorded at Barton-on-Humber in 1424, when he was a witness to a deed relating to Dove House, Shibden.

Other spellings of the name in old documents include Waterhose, Waterhowse, Watrhowse, Watterhouse, Wattirhouse, and Wattrous

The Waterhouse family: Arms
The arms of the Waterhouse family – a black inverted pyramid – can be seen on a window in the Housebody at Shibden Hall.

Motto:

veritas liberabit
truth shall make free
veritas vincit omnia
truth conquers all

The Waterhouse family of Halifax
Important local family.

15th century members of the family lived at Lower Hollins, Warley.

They were the bailiffs in the North for the Priory of Lewes, and collected tithes and administered the lands in the Parish of Halifax – see the Great Tithes dispute

After the Dissolution of the Monasteries, they bought some of the land in the district, including Shibden Hall.

Richard Waterhouse was an early member of the family.

Major Samuel Waterhouse was the last male member of the family. Catharine Grace Doherty Waterhouse was the last member of the family.

See The Bache, Warley, Mearclough Mill, Old Well Head, Shibden Hall, The Waterhouse family: arms and Well Head

The Waterhouse family of Hollins
See Lower Hollins and Jonas Waterhouse

The Waterhouse family of Shibden
Descended from John Waterhouse

The Waterhouse family of Skircoat
Robert Waterhouse was a founder member of the family

The Waterhouse family of Sowerby Bridge
Aka Waterhouse family of Broadgates. They were involved in the cloth industry. Owned the Navigation pub at Sowerby Bridge in the 17th century

See Robert Waterhouse

Waterhouse Almshouses, Halifax

Waterhouse, Bingham & Company
Silk noil spinners at Kebroyd Mills, Triangle [1905]

Waterhouse Charities
A number of charities were established under provisions of the will of Nathaniel Waterhouse, including the Blue Coat School.

See Alexander & Hammerton, Richard Kershaw, John Taylor Ramsden, Smyth's Charity School, Seal of the Waterhouse Charity and John Woodhead

Waterhouse Charity, Seal of the
The seal of the Waterhouse Charities is described in 1635 [?] as
A seal of this Corporation bears an inscription

SIGIL: CORP APUD HALLIF: 1662 Seal of the Corporation at Halifax 1662

in the field, a virgin hung in her tree by her hair, on the other side a man standing, holding in his hand a ball or a sphere

This may be a version of the story of Ælred and the virgin

See Name of Halifax

Waterhouse's: E. J. W. Waterhouse & Son
Fire brick manufacturers at Calder Fire Clay Works, Elland [1874, 1905]

Waterhouse's: John Waterhouse & Company
Woolstaplers at 39 Bull Green, Halifax [1905]

Waterhouse's: Samuel & John Waterhouse
Merchants at Savile Row, Halifax [1809]

Waterhouse Sermon
Aka Waterhouse Lecture. In his will, Nathaniel Waterhouse left a sum of £60 per annum for the curates of 12 chapels in the parish of Halifax, and each minister had to preach a sermon – known as the Waterhouse Sermon – in Halifax Parish Church on the first Wednesday of each month. Using figures for average earnings, £60 in 1645 is roughly the equivalent of £110,000.00 today.

See William Ainsworth and Rev C. D. Roberts

Waterhouse Stop
An interchangeable diaphragm for controlling the entry of light into a camera invented by John Waterhouse [1858]

Waterhouse Street Library
A subscription library of around 4500 books was founded around 1840 at Waterhouse Street, Halifax

Watering Trough, Walsden
Aka Throstlenest, Throstle Hall and Clunter Bottom.

A small farm with a cottage, barn and shippon.

Owners and tenants have included

Waterloo Brass Band, Brighouse
Established in 18??

See William Parry and Waterloo, Brighouse

Waterloo Bridge, Ripponden
Aka Ripponden Old Bridge

Waterloo, Brighouse
Area of Brighouse on the south side of Waterloo Road, Brighouse.

The land was owned by Brooke's, and there was stone quarrying here.


Question: Does anyone know if these stone quarries were those known as Lane Head Quarry?

 

Brighouse Rangers played at Waterloo Fields here.

In 1913, Brooke's planned to build a Garden City here but this was abandoned because of World War I.

In 1935, there was a dispute between Brighouse Council – who claimed that the land was agricultural and worth £3,750 – and Brooke's – who claimed that it was building land and worth £6,529. After some wrangling, the land was sold to the Council for £4,000.

There are now allotments and Saint Andrew's Junior School on the land

Waterloo, Elland
An early name for an area of Park Road around the entrance to the Park Wood Crematorium.

In the mid-1800s, many of thos living in the area were miners at the local coal mines

The Colliers' Arms is recorded at Waterloo [1871]

Waterloo Fields, Brighouse
Playing fields at Waterloo, Brighouse.

Brighouse Rangers played here [1890s].

Saint Andrew's Junior School, Brighouse was built on the site in 1971

Waterloo Hall, Halifax
Stands at Bell Hall at the junction of Savile Park Road / Emscote Street South.

Owners and tenants have included

Waterloo House, Halifax
109 Savile Park Road.

Owners and tenants have included

Waterloo House, Heptonstall
This was a popular café. It is now a private house

Waterloo Road Allotments, Brighouse
Allotments established on land formerly occupied by Brooke's at Waterloo, Brighouse

Waterloo, Stainland
A small community at Stainland. This was essentially just 2 cottages which are now demolished

Owners and tenants have included

Waterloo Villas, Halifax
Savile Park Road. Recorded in the 1841 census between Paradise Row and Savile Hall.

Owners and tenants have included

Waterside Footpath
A cantilevered walkway on the east bank of the Hebble Brook at Waterside. Runs from Lilly Bridge

Waterside, Halifax
Area around Lilly Lane along the Hebble Brook.

See Waterside Footpath

Waterside House, Todmorden
Owners and tenants have included

Waterstalls Farm, Walsden
Bottomley Road. Mid 18th century house and barn. There is a first floor taking-in door

Owners and tenants have included

The farm has been renovated and is now a private house.

The adjacent Waterstalls Mill is now derelict

Waterton, Rev Clement
[18??-18??] He was at Chilwell College, Nottingham. before becoming Pastor at West Vale Baptist Church [1886-1888].

He left to serve at Boston, Lincolnshire

Waterwheels

Watkin, Robert
[1895-1961] Born in Aston Manor, Warwick, of a Welsh family.

He was injured in World War I, and was invalided out.

He joined the Halifax Borough Treasurer's Department in 1921, as a collector. He became Chief Paying Cashier. He retired in 1959, after almost 39 years.

On 9th September 1922, he married Hilda Bottomley [1897-1971].

Children: Rita M. [b 1925] who married Alan Hugh Greaves.

The family lived at 7 Savile Drive, Halifax [1959].

On retirement, he and Hilda moved to the Isle of Wight.

After Robert's death in 1961, Hilda returned to live in Luddendenfoot

Watkins, Archibald Lionel
[19??-19??] A mathematics teacher from Somerset. In 1955, he established Lightcliffe Preparatory School. He was headmaster and principal at the school. His son and granddaughter carried on the school

Watkins, D. J.
[19??-19??] Minister at Bethlehem Pentecostal Mission, Wheatley Road [1966]

Watkins, Mary Elizabeth
[18??-19??] Of Richmond, North Yorkshire. She came to work in service at a Brighouse house.

She married Harry Percy Jackson

Watkins, Wilfred John Arthur
[1916-2005] In 1944, he married Ann Fenella Rawson.

Children: John Frederick Llewellyn.

The family lived near Dundalk, Eire before coming to live at Haugh End House

He died 26th November 2005.

He was buried at Saint Peter's Church, Sowerby

The Watkinson family of Hipperholme
Henry Watkinson was an early member of the family.

A branch of the family became important in Ovenden.

See Perth House, Lightcliffe and Watkinson Chapel, Lightcliffe

Watkinson, Alfred
[1881-1950] Son of Samuel Watkinson. Baptised at Coley [12th October 1881].

He was a woollen manufacturer [1901]; a worsted manufacturer [1911].

In 1939, Alfred Watkinson was a director of South American Railways in place of Samuel Watkinson [1939].

On 29th July 1914, he married Marion, daughter of Albert Eastwood, at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Samuel; (2) Nellie.

The family lived at Spring Hall, Shelf [1922]

Watkinson Almshouses, Lightcliffe
4 cottages – 2 detached cottages and 1 semi-detached – endowed by Miss Emma Watkinson in her parents' memory and built in 1926.

They were for

TO PROVIDE ACCOMMODATION FOR ALMSPEOPLE BEING DESCENDANTS OF GEORGE AND JANE WATKINSON OR PERSONS WHO HAVE RESIDED FOR NOT LESS THAN THREE YEARS IN THE ECCLESIASTICAL PARISHES OF ST MATTHEW LIGHTCLIFFE, ST MATTHEW NORTHOWRAM AND ST JOHN COLEY,

They were designed by J. F. Walsh. An inscription reads

These four houses were erected in 1926 and endowed by Emma Watkinson (who died 30th November 1923) in memory of her father and mother, George and Jane Watkinson

See John Wright

Watkinson & Crabtree
Makers of common & fire bricks, crucibles, tiles, pottery, clay, etc., at Swan Bank Brick Works [1865].

Partners included Mr Watkinson and Joseph Crabtree

Watkinson, Arthur
[1884-19??] Son of John Watkinson. Born in Holywell, Flintshire.

He was educated at Rossall School, Fleetwood, Lancashire [1901].

On 17th July 1907, he married Mary Healy [1877-19??].


Mary, from Navan, Ireland, was the daughter of Christopher Healy (gentleman) 
 

At the time of the marriage – at Saint Peter's Church, Harrogate – Mary's address was given as The Majestic Hotel, Harrogate, and Arthur's address was given as Brook Park, Northop, Flintshire.

Arthur became very wealthy and converted to Catholicism.

Around 1911, Arthur and Mary went to live in Campden, Gloucestershire.

They were benefactors to the people and the Catholic church in Campden.

The English etcher F. L. Griggs, also a Catholic convert, was an acquaintance of the family.

Arthur installed a memorial to his wife in Saint Catharine's Catholic church at Chipping Campden.

It is possible that the memorial was a large crucifix, designed by F. L. Griggs, and carved by Alec Miller.


Question: Does anyone know exactly what the memorial was?

 

The family lived at Mickleton Lodge, Campden, Gloucestershire [1911, 1918]; Broad Campden, Gloucestershire [1922, 1926]

Jenny Bruce of the Chipping Campden History Society tells me

Arthur Watkinson lived in a house called Maidenwell in the next village of Broad Campden. He entertained the children from Saint Catharine's Catholic school to summer parties. He also supported fund-raising for the Town Band, and donated land for Broad Campden Recreation Ground. He [possibly] bought a lot of land when the Earl of Gainsborough's estate was broken up

Watkinson's Charity
In 1732, Rev Edward Watkinson gave the rent from property in Leeds and Hunslet to buy twelve 2d loaves each week and distribute these every Sunday after morning service to 6 poor widows in Midgley and 6 in Warley. Each person should also received 6d on Trinity Sunday, 12d on the Sunday before Christmas, and 6d on Easter Sunday. Using figures for average earnings, 6d in 1732 is roughly the equivalent of £37.50 today

Watkinson, Edward
[15??-1???] On 2nd August 1586, he married Mary Hopkinson at Northowram

Watkinson, Rev Edward
[16??-1767] DD. Eldest son of Benjamin Watkinson MD of Wakefield.

He was Rector in Kent before becoming Curate at Luddenden [1724-1728]. He later became rector of Little Chart, Kent.

He published several pamphlets including An Essay on Economy, An Essay upon Gratitude, and An Admonition to the younger Clergy [1765].

He was a subscriber to the publication of Watson's History.

He married Anne Mitchell.


Anne was the daughter of Alderman Rowland Mitchell of Hunslet Hall, Leeds
 

Children: Maria.

He established Watkinson's Charity

Watkinson, Elizabeth
[1796?-1879] Daughter of John Watkinson.

She and her sister, Hannah, were assistants to Mrs Haugh of Doncaster, before they established Watkinson's School for Young Ladies, Halifax.

She married John Turney at Clapham.

She died in Leek Wootton in December 1879, 8 weeks after her husband

Watkinson, Elizabeth Angela
[1910-19??] Known as Angela. Daughter of Canon George Watkinson.

In 1933, she was preparing to marry John Green Asquith, but he died a few weeks before the wedding.

In 1935, she married Gerald F. Summers from Barnes, in Halifax.

Children: Lucy Angela [b 1946].

The family lived at Woodfield, Hipperholme

Watkinson, Emma Jane
[1850-1923] Daughter of George Watkinson.

She was badly-disfigured.

She never married.

She lived at The Longlands, Lightcliffe which was built for her in 1904, the year after the death of her father.

She died at Longlands [30th November 1923].

Probate records show that she left personal effects valued at £32,296 4/7d.

In her will, she left money for several good causes, including £300 to the Royal Halifax Infirmary, and a field and £7,000 to build the Watkinson Almshouses near her home at Lightcliffe in her parents' memory

Watkinson's: F. Watkinson Limited
Belting manufacturers at Victoria Street East, Halifax [1938].

Frank Watkinson was MD [1938]

Watkinson, Frank
[18??-1949] Son of Thomas Watkinson.

He was a Conservative; a Halifax Councillor [from 1919]; Freeman of the Borough [22nd March 1948]; a Freemason; a member of Halifax Rotary Club; MD of F. Watkinson Limited; Mayor of Halifax [1937-1938] His wife was Mayoress.

In 1918, he married Ellen L. Harrison from Dudley Hill, in Bradford

Watkinson, George
[1792-18??] Of Northowram. Son of Henry Watkinson. Baptised 22nd April 1792.

He was a manufacturer [1814]; a wool stapler [1818].

On 28th November 1813, he married Mary Holdsworth at Halifax Parish Church. They were married

by License and Consent of Parents

(possibly) because Mary may not have been of age.

Children: (1) George; (2) Martha Gibson [1818-1892] who married Thomas Clark

Watkinson, George
[1814-1903] Son of George Watkinson.

Born in Northowram [29th October 1814].

About 1870, he formed a partnership with his sons, George Watkinson & Sons.

He made a substantial amount of money in wool and coal

Watkinson, George
[1843-1905] Son of George Watkinson.

In 1874, his father withdrew from day-to-day management of the family's woolstapling business, leaving these to George.

On 27th September 1871, he married Alice Mary Cockcroft [1848-1889] from Rossendale.

Children: (1) George; (2) Samuel Lord; (3) Ethel Mary [b 1875] who married Rev Richard Piers Whittington; (4) Alice Helena [b 1877] who married James Allan Coutts.

He lived at The Grange, Hipperholme. In 1903, he inherited Woodfield, Hipperholme.

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1905

In his will, he left an estate of £1m. Using figures for average earnings, £1,000,000 in 1905 is roughly the equivalent of £426,000,000 today. Probate records show that he left effects valued at £453,537 19/- [resworn £453,960 14/6d]

Watkinson, Canon George
[1872-1961] MA. Son of George Watkinson.

Curate at Coley [1900] and Curate at Saint Matthew's Mission Church, Northowram [1891].

He was the first Vicar of the new Parish of Northowram at Saint Matthew's Church, Northowram [1910-1958]. He lived at Woodfield, rather than at Saint Matthew's Church Vicarage. His Curate lived at the Vicarage.

He resigned in 1958. He was Honorary Canon of Wakefield Cathedral.

He was a founder member of the Lightcliffe Lodge of Freemasons. He was a governor of Hipperholme Grammar School [1933].

He was interested in lepidoptery and had a large collection of moths and butterflies.

In 1902, he married Lucy, daughter of Thomas Luke Walsh, in Knaresborough.

Children: (1) George; (2) Phyllis Mary [b 1906]; (3) Lucy Margaret; (4) Elizabeth Angela; (5) Violet Stephanie Constance [1913-2005] who married Denis William Standeven; (6) Emma.

He lived at Grange, Lightcliffe. He inherited Woodfield, Hipperholme.

He built a Sunday School in the grounds of Woodfield.

In his will, he left £2,000 to Northowram Parish Church and £500 as an endowment for the church

Watkinson, George
[1904-19??] Only son of Canon George Watkinson.

In 1927?, he married Marjorie Morton from Halifax.

He became a farmer in Salisbury, Wiltshire

Watkinson's: George Watkinson & Sons Limited
Woolstaplers at Wade Street, Halifax. Established around 1870 by George Watkinson.

Partners included Samuel Watkinson.

The company diversified and had coal mining interests in Yorkshire and Wales.

In 1874, George managed the coal mines, but retired from managing the wool stapling business, and turned the operation over to his eldest son George, but continued as Chairman of the company. With son George, managing the woolstapling business, second son, John was made managing director of the company's coal mines in Wales.

They had several mines at Buckley, Flintshire:

  • Elm Number 1 [recorded in 1896]

  • Elm Number 3 [recorded in 1896]

  • Maesygrug [recorded in 1884]: In 1884, there was a strike at the Elm and Maesygrug pits after market conditions led managing director John Watkinson to reduce the miner's wages by 10%. On 13th August 1884, Watkinson terminated all the employees' contracts. This was the longest strike in the North Wales coalfields

  • Mountain [recorded in 1896]

  • New Ash [recorded in 1896]

  • Oak [recorded in 1896]

  • Willow which was bought from John Lassey around 1871

Watkinson Hall, Ovenden
Aka The Rookery. The first part of the hall was probably built by John Watkinson.

The second portion of was probably built around the time when John married in 1783. This portion of the house originally had a cloth warehouse built at the south end of it. This was pulled down when Beechwood Road was made about 1880.

Many members of the Watkinson family lived here.

Other owners and tenants have included

Watkinson, Hannah
[1798-1877] Daughter of John Watkinson.

She and her sister, Elizabeth, were assistants to Mrs Haugh of Doncaster, before they established ran Watkinson's School for Young Ladies, Halifax.

She married Thomas Turney. They lived at Park Lodge, Ovenden.

She and her husband were buried at Illingworth Church.

See Park Lodge, Ovenden

Watkinson, Henry
[1759-1831] An early member of the Watkinson family of Hipperholme.

He was a shalloon maker [1783, 1786]; a corn dealer [1792]; a manufacturer of Northowram [1788].

After the death of his father-in-law William Edwards, Henry took over as innkeeper of the Pine Apple, Halifax [1796, 1798, 1822]. In 1822, Henry is named as owner of the Pine Apple Inn.

On 20th April 1783, he married (1) Mary, daughter of William Edwards at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) John [bapt 1785]; (2) Ann [bapt 1786-1787]; (3) William Edward [bapt 1788]; (4) George; (5) William [bapt 1794-1796]; (6) Elesabeth [bapt 1796]; (7) infant [1798]; (8) Edward [1798].

Mary died in childbirth, and she and their newborn child, were buried on 7th February 1798. Edward, who appears to be a twin of this infant, was buried on 29th March 1798.

On 2nd November 1802, Henry married (2) Ellen Thompson [1768-1824] in Birstall.

Children: (9) Mary.

Henry died in Hightown, and was buried at Liversedge [21st January 1831]

Watkinson, Herbert
[1883-1949] Son of John Watkinson.

He became a barrister.

He lived at Brook Park, Northop, Flintshire.

After the death of his sister Marian and her husband Richard Kershaw, Herbert took their children in at Brook Park

After Herbert's death, his nephew Arthur Watkinson Kershaw removed most of the contents of Brook Park to Australia

Watkinson, James Bottomley
[1878-1922] Of Shelf Hall.

Son of Samuel Watkinson. Baptised at Coley [9th October 1878].

He was a wool merchant [1901]; a Councillor for Norwood Green.

On 21st August 1907, he married (1) Mary, daughter of Henry Waddington at Saint Michael's & All Angels' Church, Shelf.

Children: Mary Waddington (Watkinson) [b 1909].

His wife, Mary, died of complications following the birth of their daughter.

On 9th October 1912, he married (2) Mabel Oates [1891-19??] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (2) Samuel; (3) Richard Edward; (4) Geoffrey.

The family lived at Coley House, where he died [15th February 1922].

His will was proved by Samuel Watkinson of Perth House, Lightcliffe, Alfred Watkinson of Spring Hall, Shelf, and John Tordoff.

The family lived at Coley House, Coley.

He died at Coley House [14th February 1922].

Probate records show that he left personal effects valued at £61,184 8/-.

See Watkinson Memorial Offices, Norwood Green

Watkinson, John
[1???-1???] Or Watkinsone. Son of Thomas Watkinson

Watkinson, John
[1661-1731] Of Watkinson Hall, Ovenden.

He married (1) Susanna, daughter of Samuel Lister of Upper Brea.

Children: John.

After Susanna's death, he married (2) Judith Holdsworth from Northowram.

Judith was buried at Illingworth Church [11th May 1726].

John was buried at Illingworth Church [27th March 1731].

See Moor End Congregational Church, Pellon and James Waddington

Watkinson, John
[1693-1764] Son of John Watkinson

On 4th June 1718, he married Lydia Kershaw [1???-1753] from Ovenden.

Children: John.

The couple were buried at Illingworth Church: John [24th May 1764]; Lydia [10th February 1759]

Watkinson, John
[17??-18??] Around 1797, he built a mill at Holmfield. He carried out cotton spinning here.

In June 1812, he was declared bankrupt

Watkinson, John
[1721-1791] Son of John Watkinson.

He was a Constable of Ovenden [1758] and one of the Overseers for the Poor for Ovenden [1760].

In 1760, he was described as

of Moorside

In 1777, he subscribed £50 towards the rebuilding of Illingworth Church in which he took a deep interest.

He married Sarah Ramsden from Illingworth.

Children: (1) John; (2) Joseph.

He gave Park Lodge, Ovenden to his son Joseph who did not marry.

It is likely that he built the first part of the present Watkinson Hall.

He died 9th November 1791. He was buried at Illingworth Church

Watkinson, John
[1753-1834] Son of John Watkinson.

In 1783, he married Jane Waddington [1757-1844] from Clapham.

Children: (1) Hannah; (2) Elizabeth; (3) daughter; (4) daughter; (5) son; (6) son.

John died at his house in Ward's End, Halifax [5th June 1834] (aged 81)/ He was buried at Illingworth Church [10th June 1834]

Watkinson, John
[1845-1907] Son of George Watkinson.

Born in Halifax [6th November 1845].

Partner in George Watkinson & Sons.

John was made managing director of the company's coal mines in Wales, and his brother George was managing the family's woolstapling business,

In 1871, John went to Buckley, Flintshire, to assess the prospects of investing in coal mining there.

Around 1872, he bought the Buckley Colliery Company – from John Lassey – for £7,000.

He was a colliery proprietor (employing 800 men) [1881]; a farmer of 27 acres (employing 1 man) [1881]; managing director of the Buckley Colliery Company [1884].

On 13th January 1875, he married Mary Ann Sutcliffe [1854-1925] at Heptonstall.


Mary Ann was the daughter of John Sutcliffe
 

Children: (1) Marian [1876-1913] who married Richard Kershaw; (2) John [b 1877]; (3) Frederick [b 1880]; (4) Fanny [b 1881]; (5) Herbert; (6) Arthur; (7) (possibly) Maud [1886] who died in infancy.

The family lived at Brook Park, Northop, Flintshire [1881, 1891, 1901, 1907].

John died at Brook Park, Northop, Flintshire [26th May 1907].

Probate records show that he left personal effects valued at £275,891 11/7d

Watkinson, John Ellis
[18??-18??] Grocer at Northgate, Halifax [1850]

Watkinson, John Speak
[1909-19??] Son of Samuel Watkinson.

He inherited from his greatuncle John Speak

Watkinson, Joseph
[1629-1696] Of Illingworth.

He married Grace [1634-1697], daughter of Joseph Wood.

Children: John.

The family lived at Moorside House, Ovenden.

He was followed by his son John and successive Johns in the ownership of the house at Moorside.

He was buried at Halifax Parish Church. His wife died 6 weeks later

Watkinson, Joseph
[1757-1818] Son of John Watkinson.

Fancy stuff manufacturer at Ovenden [1809].

He did not marry. His father gave him Park Lodge, Ovenden. He lived there.

Joseph was taken suddenly ill in Halifax Piece Hall on Saturday morning, 24th January 1818. He was carried to the home of his brother John in Northgate, where he died next day.

He was buried at Illingworth Church [29th January 1818]. Anne Lister described the funeral in her journals

Watkinson, Lucy Margaret
[1908-19??] Aka Peggy. Second daughter of Canon George Watkinson.

She married Dr Thomas Lindsay Clark.

See Saint Matthew's Sunday School, Northowram

Watkinson, Maria
[1723-1726] Only daughter of Rev Edward Watkinson.

There is a memorial to her in Halifax Parish Church. The epitaph on the memorial is recorded in the book Monumental & Other Inscriptions

Watkinson Memorial Offices, Norwood Green
In 1922, Samuel Watkinson presented the Parish Council Offices to Norwood Green in memory of his son, James Bottomley

Watkinson, Mr
[18??-18??] Partner in Watkinson & Crabtree [1865]

Watkinson, Samuel
[1848-1939] Third son of George Watkinson.

See Dr F. A. Roberts and Watkinson Memorial Offices, Norwood Green

Watkinson, Samuel
[1878-1936] Son of Samuel Watkinson.

Born in Northowram. Baptised at Coley [9th October 1878].

He was a worsted manufacturer [1901, 1911].

On 16th June 1908, he married (1) Alice Dora Speak, at Illingworth church.

Children: John Speak.

Alice Dora died of complications following the birth of their son.

He married (2) Marion Priestley.

The family lived at Woodside, Shelf; Perth House, Lightcliffe [1936].

He died at Perth House, Lightcliffe [21st February 1936].

Probate records show that he left personal effects valued at £67,868 8/10d

Watkinson, Samuel Lord
[1874-1915] Son of George Watkinson.

He lived at The Grange, Lightcliffe. He was a member of the West Riding County Council.

In 1909, he married Annie Charteris [b 1871] in Halifax.

Children: (1) William Edward Charteris; (2) son; (3) Violet Corrie who married [1936?] Rodney Frances Turner of Derbyshire.

On 8th February 1911, he gave £3,000 for the erection of the tower, the completion of the bells, and the provision of a clock at Saint Matthew's, Northowram. Using figures for average earnings, £3,000 in 1911 is roughly the equivalent of £1,190,000 today.

In his will, he left bequests to Lightcliffe Parish Church, the Royal Halifax Infirmary, Saint Matthew's Church, Northowram, and the Halifax Tradesmen's Benevolent Institution

Watkinson, Sarah Ellen
[1886-1968] Aka Nellie. Daughter of Samuel Watkinson. Baptised at Coley [29th September 1886].

In 1905, she travelled to the USA with her father.

She married Alfred Edward Sykes.

Alfred and Nellie separated in the late 1920s. She stayed on at Ing Royd until the 1950s when she sold the house and moved to Savile Dene

Watkinson, Thomas
[1535-1???] Or Watkinsone. Born in Giggleswick [?].

On 27th October 1577, he married Isobel Brodlye [15??-1578] at Northowram.

Children: John Watkinson

Watkinson, William Edward Charteris
[1910-1981] Elder son of Samuel Lord Watkinson. Born in Knaresborough.

He came to live at The Grange, Lightcliffe. After the death of his father, he went to live in Malvern.

In the 1930s, he was known as a rally driver and trials drivers for MG and other car makers.

In 1935, there was an announcement of his engagement to Jocelyn Philippa Turner of Derbyshire.

In 1938, there was an announcement of his engagement to Glenda Fleming of Groombridge.

In 1942, he married Anne Farmer

Watling, Roy
[1938-] MBE, F.I.Biol, C.Biol, F.L.S. Well-known mycologist. Educated at All Saint's Primary Salterhebble and Heath Grammar School

Watman
A variant of the surname Watmough

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Watman, Rev Peter
[17??-18??] MA. Of Erringden [1822]

Watmore
A variant of the surname Watmough

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Watmough
Other forms of the surname include Watman, Watmore, Wattmaughe, Wattmoughe and Whatmore

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

George Redmonds writes that William Watman/Watmore/Wattmoughe is recorded in Halifax in 1541-1557, and Henry Watman/Watmaughe is recorded in Halifax in 1549-1555

There are currently only around 5 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Watmough. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Watmough, Hugh
[1???-1???] Son of John Watmough.

He inherited Thornton Hall, Bradford.

He married Susan, daughter of Dr John Favour

Watmough, John
[1537-1601] Son of William Watmough.

Born at Halifax.

In the 1590s, he was appointed as High Constable of Halifax.

He married (1) Unknown.

He married (2) Grace [15??-1623].

Children: (1) Hugh; (2) Martha; (3) Edith; (4) Esther; (5) Isabel; (6) Grace; (7) Margaret.

He had property in the district – including Bell Croft and Winding Hill Close - and elsewhere. In 1572, he acquired some land at Thornton, Bradford from the Tempest family, and built Thornton Hall

Watmough, Robert
[16??-1???] Lived at Lacey Hey Farm, Midgley. There is a datestone RW/1672 for him.

In 1699, he sold the property to Edward Baskerville

Watmough, Thomas
[16??-17??] Halifax jail-keeper.

In 1???, he married (1) Unknown [16??-1710].

In July 1710, he married (2) Unknown

Watmough, William
[15??-15??] From Lancashire.

He married Margaret.

Children: (1) John; (2) Margaret [b 1539]

Watson
[Surname]

There are currently around 27 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Watson. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Watson, Alan
[1???-19??] JP. He was Mayor of Todmorden [1959-1960]

Watson & Foster
Woolstaplers at Halifax. Partners included Mr Watson and Mr Foster.

The partnership was dissolved in December 1868

Watson & Townend
20th century clothing manufacturer at Townson Works, Hebden Bridge

Watson, Andrew
[1857-1???] Born in British Guiana. He lived in Halifax [1864-1870]. In August 1866, he attended Heath Grammar School. He went to public school in London. He was the first black man to play for a senior British football team, and the first black international football captain. He was Scottish football captain

Watson, Arthur
[1872-19??] Born in Halifax.

He was a lithographic printer [1911].

In [Q4] 1898, he married Eliza Moore [1874-19??] from Greetland.

Children: (1) Fred [b 1900]; (2) Elsie [b 1901]; (3) Bertha [b 1903]; (4) Helen [b 1905]; (5) twins Florence [b 1906]; (6) Jessie [b 1906]; (7) Leonard [b 1908]; (8) William [b 1910].

The family lived at 12 Saint Anne's Road, Skircoat Green [1911]

Watson, Arthur
[1877-1940] The 63-year-old was one of the 11 civilian casualties of the Hanson Lane bomb which fell on 22nd November 1940. He died on the same day

Watson Brothers
Card makers and card clothing manufacturers at Union Mills, Halifax [1905, 1923], and Savile Mill, Halifax [1936]

See George Walker Highley

Watson, Charles
[18??-18??] He ran a school in Halifax [around 1850].

He lived at Rhodes Street, Halifax [1850]

Watson, Charles
[18??-19??] FRSA. Schoolmaster at Edwards Akroyd's Haley Hill College.

He designed and patented a syphon ventilator. He designed a ventilation system for Mulcture Hall, Halifax,

Around 1855, he established an engineering business making the ventilators.

The firm's products included

Watson syphon ventilator
Watson's double current syphon ventilator
Excelsior syphon ventilator
Excelsior outlet ventilator

Their products were installed for the Royal family at Windsor Castle, Frogmore, and Sandringham House.

The business became Hill & Hey in 1871.

See Double current ventilators

Watson Cottage, Southowram
Recorded in 1911, when William Pearson [b 1842] (silk card machine tenter) and daughter May [b 1879] (dressmaker) lived here.

See Watson House, Southowram

Watson Crossing, Sowerby Bridge
A halt on the railway line between Sowerby Bridge and Triangle.

Vacuum-operated steps allowed the passengers of the motor train to use the ground-level platform at the Crossing.

Opened in 1907.

On 16th August 1926, a number of runaway railway coaches crashed here.

It closed in July 1929.

See Motor Train

Watson, Dyson
[1???-1???] He was a member of the Calder Valley Poets

Watson, Harling
[18??-19??] Licensee of the Kimberley Arms, Halifax [1905]. Partner in Turner & Watson

Watson's: Henry Watson Limited
Printer at Southgate, Elland [1906]

See Halifax Street Guide

Watson House, Southowram
Owners and tenants have included

See Watson Cottage, Southowram and Watson Quarries, Southowram

Watson, James
[1???-1930] Cotton manufacturer.

He lived at Field House, Mytholmroyd

Watson, Rev John
[17??-18??] AM. Brother of Rev Thomas Watson.

He was Vicar of Coley [1791]

Watson, Rev John
[1724-1783] Born in Cheshire [26th March 1724]. He was Curate at Halifax [1750] and Curate at Ripponden [1754-1769].

He was a well-known local historian and antiquary, and author of the classic History and Antiquities of The Parish of Halifax in Yorkshire.

See E. Jacobs and William Williams

Watson, John James
[1848-1871] Born in Halifax.

He was an ironmonger employing 3 men & 1 boy [1871]. In 1870, he married Jane Elizabeth Nicholson, in Halifax.

In 1883, Jane Elizabeth married Henry Raphael Oddy.

The family lived at 6 Green Hill Terrace, Halifax [1871]

Watson, Keith
[19??-] In December 2010, he took over from Ann McAllister as Mayor of Calderdale [2010-2011]. His wife, Eileen, was Mayoress

Watson Limited
Printers at Southgate Printing Works, Elland [1905]

Watson Mill Bridge, Sowerby Bridge
Crosses the Ryburn. Mentioned in the 17th century. It was rebuilt in 1660 when the road to Watson Mill was constructed

Watson, Milnes
[1837-1875] Innkeeper of Halifax.

He died 7th July 1875.

He was buried at Christ Church, Pellon

Watson, Mr
[17??-1793] Of Halifax.

On 12th April 1793, he was executed at the Tyburn, York

for breaking open and robbing the dwelling-house of John Ambler, of Halifax, and stealing therefrom 1 mahogany desk, 7 or 8 guineas in gold and other articles to a considerable amount

Watson, Peter
[18??-18??] Saddler and harness maker, and cementer of mill straps at Hebden Bridge and at Hall End, Halifax [1845]

Watson, Richard
[17??-1793] Of Halifax.

On 12th April 1793, he was executed at the Tyburn, York for breaking open the dwelling house of John Ambler in Halifax, and stealing 1 mahogany desk, 7 or 8 guineas, and other articles to a considerable amount

Watson, Rosamund
[15??-16??] Of Halifax. Wife of John Waddington

Watson, Rowland
[1710-1776] Of Keighley.

He (possibly) married Mary.

Children: (1) Ann [1737-1780] who married Thomas Ramsden; (2) Mary [1738-1785] who married Elkanah Hoyle.

In his will of 7th May 1776, he left

all his freehold lands in Keighley and all his messuages at Hill Top in Keighley to his daughter Ann, wife of Thomas Ramsden of Halifax, gent; £1000 to Thomas Ramsden and John Clapham of Utley, shalloon maker, upon trust that they put it out at interest and pay the interest to his daughter Mary the wife of Elkanah Hoyle of Hipperholme, gent, and after her death to pay £200 to his grandsons Rowland Ramsden and Rowland Hoyle, and the £800 residue to Luke, Elkanah, Rowland, and Mary the children of Mary and Elkanah Hoyle.

To Thomas Ramsden and John Clapham all his household goods, on trust that they permit his daughter Mary to have the use thereof, and after her death to go to her children.

He acquits Elkanah Hoyle of all loans and leaves to Sarah Ratcliffe his housekeeper £20, and to Henry Smith his servant £10, and the residue of his personal estate after his debts have been paid to his daughter Ann Ramsden whom he appoints sole executrix

Watson, Solomon
[18??-19??] In December 1901, he applied for patents
for improvements in and relating to wire mattresses

Watson, Solomon
[1844-19??] Born in Howden Dyke, Yorkshire.

He was bookkeeper at a timber yard in Halifax [1871]; merchant's clerk and innkeeper at Ward's End, Halifax [1881]; publican at the Shakespeare, Halifax [1887]; publican at Sowerby Bridge [1900].

He married (1) Caroline Emma [1847-1875] from Knaresborough.

Children: (1) George Herbert [b 1867]; (2) Annie Eliza [b 1873].

In 1878, he married (2) Elizabeth Rowlings [1858-1???] from Halifax, in Halifax.

Children: (3) Eleanor Gertrude [1879-19??] who married Cyrus Sing Lloyd.

The family lived at 48 Great Albion Street, Halifax [1871]; 2 Ward's End, Halifax [1881]

Watson, Rev Thomas
[1758-1833] Brother of Rev John Watson. Vicar of Elland [1793]. He died at Eden Hall, Penrith

Watson, W.
[18??-18??] Ironmonger at Elland.

In 1849, he was declared bankrupt

Watson-Wentworth, Charles
[1730-1782] 2nd Marquess of Rockingham. He was Whig Prime Minister 1765-1766 and 1782. He was Lord Lieutenant of the county.

In November 1769, he presided at the enquiry which he had called to discuss the problem of the coiners and the murder of William Deighton.

He was popular in the town and was greeted by a special peal of bells at Halifax Parish Church on his arrival. During the visit, he stayed with John Royds at Royds House.

Watson, William
[17??-18??] Watchmaker and clockmaker at Elland [1834]

Watson, William
[18??-19??] Of 9 Sholebrook Terrace, Leeds.

In 1903, he was one of the first people to be granted a motor drivers' licence, and may have been chauffeur to a family in Halifax

Watson, William Briggs
[18??-19??] Of Higgins & Company.

He lived at Bull Close Lane, Halifax [1905]

Watson, Willie
[1920-2004] England test cricketer and England international footballer.

He appeared at the Shay – as player-manager between 1954 and 1956, and as manager from 1964 to 1966. He played cricket for Yorkshire and played in 23 Tests for England including 7 against Australia. He played 4 times for the England national football team and when he joined Halifax Town, he was one of Wisden's five cricketers of the year. He scored more than 25,500 first-class runs in his career that also included county appearances with Leicestershire. After leaving Halifax Town, he played for the England Test side for the 1957/58 Ashes tour.

He emigrated to South Africa in 1968

Watterson, Henry
[1849-1906] Son of John Watterson (cordwainer), and brother of John Watterson. Born in Stockton, Yorkshire.

By 1871, he had moved to Halifax and was living with his brother John and family at The Lodge Cottage, Sowerby.

He was a farm servant/labourer [1871]; a carter [1881]; a teamster [1891]; a carter (mill) [1901]; an employee of the Rawson's [for 38 years]; a member of the Committee of Sowerby Bridge Industrial Society.

In [Q4] 1871, he married Edna Lawrence [1847-1???] at Saint Mary's Church, Sowerby.


Edna of Stubbin, was born in Sowerby, the daughter of Sarah and Edward Lawrence, woollen weaver
 

Children: (1) Agnes [b 1874] who was a woollen weaver [1891, 1901], a costume cloth weaver [1911]; (2) Edith [b 1876] who was a woollen warper [1891], a woollen weaver [1901]; (3) Emily [b 1878] who was a woollen spinner [1891], a woollen weaver [1901]; (4) Ethel [b 1872] who was a woollen weaver [1901]; (5) Annie [b 1886] who was a woollen twister [1901], a costume cloth weaver [1911].

The family lived at Saw Hill, Sowerby [1881, 1891, 1901]; 17 Saw Hill, Triangle [1911].

Living with them in 1891 was Edna's widowed mother Sarah Lawrence [aged 82].

Henry died on 5th October 1906.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £449. Probate was granted to his widow Edna.

He was buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones [9th October 1906]

Watterson, John
[1840-1???] Born in Stockton, Yorkshire.

He was a coachman [1871].

In [Q4] 1863 he married Ann Lang [1841-1???] in York.


Ann was born in Selby
 

Children: (1) Mary Elizabeth [b 1865]; (2) Anne Rosamund [b 1868]; (3) Jebson Lang [b 1870].


The family moved to Halifax between 1861 and 1865
 

The family lived at Stockton on the Forest [1861]; The Lodge Cottage, Sowerby [1871].

Living with them in 1871 were John's brother Henry Watterson [aged 23] (farm servant), and sister Annie Watterson [aged 17] (worsted twister), and niece Blanche Lang [aged 9]

Watterson: John Watterson & Company
Wool and waste dealer at West Vale.

In October 1880, the company was declared bankrupt

Wattmaughe
A variant of the surname Watmough

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Wattmoughe
A variant of the surname Watmough

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Watts & Naylor
Carpet manufacturer at Calder Carpet Works, Brighouse. Partners included E. Watts, T. Naylor and J. W. Naylor.

The partnership was dissolved in April 1868

Watts, Rev Henry
[1801-18??] Born in London.

He was a Methodist New Connexion minister in Halifax [1837].

In 1837, he married Susannah, daughter of James Walsh, in Halifax.

Children: Eliza [b 1836].

They lived at 10 Brunswick Street, Halifax [1837]; Stannary, Halifax [1841]; 9 Chapel Terrace, Stafford, Staffordshire [1851]; 156 Great Dover Street, Newington, Lancashire [1861]

Watts, Rev John William
[1807-18??] Vicar of Bicester.

He married Rebecca [b 1806] who was born in Antigua, West Indies.

Children: (1) Langford Lovell; (2) Agnes [b 1836].

He died on the Isle of Wight

Watts, Rev Langford Lovell
[1834-1882] Son of Rev John William Watts.

Born in Bath.

He was at Saint Aidan's College, Birkenhead before becoming Perpetual Curate at Stainland [1861, 1874].

On 2nd October 1860, he married Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Rev Charles Rogers.

Children: (1) Henry Langford [b 1862]; (2) Edith Mary [b 1865].

Living with them in 1871 was niece Letitia Mary Pollitt [b  1847] from Sowerby Bridge.

He died on the Isle of Wight

Watts Wrigley & Son
Silk waste spinners established by Watts Wrigley at Brow Mills, Sowerby Bridge [1832], and at Shay Lane Mill, Holmfield which they built about 1836.

In 1835, the firm was one of the subscribers to the Halifax Dispensary, giving 5 guineas

Watty House, Todmorden
Owners and tenants have included

Watty Place, Todmorden
Owners and tenants have included

Watty Scout, Todmorden
Dulesgate. Rock outcrop about 120 ft high

Waugh, Anna Mary
[1853-1928] Daughter of Edward Waugh, a solicitor in London. Born in Cumberland.

She was the second wife of Frederick Walter Hadwen.

She died at The Dene, Triangle.

She and her husband were buried at Saint Mary's Church, Cottonstones

Waugh, Mr
[15??-16??] Vicar of Coley [1623]

Wavell, Edmund Minson
[1807-1898] JP. Born in Newport, Isle of Wight [25th September 1807].

He became a law student [1823], and a solicitor [April 1830]. He moved to Halifax where he became an attorney [1833].

He was one of the subscribers to John Horner's book Buildings in the Town & Parish of Halifax [1835].

He had an office at Union Street, Halifax [1834].

People articled to Wavell included

He was an agent for the Phoenix & Protector Fire Offices [1836]

He and Johnson Atkinson Busfeild were involved in the formation of the Halifax, Bradford & Keighley Insurance Company [1846].

He was one of the original guarantors of the Yorkshire Penny Bank [1859].

He went into partnership with his son, Edmund, and Henry John Philbrick as Wavell, Philbrick, Foster & Wavell [1852] Recorded as Wavell & Company [1868].

He was the first president of the Halifax Law Society [1886].

He retired in 1896, being the oldest practising solicitor in the country at the time.

He was Halifax Town Clerk [1850, 1856]; Chairman of the Calder & Hebble Navigation Company [1886]; President of King Cross Constitutional Club.

He read the loyal address when the Prince of Wales opened Halifax Town Hall in 1863

In [Q3] 1838, he married Mary Annie Browne.


Mary Ann was the daughter of George Buckstone Browne
 

Children: (1) Mary Anne / Marianne [b 1840] who married [16th October 1861] William Wakefield; (2) Edmund; (3) Sophia Elizabeth [b 1844]; (4) George Henry [b 1846]; (5) Frances Jane [b 1847]; (6) Louisa Tabitha [b 1848] who married [1887] Joseph Warrall in Halifax.

Sophia was a pupil at Calcloth Hall, Newton Heath, Manchester [1861].

The family lived at New Road, Halifax [1841, 1850]; Field House, Halifax [1851, 1861, 1881, 1898].

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1898.

See Halifax Town Hall, Saint James's Club, Halifax, Wavell, Kerr & Kerr and Wavell, Son & Marshall

He was buried at Saint Paul's Church, King Cross

Wavell, Edmund Minson
[1843-1894] Son of Edmund Minson Wavell.

He was a student at Middle Temple [1871], a solicitor at Halifax [1881], and a partner in Wavell, Philbrick, Foster & Wavell and Wavell, Son & Marshall. He was a Colonel 4th Battery of 2nd West Yorks Garrison Artillery Volunteers [1907].

On 1st December 1880, he married Mary Helen Foster.


Mary Helen was the eldest daughter of William Foster
 

They lived at Field House, Halifax [1871]; Holme Leigh, Skircoat [1881]; 6 Park Road, Halifax [1887].

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1894.

Helen Mary Wavell [late of 9 Park Road, Halifax] died at Livingstone Mansions, Queens Club Gardens, London. [6/1/1907].

She was buried at Saint Paul's Church, King Cross

Wavell, Florence Mary
[18??-19??] Daughter of ??.

She lived at 6 Park Road, Halifax [1891].

In 1903, she was one of the first people to be granted a car registration and a motor drivers' licence

Wavell, George Henry
[1846-1???] (Possibly) son of Edmund Minson Wavell.

He was a scholar at Sedburgh Free Grammar School [1861]; a solicitor (not in practice) [1881]

Wavell, Kerr & Kerr
Halifax solicitors established around 1895.

Partners included Edmund Minson Wavell, Robert Moffat Kerr, and John Milton Kerr

Wavell, Philbrick & Foster
Halifax attorneys. Partners included Edmund Minson Wavell, Henry John Philbrick, and William Foster.

See Robert Moffat Kerr and Wavell, Philbrick, Foster & Wavell

Wavell, Philbrick, Foster & Wavell
Solicitors.

They were at 14 George Street, Halifax [1868] and 26 George Street, Halifax [1874].

Partners included Edmund Minson Wavell, Henry John Philbrick, and William Foster.

See Wavell, Philbrick & Foster

Wavell, Son & Marshall
Halifax solicitors [1898]. Partners (possibly) included Edmund Minson Wavell, Edmund Minson Wavell, and Harold Marshall

Wavell, Sophia Elizabeth
[18??-1???] On Wednesday, 4th January 1871, she married Ronald Currie MD at Square Church, Halifax

Wavy Steps, Hebden Bridge
A set of suitably fashionable steps constructed in 2077, and leading down to Hebden Water near River Cottage

Wawn, Rev William Hey
[1818-1896] BA. Perpetual Curate at Coley [1847]. He resigned in 1892.

He died at Stockport

Wawne, Thomas
[16??-16??] Of Sowerby. In 1671, he, John Brigg, Thomas Holt and Abraham Wadsworth were amongst a number of local people who had supported the Royalist cause in the Civil War and who received a pension of 6/5d per year under a county-based pension scheme set up in 1662 for
the reliefe of poore and maimed Officers and Souldiers who have faithfully served His Majesty and His Royal Father in the late [Civil] Wars

Wax, Halifax is made of
An old rhyme runs:
Halifax is built of wax
Heptonstall of stone
There's pretty girls in Halifax
In Heptonstall, there's none
Hanson suggest that this may have been sung in the 18th century when houses in Halifax were first built of brick, the colour of which resembled sealing wax

Way Stone Edge, Rishworth
A steep escarpment overlooking the M62

Wayman, Alice Mary
[1863-1944] Youngest daughter of Thomas Wayman. Born in Halifax [11th May 1863].

On 22nd July 1890, she married Dr Henry James Edwards from Windermere at Park Congregational Church.

She died 2nd February 1944

Wayman, Annie
[1857-1881] Daughter of Thomas Wayman.

She was the first wife of Henry Edmunds. She was married from The Grove, Halifax.

She died in childbirth in 1881, giving birth to twins – Claud Henry and Dorothy Annie.

She was buried at Stoney Royd Cemetery

Wayman, Frederick Ellis
[1861-1940] JP.

On 26th August 1890, he married Annie Louise Baines, niece of William Ambler.

He lived at 4 Heath Villas, Halifax [1905].

He died 25th November 1940

Wayman, Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Holdsworth
[1877-1933] OBE, DL. Son of William Henry Wayman.

He married Dorothy.

Children: daughter [b 1925]

Wayman, Maurice
[18??-19??] In 1916, he bought Giles House, Hove Edge from the Kershaw family

Wayman, Sons & Company
Woollen manufacturers at Haley Hill Mills, Halifax [1905] Partners included William Henry Wayman

Wayman, Thomas
[1833-1901] JP, MP.

Son of William Henry Wayman. Born in Orange Street, Halifax.

He was educated at private schools in Halifax.

Established Thomas Wayman & Company [1850s]. He carried on business as a woolstapler until 1892. He was active in local affairs and was a member of Halifax Town Council [1865-1877, 1882-1886]; Mayor of Halifax [1872-1874]; Vice-Chairman of the Halifax Chamber of Commerce; a governor of Crossley Orphanage [1885]; associated with Sion Chapel, Halifax.

In 1856, he married Sarah Ellis at Sion Congregational Church, Halifax.

Children: (1) Annie; (2) Alice Mary.

The family lived at 2 Park Terrace, Halifax [1861]; Savile Close, Halifax; The Grove, Halifax [1880]; Banbury, Oxfordshire [1901].

He was Liberal MP for Elland from 1885, beating F. C. Rasch [1885], J. Fitzalan Hope [1892], and Arthur Travis Clay [1895]. He held the post until he retired due to ill-health on 17th February 1899.

He died at South Bank, Banbury, Oxfordshire [9th February 1901].

See Halifax White Swan Company Limited

Wayman's: Thomas Wayman & Company
Halifax woolstaplers, wool merchants and top makers. Established by Thomas Wayman [1850s]. They were at 27 Horton Street, Halifax [1905].

The company's names appears on the wall outside Bracken's Warehouse in Horton Street.

See Thomas Ogden and William Henry Wayman

Wayman, William Henry
[1801-18??] Card maker of Halifax.

On 26th October 1833, he married Nanny Rawcliffe [1812-1894].


Nanny was born in Salterhebble
 

Children: (1) Thomas; (2) William Henry; (3) Martha [1848-1893]; (4) George [b 1852] who was a coal merchant [1891].

The family lived at 19 Cromwell Terrace, Halifax [1891].

William Henry was dead by 1891.

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 90]

Wayman, William Henry
[1847-1929] Son of William Henry Wayman.

Born in Halifax [26th August 1847].

He was senior partner in Thomas Wayman & Company [1902]; senior partner in Wayman, Sons & Company [1902]; Vice-president of the Halifax Cricket & Football Club.

In [Q4] 1871, he married (1) Mary Ann Holdsworth [1853-1878] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Walter Percy [1872-1876]; (2) Henry Holdsworth; (3) daughter.

In [Q2] 1879, he married (2) Jessie Margaret Whitley [1855-1931] in Halifax.


Jessie Margaret was the daughter of John Whitley
 

Children: (4) Kenneth [1884-1885]; (5) Nora [b 1886] who married Richard Edgar Sugden; (6) daughter.

The family lived at Southfield, Halifax [1902].

Jessie Margaret died at Hastings [23rd March 1931].

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery

Wayte, Frank Edward
[18??-19??] Physician and surgeon at Halifax. His surgery was at 86 Hanson Lane [1905]

Weasel Hall Cottage, Erringden
2 New Road

Constructed about 1840 by the Manchester & Leeds Railway Company to replace the original Weasel Hall which was demolished when the railway line was built.

It is now private dwellings

Weasel Hall, Hebden Bridge
Demolished about 1840 when the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway line was built. Weasel Hall Cottage was built

Weasel Hall Tunnel, Hebden Bridge
Railway tunnel

Weather

Weather station
A meteorological recording station was set up at Belle Vue in 1892

Weatherall, Billy
[1???-19??] Of Warrington.

On 28th October 1933, he set a new world skating record of 112 hours 46 minutes at Sowerby Bridge Town Hall

On 18th November 1933, he set a new roller skating record of 113 hours 4 minutes set in Halifax

Weatherhead, James
[1???-17??] Merchant. Recorded in 1735 at Hough Hall, Halifax

Weatherhead, John W.
[1867-19??] Born in Leeds. Landlord of the Rising Sun, Rastrick [1901].

He married Fanny [1865-19??] from Leeds

Weatherill, James
[1784-1859] He was a stone mason.

He married Nelly Newall of Walsden [1782-1859].

Children: (1) Sarah; (2) Richard; (3) William.

He died on 5th July 1859 when John Holden's joiner's shop in Union Street, Todmorden collapsed, killing James and Abraham Crossley who were working there at the time.

James's wife, Nelly, never recovered from the shock and died a few months later on 18th September.

The couple were buried at Christ Church, Todmorden

Weatherill, Miles
[1845-1868] Son of Richard Weatherill.

A cotton worker or check-weaver of Back Brook Street, Todmorden.

It is said that his father, Richard, was eccentric and once locked baby Miles in a drawer and told his wife, Alice, that a woman had taken him away. It was 2 hours later, before Alice found the baby in the drawer.

Miles was generally regarded as being

a young man of good character and conduct

although newspapers reported that

no gentleman's housemaid was free from his solicitations

He was a Methodist before he began to attend Christ Church, Todmorden. Weatherill met his sweetheart, Sarah Bell, at Sunday School. The relationship led to the murder of Rev Plow at Todmorden.

At 8:00 am on 4th April 1868, Weatherill and a 30-year-old weaver, Timothy Faherty, who had murdered a girl from Droylsden, were the last men to be publicly hanged outside the New Bailey Prison in Manchester. Both were buried in the Prison Yard at Manchester.

After the hanging, a friend found a letter in Weatherill's cell in which he wrote

You know I am to hang. It is an awful shameful death to die

An effigy of Weatherill was installed at Madame Tussaud's.

This is discussed in Halifax Murders.

See James Weatherill

Weatherill, Richard
[1???-1???] He married Alice.

Children: Miles Weatherill.

It is said that Richard was eccentric and once locked baby Miles in a drawer and told his wife, Alice, that a woman had taken him away. It was 2 hours later, before Alice found the baby in the drawer

Weaver
[Surname]

Weaver to Web
An archive of over 22,000 images of historical documents and photographs illustrating the history of Calderdale. The archive is compiled by Calderdale Council. The collection includes postcards, newspaper reports, maps and photographs, personal diaries and accounts, business records, wills, Acts of Parliament, and census returns.

Weavers' Cottages
These are a distinctive feature of 18th/19th century housing in the district. Typically, they have windows set high in the upper floor, so as to give maximum light to the handloom weavers working there.

Some examples can be seen at

Weavers' Rhyme
An 18th/19th century rhyme records the route from the west along the Long Causeway which the weavers took between their homes and their markets:
Burnley for ready money,
Mereclough noa trust,
ye're peepin in at Stiperden,
But call at Kebs, ye must,
Blackshawhead for travellers,
and Heptonstall for trust,
Hepton Brig for landladies,
and Midgley near the moor,
Luddenden's a warm shop,
Royle's Head's varry cold,
if ye get to Halifax,
ye mun be varry bold
In order to make lines 4-7 scan, Donald Haigh has suggested that they should be:
Blackshawhead for travellers,
and Heptonstall for whores,
Hepton Brig for landladies,
and Midgley near the moors,

See Hull, Hell & Halifax

Web Archive of the Calderdale Companion
The British Library has included the Calderdale Companion in their online Archives at


http://www.webarchive.org.uk/ukwa/

Webb
An occupational surname meaning a weaver, usually male. The female form is Webster

There are currently only around 3 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Webb. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Webb's: Henry Webb & Company
Tar distillers at Rastrick [1874]

Webb, Rev James
[1826-1876] He was Vicar of Hartshead-cum-Clifton [1866-1876] and Master of Clifton Free School [1867-1873], taking over from Rev James Webb.

He resigned in August 1876.

He left the district and died at Bournemouth [21st December 1876]

Webb, Captain Matthew
[1848-1883] In the 1870s, he trained at Hollingworth Lake for his cross-channel swim

Webb, Samuel
[18??-18??] Manufacturer of sanitary pipes, chimney tops, ridge tiles, fire and common bricks, boiler blocks, and flue covers at New Bank, Halifax [1874]

Webb, Thornton & Shaw
Fire and common brick manufacturer at Bank Top, Northowram [1861]

Webster...
The entries for people with the surname Webster have been moved to a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Webster
An occupational surname meaning a weaver, usually female. A Thomas the Webster of Hipperholme is mentioned in court rolls of May 1275.

The male form is Webb.

See Textor

There are currently around 40 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Webster. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Webster & Wade
Marble masons at 7 Aked's Road, Halifax [1905]

Webster's, Brighouse
Brighouse furniture business. Established in 1865. The company now occupies a series of shops in Commercial Street

Webster's: George Webster & Son Limited
In 1819, George Webster had a grocery and confectionery business in 6 Southgate, Halifax and another at Hipperholme cross-roads (next to the Infants' School). In 1828, he established his tea and grocery business at 3 and 5 Silver Street / Commercial Street, Halifax.

His son, Charles, took over the business, becoming sole partner.

In 1874, they were at 7 Union Street, Halifax.

Later, the company had the Mikado Café [1889], and the Imperial Café [1908].

In 1936, they had a shop in The Arcade Royale, Halifax.

The company went out of business in 1963

Webster's Green Label
Beer introduced by Samuel Webster's in 1928

Webster's, Hipperholme
A branch of George Webster & Son Limited stood at Hipperholme cross-roads (next to the Infants' School). It is now [2012] an office equipment company

Webster's: Samuel Webster & Sons Limited
Union Cross Yard, Halifax. The brewery business was started by Samuel Webster at the Fountain Head Brewery in 1838.

He was joined by his sons, Isaac, George Henry and Samuel Green.

Other people who served in the Board included

The company was registered in March 1890.

A 1900 advertisement for the business announced

Samuel Webster & Sons Limited
Brewers and Wine & Spirit merchants

Offices; 57, Northgate, Halifax

On 30th December 1932, Samuel Webster's and Joseph Stocks amalgamated.

The Brewery is discussed in Halifax Pubs.

See Prynn & Company, Victoria, Halifax and Webster's Green Label

Wee Sam
Popular name for Samuel Webster's Fountain Head Brewery and its products

Weeding, Major A. J.
[18??-1876] He served with the 33rd Duke of Wellington's Own Regiment. He died in India.

There is a memorial to him and other members of the regiment in Halifax Parish Church

Weedon, Thomas
[1880-1915] Son of Emma [née Worley] and Richard Weedon, painter. Born in Tooting, London.

He was a labourer [1911]; a dyer with Davis, Gordon & Company.

On 7th April 1907, he married Rose Gardiner [1882-19??] in Halifax.


Rose was the daughter of John Gardiner
 


In 1911, a daughter Violet Weedon [aged 11] born in Halifax was recorded
 

Children: Vera May [b 1914].

The family lived at 13 Wood Square Mill Lane, Boothtown, Halifax [1911]; Lower Range Terrace, Range Bank [1915].

He enlisted 15th October 1914. He served with the 2nd Battalion (76th Foot) The Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment). He served as a Private in France and Flanders.

He was killed in action during a gas attack on Hill 60 [5th May 1915].

He is remembered on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium [Panel 20]

Weedop
A variant of the surname Widdop

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Weekly Courier & Guardian

Weightman, Hugh
[18??-19??] Motor coach proprietor.

He established Weightman's Tours Limited and began operating charabancs on excursions and tours from Halifax by 1923. The company's registered address was 5 Emscote Grove, Halifax.

The limited company was formed in 1948, and the following year it was sold to Ripponden & District Motors, who continued to operate it as a subsidiary. Ripponden & District sold its coach operations to Hebble Motor Services in 1957, including the Weightman's licence

Weightman, Samuel
[1851-1???] Born in Bassingham, Lincolnshire.

He was an indoor farm servant at Aversham, Southwell, Nottinghamshire [1871]; a police constable [1881]; a police inspector [1891]; a police superintendent at Halifax [1895, 1901]; a police pensioner [1911].

Around 1898, he is mentioned in several newspaper reports of crimes and incidents in and around Halifax.

In 1871, he married Sarah Johnson [1850-1???], born in Coddington, in Newark, Nottinghamshire.

Children: (1) Fanny [b 1871]; (2) Anne [b 1872]; (3) Adeline / Adelina [b 1875]; (4) Kate [b 1877]; (5) Alice Mary [b 1879] who was a dressmaker [1911]; (6) George [b 1880]; (7) Millie [b 1882]; (8) Minnie [b 1884]; (9) Fred [b 1886]; (10) Hugh [b 1887]; (11) Liley [b 1889]; (12) John [b 1892] who was a butcher's apprentice [1911].

The family lived at 17 Hook Road, Hook, Goole [1881]; Omar Street, Heckmondwike [1891]; West Riding Court House, Halifax [1901]; Bottesford, Nottingham [1911]

Welby, Moses
[1845-1923] Aka Owd Mo', Owd Mow.

Born in Farnworth, Lancashire.

He was a 19th century convert to Methodism.

Before his conversion, he was said to be the leader of a group of ungodly men.

On 25th March 1906, he preached at Salem Wesleyan Chapel, Hebden Bridge

He wrote an autobiography entitled From Coal-Pit To Joyful News Mission. The introduction to the book says

Moses Welsby was born and brought up in a public-house, his early surroundings and habits were rough and wicked, and he literally ran an evil course.

He was a noted dog-runner and pigeon-flyer, the racecourse knew him well, and in gambling and drink he spent most of his hardly-earned wages as a coal-miner.

Till his thirty-sixth year he lived without God, in a land of Bibles and Christian influences.

Some few years after his conversion, he was led in the providence of God to join our Joyful News Mission, and to devote his life to telling forth the news of a Saviour's love

He died in Rochdale

Welch, Nathaniel
[1???-16??] Curate at Luddenden [1634]

Weldrivet Boiler & Motor Company Limited
Boiler & motor makers at Empire Works, Holmfield [1905]

Well Close House, Brighouse
Off Church Lane.

Church Lane Surgery now stands on what was the drive to the house. Owners and tenants have included

Well Head
Area of Halifax and site of a natural spring.

The well was known as Old Well and Common Well.

The area around the well was known as Oldwelling or Old Well Ing.

In 1398, John Smythson was charged with enclosing a footpath leading to the well.

The well was the main local source which – by way of open troughs, then wooden pipes passing along Harrison Road, Barum Top, and feeding a cistern in Old Cock Yard – provided the town with water for many years up to the 18th century.

In 1762, an Act was passed for the purpose of opening a water course from Well Head and other public springs.

In 1852, the wells supplied around 80,000 gallons per day.

Arthur Porritt writes that ...

in some of the town's inns, drinkers would ask for "Whisky and Well Head"

Two houses – Well Head and Old Well Head – stood here and were demolished in 1976 when the area was redeveloped.

In 1902, the Midland Railway Company agreed to purchase the Shay estate to run a part of the Lancashire and Yorkshire line to Halifax. However, it was later felt that there was no prospect of the railway being constructed in the immediate future, and the plan was abandoned. Work had been started on a tunnel under the new Skircoat Road, on the Well Head side of the road, and this tunnel is still in evidence today. This was used as an air-raid shelter during World War II.

See Act for supplying Halifax with Water [1762] and Royal Aerated Waters

Well Head Fields, Halifax
The former grounds of Well Head House formed a deep valley west of Skircoat Road.

Once a rural setting, the area is now covered with the usual ubiquitous and unimaginative houses.

See Burdock Way

Well Head House, Halifax
House at Well Head built for Grace Elizabeth and John Waterhouse after their wedding – possibly by John Carr. Old Well Head was earlier.

The house had a Snetzler chamber organ which Catharine Grace Waterhouse gave to All Saints' Church, Elland in 1915.

In the 19th century, John Waterhouse had an observatory in the grounds. There were extensive gardens with greenhouses and a staff of 6 gardeners. They cultivated exotic ferns, including a todea superba which Waterhouse had imported from New Zealand in 1860 and which is now at Kew Gardens.

John Waterhouse died here.

Catharine Grace Doherty Waterhouse was the last of the family to occupy the house.

Frank Thompson is recorded at Well Head in Directories published in 1905.

In 1916, it was sold to industrialist Frank Lee. He lived there until his death in 1956, and his widow continued to live there until 1968.

During the 1970s, there were many plans, including one to build a road through the estate. While Halifax Council dithered (sounds familiar!), the house fell into disrepair and was demolished in 1975, at the same time as Old Well Head.

During the 1990s, the green parkland of the estate was given over for development and is now heavily built-up

Well House, Halifax
Savile Road. Small Georgian Gothick building built in the 18th/19th century

Well of Saint John the Baptist
Aka Jonas Well. A natural spring which was sited about 200 yards north of Halifax Parish Church at the end of Mulcture Hall Road.

See Cripplegate and Well I' Th' Wall Lane, Halifax

Well Royd, Stainland
High Street. Dated RRM 1762.

Adjoins Shepherd's Cottage, Stainland.

Owners and tenants have included

Wellburn, Dr Edgar Duesbury
[1861-1941] Son of Eliza [née Harrison] [1824-1???] and Zachariah Tranmer Wellburn [1822-1898]. Born in Scarborough.

He served with the 1st Volunteer Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment [1890].

He was a medical practitioner in Sowerby Bridge; with the Local Government Medical Service [1895]; Medical Officer of Health for Luddendenfoot, Sowerby, and Sowerby Bridge [1895]; Medical Officer of Health and Public Vaccinator for Norland, Copley, Sowerby and Sowerby Bridge UDC [1905].

In [Q4] 1886, he married (1) Annie Elizabeth Darrell [1858-1892] in Halifax.

In [Q3] 1893, he married (2) Emma Hatton [1869-1936] in Halifax.

Children: (1) Emma Hatton 1894; (2) Mary Hatton 1899; (3) John Hatton 1906.

The family lived at Beech House

Wellcroft Nurseries, Hipperholme
George Sharp & Sons were here [1905]

Wellesley, Arthur
[1769-1852] 1st Duke of Wellington. Politician and military leader.

See Duke of Wellington's Regiment, Napoleonic Wars, Peninsular War and Battle of Waterloo

Wellesley Barracks, Halifax
Gibbet Street / Spring Hall Lane, Highroad Well. Established in 1875 following a Bill of 1872 – the Cardwell reforms – which sought to spread home forces across the country, country to encourage local connections and to assist in recruitment. The building was designed by the Royal Engineers' architect, J & W. Beanland of Bradford, in a castellated Gothic Revival style. The land was given by Charles Musgrave. The 16 Army buildings include a chapel, officers buildings, the Orderly Room and the Guard Room. The barrack blocks were known as Wellington and Musgrave. The barracks were inaugurated on 29th August 1877 when the 33rd and 76th Regiments of Foot occupied the building. In October 1877, the 6th West Yorkshire Militia moved in.

The present building was begun in 1938.

The property was known as The Barracks until the name Wellesley Barracks was given in 1953.

The Duke of Wellington's Regiment remained at the barracks until 1959 when the barracks closed.

The site was bought by Halifax Council for £30,000 in September 1963 and renamed Wellesley Park. In May 2003, the Council approved controversial plans to build a new school at the Barracks.

The keep and other parts of the building are listed.

See Rev Alec Charlton

Wellesley Mount, Halifax
Houses at Savile Park Road

Wellesley Park
Highroad Well. Wellesley Barracks was acquired by Halifax Council in 1963 and renamed. It was used for musical and physical education.

In Spring 2005, Halifax High School moved here from the old Clare Hall site on Huddersfield Road, Halifax

Wellfield House, Langfield
Owners and tenants have included

Wellholme, Brighouse
Wellholme Park and the house were originally private land and a part of the Camm Park Estate owned by Alfred Camm and the Camm family.

The house is now a part of Wellholme, Brighouse

Owners and tenants have included

See Richard Kershaw

Wellholme Park, Brighouse
Bradford Road. Wellholme, Brighouse and the park were originally private land and a part of the Camm Park Estate owned by the Camm family.

In 1867, land was sold for the construction of the Parish Church of St James, which opened in 1870.

In 1902, a shelter popularly known as Park Parliament was erected.

In 1912, the Electric Animated Picture Company built a walk-in cinema with a capacity for around 600 people in the park – the presentation was moved across the road to Brighouse Town Hall or to the Oddfellows' Hall, if wet.

In 1935, the park was bought by Brighouse Corporation as the town's main park.

In 1937, there were plans to build a new civic hall in the park.

In 1938, trenches were dug as a part of the town's defences.

It was used for galas, concerts, and public events from the start of the 20th century.

In 2012, this and Centre Vale Park, Todmorden were awarded Queen Elizabeth II Fields status, which protects the land forever.

Clifton Brook flows through the park.

See Brighouse Agricultural Show, Brighouse Baths, Brighouse Charity Gala, The Gill family of Brighouse and Wellholme Day Nursery, Brighouse

Wellington Arcade
Brighouse. Shopping precinct built in the 1960s on the site which had previously been occupied by Brighouse market, and the Wellington pub, and then bus station.

It has always been a rather dull, concrete, Soviet-style building.

The arcade is currently a run-down eyesore with most of the shops – except for the post office, chemists, a pet shop, and a hardware shop – boarded-up and covered with graffiti. Because the chemists are not prepared to leave, the site cannot have a long overdue refurbishment

Wellington Club
Aka Southowram Wellington. Southowram football club of the late 19th century. Evolved into the Brookfoot Football Club

Wellington, Duke of

The Wells family of Norwood Green
The family came to the district from Bowling with Isaac Wells, who was land agent for Sir Francis Lindley of Bolling Hall, Bradford

Wells & Company
Cotton spinners at West Vale.

Partners included W. Wells, G. Lumb (of Common Royd), G. Lumb (of Lightlee Royd), and J. Lumb.

Recorded in September 1858, when the partnership was dissolved

Wells & Lumb
Cotton spinners at West Vale. Partners included W. Wells, G. Lumb of Common Royd, G. Lumb of Lightlee Royd and J. Lumb.

The partnership was dissolved in August 1859

Wells & Spas

Wells Farm, Warley
Stock Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

  • The Mellor family [1893]

Wells, George Stansfield
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner at Beestonhirst Mill, Ripponden [1815].

In December 1839, he was declared bankrupt

Wells, Isaac
[1898-1917] Son of Willie Wells.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the A Company 10th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He died 7th June 1917 (aged 19).

He was buried in Woods Cemetery, Belgium [III E 13].

He is remembered on Norwood Green War Memorial

Wells, John
[1822-1895] Born in Leeds. After 1867, the family moved to Rishworth.

He was landlord of the Brown Cow, Rishworth [1881, 1891]; a butcher and a farmer [1881]; farmer and innkeeper of the Brown Cow, Rishworth [1895]. He was succeeded by his son-in-law, Fred Firth, at the Brown Cow.

In 1861, he married Sarah Jackson [1826-1884] from Rishworth.

Children: (1) Ruth [1862-1936] who married Mahlon Firth [1860-1929], brother of Fred; (2) Mary; (3) Elizabeth [1866-1935].

In 1881, there were lodgers with the family: John Bentley [1841-1???] who was a paper maker and Catharine E. Henry [1859-1???] who was a school teacher.

He died at Rishworth.

John and daughter Elizabeth are mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1895

Wells, John Stansfield
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner at Booth Bridge Mill, Ripponden [1818-1882]

Wells, Joseph
[1???-17??] In 1737, he bought Bowers Hall, Barkisland and Bowers Mill. In 1770, he rebuilt the Mill as a corn mill

Wells, Mary
[1864-1927] Daughter of John Wells.

She had a daughter, Henrietta Wells [1890-1968].

In 1898, she married Fred Firth.

Henrietta and her half-sister, Florrie, took over at the Brown Cow after Fred's death

The Wells, Warley
Stock Lane. At the Highroad Well end of Warley.

Late 18th century cottages.

Named for the wells which stand at the roadside.

The stonework around the wells was rebuilt by public subscription in 1836.

The wells and springs which supplied the area, gave Highroad Well its name.

This is discussed in Our Home & Country.

Wells Farm, Warley

Wells, Willie
[18??-1???] He married Mary Jane [18??-1???].

Children: Isaac.

The family lived at Green Mount, Norwood Green [1917]

Welsh, Anthony
[18??-1???] Leeds artist who designed the pulpit at Wainsgate Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge

Welsh, Rev John
[17??-17??] Aka Walsh. MA.

He was Curate at Todmorden [or Cross Stone, 1713-1726]; Curate at Cross Stone Church [1744]; Curate at Luddenden [1749-1750]; Curate at Sowerby [1750, 1776].

At Todmorden, he was said to have been

very successful in reclaiming Dissenters

Todmorden Endowed School was built during his ministry.

In 1758, he paid Window Tax of 2/- for 9 windows at Lane Ends Farm, Norland.

He was a subscriber to the publication of Watson's History.

In 1716, he married (1) Mary Lacey.

In 17??, he married (2) Betsy Gibson

Welsman, Henry
[18??-18??] Around 1855, he established business as a plumber and glazier in Brighouse. In 1864, the business was taken over by Joseph Lawson

Wentworth, Anna Maria
[1736-1788] Of Wentworth Woodhouse. Daughter of Godfrey Wentworth and Dorothy Pilkington.

She married Sir George Armytage.

She was buried at Hickleton, Yorkshire

Wentworth, Dorothy
[15??-1601/2] She was the third wife of Sir John Savile

Wentworth, Elizabeth
[15??-1592/3] Daughter of Thomas Wentworth of Elmshall.

She was the second wife of Sir John Savile

Wentworth, Lieutenant-Colonel Sir George
[15??-16??] Of Woolley, Yorkshire. He was MP for Pontefract. He became a Royalist commander of the cavalry during the Civil War. He served at Halifax and occupied King Cross and Sowerby Bridge, watching for Parliamentary attacks from Manchester and Rochdale. He was fined more than £3,000 in decimation.

See Joseph Priestley and Battle of Sowerby Bridge

Wentworth, George
[16??-16??] Of Woolley. He was a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Halifax Army during the Civil War. He supported the Royalist cause and paid £3,188 fines in 1647. This was said to be the largest fine beyond the Trent

Werla feslei
Reference to Warley Town in Domesday Book

Wesley Bob
Aka Wassail Bow. A traditional Christmas decoration in which 2 rings of wood – typically from a butter tub – were fixed one inside the other and at right-angles, then covered in coloured tissue paper. A bell, doll or glass ball was hung inside. This would be carried around the streets, accompanied by singing, as a collection was made for charity

Wesley, Charles
[1707-1788] Organist and composer, he was the younger brother of John Wesley and one of the original Methodists at Oxford. He became a preacher and theologian of the Wesleyan Methodists, and wrote some 6,500 hymns, including
Jesus, lover of my soul

His Collection of 1737 is probably the first hymnal for congregational worship.

It is said that the climb to Heptonstall [1740] led him to compose the hymn

Oh, for a thousand tongues to sing

He visited Halifax in 1751 and preached to a crowd of 1,000 on 16th September.

He writes

15th September 1751: I ... followed our nimble guide, Johnny Grimshaw, to Ewood. His father came panting after us

16th September 1751: I preached at nine, in a convenient field to about a thousand believers ... and again at three, to about three thousand. Their spirit carried me beyond myself. Such a lively people I have not met with, so simple, loving, zealous. I could have gladly stayed to live and die with them

Wesley Court Reading Room
Established in 1847. Merged with the Halifax Mechanics' Institute

Wesley House, Cragg Vale
Formerly Cragg Vale Wesleyan Chapel.

It is now occupied by an organisation providing courses in the use of sewing machines

Wesley, John
[1703-1791] The Lincolnshire-born founder of Methodism. From 1742, onwards, he visited the Halifax & Calderdale district many times. On 14th February 1748, he first preached in Halifax at the Union Cross. In 1790, he preached his last sermon in the North of England at Mount Zion Chapel, Ogden.

See The Bintliff mite box, Octagonal Chapel, Heptonstall, Sally Simpson and Stoneshey Gate, Heptonstall

Wesley's Pulpit
A rock at Widdop where John Wesley preached in 1766 is inscribed JW 1766

Wesleyan Reform Movement
Aka The Reformers. Founded in 1859 by those Methodists who did not join the United Methodist Free Churches

West Air, Halifax
Washer Lane. House designed by Richard Dugdale and built for John Edward Wainhouse [1877]. Wainhouse lived here until his death.

Dated 1877.

A remarkable feature of the house is that all of its windows are in different styles.

There are a number of cryptic Latin inscriptions referring to aspects of Wainhouse's life. One inscription

Spare the lowly and make war upon the proud

is said to be a reference to Wainhouse's feud with Edwards.

The house became a pub named The Royal, and then The Folly

West & Lister
Butter factors at Bradford and Brighouse. Partners included Thomas West and Thomas Thompson Lister.

The partnership was dissolved in May 1854

West, Arthur
[18??-19??] Partner in Thomas West & Sons.

He lived at 44 Stansfield Road, Todmorden [1905]

West Bar, Todmorden
Numbers 1, 2 & 3 Pudding Lane. Early 18th century house and barn

West End
The western end of Halifax, around King Cross

West End& Barn#44; Hipperholme
Mid 17th century double-aisled barn.

Now a private house.

West End Bridge, Hebden Bridge
Aka New Bridge. Built in 1772 when the Old Bridge proved too steep and narrow to carry the new turnpike road from Todmorden to Halifax. It has 2 stone arches. It was widened in 1835

West End Congregational Mutual Improvement Society
Sowerby Bridge. Recorded in January 1903, when the members visited Halifax Gas Works.

See Mutual Improvement Societies and West End Congregational Church, Sowerby Bridge

West End Farm, Hipperholme
Farm.

Owners and tenants have included

  • Rev George Edward Aspinall [1922] – after his death, the property, including 12 acres of land and houses at Towngate, was sold at auction for £1100

West End Golf Club
Founded in 1906.

The course was extended on 4th April 1912. A new clubhouse opened on 4th April 1914.

Founder members included Hugh Campbell.

The course is on the site of the Halifax Race Course

West End, Hipperholme
House dated 1693

West End House, Hebden Bridge
Oldgate. Built around 1850 by Richard Binns. It was originally a private house, but has had many uses: a Methodist Sunday School, a dental surgery, a restaurant, and the Inn on the Bridge.

Owners and tenants have included

West End, Sowerby Bridge
The area of Sowerby Bridge west of the Ryburn.

Ryburn Buildings is a prominent feature of the south side of the street here

West End Tailoring Establishment, Halifax
Recorded in 1881 at 1 Hampden Place, Gibbet Street, when J. Bradford was proprietor

West End Working Men's Club, Sowerby Bridge
Recorded in 1900. Samuel Wilkinson was involved in construction of the Club [1901/1902]

Recorded in 1917 at Carlton Street, Sowerby Bridge, when Fred Greenwood was secretary.

See Savings Clubs

West, Greenwood
[18??-19??] Partner in Thomas West & Sons.

He lived at 42 Stansfield Road, Todmorden [1905]

West Grove Bottling Company, Halifax
Brewers/bottlers run by W. M. Cockshott

West Grove Home for Incurables, Halifax
Recorded in 1905 at 44 Hopwood Lane when the Matron was Miss McNeice

West, Hannah Maria
[1879-1908] From Woodlesford, Leeds. She came to Halifax and worked in a woollen mill.

In 1903, she married George Whitley, a Halifax motor mechanic.

They had a daughter, Evelyn, but the couple separated and George went to live in America.

Maria was stabbed to death by Ernest Hutchinson with whom she lived at 20 Great Albion Street, Halifax.

Hutchinson and Mrs Whitley had lived together for several months, but he was jealous and suspected her of prostitution. When he returned home from drinking on Christmas Eve 1908, he saw a man leaving the house and later saw a sum of money on a table. He grabbed a knife and stabbed her several times.

Mrs Whitley's 5-year-old daughter, Evelyn, found her mother's body on Christmas Day 1908.

Hutchinson had tried to cut his own throat.

He was hanged at Wakefield prison [2nd March 1909]

West Hill Park
Gibbet Street, Halifax.

On 29th August 1853, there are reports of

A very exciting race for £100 was run at West Hill Park, Halifax, between Isaac Hemingway of Leeds, and John Whittingham of Bradford, both celebrated runners. After a very severe struggle, the race was won by Whittingham

A notice in the local paper for 11/3/1854 announced

WEST HILL PARK
THE GREAT TEN MILE RACE

for £60 and the CHAMPIONS BELT (given by the proprietor of the Copenhagen Grounds, London) will be run in WEST HILL PARK, Halifax on Monday next, 13th March 1854 by WM. JACKSON, the American Deer, the present holder of the Belt, and J. PUDNEY of London, the winner of the Ten Mile Belt at Hyde Park, Sheffield on Monday last.

To be at the starting place by 4 o'clock.

Admission: Threepence each

No dogs allowed in the Park on any account whatsoever.

Parties found damaging the walls or trees will be prosecuted as the law directs.

The Belt (and also the one won by Pudney at Sheffield on Monday last)  will be exhibited in the shop window of Mr. Oates, Silver Street, this day

Between 1863 and 1868, a Model housing scheme of 185 houses in Tudor and Gothic styles was built for John Crossley.

The designs were by Paull and Ayliffe and were centred around Park Congregational Church.

J. D. Taylor was active in promoting the scheme.

Several streets were named after 17th century Puritans and Nonconformists, such as Cromwell, Gladstone, Hampden, Heywood and Milton.

The Gibbet Street Turkish Baths were nearby.

See Joseph Horrocks and West Hill Park School & Preaching Room

West, Horsfall & West
Cotton spinners and manufacturers at Gauxholme. Partners included John West, John Horsfall, and Thomas West.

In January 1870, the partnership was declared insolvent

They were tenants of Gauxholme Cotton Mill in 1871 when it partly burnt down

West House, Elland
76 Westgate.

Owners and tenants have included

West House, Halifax
Late 18th century house at the south-west corner of People's Park.

Owners and tenants have included

In 1913, the 4 youngest daughters of John WhitleyFlorence, Eleanor Maude, Mary Anne, and Frances Louisa - gave the house to Halifax Corporation, in accordance with their father's wishes. The daughters paid for the house to be converted for use as offices.

From 1914 until the 1960s, it was the Council's Education Offices. Since then it has been owned by private companies

West, James
[17??-18??] Master at Rastrick Grammar School [1793]

West, Rev James
[17??-1822] Curate at Saint Anne's in the Grove Church, Southowram [1821].

In 1821,

he committed the offence of praying for the Queen [Caroline, the estranged Queen Consort of George IV] in defiance of an order in council forbidding it

West, John
[13??-1???] In 13??, he William de Bery and John Megotson – all of Halifax – were outlawed for failing to appear at Westminster to defend themselves after being accused of killing deer in the park of Sir William de Nevyle of Raby, at Cottingley

West Laithe, Heptonstall
A row of 18th century dwelling and underdwelling houses. The underdwellings are of the back-to-earth type

West Leigh, Halifax
House on Savile Park Road.

Owners and tenants have included

West Lodge, Todmorden
Stansfield.

Owners and tenants have included

West Mount Building Society
In 1870, the members built 14 back-to-back houses in Lincoln Street and Penn Street, Halifax

West Mount Co-Op
Branch number 29 of the Halifax Industrial Society opened in January 1890

West Mount Street Livery Stables, Halifax
Pellon Lane.

Edgar Tillotson was here [1900, 1912]

West, Rev R. A. C.
[19??-19??] Congregational minister at Northowram. In 1957, he moved to Shotton, North Wales

West Riding
The western of the 3 historic divisions of Yorkshire.

In 1861, the West Riding was divided into 2 divisions – North and South – each returning 2 MPs.

In 1867, the West Riding was divided into 3 divisions – North, South and East – each returning 2 MPs.

In 1885, the North Division of the West Riding was divided into 5 constituencies – including the Sowerby Division – each returning 1 MP.

In 1974, the West Riding was reorganised into West Yorkshire and South Yorkshire.

See Deputy Lieutenant for the West Riding, We of the West Riding, Calder Registration District, MPs for the West Riding, Todmorden & Lancashire, Wakefield and Wapentake

West Riding Ambulance Service
This became the West Yorkshire Metropolitan Ambulance Service [1974] and the Yorkshire Ambulance Service [1st July 2006]

West Riding Building Society
Unsuccessful society, closed in 188?

West Riding Constabulary
Established in 1856.

See Captain Robert S. Ormsby and West Riding Constabulary Offices, Halifax

West Riding County Council
Abbr: WRCC. Formed in 1888.

See John Caw, John Foster Clay, Joseph Greenwood and Joseph Smithies

West Riding Court House, Halifax
See Borough Club, Halifax

West Riding Junction
Line on the West Yorkshire Railway. It began at Copley Mills, joined the main line through Halifax then by way of Low Moor to Leeds and Pudsey. Recorded in March 1845

West Riding Lunatic Asylum

West Riding Magistrates' Office
Aka Sessions Court House. Opened next to the market in Market Street / Union Street, Halifax in 1818.

It was described as

The new Court Room in the Market Place

and

I'll take thee under the Clock

was a threat of legal action.

From 1849, the court-house was used as the Halifax County Court. It became unfit for use.

A new West Riding Magistrates' court house was opened on Harrison Road on 8th January 1859. There was accommodation for the Superintendent of Police, offices for clerks, and cells. The building was described as

being opposite the Halifax Literary & Philosophical Society, and an unassuming building [which] adds little to the architectural beauty of the town

The court room measured 43 ft 10 ins long, 30 ft 10 ins wide, and 20 ft high.

In 1873, the new County Court building in Prescott Street came into use. The Union Street building then became a cocoa house.

The court house became the Central Hall.

See Halifax County Court

West Riding, MPs for

West Riding of Yorkshire Provident Society & Penny Savings Bank
In May 1856, Edward Akroyd published a pamphlet proposing the creation of a West Riding Working Man's Provident Society and Penny Savings Bank.

On 17th November 1856, Akroyd convened a meeting at the Philosophical Hall, Leeds,

for the purpose of establishing a Provident Society, and Penny Savings' Bank for the West Riding

Resolutions were adopted in favour of the scheme.

In 1859, he established the Bank, supported

In 1861, the West Riding of Yorkshire was removed from the name – becoming the Yorkshire Penny Savings Bank – in order to enable the bank to operate across Yorkshire

The West Riding Patent Office
Established in 1852 by William Tasker at 3 Commercial Street, Halifax, when the Patent Law Amendment Act [1852] came into operation.

This was the first patent office in Yorkshire.

He was joined by A. B. Crossley.

It became Tasker & Crossley [1881].

West Riding Permanent Benefit Building Society
Established in 1849.

Recorded in 1881, when their Head Office was at 21 Waterhouse Street, Halifax, and G. Taylor was Manager

West Riding Police Station, Halifax
In 19??, the County police station of the West Riding Constabulary opened at the junction of Prescott Street and Skircoat Road.

This was the Headquarters for Brighouse, Sowerby Bridge, Hebden Bridge and Todmorden.

In the 1970s, several police officers reported strange happenings in the Prescott Street building. These included whistling, doors opening and closing by themselves, cold spots, and ringing bells that were connected to empty cells.

Until 1974, both police stations – Harrison Road and Prescott Street – had their respective courts and cells.

From 1975, Prescott Street was used only as an administrative centre for Halifax and the surrounding towns.

It has been converted in apartments.

See Tom Gordon

West Riding Spinning
See Oats Royd Mills, Luddenden

West Riding Telephone Company
Founded by Louis John Crossley

West Riding Union Banking Company
Partners included John Bottomley [1852] and William Helm [1853-1865]

West Riding Union Railway
Line through Halifax to Bradford, via Beacon Hill Tunnel. The company engineer was Sir John Hawkshaw.

In 1847, merged with other railways to become the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Company

West Rodwell End
Rodwell End Lane. 2 mid 18th century cottages attached to Rodwell End Chapel

West Royd Farm, Warley
Great Edge Lane / Butts Green Lane. The house is dated MM 1624 for Martin Milnes

West Royd, Sowerby

Owners and tenants have included

West Scout, Walsden
Hill which overlooks Lumbutts

West, Seth
[1845-19??] Born in Skircoat, Halifax.

He was an iron planer [1911].

In [Q4] 1888, he married Grace Ann Dargu [1857-19??] from Sowerby, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Ruth Edna [b 1884] who was a cotton reeler [1911]; (2) Susan [b 1889] who was a cotton reeler [1911]; (3) Brinton [b 1893] who was a teamer for a coal merchant [1911]; (4) Irvine [b 1899] who was a part-timer, silk doffer [1911].

The family lived at 73 Bradford Road, Brighouse [1911]

West Summit Lock, Todmorden
Lock #37 on the Rochdale Canal

West, Thomas
[1???-1???] Constable at Todmorden & Walsden [1750]

West, Thomas
[1713-1795] MA. Educated at Emmanuel College Cambridge [1736].

On 14th July 1747, he married Mary Allenson [1710-1784].

Headmaster of Halifax Free School [1751-1771]. He resigned in 1771.

He was Curate at Luddenden [1761]; Curate at Ripponden [1770-1796]; Minister at Halifax [1764]

West's: Thomas West & Sons
Cotton manufacturers at Vale Mill, Todmorden [1905].

See Arthur West and Greenwood West

West Vale
Area of Halifax below Elland and Greetland.

See Trams & buses: West Vale

West Vale Brass Company
Brass founders and finishers at West Vale Brass Works, Maude Street, West Vale [1905]

West Vale Choral Society
Recorded in September 1877, when they took part of a performance of the Messiah to raise funds for a new Blackley Particular Baptist Church

West Vale Civic Hall

West Vale Co-Op
Branch #4 of the Sowerby Bridge Industrial Society opened on Stainland Road [17th April 1909].

The left-hand side is now [2014] Ingham's Butchers

West Vale Conservative Club
Opened on 1st October 1910

West Vale constables
The Foldout lists some of the people who have served as Police Officers in West Vale

West Vale Constitutional Club
Recorded in 1917, when W. E. Quarmby was secretary.

It has been suggested that it was at 45 or 47 Stainland Road, West Vale

West Vale Economic Stores
Stainland Road. A branch of Economic Stores (Halifax) Limited. Opened in 18??.

The datestone is inscribed Prospect Place AD 1869

West Vale Fire Brigade
The Rose Brigade of West Vale is recorded when they tackled a mill fire on 8th December 1866.

The West Vale Fire Brigade is recorded when they tackled fires on 24th July 1869 and 4th February 1873.

See Greetland & West Vale Fire Brigade

West Vale Glee Club
Recorded in September 1868, when they entertained at The Fine Art & Industrial Exhibition at Lindley

West Vale History Group
Established December 2009

West Vale House
House at Stainland Road / Saddleworth Road, Lower Greetland.

Because of the different gauge of the tram lines in Halifax and in Huddersfield, trams could not run uninterrupted between the 2 towns. Passengers had to disembark and change to another vehicle at West Vale House for the Halifax-West Vale-Huddersfield service

It is said that the name of the terminus – West Vale House – gave its name to the area of Lower Greetland which then became known as West Vale


Question: Does anyone know whether this renaming of Lower Greetland is correct or apocryphal? This also begs the question "How did West Vale House get its name?"

 

West Vale Liberal Club
Inaugurated 15th April 1882 at West Vale Mechanics' Hall. David Fox was President.

Recorded in 1917, when George Arthur Hannah was secretary

West Vale Library
Victoria Street.

As part of a cost-cutting exercise, the library closed in 2006, and was one of several properties which Calderdale Council put up for sale by auction in March 2007. It had a guide price of between £50,000 and £60,000

West Vale Mechanics' Hall

West Vale Mechanics' Institute
Aka Greetland & West Vale Mechanics' Hall. A Mechanics' Institute built by the Greetland & West Vale Mechanics' Hall Company Limited. The company was registered in April 1872.

The corner stone was laid on Saturday 21st June 1873 by Edward Crossley, of Halifax.

In 1879, Anglican services were held here until Saint John the Evangelist, West Vale was built.

In 1907, it was sold to Greetland District Council for £2,000.

It was subsequently known as West Vale Public Hall.

See James William Davis and Alfred Maude

West Vale Naturalist Group

West Vale Public Hall
Rochdale Road. Stands next to West Vale Baptist Church. This was formerly the West Vale Mechanics' Institute

West Vale Railway Station
The only station on the branch line from North Dean to Stainland and Holywell Green.

It opened on 1st January 1875.

The branch line between Halifax and Stainland and the passenger station closed on 23rd September 1929.

Stationmasters at the Station have included

  • Thomas Mann [1881]

See Greetland Station, North Dean Station and Stainland Station

West Vale Rovers
Junior rugby union [?] club. Recorded in April 1899

West Vale Squash Club
Their premises are in the former Middle Dean Street Chapel

West Vale Stoving Company
They were at Victoria Mills, West Vale [1870]

West Vale Works Band
Aka Greetland & West Vale Band

West View, Halifax
Owners and tenants have included

West View, Hipperholme
Denholme Gate Road. A terrace of 3 houses – Numbers 1, 2 and 3 – dated WMS 1771 are listed.

The Hipperholme pinfold was behind the houses.

The building stands next to Smithfield House

West View Park
14-acre park at Warley Moor. It was originally known as Highroad Well Moor. Built on land donated by Lord Savile. H. C. McCrea and Enoch Robinson paid for landscaping and planting the park. The Park opened in 1897.

The war memorial to the South African Wars was unveiled in 1904

West View Park War Memorial
Highroad Well, Halifax. Halifax Town Council had wanted the memorial to stand in Belle Vue Park.

This memorial to 2 soldiers who died in the Afghan Wars, and 73 soldiers who died in the South African Wars [1899-1902] – mostly from disease – was erected by Public Subscription and was unveiled by Major Sir Leslie Rundle KCB on 7th November 1904. The 76 ft high monument was designed by W. W. Longbottom, and the sculptor was B. Sheppard.

A balustrade which came from the eastern side of Halifax Town Hall was placed around the memorial in 19??. The balustrade and terrace were designed by Sir Charles Barry. The sandstone balusters were made at Pickard's Bobbin Factory. Recently, much of the balustrade was removed for safe-keeping.

The statue was blown over by a gale in 1937.

3 original field guns which stood by the statue were removed in 1937 when the wood rotted.

In July 2008, the bronze plaque of 1904 was stolen

West Ward, Halifax
One of the Electoral Wards of Halifax. Recorded in 1866.

See Frederick Bancroft

West Ward Liberal Club
Hanson Lane. Established in 1884. The building offered a meeting room to accommodate 200 people, recreation and games rooms, and a news room.

Recorded in 1905 at Colin Street, Halifax

West Yorkshire
Comprises part of the old West Riding.

Wakefield is the administrative capital of West Yorkshire

West Yorkshire Archive Service

West Yorkshire Bank Limited
Formed from the amalgamation of Halifax & Huddersfield Union Bank and the Joint Stock Bank in 1910.

On 17th June 1911, the name of the Halifax Joint Stock Banking Company was changed to West Yorkshire Bank.

The Bank was taken over by Lloyds in 1919

West Yorkshire Cycle Route
A 150-mile circular cycle route. The route closely follows the West Yorkshire county boundary and is signposted with a white rose and the WYCR logo on a green background

West Yorkshire Fire Brigade Friendly Society
A friendly society founded by Henry Jocelyn Barber

West Yorkshire Metropolitan Ambulance Service

The West Yorkshire Railway Company
Proposed in 1844.

See West Riding Junction

West Yorkshire Railway Office
Recorded in 1845 at 19 Broad Street, Halifax when Richard Otley was Secretary

West Yorkshire Road Car Company
Originally, Blythe & Berwick of Bradford

West Yorkshire Volunteers
See 1st Volunteer Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, 2nd West Riding Yorkshire Volunteer Artillery and 4th Yorkshire West Riding Rifle Volunteers

West Yorkshire Yeomanry Cavalry
Aka Second West Yorkshire Yeoman Cavalry

Westbury House, Elland

Owners and tenants have included

Westercroft
Area between Northowram and Coley.

See Thomas Turner & Company, Upper Westercroft and Westercroft Farm

Westercroft Coaches
Transport company founded at Northowram by Cyril Bottomley – with his brother-in-law Fred Smith and son-in-law Jack Tunstall – shortly after World War II.

In 1958, the Proprietor was G. Feather. The company was based at Westercroft Garage, Moorclose lane, Ambler Thorn. They had 3 coaches. The fleet livery was Orange/Cream

Westercroft Farm, Northowram
Aka Westercroft House.

Owned by John Lum [1650].

He built many other buildings nearby which he leased out.

Owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in Our Home & Country.

See Upper Westercroft

Westerman, Ada
[1884-1961] Daughter of Crossley Westerman.

Like her father, she was a photographer. She carried on her father's business after his death in 1918, until 1935, when she married Sydney Redman.

In 1921, she took Alice Speak – later Longstaff – on as an assistant, after Alice responded to an advert in the shop window.

She lived at Aisgarth, Birchcliffe Road, Hebden Bridge.

The book, Alice's Album [2004], by Issy Shannon and Frank Woolrych, tells the story of Crossley Westerman and Ada, and Alice Longstaff

Westerman, Crossley
[1861-1918] Youngest child of Henry Westerman.

He became a fustian cutter in Hebden Bridge.

In [Q3] 1882, he married Mary Cockcroft.

Children: (1) Ada; (2) Elizabeth Ann Cockroft [b 1885]; (3) Sarah Hannah; (4) Henry; (5) Phyllis Mary [b 1900].

His mother Sarah had a toy shop business at West End, Hebden Bridge. Sarah died in 1892 after falling down the stairs at her home.

In 1892, he opened a photographic studio in what had been the toy shop.

He made a large collection of photographs recording life and times in the district.

He lived at Osborne House, Hebden Bridge.

In 1917, he opened another studio in Victoria Road, Todmorden.

He suffered from heart trouble. He died of a heart attack as he rushed to catch the 5 o'clock train from Todmorden to Hebden Bridge on 25th August 1918.

He was buried at Heptonstall Slack Baptist Cemetery.

The business was carried on by his daughter, Ada.

The business and studio at West End, Hebden Bridge were taken over by Alice Longstaff.

The book, Alice's Album [2004], by Issy Shannon and Frank Woolrych, tells the story of Crossley and his daughter Ada, and Alice Longstaff

Mary died 12th January 1938

Westerman, Henry
[1825-1873] Son of Samuel Westerman.

In [Q1] 1854, he married Sarah Hartley [1822-1892] in Halifax.


Sarah was the daughter of Bernard Hartley
 

Children: Crossley.

Sarah died 29th January 1892

Westerman, Henry
[1893-1946] Son of Crossley Westerman.

In 1933, he married Florence Hamilton in Todmorden.

Children: (1) Anne; (2) Geoffrey

Westerman, Samuel
[18??-1852] Painter, gilder and paper hanger at 23 Commercial Street, Hebden Bridge [1845].

He married Unknown.

Children: Henry

Westerman, Samuel
[1802-1852] Of Hebden Bridge.

He married Anne [1802-1866].

Children: (1) William [1827-1844]; (2) Helen [1835] who died aged 5 months; (3) Frederick [1841-1855].

Members of the family were buried at Hebden Bridge Parish Church

Westerman, Thomas
[17??-1???] Of Leeds. He was imprisoned at York on suspicion of coining

Western House, Boothtown
See S. Moss & Sons

Westfield
An area of Sowerby between Mytholmroyd and Sowerby, south of the Calder. Westfield Mills and Burnley Road Junior, Infant & Nursery School are here

Westfield Children's Home, Sowerby Bridge

Westfield Farm, Warley
Great Edge Road. Late 15th century building. A part of Westfield House, Warley

Westfield House, Halifax
House which stood opposite People's Park, on the south side of King Cross Street, just below Swire's Road.

It was built in 17??, by [??].

In the early 19th century, this was the home of Copley Browne and his daughter, and in mentioned in Anne Lister's journals.

Owners and tenants have included

A sculpture – The Thracian Falconer – by Joseph Bentley Leyland stood in the garden.

In February 1927, Halifax Town Council bought the house for £12,600. In 1932, it was taken over to accommodate up to 30 children who had previously been at the Poor Law Institution.

It subsequently accommodated up to 49 children at one time. The children's home closed on 1st July 1958 and the remaining children were moved to a new home in Mixenden Road.

The house was demolished in 1960. The site is now occupied by Saint Mary's Infants' School.

Westfield House, Sowerby Bridge
Sowerby New Road. Built by John Atkinson.

Owners and tenants have included

A block of flats has been built on a part of the grounds

Westfield Quarter
Mentioned in the Nomina Villarum [1865] as being a place in the Parish of Halifax, although its precise location is not indicated

Westfield, Warley
Great Edge Road. Late 15th century timber-framed house which was cased in stone in the 17th century.

A doorway is dated TMF 1714 for Thomas and Mary Farrar.

Owners and tenants have included

See Westfield Farm, Warley

Westgate House, Elland
Owners and tenants have included

  • Jonathan Crowther [18??]

  • Charles Crowther [18??]

  • Joseph Wilson [18??]

Westgate Market, Halifax
There were a variety of small stalls and shops in the ground floor of the building on the corner of Westgate and Market Street, Halifax. The new building opened in 1971 to replace the Lower Market.

It closed in 2005 and has been converted into a single retail outlet

Westgate Working Men's News Room, Elland
News room recorded in 1905

Westmacott, Rev Francis E.
[19??-19??] Deacon of Lightcliffe [1936].

In 1937?, he married Joan Taylor at Lightcliffe.

In 1938, he was appointed Domestic and Diocesan Chaplain by the Bishop of Wakefield

Westmacott, Sir Richard
[1775-1856] RA. Professor of sculpture at the Royal Academy [1827].

He was the sculptor of The Good Samaritan and monuments to members of the Rawson family – including John Markland Rawson and William Rawson – in Halifax Parish Church, and a mourning classical female figure at Lightcliffe Old Church [1830].

His father [1747-1808] and his son [1799-1872] were also monumental sculptors – all called Richard.

He was an acquaintance of Joseph Bentley Leyland

Westminster Bank, Halifax
Stood at the corner of Cheapside and Commercial Street

Weston, Edwin
[1845-1895] Innkeeper of the Shakespeare Hotel, Halifax [1895].

He married Sarah.

After Edwin's death, Sarah took over at the Shakespeare Hotel.

They are mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1895

Weston, Rev Henry Austin
[1842-1871] Curate at Holy Trinity Church, Halifax [1871]

Weston, Rev Percy Moss
[1878-1957] Born in Liverpool.

In 1903, he married Beatrice Anne Lloyd [1881-1???].

Vicar at Siddal [1920s].

He died in Weston super Mare

Westre
[????-????] At the time of Domesday Book, he and Scanulf held land at Wyke

Westroyd House, Luddendenfoot

Owners and tenants have included

West Symes, Dr Edmond
[1846-1912] MD, MB (Edin) 1871, MRCS. Son of surgeon Dr Edmond Sheppard Symes [1805-1881] of Manchester Square and Grosvenor Square, London, by his first wife, Mary West.

Physician and surgeon.

In 1873, he was appointed Medical Officer of Health for the Skipton & Settle Rural and Urban Sanitary Districts. He moved to Halifax late in 1877.

He was Medical Officer at the Halifax Infirmary & Dispensary [1895]; Honorary Medical Officer at the Royal Halifax Infirmary [1905]; surgeon of No 5 District, which included West Yorkshire; a member of Saint John's Ambulance Brigade; a member of Halifax Parish Church Choir.

On 8th May 1878, he married Mary Evelyn Atkinson [1854-1939] at Saint John's Church, Leeds.


Mary Evelyn was the daughter of solicitor John William Atkinson
 

Children: (1) Evelyn Dorothy (1879-1964); (2) Edward Bertram; (3) Ursula Marion [1882-1972]; (4) Rimington; (5) Evelyn Spence [1891-1962] who married [Ilkley 1917] Rev George Stewart Addison [1887-1952] of Swinton, Manchester, later vicar of Stratton Audley, Oxfordshire.

The family lived at Hope Hall, Halifax

West Symes, Edward Bertram
[1880-1900] Elder son of Dr Edmond West Symes. Born 1st April 1880,

He was a member of Saint John's Ambulance Brigade.

During the South African Wars, he served as a private in the Leeds Corps.

He died [28th April 1900] of enteric fever in Cape Colony, South Africa.

His is one of the names commemorated on the joint Boer War memorial in Halifax Parish Church, and there is also an individual brass plaque in his memory on a pillar in the north aisle. The epitaph on the memorial is recorded in the book Monumental & Other Inscriptions.

He is also mentioned on a memorial in the Garden of Remembrance, Woltemade Cemetery, Goodwood, Cape Town

West Symes, Rimington
[1884-1956] Son of Dr Edmond West Symes.

In 1923, he married [1923] Winnifred Grace Gill [1896-1939] in Surrey.

Children: several

Westwood, Charles
[1???-18??] Of Southowram.

On 24th December 1815, he married Grace Hoyle of Southowram.

Children: (1) John [b 1817]; (2) Alfred [b 1820]

Westwood, Charles
[17??-1???] A cloth dresser of Southowram.

On 26th September 1776, he married Mary Fox of Southowram

Westwood, Ernest Hargreaves
[1878-1948] Son of William Westwood.

Born in Southowram.

He was a newspaper boy [1891]; a mason [1911]; a well known Methodist; associated with Church Lane Methodist Church since boyhood; choirmaster [1902]; organist [1906]; a member of the former Southowram Male Voice Glee Union and; a member of the Halifax Choral Society; a foreman mason with John Crossley & Sons; a debt-collector for Dr Lawson.

He (possibly) married Catherine Mowbray Barclay [1878-19??].

Children: (1) George William Hargreaves [1905-1988] who married [March 1931] Estelle Speak [1904-1???], daughter of Greenwood Speak of Hill Crest, Plane Tree Nest, Halifax, and lived at 9 Westborough Drive, Halifax [1948]; (2) Herbert Stuart [1907-1992] who married [1933] Ivy Mitchell [1901-19??], daughter of mason William Mitchell of Ingledene, Marlborough Drive, Halifax, and died in Barnstaple, Devon.

The family lived at 26 Cain Lane, Southowram [1911]; Craggan, 6 Law Lane, Southowram [1948].

On 25th September 1948, he was found on his bed suffering from severe head injuries. He was taken to Halifax Infirmary but died later that day.

Arthur Osborne of Bognor – who is said to have owed Westwood £14 – was accused of the murder and was hanged at Armley Jail on 30th December.

After Westwood's death, the house in Law Lane lay empty for several years.

In 1950, PC Vincent Egan and his wife moved in, and Mrs Egan reported sounds of rapping above her head, and a trapdoor in the ceiling rising and falling of its own accord. They left in January 1954

Westwood, Harold Victor Leslie
[1896-1971] Known as Victor Westwood. Son of Joseph Westwood.

In 1911, he was a schoolboy living with farmer George and Lilian Kirkbride and family at Close Foot Farm, Ulverston.

He was a butcher; an official of Halifax Agricultural Show; (possibly) a Director/Shareholder of the Halifax Abattoir; a meat inspector.

In 1928, he married Elsie Taylor in Halifax.

He lived at Rosemary Farm, Siddal [1936, 1971]

Westwood, Henry
[18??-18??] Of Lightcliffe.

He married Unknown.

Children: Frank [b 1860] who became a solicitor and married [1897] Annie Louise Wade

Westwood, John
[1???-18??] A coal miner of Southowram.

On 18th February 1817, he married Elizabeth Lister of Halifax.

Children: Charles [1825]

Westwood, John
[17??-1???] Of Southowram.

On 11th May 1788, he married Mary Taylor of Southowram

Westwood, Joseph
[1862-1950] Or Joe. Son of Thomas Westwood. Born in Southowram. Baptised [1863].

He was a butcher's assistant [1881]; a butcher [1889]; a butcher/shopkeeper (employer) [1891].

In 1889, he married (1) Hannah (Annie) Elizabeth Bateman [1860-1899].


Hannah (Annie) Elizabeth was the daughter of currier Charles Rhodes Bateman [1824-1896] of Cleckheaton
 

Children: (1) Lilian [1891-1892]; (2) Harold Victor Leslie; (3) Arthur Reginald [b 1898] who married [1927] Marion E. Greenwood.

In November 1900, he married (2) Fanny Maria Bateman [1868-1958],


Fanny Maria was the sister of his first wife and the daughter of leather merchant Charles Rhodes Bateman [1824-1896]
 

Children: (4) Ronald [b 1901] who married [1929] Marion Bailey; (5) Joe Douglas [b 1902] who married [1929] Millicent Harwood; (6) Annie Kathleen [b 1905] who married [1931] Stephen E. Weaver; (7) Charles Vivian [1908-1941] who married [1936] Constance Denison and lived at Belvoir, Saint Albans Road, Halifax; (8) Roy Bateman [1909-1993] who married [1939] Isobel Green in 1939 and he died age 84 in 1933.

In 1881, Joe and his mother Sarah (servant) were lodgers living with Thomas Thompson.

In 1891, Joe, wife Annie and daughter Lilian [aged 2 weeks] were living with Thomas Thompson.

The family lived at 20 Market Street, Halifax [1901].

Living with them in 1901 was visitor Thomas Thompson

Westwood, Thomas
[1839-1???] Son of William Westwood.

He was a quarryman; a miner [1861].

In 1861, he married Sarah Ann Hemingway [1840-1???].


Sarah Ann was the daughter of tailor John Hemingway of Halifax
 

Children: Joseph.

The family lived at Park Nook, Southowram.

In 1881, Sarah (servant) and her son Joe were lodgers living with Thomas Thompson at Park Nook.

Thomas Westwood was dead by November 1900

Westwood, William
[1805-1893] Son of Betty and manufacturer Thomas Holdsworth. Baptised in February 1805.

He was ag.lab [1841]; a mason [1861]; a farm labourer [1869]; a fence waller [1871, 1881]; living on own means [1891].

On 25th December 1838, he married Grace Smith [1815-1867].


Grace was the daughter of butcher Abraham Smith of Southowram
 

Children: (1) Thomas; (2) Joseph [1841-1850]; (3) William; (4) Catherine [b 1845]; (5) Elizabeth [b 1847]; (6) Hannah [1851-1873].

The family lived at Park Nook, Southowram [1841, 1871, 1881, 1861].

Living with them in 1871 was grandson Joe Westwood [aged 8]

Westwood, William
[1843-1???] Son of William Westwood.

He was a contractor [1869]; a dry waller [1891, 1901].

In February 1869, he married (1) Caroline Clayton [1836-1876].

Children: Grace [b 1870].

In 1877, he married (2) Martha Hargreaves [1840-1883].

Children: (2) Ernest Hargreaves; (3) Hannah Maria [1882-1883].

In September 1896, he married (3) Margaret Jane McLean [1859-1???].


Margaret Jane, of Hall Ings Southowram, was born in Inverness, the daughter of labourer John McLean
 

The family lived at New Row / New Street, Southowram [1871]; New Street, Southowram [1891, 1901]

Wet Dock, Sowerby Bridge
Formerly the East Warehouse at Sowerby Bridge canal basin. Built around 1775

Wetherherd, Christopher
[17??-18??] He was one of the town's trustees for Halifax. He was removed in 1770, and William Chambers took his place.

He married Unknown.

Children: Mary [17??-1805].

Daughter Mary died [19th October 1805]. An obituary recorded

Miss Mary Wetherherd, only daughter of the late Christopher Wetherherd Esq, of Halifax, died after a long and severe illness which she bore with the utmost fortitude and resignation. To her tenants she was a kind and indulgent landlady, and to the poor a most liberal benefactress

She bequeathed the interest from £400 to the poor of Halifax, for ever

Wetherherd, James
[17??-17??] In November 1769, he attended the enquiry which had been called by the Marquis of Rockingham to discuss the problem of the coiners and the murder of William Deighton.

Wetherherd, James
[1704-1777] He married Mary [1710-1791].

Children: (1) Mary [1734-1805]; (2) child; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child; (6) (possibly) child.

Members of the family were buried in Halifax Parish Church.

The epitaph on the family memorial in Halifax Parish Church is recorded in the book Monumental & Other Inscriptions

Wetherherd, James
[1769-1822] He served as a Captain with the 23rd Light Dragoons and was severely wounded in the Irish Rebellion of 1798.

He served with the 7th Royal Veteran Battalion. There is a memorial to him in Halifax Parish Church.

The epitaph on the memorial is recorded in the book Monumental & Other Inscriptions

Whalley & Appleyard Limited
Worsted spinners at Cross Mills, Halifax [1936]

Whalley, Arthur Thursby
[18??-19??] In 1908, he married Fanny Rebecca Hartley, daughter of Walter Edwin Crossley, in Burnley.

Children: (1) Alice who married Albert Bedford; (2) Roy; (3) Margaret; (4) Annie who married Arthur Spencer

Whalley's: J. Whalley & Company
Worsted spinners at New Mill, Wainstalls [1907-1910]. Established by Joseph Whalley

Whalley, Rev James
[18??-18??] He was a Fellow of Magdalene College Cambridge before becoming Curate at Cross Stone [1868]

His first sermon was preached at the reopening of Saint Mary's Preaching Room, Todmorden.

In 1869, he wrote The Wild Moor

A Tale founded on fact by Rev James Whalley, curate at Cross-stone, Todmorden with a preface by the incumbent of Cross-stone, Rev Whiteley Mallinson

Whalley, Joseph
[16??-1???] Of Kilnhurst.

In 17??, he married Hannah Fielden at Shoebroad Meeting House

Whalley, Joseph
[18??-19??] Established J. Whalley & Company.

He lived at New Mill Terrace, near their Wainstalls Mill [1905]

Whalley, Rev Thomas
[1???-16??] Curate at Todmorden [1633-1634]

Whalley, Rev William
[16??-16??] Minister at Cross Stone [1646].

On 31st December 1646, he was

curiously mixed up with a case of witchcraft at Heptonstall

Whams, Cragg Vale
Owners and tenants have included

Wharf Garage, Sowerby Bridge
Stands on the site of the Wharf Inn, Sowerby Bridge

Wharf House, Sowerby Bridge
Wharf Street / Bolton Brow.

Late 18th century house.

Clough House was next door.

Owners and tenants have included

In 1897, Brear & Brown Limited bought the House for £2,050.

Jackson & Fox submitted plans for alterations to the property.

The new building was to have 2 entrances, a refreshment bar [17 ft by 16 ft], a commercial room [16 ft by 18 ft], a tap room [17 ft by 14 ft], a smoke room [16 ft by 18 ft], a private sitting room [19 ft by 10 ft], and 10 bedrooms. There was to be stabling for 8 horses

In August 1897, the licence from the Wharf Inn, Sowerby Bridge was transferred to Wharf House on the opposite side of Wharf Street. The new hostelry was known as the Wharf House Hotel.

It was later known as the Wharf Hotel

See Wharf Lodge, Sowerby Bridge and Wharfinger House, Sowerby Bridge

Wharf Inn Family Funeral Brief
A friendly society established in 1829 at the Wharf Inn, Sowerby Bridge
to provide money for funeral expenses, to prevent poor people having to appeal to the public

when death occurred in their families. On 10th August 1900, a special meeting of the members unanimously resolved to wind up the Society, and to pay out the funds on a sliding scale. It was noted that new members had not joined latterly, owing, probably, to the newer system of industrial assurance, hence the resolution to wind up

Wharf Inn Smoke Club, Sowerby Bridge
A smoke club at the Wharf Inn, Sowerby Bridge. Recorded in 1901 and 1905

Wharf Lodge, Sowerby Bridge
Bolton Brow. Aka Wharf House.

Built about 1837 as a porter's lodge for the Rochdale Canal Company.

Between 1863-1894, the building was leased to the West Riding Constabulary for use as a Police Station. The barred rear window dates from this time, and the room was a cell.

Owners and tenants have included

See Wharf House, Sowerby Bridge

Wharfinger House, Sowerby Bridge
Bolton Brow.

Recorded in 1881, when Henry Richardson was living here

See Wharf House, Sowerby Bridge

Wharlers, Northowram

Wharton, Robert
[18??-19??] Quarry owners and stone merchants at Bank Close Quarry, Hipperholme [1905]

Wharton, Rev T. A.
[19??-19??] He was at Ambleside before becoming Vicar at Saint Matthew's Church, Northowram [1958-1965]. He left to become vicar of Chipping Norton

What's in Calderdale

Whatmore
A variant of the surname Watmough

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Whatmough, Francis John
[1857-1904] Cricketer. Born Francis John Whatmuff in Saltaire [4th December 1856]. Known as Frank.

He played first-class cricket between 1878 and 1882. He played for Yorkshire against Australia in 1878.

He lived in Rastrick.

He was a journeyman painter [1882]; publican at the Stott's Arms, Brighouse [1891]; innkeeper at the Greyhound, Rastrick [1900-1904].

On 20th September 1882, he married Ellen, daughter of Thomas Bottomley Dyson, at Bradford Cathedral.

They brought up Harry and Maud Mary Whitehouse who were listed as cousins in the census.

Francis John died of liver cancer at Rastrick [3rd June 1904].

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £106.

After his death, Ellen took over at the Greyhound

Whatmough, Robert
[16??-16??] A Halifax carrier. In 1667, he issued tradesmen's tokens worth ½d bearing the image of a loaded horse

Wheat Ing Bridge, Wadsworth
A single-span stone accommodation bridge built about 1780 for the cottages at Wheat Ing, Wadsworth

Wheat Ing, Wadsworth
Originally 3 cottages built about 1780. Now a single dwelling.

Gives its name to Wheat Ing Bridge

Wheatcroft, Rev F. E.
[18??-19??] Vicar of All Souls' Church, Halifax [1913]

Wheatcroft, John
[19??-] Editor of the Hebden Bridge Times and the Todmorden News [1984-1987]. In 2012, he published a novel Here in the Cull Valley. He lives in York [2012]

Wheatcroft, T. Dalby
[18??-18??] Curate at Brighouse [1852-1866]

Wheatley
Area to the north-west of Halifax

Wheatley Bottoms
Recorded on maps produced in 1854

Wheatley Co-Op
Branch number 12 of the Halifax Industrial Society opened in May 1864

Wheatley Falls
Waterfall on the Hebble Brook

Wheatley, George
[1???-1???] He was the second husband of Isabel Otes, widow of John Waterhouse

Wheatley, Rev George
[18??-19??] Minister at Bethesda Methodist New Connexion Chapel, Elland [1886]

Wheatley, John
[1???-1???] He married Sarah, daughter of William Holland.

Children: William.

The family lived at Royd House ??

Wheatley, Joseph
[1823-1897] Son of Richard Wheatley.

Born in Brighouse.

He was a draper in Halifax. He was retired in 1861.

In 1859, he married Agnes Sunderland.

Children: (1) Elizabeth [b on the Isle of Wight 1859] who married [1898] John McConnell; (2) Susan [b 1861].

The 2 daughters remained with their father throughout his life. In the year after his death, Elizabeth, then aged 38, married John McConnell.

The family lived at Tewson Cottages, Brighouse [1861]; Ganny Cottage, Brighouse [1871, 1897]

Wheatley, Josiah
[17??-18??] Or Joseph. Of Mirfield / Hopton.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Sarah; (2) Elizabeth who married John Emmet

Wheatley Liberal Club
Recorded in 1905 at 2 Ramsden Street, Wheatley when George Mills was secretary.

In 1917, Thomas Ramsden was secretary

Wheatley Post Office
In 1874, Joseph Ashworth, a grocer, was postmaster.

Recorded in 1905 at 47 Wheatley Road. It was then at the same address as the business run by George Milnes, confectioner

Wheatley Railway Station
A station was planned here for the High Level Railway, but it was never built due to low passenger expectations

Wheatley, Richard
[1796-18??] Born in Kirkheaton.

He was a linen draper in Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse [1841, 1851].

He married Unknown.

He was (possibly) a widower [1841]

Children: Joseph.

The family lived at Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse [1841]; Bridge Street, Hipperholme-cum-Brighouse [1851].

On 28th November 1840, an item in The Leeds Mercury announced

Sale of Messuage or Mansion House, 1134 square yards at the Ganny in Brighouse in the possession of Mr Richard Wheatley.

which I assume refers to Ganny Cottage, Brighouse

Wheatley Royd House, Brearley
Early 17th century house. A window is inscribed RA and AH.

It is now 2 separate dwellings

Wheatley, Sarah
[1803-1879] Daughter of Josiah Wheatley.

In 18??, she married (1) John Hodgson. She stayed on at Mulcture Hall, Halifax after her husband's death.

In November 1847, she married (2) John Crossley

Wheatley Steam Laundry Company Limited
A 1900 advertisement for the business announced

The above Laundry has now been going some six months or more, and is turning out work second to none

This Laundry is in an exceptionally good situation for the purpose, having any amount of outside drying ground and plenty of water

No Chemicals are used, and only female labour is employed

All they ask is for you to give them a trial, when they are confident that their work will speak for itself

The Ladies are specially asked to prove for themselves by visiting the Laundry, on any afternoon – Wednesday or Thursday in preference – when Mrs Callow, the manageress, will conduct them over the premises

Don't fail to give them a trial

Their registered office was at Jack Royd, Wheatley [1905, 1922]

Wheatley, Sergeant T. H.
[18??-19??] Drill instructor at Heath Grammar School [1905]

Wheatley Tunnel
819 yard long railway tunnel which took the High Level Railway from Greystones at Wheatley to Moorside at Illingworth

Wheatley Valley Bridge
In the 1890s, it was proposed to build a high-level road bridge from Beech Hill, Halifax to Saint George's Church, Lee Mount.

The design shown in the illustration was by Bancroft & Horsfall.

The bridge was not built

Wheatley Viaduct
10-arched, 100 ft high viaduct which carried the High Level Railway across the Wheatley valley

Wheatley Wells, Wheatley
Natural spring.

See Wheatley Wells, Wheatley

Wheatley, William
[15??-16??] Yeoman of Emley.

He married Elisabeth (Eleanor) / Rosamunda, daughter of Charles Stansfeld.

In 1561, William and Elizabeth recognised a moiety of one hundred messuages etc. in Stansfeld, Hartishead, Sowerby, Rishworth, Northeland (sic), Wadsworth and Langfield to be the right of Edward Stansfeild Esq.

In 1623, deed – William and Elizabeth to Edward Stansfeild of Stansfeild, gent. – of various evidences, writings etc formerly belonging to Charles Stansfeild, relating to lands quitclaimed to the said Edward Stansfeild, 1561

Wheelbarrows
See Abraham Dawson and Watson Mill Lane, Sowerby Bridge

Wheeler & Wilson
Sewing machine agents [1865] Partners included Mr Wheeler and Thomas Wilson

Wheeler, Rev E. T. C.
[19??-19??] He was in Hertfordshire before coming to serve in Stainland and Holywell Green in 1962

Wheelhouse, Ada
[18??-1???] Of Hebden Bridge. In a report in the Leeds Mercury Weekly of 19th June 1880, she and Thomas Hartley were named as successful candidates for the 8 Yorkshire vacancies at the Royal Albert Idiot Asylum at Lancaster

Wheelhouse & Fletcher
Hebden Bridge tailors [1905]. Partners included Wallace Wheelhouse and James Fletcher

Wheelhouse & Howarth
Succeeded Wheelhouse & Shaw as corn millers and maltsters at Gauxholme Mill, Walsden. They were there in 1877

Partners included Joseph Wheelhouse and James Howarth.

The partnership was dissolved in 1879.

Howarth continued there on his own until the early 1880s.

He was the last corn miller at the mill

Wheelhouse & Shaw
Corn millers at Gauxholme Mill, Walsden [186?]. Partners included Joseph Wheelhouse.

The firm became Wheelhouse & Howarth

Wheelhouse, Joseph
[1816-1???] Son of William Wheelhouse.

Born at Mayroyd Mill, Wadsworth.

He was a corn miller; partner in Wheelhouse & Shaw; partner in Wheelhouse & Howarth.

He married Grace Greenwood of Wadsworth.

They lived at Plane Tree Cottage, Clough, Walsden [1871]

Wheelhouse, Taylor
[1833-1903] Leather dealer at Bailiff Bridge.

He was recorded as doing good business with France. In 1883, he was fined 500 francs when 2 bales of leather had been detained by the French authorities on suspicion of being of American origin – American goods being liable to a heavier duty.

He was a member of the Clifton Board of Guardians [1869].

(Possibly) in [Q2] 1854, he married Hannah Collins in Bradford.

Children: Ada who married Lionel C. G. Sharp.

He lived at Birkby Lane, Clifton [1869] and Birkby Hall, Bailiffe Bridge [1894].

He (possibly) died in Ulverston [1903] (aged 70) 

Wheelhouse, Wallace
[18??-19??] Partner in Wheelhouse & Fletcher.

He lived at Beechwood, Hebden Bridge [1905]

Wheelhouse, William
[17??-18??] Corn and flour miller at Mayroyd Mill, Hebden Bridge [1802, 1834].

He married Betty.

Children: Joseph Wheelhouse

Wheelwright
[Surname]

There are currently around 15 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wheelwright. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Wheelwright family
The family was important in Rishworth. They owned mills in the Ryburn valley.

Members of the family have included John Wilkinson Hoyle Wheelwright, Michael Wheelwright, John Wheelwright and John Wheelwright.

See Heathfield House, Rishworth, Rishworth Mills, Rishworth School and Goat House, Rishworth

Wheelwright & Lumb
Woollen manufacturers at Berry Mill, Stainland [1874]

Wheelwright's Charity
Halifax.

See West Grove Boiler Works, West Vale

Wheelwright's Charity
Sowerby and Rishworth. Established by John Wheelwright.

He was one of the original trustees together with Ely Dyson of Clay House and Abraham Thomas of Dewsbury.

It was specified that one of successors of Wheelwright was to be his male heir, or, at least, someone with the surname Wheelwright.

Later trustees included John Wheelwright, Samuel Knight [1826], George Priestley [1826], John Wheelwright [1826], Colonel Robert Stansfeld [1853], John Waterhouse [1853], John Wilkinson Hoyle Wheelwright [1853], and John Hoyle Wheelwright - and they owned much local property and several mills including Dyson Lane Mill, Rishworth, The Folly, Barkisland, Lower Dyson Lane Mill, Rishworth and Slitheroe Mill, Rishworth.

See Rishworth School

Wheelwright, Dyson George
[1875-1???] Son of John Hoyle Wheelwright.

He was partner in J. W. Wheelwright & Sons Limited [1907]

Wheelwright, Edward Lycett
[1874-1948] OBE.

Son of John Hoyle Wheelwright. Born in Soyland.

He was a farmer [1907]; partner in J. W. Wheelwright & Sons Limited [1907].

During World War II, he served as Captain in the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.

He lived at The White House, Hornsea [1907].

He and his twin sister, Hilda Lycett, were buried at Saint John the Divine, Rishworth

Wheelwright, George
[18??-19??] Fancy woollen manufacturer at Firth House Mills, Scammonden [1900]

Wheelwright, J. W.
[18??-19??] Built Little Even, Barkisland

Wheelwright's: J. W. Wheelwright & Sons
Cotton spinners and doublers at Brian Royd Mill, Greetland and Small Lees Mill. Their head office was at Rishworth Mills. Recorded in 1905.

In 1907, it became J. W. Wheelwright & Sons Limited.

The subscribers were

The directors were

Wheelwright, John
[16??-1724] Originally from North Shields. Son of Michael Wheelwright.

His father died. His mother married George Firth from Rishworth.

He became Collector of the king's salt duties. He was a local landowner. He lived at Goat House, Rishworth.

He bought Clay House, Greetland from the Clay family in 1709-1713 and let it out to tenants.

In his will of 1724, he established the Wheelwright Charity, left money for building a school at Rishworth, and bequeathed Goat House to be used as a residence for the teachers, matron and children of the school.

There is a memorial window for him in Saint John's Church, Rishworth.

His daughter were buried at Saint Bartholomew's, Ripponden and their gravestone is fixed to the tomb of Harry Maslen

Wheelwright, John
[17??-1797?]


Question: Can anyone confirm any of these dates/details, or link him to John Wheelwright?

 

On 19th October 1710 he married Elizabeth Haigh, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Mary [1713-1791] who married George Riley; (2) Sarah [1719-1752].

His daughter were buried at Saint Bartholomew's, Ripponden and their gravestone is fixed to the tomb of Harry Maslen

Wheelwright, John
[17??-18??]

He was one of the subscribers to the Leeds Infirmary [1792]

Wheelwright, John
[1736-1814] Born John Riley, son of Mary Wheelwright and George Riley.

The rules of the family's Wheelwright Charity specified that one of the trustees of the charity who succeeded Wheelwright should be his male heir, or, at least, someone with the surname Wheelwright. This was resolved in the 1750s, when John Wheelwright and George Riley petitioned the House of Lords to change John Riley's name to John Wheelwright to succeed his grandfather as a trustee of the Charity

Wheelwright, John
[1785-1855] Born John Hoyle in Rishworth.

About 1817, after the death of John Wheelwright, there was a dispute about who was to succeed him as a Trustee of the Wheelwright Charity. This was resolved in 1826, when John Hoyle changed his name to John Wheelwright.

He was a trustee of the Wheelwright Charity [1826]; a farmer of 60 acres [1851]; a cotton dealer [1851].

He married Sarah Wilkinson [1791-1843].

Children: (1) Marian [1809-1824]; (2) John Wilkinson Hoyle; (3) Thomas Hanwell [1813-1825]; (4) Sarah Ell Hoyle [1815-1891]; (5) Ann Hoyle [1817-1888] who married John Robinson; (6) Michael Hoyle; (7) Benjamin [1823-1831].

The family lived at Rishworth Mill [1851]

Members of the family were buried at Saint Bartholomew's, Dean Head in the Wheelwright family tomb there. There is a transcription of the epitaph [number 153] at Scammonden in Alan Shaw's CD Monumental Inscriptions in the Ripponden Area

Wheelwright, John Graham
[1829-1917] Son of William Wheelwright.

Born in Leeds.

He was Manager of Halifax Commercial Banking Company Limited in Halifax [1866]; vicar's warden at Saint John's Church, West Vale [1888-1889]; a bank manager [1891]; Borough Treasurer for Halifax [1894].

In 1874, he married Frances Ogden [1840-1899] in Scarborough.

Children: (1) Gertrude [b 1876]; (2) Edith [b 1877]; (3) Arthur Graham [b 1880].

The family lived at Bramley Lane, Hipperholme [1881]; Clay House, Greetland [1891].

The Wheelwrights sold the house in 1897.

He and Frances died at Southport.

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £5,418 6/10d. Rev George Thomas Jowett and Rev Frank Werner Soames were his executors

Wheelwright, John Hoyle
[1843-1918] Son of John Wilkinson Hoyle Wheelwright.

Born in Rishworth.

He was (possibly) educated at Barkisland Grammar School [1851].

He was a cotton spinner employing 60 hands [1881]. He and his wife were partners in J. W. Wheelwright & Sons Limited [1907].

He succeeded his father as a trustee of the Wheelwright Charity.

In 1871, he married Emily Lycett [1850-1912] from Southport, in Altrincham, Cheshire.

Children: (1) John Roland Hoyle; (2) Gertrude Emily [b 1873]; (3) twins Edward Lycett; (4) Hilda Lycett [1874-1916]; (5) Dyson George; (6) Mary Dyson [b 1876]; (7) Hugh [b 1878].

The family lived at Ryburn Cottage, Soyland [1881]; Heathfield, Rishworth [1907]

Both John Hoyle and Emily died at Heathfield, Rishworth.

They were buried at Saint Bartholomew's, Dean Head in the Wheelwright family tomb there. There is a transcription of the epitaph [number 153] at Scammonden in Alan Shaw's CD Monumental Inscriptions in the Ripponden Area

Wheelwright, John Roland Hoyle
[1873-19??] Son of John Hoyle Wheelwright.

Born in Ripponden.

He was partner in J. W. Wheelwright & Sons [1907]; a master cotton spinner [1911].

He lived at Old Haugh End [1907, 1911]

Wheelwright, John Wilkinson Hoyle
[1809-1893] Son of John Wheelwright.

Born in Rishworth.

He was a cotton spinner and doubler employing 415 males and 242 females [1851]; a trustee of the Wheelwright Charity [1853]; a cotton spinner and doubler employing 25 hands [1871]; a cotton spinner and doubler [1881]; a cotton spinner [1891].

On 30th January 1834, he married Mary Harriet, daughter of Scipio Dyson, at Elland Church.

Children: (1) Thomazia Nelson [1836-1916]; (2) Sarah Elizabeth who married Wilkinson Crossley; (3) Mary Ellen [1839-1927] who married David Bellamy; (4) Julia [b 1842]; (5) John Hoyle.

The family lived at Heath Cottage, Rishworth [1851]; Heath Field, Rishworth [1871, 1881, 1891].

Mary Harriet died at Heathfield, Rishworth.

Members of the family were buried at Saint John The Divine, Rishworth and at Saint Bartholomew's, Dean Head in the Wheelwright family tomb there. There is a transcription of the epitaph [number 153] at Scammonden in Alan Shaw's CD Monumental Inscriptions in the Ripponden Area.

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1893.

See Mary, wife of James Mallalieu Shepherd

Wheelwright, Michael
[16??-16??] Of Sandal Magna.

He married Dorothy.

Children: (1) John; (2) son.

In 1656, after Michael's death, Dorothy married George Firth from Rishworth

Wheelwright, Michael Hoyle
[1819-1864] Son of John Wheelwright.

In 1853, he married Harriet Esther, daughter of Harry Maslen, in Pontefract.

Children: Helen Eva [1854-1856].

The family lived at Slitheroe House, Rishworth [1864].

Members of the family were buried at Saint Bartholomew's, Dean Head. There is a transcription of the epitaph [number 148] at Scammonden in Alan Shaw's CD Monumental Inscriptions in the Ripponden Area

The Wheelwright's Shop: Shibden Hall
This is in the Folk Museum at Shibden Hall. There are examples of tools and equipment which was used in the production of wheels, furniture and other wooden items

Whetherherd, Christopher Chamberlain
[1731-1803] Son of James Whetherherd.

He married Unknown.

Children: James [1769-1822] who was a Captain in the 23rd Light Dragoons.

The epitaph on the family memorial in Halifax Parish Church is recorded in the book Monumental & Other Inscriptions

Whetherherd, James
[1704-1777] He married Mary Chamberlain.

Children: (1) Christopher; (2) Mary [1734-1805]; (3) child who died in infancy; (4) child who died in infancy; (5) child who died in infancy; (6) child who died in infancy.

The epitaph on the family memorial in Halifax Parish Church is recorded in the book Monumental & Other Inscriptions

Whewall, Elizabeth
[1???-1???] Hosier at 4 Old Market Halifax [1837]

Whewall, James
[1813-1890] Stocking and worsted manufacturer and merchant at 1 Northgate, Halifax, and at 8 George Street, Halifax [1837].

He lived at Union Cross Yard [1845].

See Whewall's Court and William Whewall

Whewall, William
[1???-18??]

Recorded in 1822, when he was a hosier at Old Market Place, Halifax

See Whewall's Court and James Whewall

Whichfield
A form of the name Witchfield

Whin Hill Wood, Wheatley
Recorded on maps produced in 1854

Whinchat Hall, Clifton

Whinney Cottage, Lightcliffe
Recorded around 1850 at Smith House Lane.

See Whinney House, Lightcliffe

Whinney Hall, Shelf
Owners and tenants have included

See Whinny

Whinney Hill housing estate
Brighouse. Housing estate at Whinney Hill Park which opened in 19??.

There were prefabricated houses there in the 1950s. These were later replaced by brick houses

See Whinney House, Lightcliffe and Whinny

Whinney House, Lightcliffe
Recorded around 1850 at Cow Lane / Smith House Lane. The property is shown – but not named – on later maps.

Whinney Hill housing estate was later built on adjacent land.

See Whinney Cottage, Lightcliffe

Whinney Royd, Northowram
Whinney Royd Lane. Built around 14??. In 1455, the house passed from Richard Strange to James Otes, and passed down the family to James Oates in 1608.

The present farmhouse is probably late 17th century.

See Whinny

Whipp Brothers & Todd Limited
Cotton manufacturers at Millsteads Mill, Todmorden [1905]

Whipp, Charles
[1834-1913] Born in Soyland [29th July 1834].

He was a farmer [1855].

On 24th Dec 1855, he married Grace Hollas in Halifax.


Grace was the daughter of
Joseph Hollas
 

Children: (1) Jane [b Soyland 1854]; (2) Hannah [b Soyland 1856 & died Kansas 1934]; (3) Robert [b Soyland 1859]; (4) Harriett [b Illinois 1867 & died Iowa 1949]; (5) George Henry [b Illinois 1867 & died Iowa 1943]; (6) Alice Jane [b Illinois 1868 & died Iowa 1929; (7) Flora [b Iowa 1871 & died Iowa 1953]; (8) Frederick Joseph [b Iowa 1871 & died Iowa 1941]; (9) May [b Iowa 1873 & died Missouri 1953]; (10) Laura [b Iowa 1877].

In the 1850s, the family moved to Iowa, USA. Charles arrived on 9th May 1856.

Charles enlisted in the 7th Regiment of the Illinois Cavalry and took part in the American Civil War He was discharged on 9th July 1864.

Charles was naturalised on 15th July 1868.

Grace died 28th November 1907.

Charles died 17th May 1913.

They are both buried at Maple Hill Cemetery. College Springs, Iowa. The marker beside the gravestone indicates that Charles served in the American Civil War

Whirlaw, Todmorden
Natural rocky outcrop above Todmorden. 1,200 ft above sea level.

This was a popular location for meetings, demonstrations and celebrations.

The name is used in Billy Holt's book The wizard of Whirlaw

Whirlaw, Todmorden
Settlement above Todmorden. West Whirlaw and East Whirlaw are recorded.

See Whirlaw Common, Todmorden

Whiscombe Bank

Whisht
Popular name for the illegal malt and other liquors which were sold in the Sowerby and Soyland districts around 1829 – this was known as husht selling. The customers of such whisht shops often formed a secret society with oaths, signs and passwords. A subscription fund was established to reward any informers and for the prosecution of the offenders.

The dialect word whisht means to remain silent or keep quiet

Whiskam Dandy
Aka Whiscombe Bank, Whiskcombe Dandy, and Wiscombe Bank. Part of the Wakefield Gate route, the old packhorse track which passes over and down Beacon Hill and Old Bank

There was a pub here called Whiskam Dandy

See Horsfall Buildings, Southowram

Whiskcombe Dandy

Whiskum Toll Bar
A toll bar mentioned in Anne Lister's journals

Whisky & Well Head
See Well Head

Whistle Hall, Ogden
Keighley Road. House built by the family of Jonathan Catherall. The name was given because the family made their money by selling pot whistles and taws from a donkey

Whistlepegs
[17??-1???] A man who, it was believed, was involved in the bread riots for which Mark Saltonstall and Thomas Spencer were hanged

Whistler Park, Halifax
A recent name for the Belle Vue House

Whit Monday Fields
Aka Long Royd Meadow, Hebden Bridge. In the 19th century, children from Birchliffe Chapel, Hebden Bridge marched to the area in procession on Whit Monday. A maypole was set up here

Whitacarres, Thomas
[15??-15??] Owned Norland Hall [1598]

Whitacre, John
[1678-1762] A merchant.

A 1709, he bought Longwood House, Fixby from William Starkey.

He was a trustee for Betty Nuttall Hill.

He married Unknown.

Children: Elizabeth who married Henry Gill

Whitaker...
The entries for people with the surname Whitaker are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Whitaker
Another form of the surname is Whittaker

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently around 58 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Whitaker. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Whitaker & Howarth
Boot and shoemakers at Woolshops, Halifax [1809]

Whitaker's: Edmund Whitaker & Son
Warp sizers and manufacturers established by Edmund Whitaker. They were at Sandholme Mill, Todmorden [1842-1881]

Whitaker's Minstrels
A musical entertainment group.


Question: Does anyone know whether this was connected to Richard Whitaker & Sons?

 

Whitaker's Opticians
Opticians established in 1932 by Albert Whitaker at Sowerby Bridge.

In 1974, they acquired Mr Spencer's practice at King Cross, Halifax. This closed in 2008.

In 1977, they opened a practice in Elland.

In 1997, they acquired Mackereth Opticians in Regent Street, Halifax

Whitaker Pit Woods, Clifton
Woodland near Whitaker Pit, Clifton. The tramway to the pit ran along, what is now, the path through the woods.

There are remains of many bell pits here and the associated oak trees are still in evidence

Whitaker Pits Farm, Clifton
Just south-east of Whitaker Pit

Whitaker's: Richard Whitaker & Sons Limited
Brewery founded by Richard Whitaker in 1860. From 1867, they brewed at their Cock o' the North brewery at 36 Corporation Street, Halifax – see Stannary.

This was later made famous by the Cock o' the North mark. There were malt kilns at Elland.

Richard's sons took over the business when he died in 1871.

The main kilns were added when the brewery was enlarged in 1893.

A maltings, stabling and bottling plant were added in 1898.

The company was registered on 28th April 1890. At that time, they produced about 40,000 barrels per year.

In 1905, they acquired the business of Mr G. B. Whitaker.

The character Doc Shire – a portly gentleman with top hat and cane and smoking a cigar – was created by J. J. Mulroy to advertise Whitaker's beer in the 1930s.

In 1959, two Whitbread directors joined the Whitaker's board with the result that Whitaker's houses immediately stocked Whitbread beers. Brewing at the Corporation Street brewery stopped when the company was completely taken over by Whitbread & Company Limited in 1968. The brewery closed down in 1969.

The buildings stood derelict and were demolished in 1973.

The Brewery is discussed in Halifax Pubs.

See Albert Clifford Robinson, Joseph Frederick Walsh, George Bedford Whitaker, G. Murgatroyd Whitaker, Herbert Whitaker, Captain Joseph A. Whitaker, Michael Whitaker and Thomas Whitaker

Whitaker's: S. N. Whitaker & Son
Printers at Saint James's Street, Halifax [1880]

Whitbread & Company Limited
Brewers. Established in 1742 by partners Samuel Whitbread and Thomas Shewell. They were at Chiswell Street, London [1750].

In 1968, the company took over the business and houses of Richard Whitaker & Sons Limited

Whitbread, Helena
[19??-] Local historian and writer.

She began to decipher Anne Lister's journals 1982.

These were published in two volumes:

  • I know my own heart [1988] – The diaries of Anne Lister 1791-1840. This brought the diaries to popular public view

  • No Priest but Love [1992] – The Journals of Anne Lister from 1824-1826

White, Albert Samuel
[1847-1???] Born in Haltham, Lincolnshire.

Recorded in 1881, when when he was a certified teacher at Wainstalls Board School.

In 1877, he married Annie Chappell in Louth, Lincolnshire.

Children: (1) daughter; (2) daughter

White, Alfred
[1857-1906] He married Christina Fawcett [1854-1915].

Children: Mary Ann [1876-1947] who married Wilson Freeman

White, Arthur
[18??-19??] He established a business making planing machines in Halifax.

The business closed and he joined Oldfield & Schofield as a designer

White Birch Farm, Northowram
See Barkisland Workhouse

White Birch, Ovenden
Wheatley Road.

Owners and tenants have included

White Birch, Warley
House dated 1654.

See Yellow Birch, Warley

White Birk, Wheatley
Recorded on maps produced in 1854

White Chimneys, Skircoat Green
Rawson Avenue.

Owners and tenants have included

White Eagle Polish Club, Halifax
Hopwood Lane. Popular social club for the local Polish community

White, Rev Frank
[1911-1986] He was vicar of Liversedge before becoming Vicar of Lightcliffe [1955-1972]

White Hall House, Hipperholme
Stood along the Halifax-Leeds road, just north-west of the Hipperholme crossroads.

The house gave its name to the Whitehall Inn and the Leeds-Whitehall turnpike road which opened in 1833.

Owners and tenants have included

White Hall, Ovenden
Aisled house

White, Rev Henry
[18??-1???] In June 1875, Reynolds's Newspapers announced that, following the death of Rev Charles Musgrave,
Mr Disraeli offered the living of Halifax to Rev Henry White MA chaplain in ordinary to the Queen and the Chapel Royal Savoy. Mr White was some time chaplain to the House of Commons

2 months later, the paper announced that Rev Francis Pigou had been offered the post

White Hill, Rishworth
Small hill on Rishworth Moor

White Hole Farm, Hebden Bridge
Stands at the head of Crimsworth Dean. Recorded in the 1600s, when he married

White Hole, Wadsworth
Thurrish Lane. Late 17th century house with a datestone WIR 1731

White Holme Reservoir
Mytholmroyd. Built around 1805 to maintain water levels in the Rochdale Canal.

See Light Hazles Reservoir and Wool Pack Stones, Warland

White House, Brighouse
Recorded in 1893 off Bonegate and south of the land now occupied by the allotments on Waterloo Road

White House Holme, Mytholmroyd
The Mytholmroyd Charity Demonstration and the Sunday Sing were held here

White House, Rastrick
A landmark at the top of Toothill Bank Recorded in 1910

White House, Stainland

Owners and tenants have included

White, J. H.
[18??-19??] Printed the Halifax Comet at the office of the Guardian

White's: J. L. White
Milliners at Cheapside, Halifax [1930s]. The premises were later occupied by Liley's pram shop

White, Rev J. Pemberthy
[18??-19??] Minister at Bolton Brow Methodist Chapel, Sowerby Bridge [1905]. He lived at Triangle

White, John
[1764-1817] Originally from Edinburgh. He was Quarter-master in the Halifax 1st Regiment of the local militia

White, Rev John
[1788-1849] Born in Harden, Bingley. Minister of Heywood's Chapel [1820] and Master of Heywood's School [1827] where his brother, Thomas White, was a teacher.

The rifts caused by his predecessor, Rev Robert Harper, were mended and the branch chapel was converted into a cottage and sold.

He married (1) Miss Howitt [1805-1840] from Leeds.

Children: (1) child; (2) child; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child; (6) child.

His wife's father ran into financial difficulties and this resulted in reduced circumstances for Mr and Mrs White.

In 1840, he established Northowram Infants' School.

He married (2) Miss Walker from Mirfield.

He approached those who had left Heywood's Chapel during the ministry of Rev Robert Harper, and got them to return to the Chapel.

He sold off pieces of Heywood's old pulpit to raise money for the new Chapel. He was known as King of the Beggars because of the manner in which he raised money for the new Chapel and Sunday School. He was also known as The Steam Preacher because he perspired freely when exerting himself.

He was a founder and first President of The Halifax Total Abstinence Society. He was a founder of the Halifax & District Sunday School Union. He initiated the idea for establishing Northowram Infants' School.

He was buried near the entrance of the Chapel. There is a monument at Northowram

White Lee Clough, Mytholmroyd
Runs down from Wadsworth to Mytholmroyd

White Lee House, Mytholmroyd
One of a group of buildings at White Lee, Mytholmroyd.

This is a late 18th century laithe-house.

Owners and tenants have included

White Lee, Mytholmroyd
Midgley Road. A group of buildings comprising

See also Lower White Lee Works, White Lee Clough, Mytholmroyd, White Lee Croft, Mytholmroyd and White Lee Mill, Mytholmroyd

White, Leslie
[19??-19??] Player with Halifax RLFC [1951]. He won caps for Wales while at Halifax

White Lion Fisheries, Hebden Bridge
Numbers 4 & 5 Hollins Place. Late 17th century buildings and barn

White Lion Toll Bar, Hebden Bridge
Established outside the White Lion in 1765. This was the first toll bar in Hebden Bridge. It was discontinued around 1785

White Lion Yard, Halifax
There was a theatre above the stables at the White Lion Hotel & Posting House, Halifax which was well-known for its dramatic presentations. The actor-manager Tate Wilkinson described performing here in 1776

White, Rev Matthew
[1820-1890] From Kirkburton. He was educated at Pickering Academy before becoming minister at Reeth [1850-1872] and chaplain at a Sunderland Cemetery.

He was buried at Providence Congregational Church, Ovenden

White, Monkman
[1835-1875] Born in East Ayton, Scarborough.

He worked as foreman for farmer George Jackson in Middle Deepdale and a carter before becoming a paper-maker at Booth Wood Paper Mill, Rishworth. He may have got the job at Rishworth through his brother-in-law, William Mellor.

In 1865, he married (1) Susey Howarth.


Susey was the daughter of Samuel Howarth.

She died 9 months later [January 1866]

 

In October 1866, he married (2) Ann Candler [1838-1???] from Scarborough, at Scarborough.

Children: (1) Margaret Ann; (2) Thomas John.

He was killed at the mill [16th October 1875].

The Inquest is discussed in the Foldout.

He was buried at East Ayton, Scarborough, where there is a monument erected by Mary Mellor, his eldest sister

White's Nurseries, Brighouse
Recorded in the 1960s at the Old Coach Road, Lightcliffe.

They had a florist's shop in Commercial Street, Brighouse

White, Rev Philip James
[18??-18??] Methodist New Connexion Minister.

He lived at North Parade, Halifax [1845]

White's: R. White & Company
Mineral water manufacturers at Navigation Wharf, Halifax [1905]

White, Robert P.
[1855-1???] MB. Born in Wigan. Physician & surgeon at Halifax. Head house surgeon at the Halifax Infirmary & Dispensary [1881]

White Rock, Luddenden Dean
Saltonstall. Small, natural outcrops of rocks which were painted white in 1890 and have since been repainted many times.

Horsfall Turner writes that people celebrating Luddenden Dean Spa around 1890, were surprised to see the rocks painted white.

The original painter and those who have subsequently re-painted the rocks have never been identified

White Rose Archery Club, Hebden Bridge
They share facilities with Hebden Bridge Cricket Club

White Rose Water Ski Club
Based at the lake at Cromwellbottom

White Slack Gate, Walsden
A part of the packhorse route.

See White Slack, Walsden

White Slack, Walsden
White Slack Gate. Early 18th century laithe-house

White, Stephen
[18??-1???] Partner in Stringer & White and then White & Stringer.

In 1879, the partnership was dissolved when John Stringer suffered ill-health.

White continued the business as Stephen White. He had a shop with offices and show-room at 20 Broad Street, Halifax [1881]

White Stone Clough Farm, Cotton Stones
Recorded in May 1906, when it was sold for £500. The purchaser was possibly the tenant, Robert Pratt

White, Thomas
[1???-18??] Brother of Rev John White.

He was Master of Heywood's School [1827]. He did the work with the understanding that his brother was responsible. During this time, his wife's niece, Mary Ann Ogden died at the school

White, Wheater
[1848-1907] Born in Allerton.

He was a farmer in Wilsden [1881]; an oil merchant at Stead Street, Halifax [1905]; a town Councillor in Halifax [1907].

In 1876, he married Sarah Sophia Newton [1852-1???] from Leeds, in Bradford.

Children: (1) Jessie Muriel [b 1876]; (2) Nora Sophia [b 1878] who married Roger Thomas; (3) Hermon Wheater [b 1879].

He lived at Upper Westgate Farm, Allerton, Wilsden, Bradford [1881], Exley House, Exley Bank [1905], and Crossley Hall, Salterhebble [1907]

White Windows, Sowerby
Fore Lane Avenue. In the 16th century, the land here was owned by John Gaukroger. John Priestley bought the estate in 1765.

A new three-storeyed house was designed by Carr of York in 1767. Joseph Priestley had a Justices' Room here, and his name is inscribed on a window pane.

The house passed to his son, George. In 1837, he bought property in Chalfont, Buckinghamshire, and went to live there. He tried to sell White Windows without success. His son, George Kirkman Priestley sold the house to John Rawson in 1878.

The house remained with the Rawson family until the 1950s.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

It had been used variously as a school and a hostel.

In May 1957, it became a Cheshire Home for around 30 patients.

See Sir Henry Edwards and Rev Daniel Hartnett

White Wood Reservoir
Reservoir on the Ryburn

Whitegate, Siddal
In the 18th century, the house was owned by John Rawson.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

Whitegatefoot, Skircoat
Owners and tenants have included

Whitehall, Halifax
1 Russell Street. The building stands at the junction of Russell Street and Corn Market.

It was built in 1891 for William Henry Beal who had the agency for White Sewing Machines

Whitehall, Heptonstall
Northgate. Originally known as Great House on the Northgate.

The original mid-17th century farmhouse was rebuilt in the 19th century.

The Bentley family lived here.

Approaching the house, there is a stone gateway with a lintel dated IB 1578 for John Bentley. This was possibly reused from a cart entry to the farm

The Bentley family left in 1722 and moved to Oulton.

The archway is listed separately

Whitehall, Hipperholme

Whitehaughs Arch
The A629 passes underneath the M62 between Ainley Top and Elland. The tunnel is 443 ft long

Whitehaven, Todmorden
18th century milking-house. In the mid-19th century, it was renamed The Haven.

See Mr Clegg

Whitehead
[Surname]

There are currently around 38 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Whitehead. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Whitehead, Abraham
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner at Upper Lumb Mill [1805]. In 1811, he operated 2880 spindles.

He married Unknown.

Children: Abraham.

His son carried on the business

Whitehead, Abraham
[17??-18??] Son of Abraham Whitehead.

He carried on his father's cotton spinning business at Upper Lumb Mill.

In 1812, he was declared bankrupt

Whitehead, Abraham
[1777-1835] He was principal clerk to Fielden Brothers.

His obituary in The Leeds Mercury of 20th June 1835 reported

He had for a great number of years been a steady and consistent member and leader in the Wesleyan Methodist Society. He has left a family of 16 children to lament their loss

Whitehead, Ammon Willis
[1886-1915] Of Halifax.

He was killed in action in the Dardanelles [31st August 1915].

There is a memorial to him in Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 1042]

Whitehead, Anthony
[18??-1???] Licensee of the Waggon & Horses, Sowerby Bridge [1860].

In February 1860, he was fined 30/- for selling at illegal hours on Monday 31st January 1853

Whitehead, Anthony
[1854-1926] Son of George Whitehead

He was a tin plate maker working with his brothers William, Howarth, Frank, and Sam trading as George Whitehead & Sons and Whitehead brothers, at Crescent Mill and Salford Old Foundry.

He was Worshipful Master of the Prudence Lodge of Freemasons [4th January 1907].

He married (1) Nancy Ann Travis.

Children: (1) Charles; (2) Jane; (3) Clara; (4) Bertha.

In 1900, he married (2) widow Hannah Wolfenden (née Crabtree) at Todmorden Unitarian Church.

The family lived at Dawson Weir [before 1896 to after 1901].

He later retired to Southport. He died at 190 York Street, Southport

Whitehead, Arthur
[1???-1???] Member of the Halifax Art Society

Whitehead Brothers
Tinplate workers at Crescent Mill [1851] and Salford Old Foundry [1905].

Partners included Henry Whitehead, George Whitehead, William Whitehead, Sam Whitehead, Anthony Whitehead, Frank Whitehead, and Howarth Whitehead

Whitehead, Clifford
[1898-1961] Born in Queensbury.

On 17th May 1919, he married Sarah Jane Furness in Halifax.


Sarah Jane was the daughter of
John Furness
 

Whitehead, Eric
[19??-] JP. He was Mayor of Calderdale [1981-1982] and Mayor of Halifax [1968-1969]

Whitehead, F.
[18??-191?] He worked for Mackintosh's.

He died in World War I.

He appears on the list of Mackintosh's employees who served in the Great War

Whitehead, Frank
[1851-1893] Son of George Whitehead.

He was a tin plate maker working with his brothers William, Howarth, Anthony, and Sam trading as George Whitehead & Sons and Whitehead brothers, at Crescent Mill and Salford Old Foundry.

He married Hannah Crossley.

Children: (1) Mary; (2) Ruth; (3) Alice; (4) Emily; (5) James; (6) Fanny; (7) George; (8) Harry.

The family lived at Stansfield Street, Todmorden [1893].

On 8th December 1893 he died suddenly at the age of 42.

He was Grand Master of the Oddfellows in the District. On the Sunday following, 100 members of the Independent Order of Oddfellows met at the Oddfellows Hall, Todmorden, and walked in procession to Christ Church

Whitehead, G. T.
[18??-19??] General printer and bookbinder at Trinity Street, Halifax [1895, 1905]. Printed the Halifax Comet

Whitehead, George
[1821-1885] Son of John Whitehead.

Born in Todmorden.

In 1841, he was an apprentice tinner at Sutcliffe Buildings, Todmorden, with his father and brother William.

In 1851, he was an iron and tin plate worker in a partnership with his brothers Henry and William, trading as Whitehead Brothers, and employing 2 apprentices.

About 1890, he started up George Whitehead & sons without his brothers but with his sons and occupied the foundry at Salford Old Foundry and also Hall Ing.

He married Ellen Howarth.

Children: (1) William; (2) Mary; (3) Howarth; (4) Frank; (5) Anthony; (6) Sam; (7) James; (8) Alice [1861-1890]; (9) Emma [1870-1889].

Members of the family were buried at Unitarian Chapel, Todmorden

Whitehead's: George Whitehead & Sons
Tinplate workers at Crescent Mill and Salford, Todmorden [1905]. They made sizing and drying machines, tin and copper cylinder and roller makers.

Partners included George Whitehead, Howarth Whitehead, William Whitehead, Anthony Whitehead, Frank Whitehead, and Sam Whitehead

Whitehead, Harry
[1879-19??] He was a horizontal borer [1911].

He married Ada, daughter of Jonathan Mallinson.

Children: (1) Ellen [b 1908]; (2) Maud [b 1909].

The family lived at 20 Belmont Street, Claremount [1911].

Living with them in 1911 were Ada's parents Betty and Jonathan Mallinson

Whitehead, Henry
[1817-1898] Son of John Whitehead.

Born in Todmorden.

In 1851, he was at Hall Ing, in partnership with his brothers George and William, employing 2 apprentices and trading as Whitehead Brothers.

He married Isabella.

Children: (1) James; (2) Elizabeth; (3) Jane; (4) Ann; (5) Fred.

The family lived at Waterfield Cottage, Patmos, Todmorden

Whitehead, Howarth
[1852-1910] Son of George Whitehead.

He was a tin plate maker working with his brothers William, Frank, Anthony, and Sam trading as George Whitehead & Sons and Whitehead brothers, at Crescent Mill and Salford Old Foundry.

He married (1) Ada.

Children: (1) Ellen; (2) Ada.

He married (2) Mary Grace Hitchen.

Children: (3) Hilda.

He married (3) Betty.

They had no children.

The family lived at 8 Victoria Road, Todmorden [1905].

Members of the family were buried at The Unitarian Sunday School graveyard, Todmorden

Whitehead, Rev J. T.
[18??-19??] He was at Merthyr Tydfil before becoming Minister at Providence Congregational Church, Stainland [1923]

Whitehead, James
[1822-18??] A damask weaver of Haley Hill. He worked at James Akroyd & Sons Limited.

He had been an overlooker, but he was sent back to work on the looms on account of inefficiency. 3 weeks earlier, he had been dismissed when he refused to take on another warp.

On 15th November 1872, he was outside the Coach & Horses, Halifax when he shot – at a range of 3 yards – and wounded John Edward Champney, a director of Akroyd's, whom he had been following down Haley Hill.

The injuries were not serious. A bullet – crudely made by Whitehead from an iron weaving rod – was found lodged in Champney's skin, and another between his waistcoat and braces.

On 6th December 1872, he was indicted for feloniously shooting at Champney, with intent to kill and murder, at Halifax. He was sentenced to 15 years' penal servitude

This is discussed in Halifax Murders

Whitehead, John
[1???-18??] Son of John Whitehead.

In the 1830s, he joined his father in cotton spinning at Upper Lumb Mill

Whitehead, John
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner at Upper Lumb Mill. His son joined him in the business.

In the 1830s, it was recorded that they employed 58 workers, and their young employees did not work overtime.

He married Unknown.

Children: John

Whitehead, John
[1790-186?] Known as Jack o' th' Tinner's. Born in Bury

He was a brazier and tinner at Sutcliffe's Buildings, Todmorden [1837]; a tinner at Sutcliffe Buildings, Todmorden, with sons George and William (his apprentices) [1841]; a journeyman iron & tin plate worker at Hall Ing, Todmorden [1851].

He married Mary

Children: (1) Henry; (2) George; (3) William.

He died in Todmorden [after 1861]

Whitehead's: Julius Whitehead & Company
Stone quarrying company at New Bank [1800]

Whitehead, Lydia
[1830-1???] Born in Lightcliffe.

In 1846, Lydia – then a 15½ year-old servant girl – had an illegitimate son – William Edward Armytage Axon – fathered by Edward Armytage.

The child was adopted by the Axon family, and he took their surname. She kept in touch with her son, and he spent holidays with her on the family farm.

She married Elijah Mitchell.

Family stories tell how, after Edward Armytage's business failed and he fell on hard times, Lydia returned and nursed him on his deathbed

Whitehead, Martha
[16??-17??] Second wife of Thomas Cordingley

Whitehead, Mr
[17??-1805] Sowerby Bridge clockmaker and watchmaker. His obituary describes him as having
died in the prime of life

Whitehead, Private Marshall
[1900-1920] Of Hope Street, Halifax.

He served with the Northumberland Fusiliers in France, and the 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment in Ireland.

On 20th September 1920, he was involved in an ambush in Church Street, Dublin, and was shot in the stomach by Sinn Fein. He died 2 hours later.

Kevin Barry [aged 18], a medical student, was court martialled and hanged on 1st November 1920 for the shooting.

Private Whitehead was buried at Stoney Royd Cemetery

Whitehead, Rev Robert
[16??-1699] BA. Educated at Brasenose College Oxford. Curate at Todmorden [1699]

Whitehead, Sam
[1857-1926] Son of George Whitehead.

He was a tin plate maker working with his brothers William, Howarth, Frank, and Anthony trading as George Whitehead & Sons and Whitehead brothers, at Crescent Mill and Salford Old Foundry.

He married Zillah Barker

Whitehead, Samuel
[18??-18??] Landlord of the Old Crispin, Halifax [1860, 1864].

In 1860, he was one of a number of publicans charged with the adulteration of their beer by using grains of paradise in brewing. Whitehead claimed that the offence had been done by his brewer Shoesmith. The bench considered that the defendant was liable for the act of his servant. He was fined £50. Renewal of his licence was challenged because his offence.

Druggist Richard Toone was charged and fined £125 for supplying the grains

Whitehead, Stuart
[18??-18??] Established Stuart Whitehead & Company.

He lived at Savile Park Road, Halifax [1874]

Whitehead's: Stuart Whitehead & Company
Wire manufacturers established by Stuart Whitehead at Blackwall Wire Works, Halifax [1874]

Whitehead, Thomas
[18??-1879] He lived at Leafland Street, Halifax.

He was killed in an explosion at the works on 9th October 1879. He left a wife and 4 children

Whitehead, Thomas Charles
[1821-1???] Woolstapler at Halifax.

He married Ellen [b 1839].

They lived at 12 Park Road, Halifax [1881]

Whitehead, Thomas Edward
[1859-19??] Born in Sowerby Bridge.

He was an iron moulder [1881, 1891]; an iron moulder engines [1901]; a lamplighter & shop keeper general dealer [1911].

An article in the Sowerby Bridge Chronicle [24th May 1907], celebrating the anniversary of Bolton Brow Wesleyan Sunday School, noted that he was choirmaster there for 12 years, teacher for 9 years, book steward for 6 years, secretary for 6 years, a member of the Band of Hope for 39 years, connected with the chapel choir for 36 years, and secretary to the Free Church Council of Sowerby Bridge for 6 years.

In 1878, he married Martha Ann Helliwell [1858-19??] in Halifax.


Martha Ann was born in Cragg Vale
 

Children: (1) Mary Harriet [b 1879] who was a worsted spinner half timer [1891]; (2) Beatrice Alice [b 1881] who was a worsted spinner half timer [1891], an assistant school mistress [1901]; (3) Granville [b 1896] who was a taker off worsted mill [1911]; (4) Dorothy [b 1902].

The family lived at Earnings Place, Warley, Sowerby Bridge [1881]; 16 Albert Road, Warley, Sowerby Bridge [1891]; 12 Lord Street, Sowerby Bridge [1901]; 33 Bolton Brow, Sowerby Bridge [1911].

Living with them in 1891 was visitor Maud Lilian Gledhill [aged 5].

Living with them in 1911 was a boarder John Thomas Orme [aged 45] (bazaar decorator, clerk) 

Whitehead, Tom
[19??-19??] Local artist. Member of the Halifax Art Society

Whitehead, Wallace
[1884-1918] DCM. Born in Sowerby Bridge.

He was a dyer's labourer [1911].

In [Q4] 1907, he married Ellen [1882-19??] in Halifax.


Ellen, born in Liverpool, was a wire weaver [1911]
 

Children: (1) Louisa [b 1897] who was a wire weaver [1911]; (2) Thomas [b 1899] who was a part-timer cop twiner [1911]; (3) Ellen [b 1901].

The family lived at 2 Industrial Place, Sowerby Bridge [1911]

He served with the Gordon Highlanders during World War I. Corporal Whitehead was awarded the DCM...

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty as a stretcher-bearer fo over 24 hours without rest. He carried in 2 wounded officers unaided, after other stretcher-bearers had become casualties in attempting to do so [6th February 1918]

Serjeant Whitehead died 30th July 1918.

He is buried at the Senlis French National Cemetery [II B 53]

Whitehead, William
[1???-18??] He was landlord of the King's Head, Halifax [1841]; landlord of the New Inn, Sowerby Bridge [1845, 1861, 1864].

He married Mary Smith.


Mary was the daughter of Whitehead Smith
 

Whitehead, William
[1827-1874] Son of John Whitehead.

Born in Todmorden.

In 1841, he was an apprentice tinner at Sutcliffe Buildings, Todmorden, with his father and brother George.

In 1851, he was an iron and tin plate worker at Hall Ing, Todmorden in partnership with his brothers Henry and George, employing 2 apprentices, and trading as Whitehead Brothers.

Partner in Whitehead Brothers.

He lived at Ridge Street, Todmorden [1905]

He married Sarah.

Children: (1) Lucy; (2) Frances; (3) Arthur Othello

Whitehead, William
[1847-1909] Son of George Whitehead.

He was a tin plate maker working with his brothers Howarth, Frank, Anthony, and Sam trading as George Whitehead & Sons and Whitehead brothers, at Crescent Mill and Salford Old Foundry.

He never married.

He was buried at Unitarian Chapel, Todmorden.

On 27th January 1912, a portrait of William was unveiled at the Unitarian Sunday School

Whitehead, William Chantler
[18??-18??] BA. Educated at Saint John's College Cambridge. He was Usher at Heath Grammar School [1862]

Whitehill Lodge, Illingworth

Whitehouse, Rev Thomas Horatio
[18??-19??] Vicar of Warley [1937]

Whitelam, J.
[1???-19??] Curate at Brighouse [1944-1946]

Whiteley...
The entries for people with the surname Whiteley have been moved to a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Whiteley
Other forms of the surname include Whitely and Whitley.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

The Whiteley family of Barkisland
Important paper-making family in and around Barkisland and Slitheroe Mill.

Members of the family included Dan Whiteley, Thomas Whiteley and John Whiteley & Company

The Whiteley family of Halifax
The family had a well-known business in the making of hats.

Joseph Whiteley was an early member of the family.

See Whiteley's Hat Shop, Halifax and R. Whiteley & Son

The Whiteley family of Rishworth
Important family in and around Rishworth.

Whiteley & Son owned several mills in the area including

See White Hart, Ripponden, Rishworth Particular Baptist Chapel, Joe Whiteley, John Whiteley and Whiteley's Botanical Brewery, Ripponden

Whiteley & Ainley
A 1900 advertisement announced

Whiteley & Ainley
(Late Mason & Son) 

Jewellery, Watches, etc

30 Waterhouse Street, Halifax

Whiteley & Pickard
Waste and shoddy dealers at Mill House Mill, Triangle [1905]

Whiteley & Son
Cotton spinners at Rishworth and Ripponden established by John Whiteley. They and owned several mills in the area including

Whiteley Arches Dyers Limited
At Hebble End Dye Works, Erringden [2010]

Whiteley Arches, Mytholm
Railway viaduct built in 1840 by Robert Stephenson. It crosses the Manchester & Leeds Railway, the river Calder, and the Rochdale Canal Earlier plans to build a tunnel for the railway were abandoned on account of the nature of the ground.

The viaduct was originally called Charlestown Viaduct. The later name comes from John Whitely who had a mill nearby

Whiteley's: Benjamin Whiteley & Sons Limited
Cotton spinners established by Benjamin Whiteley at Park Road Mills, Elland.

In 1912, they took over business from Sutcliffe Brothers.

In 1921, the cotton production ended and they carried on with doubling and twisting.

In 1965, half the shares were bought by lace manufacturers John Heathcoat & Company of Tiverton, Devon. The yarn-processing operation ceased in January 2001

Whiteley's Botanical Brewery, Ripponden
The Whiteley family of Ripponden brewed soft drinks, ginger beer and mineral waters. Their stone flagons and bottles can still be found

Whiteley Brothers
Quarry owner and stone merchant at Marsh Quarries, Southowram [1905]. Partners included Joseph Shaw Whiteley, Fred Whiteley, and J. W. Whiteley

Whiteley Brothers
Paper makers at Soyland [1874] and at Slitheroe Mill, Rishworth [1905]

Whiteley Brothers
Cotton doublers established by Thomas, Joseph and Robert Whiteley at Victoria Mills, Brighouse in 1882. In 1892, the business moved to larger premises at Owler Ings Mills, Brighouse. They operated 10,000 spindles [1895]

Whiteley Brothers
Woollen merchants at New Road Terrace, Sowerby Bridge [1905]

Whiteley's Corner, Brighouse
The building on the south-west corner of the junction of Bethel Street and Bradford Road. Named for Rider & Whiteley who had their shop on the site

Whiteley's: Eli Whiteley & Sons
Cotton spinners established by Eli Whiteley. They were at Lower Willow Hall Mills, Sowerby Bridge [1905] and Hollings Mill, Sowerby Bridge 1907

Whiteley's: Fred Whiteley
Restaurant engineers, makers of coal, gas and electrical cooking apparatus for fish friers etc at Gerrard Street Works, Halifax [1936]. Partners included H. F. Whiteley and N. Whiteley

Whiteley's: G. & W. Whiteley
Wine merchants at Todmorden. Partners included G. Whiteley and W. Whiteley.

The partnership was dissolved in September 1889

Whiteley's: G. S. Whiteley & Company
Blacksmith with business at the bottom of Ogden Lane, Rastrick. Established in 1860 by George Whiteley. The business was subsequently run by Whiteley's nephew, John, his son, Clifford Riley, and the Riley family who produced the Riley Link. The business finally passed to Clifford's nephew, John. In September 1995, John died suddenly at the age of 38. The business closed and the company's workshops were demolished.

The company produced the weather-vane for Saint Matthew's Church, Rastrick.

A ghost, known as Uncle George, after the founder, was said to haunt the premises.

See A Village Blacksmith

Whiteley, Garsed & Company
Cotton-spinners at Albert Mills, Rastrick. Partners included L. Whiteley, J. Garsed, M. Farrar, W. Farrar, and W. H. Lever.

Their mill burnt down on 16th June 1864.

In August 1864, the partnership was declared bankrupt

Whiteley's: H. Whiteley & Company Limited
Halifax joiners and builders established by Henry Whiteley

Whiteley's Hat Shop, Halifax
Hatters and outfitters established in 1746 at 12 Corn Market, Halifax by Joseph Whiteley. After Joseph's death, the business was carried on by his son, Charles.

After Charles's death, the business was continued by his sons, Robert and George. The partnership bought the business, paying £800 for the stock, £400 for goodwill, and a promisory note for £400 paying 4%. The partnership was dissolved in 1842, and Robert continued on his own.

Robert took his son, Frederick, into partnership as R. Whiteley & Son.

From around 1880, Frederick was the sole proprietor

Whiteley's: J. F. & E. Whiteley & Company
Cotton spinners and doublers at Lower Willow Hall Mills, Sowerby Bridge established when John Finton Whiteley and Edward Whiteley took over their father's business.

When John Finton died in the 1870s, Edward went into partnership with Christopher Wadsworth and moved to Britannia Mills, Brighouse

Whiteley's: James Whiteley Limited
In 1866, James Whiteley acquired an existing business manufacturing textile machinery and machine tools.

Before the outbreak of World War I, they looked into the production of commercial cars, but the demand for machine tools took priority.

A motor lorry produced around 1914 was well received.

Towards the end of the War, they concentrated on the manufacture of parts for aeroplane engines.

They were at Jubilee Works, Ovenden and Eagle Works, Halifax [1901, 1919].

See Jackson Holroyd

Whiteley's: John Whiteley & Company
19th century paper-makers of Firth House Mill, Stainland established by John Whiteley.

In June 1867, the partners Thomas Whiteley and John Whiteley were declared bankrupt.

On 1st January 1868, the company reformed with new partners William Whiteley, Thomas Whiteley, Joseph Whiteley, Thomas Lumb, and William Whiteley.

The partnership operated under the name of John Whiteley & Sons of Huddersfield – where they were paper merchants at Market Street and Dundas Street – and of Horsforth, where they were paper manufacturers. The business was dissolved on 22nd September 1868. The Horsforth mill was carried on by William Whiteley & Thomas Lumb.

The business is recorded at Firth House Mills, Stainland [1874].

See Whiteley family of Barkisland and William Whiteley

Whiteley's: John Whiteley & Sons
Wire manufacturers and cotton and wool card makers. Founded in July 1791 by John Whiteley at Winding Road, Halifax. They were one of the earliest manufacturers of wire for cards. They were at Paper Mill and Winding Road, Halifax [1809, 1822, 1845].

In the 1840s, they moved to Brunswick Mills, West Parade. In 1863, they were visited there by the Prince of Wales. By the 1890s, they employed 300 work people and they went on to have customers worldwide.

The business was later owned by Whiteley's sons, Joseph and George.

After the deaths of Joseph and George, the business passed to their nephews, John and Nathan Whitley.

In the 1880s, Sir Frederick Whitley Thomson became head of the business. Samuel Rinder Whitley worked for the company. In 1897, it merged with, and became a branch of, the English Card Clothing Company Limited.

They were at Savile Mill, Halifax [1936].

See Centenary Place, Halifax, John Radcliffe Rawnsley and Joseph Whiteley

Whiteley's: John Whiteley Limited
Dyers and finishers established by John Whiteley at Hoo Hole Dye Works, Cragg Vale [1905]

Whiteley's: Joshua Whiteley & Company Limited
See Joseph Whiteley

Whiteley's: Lewis Whiteley & Sons Limited
Established by Lewis Whiteley. Cotton-doublers with business at Brick Mill and Cooper House Mills, Luddendenfoot

Whiteley's: N. Whiteley & Sons
Cotton spinners at Soyland and Barkisland.

The partnership was dissolved in 1885 when the partners were T. Whiteley and J. Whiteley

Whiteley's: Nathan Whiteley & Son
Cotton spinners at Lower Dyson Mill, Ripponden [1874]

Whiteley's: R. Whiteley & Son
Robert Whiteley took over his father's business, Whiteley's Hat Shop in Corn Market, Halifax.

He took his son, Frederick, into partnership as R. Whiteley & Son.

They were at 10 Corn Market, Halifax [1881].

The premises were rebuilt in 1887.

An advertisement in 1887 announced


Established 1746.  Re-built 1887
RE-OPENING OF BUSINESS PREMISES
R. WHITELEY AND SON
are now prepared with an
ENTIRELY NEW AND SPLENDID STOCK
WHITELEY'S CELEBRATED SILK HATS.
WHITELEY'S RENOWNED FELT HATS.
LIGHT – FLEXIBLE – VENTILATING.
THE CORRECT LONDON SHAPES.
AN IMMENSE VARIETY.
All the NEW SHADES of COLOUR.
BOYS' HATS and CAPS, TENNIS HATS,
CRICKET CAPS, TRAVELLING CAPS, &c.
With every Requisite for the general Hat & Cap trade
10, CORN MARKET, HALIFAX

Whiteley (Rishworth) Limited
Manufacturers of water pumps [1908].

The business later became Partco

Whiteley Royd Farm, Todmorden
Eastwood Lane. Early 18th century house and barn

Whiteley's: S. Whiteley & Company
Hosiery and embroidery yarn merchants at Sowerby Bridge Mill [1905]

Whiteley, Sutcliffe & Whittell
Paper manufacturers at Firth House Mills, Stainland. Partners included John Whiteley, Ely Sutcliffe and Joshua Whittell.

The partnership was dissolved in April 1841

Whiteley's: Thomas Whiteley & Sons
Cotton spinners and doublers at Smithfield Mill, Elland [1905]

Whitely
A variant of the surname Whiteley

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Whitely, John
[18??-1???] Or Whiteley. He owned a house and a mill in the Mytholm area of Hebden Bridge.

See Whitely Arches, Mytholm

Whitely, Peter
[18??-18??] Owned mills in the Ryburn valley

Whiteside, Cuthbert
[18??-19??] Methodist Minister in Halifax [1820]. He was in Oldham [1822]

Whiteside, Rev T. S.
[18??-19??] Senior Curate at Halifax Parish Church [1936] and Vicar of Cragg Vale [1937]

Whitestone Clough Farm, Cottonstones
Delfs Lane. 17th century farmhouse.

An attached barn, dated 1856, is also listed

Whitewood, John Ebenezer
[1832-1914] Son of Rev Samuel Whitewood.

Born in Halifax [18th September 1832].

On 2nd October 1855, he married Sarah Illingworth in Harrogate.


Sarah was the daughter of William Illingworth
 

Children: Edith [b 1856].

Sarah died in Harrogate [1908].

John died in Harrogate [25th December 1914]

Whitewood, Rev Samuel
[1794-1860] Born in Newbury, Berkshire.

He studied for the Ministry at Stepney College, London. and served at Andover, Hampshire before becoming Minister of Pellon Lane Particular Baptist Church [ for a period of nearly 30 years from January 1831].

The new Pellon Lane Baptist Church opened during his ministry [1834].

He lived at 2 Church Street, Halifax [1845].

He resigned in 1850, but returned the following year and remained until his death – serving a total of almost 30 years.

In June 1857, he was presented with a portrait in oils, painted by Samuel Baldwin.

He married Unknown.

Children: John Ebenezer.

Samuel died 31st October 1860 (aged 66).

He was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 441]

Whiteworth
[Surname]

Whitfield, Wilhelmina
[1900-1921] The body of the 21-year-old maidservant was found on the railway line near Hipperholme on 19th September 1921. An inquest recorded that the girl had died from injuries received from a fall from a train, but there was insufficient evidence to show the cause. The girl had recently claimed to have clicked with the guard on the Bradford to Halifax train and had agreed to meet him

Whitfield, William
[17??-18??] Of Northowram. Partner in William Mitchell & Company.

The partnership was dissolved in 1??? and he and William Mitchell carried on with the business

Whitham, James
[1801-1878] Of Luddendenfoot.

He married Sarah.

Children: (1) child; (2) child; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child; (6) child; (7) child; (8) John [1836-1888]; (9) Jane [1840-1920]; (10) Eliza [1850-1921].

Members of the family were buried at Butts Green Baptist Chapel, Warley

Whitham, Seth
[1860-1895] Innkeeper of the Station Hotel, Halifax [1895].

In 1892, he married Miranda Rothery [1862-1946] from Halifax, in Bradford.

In 1911, Miranda married William Hitchen in Halifax.

Seth and Miranda are mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1895

Whithill, Northowram
The house which was later known as Northowram Hall was mentioned in 1296

Whitlam, Caroline
[1812-1893] Of Grimsby.

She married Sir Titus Salt.

She died at Saint Leonards-on-Sea

Whitley...
The entries for people with the surname Whitley are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Whitley
A variant of the surname Whiteley.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently around 62 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Whitley. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Whitley family
Local family which originated in Warley. Nathan Whitley was an early member of the family.

The family were long associated with Square Church, Halifax, and many were married and buried there.

See Bechuanaland chiefs, Green Lea, Savile Park, Sowood House, Hipperholme, West House, Halifax and Whitley surname

Whitley & Booth
Local publishers & printers established around 1820 by Nathan Whitley and John Booth. Their premises were at The Castle, Crown Street, Halifax.

In December 1832, they published the first edition of the Halifax Guardian.

After Nathan's death in 1832, his wife Elizabeth carried on the business.

In 1834, they were listed as Music & Musical Instrument Sellers at 3 Crown Street.

The company were subscribers to John Horner's book Buildings in the Town & Parish of Halifax [1835].

They were agents for The Leeds Mercury [1838, 1839].

When The Castle was demolished in 1888, the company moved into the replacement building.

In 1890, the partners included Mrs Booth and E. W. Booth.

See William Milner

Whitley Charity
Aka Thomas Whitley Charity. In his will, Thomas Whitley left £40 and the income from several of his properties in and around Hipperholme to the poor of Hipperholme. In 1885, it was amalgamated with the Sunderland Charity. The united charity was closed in 2004

Whitley's: George Whitley & Son
Proprietors of The York Restaurant at York Buildings, Halifax [1905]

Whitley's Gift
In his will of 1631, Thomas Whitley bequeathed the sum of £40 on which the interest was to be given to the poor of Hipperholme. Using figures for average earnings, £40 in 1631 is roughly the equivalent of £76,700.00 today

Whitley's: Samuel Whitley & Company Limited
Cotton spinners established by Samuel Whitley in 1883. They were at Luddendenfoot until flooding damaged the premises and they moved to the new Hanson Lane Mills, Halifax.

Other members of the family carried on the business, including John Henry Whitley, Alfred William Whitley, and Percival Nathan Whitley.

In 1957, after the death of Percival Nathan Whitley, Samuel Peter Whitley became director and the family's shares in the business were sold to Lostock Spinning Company Limited.

The Hanson Lane Mills closed shortly afterwards.

See John Radcliffe Rawnsley

Whitley Thomson
The children of Emma Whitley and Jonathan Thomson – including Sir Frederick Whitley Thomson – had the names Whitley Thomson.

In 1914, Sir Frederick Whitley Thomson took the surname Whitley-Thomson, becoming Frederick Whitley Whitley-Thomson

Whittaker
A variant of the surname Whitaker

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

There are currently around 10 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Whittaker. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Whittaker & Shreeve
Makers of clock dials at Halifax. Recorded in 1800 to 1817.

See William Whitaker and William Shreeve

Whittaker, Arthur Llewellyn
[1871-1935] JP. He was Mayor of Halifax [1927-1928]

He was Governing Director of John Whittaker & Sons (Kingston)  Limited [1935]. He was on the Board of the Halifax Building Society. He was on the Yorkshire local board of the Union Bank of Manchester Limited, which was taken over by Barclays Bank on 1st January 1940.

He married Lois [1871-1941].

Children: Kathleen Mary.

He lived at Savile Heath, Halifax [1935].

He and Lois were buried at Warley Town Cemetery

See Whiteley Turner

Whittaker, Craig
[1962-] Born in Bury, Lancashire.

In 1967, the family emigrated to Australia.

In 1984, he returned to England.

In 1998, he was co-opted on the Heptonstall Parish Council.

He was a Councillor for Rastrick Ward.

He was elected Conservative MP for Calder Valley [2010].

See Spring Villa, Brighouse

Whittaker, Dr
[17??-18??] Published a history of the district in the 1800s

Whittaker Dyke Bridge, Colden
A new foot bridge over the brook was opened on 23rd January 1909

Whittaker, Ely
[1812-1???] Born in Sowerby.

He was a lock keeper [1861].

He married Dorothy [1810-1???].

Children: (1) Mary Travis [1836-1893]; (2) James Travis; (3) Emma [1849-1937] who was a throstle doffer [1861].

The family lived at Gauxholme lock-house [1861]

Whittaker, J.
[18??-18??] Fruiterer at Halifax.

In June 1862, he was declared bankrupt

Whittaker, James Travis
[1842-1895] MD.

Son of Ely Whittaker.

He was a polymath with a wide range of interests; a school master at Waterside Factory School [1861]; a school teacher at Lumbutts Factory School.

He designed and installed the Lumbutts sun-dial opposite the school room.

He was also active in the Unitarian Sunday School.

He never married.

Around 1865, he left Lumbutts, and went to Glasgow where he studied medicine and surgery at the University (whilst teaching at elementary school during the daytime). He qualified as a doctor and worked in public institutions before going into private practice in Glasgow.

He moved to Tillicoultry, near Stirling, and then to London.

He died of acute bronchitis, in Kilburn, London

Whittaker, John
[1847-1905] Born in Burnley. Established John Whittaker & Sons (Kingston) Limited around 1900.

He lived at 17 Lord Street, Halifax [1905].

He died at Round Hill, Hackforth

Whittaker, John Henry
[1???-19??] JP. He was Mayor of Todmorden [1931-1932]

Whittaker's: John Whittaker & Sons (Kingston) Limited
Aka Whittaker's Biscuits. Biscuit and cake manufacturers at Kingston Biscuit Factory, Halifax. Established by John Whittaker.

In 1892, their stationery described them as

Biscuit Manufacturers by Patent Machinery & Ovens

A 1900 advertisement for the business announced

John Whittaker & Sons
Rich Cake and Biscuit Manufacturers
Steam Bakeries, Lord Street, Halifax

The business became Scribbans-Kemp Limited.

See Ebenezer Biscuit Works, Halifax, Kingston Biscuit Factory, Halifax, Kingston Confectionery Works, Halifax, Kingston Toffee Mills, Halifax and Arthur Llewellyn Whittaker

Whittaker, Kathleen Mary
[1910-2001] Younger daughter of Arthur Llewellyn Whittaker.

She married John Hartley Denham.

They lived at Kingston, Lightcliffe which had been built for Kathleen Mary

Whittaker, William
[17??-18??] Or Whitaker.

He was a japanner and clock-dial manufacturer who lived at 1 Aked's Road, Halifax.

Recorded in 1809 and 1815.

See Whittaker & Shreeve

Whittel
A variant of the surname Whittell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Whittell
Other forms of the surname include Whittel, Whittle and Whitwell.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Recorded in 1296.

May be derived from Whitwell, meaning white and well

There are currently only around 9 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Whittell. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Whittell & Lawford
Woollen manufacturers at Stainland. Partners included Sarah Whittell, John Whittell, Joseph Whittell and Frederick Lawford.

The partnership was dissolved in February 1853

Whittell, Benjamin
[1???-1841] On 3rd July 1841,
As Mr. B. WHITTELL, jun. fancy-manufacturer, Stainland, near Halifax, was walking home from Manchester market Saturday week, he was shot dead through the head near Littleborough Railway Station, by some villain, who robbed him of 95 Pounds

Whittell Brothers
The brothers Joseph Whittell, William Whittell, and Mr Whittell were in partnership with William Shepherd as paper-makers at Booth Wood Mill, Rishworth. The partnership was dissolved in 1820

Whittell, Edmund
[15??-16??] In 1586, he is recorded as owning land in Elland.

He lived at Whitwell Place, Elland.

He married Margaret.

Children: Robert

Whittell, J.
[18??-19??] Woollen manufacturer at Stainland.

In April 1883, he was declared bankrupt

Whittell, John
[15??-1632] Son of Robert Whittell.

He lived at Marshall Hall, Elland in 1628

Whittell, John
[16??-17??] He lived at Marshall Hall, Elland [1697].

He was one of the electorate of 59 people when Jeremy Bentley was elected first MP for Halifax in 1654

Whittell, Joseph
[1???-18??] Landlord of the Bull & Dog, Stainland [1822, 1834].

He was in partnership with his brothers – and William Shepherd as paper-makers at Booth Wood Mill, Rishworth [1816], but this was dissolved in 1820

Whittell, Mr
[17??-18??] He was in partnership with his brothers – and William Shepherd as paper-makers at Booth Wood Mill, Rishworth [1816], but this was dissolved in 1820

Whittell Place, Elland

Whittell, Robert
[15??-1631] Son of Edmund Whittell.

On 10th July 1593, he married Susan Farrer.

Children: (1) Robert [15??-1632]; (2) John.

The family lived at Whittell Place. Father and sons died within a year of each other

Whittell, William
[17??-18??] He was in partnership with his brothers and William Shepherd as paper-makers at Booth Wood Mill, Rishworth [1816], but this was dissolved in 1820

Whittington, Rev Richard Piers
[18??-1948] Born in Thornhill-Lees, Yorkshire.

He was Curate at Halifax [1901]; Vicar of Heptonstall [1902]; Vicar of Lightcliffe [1907]; Vicar of Brighouse [November 1911-1916].

He claimed descent from Dick Whittington, Lord Mayor of London.

In 1915, he was appointed Vicar of Penistone. He went on to become Honorary Canon of Wakefield, Prebendary of York Minster, and Canon Emeritus.

In 1908, he married Ethel Mary Watkinson.


Ethel Mary was the daughter of George Watkinson and sister of Canon George Watkinson.
 

He died at Charmouth, Dorset [23rd January 1948]

Whittle
A variant of the surname Whittell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Whittle, Benjamin
[1???-1841] Manufacturer of Stainland.

On 26th June 1841, he was murdered at Barkisland. A reward of £100 was offered for the apprehension of Joseph Barrit [aged between 28 and 30] who has been in the habit of travelling about the country hawking woollen cloth

Whittle, Benjamin
[1841-1892] Or Whittell.

He was an ironmonger [1871]; innkeeper at the Turk's Head, Halifax [1881]; innkeeper at the Victoria Hotel, Strangeways, Manchester [1891].

On 31st October 1865, he married Hannah Maria, daughter of John Bradley at Halifax Parish Church.

Children: (1) Louisa [1869-1874]; (2) Harriet Annie [b 1871]; (3) Harry [b 1875]; (4) Elizabeth [b 1878].

In 1871, the family were living with Hannah Maria's father John Bradley, at Slitheroe House, Rishworth.

He died at the Victoria Hotel, Strangeways, Manchester

Whittles, John William
[18??-19??] Of Whittles Coal Merchants, Rastrick.

He married Lily, widow of Percy Fewster Kendall

Whitton, Rev J.
[18??-1???] Pastor at Ebenezer Congregational Church, Summit [1891]

Whitton, Rev Joshua
[1???-1674] Or Witton. MA. A Presbyterian. He was born at Sowerby. He was godfather to Archbishop Tillotson. He became chaplain to Lord Ferdinando Fairfax. He became rector of Thornhill and was ejected

Whitwam, H.
[18??-19??] Aka Whitwam's Bazaars. Dealer in smallware, hardware, earthenware, stationery and fancy goods.

In 1916, he was at Arcade Royale, Halifax, 75 King Cross, Halifax, Jubilee Buildings, Sowerby Bridge, 39 Southgate, Elland, and 16 Bridge Gate, Hebden Bridge

Whitwam, Jesse
[18??-19??] He was a Deacon at Blackley Baptist Chapel [1911]

Whitwam, Joseph
[18??-19??] He was a Deacon at Blackley Baptist Chapel. In 1911, he was recorded as a Past Deacon

Whitwell
A variant of the surname Whittell

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Whitwell Place, Elland
House aka Whittell Place. The porch is dated 1708 and a datestone in the yard is inscribed D T W C 1719.

There is a large sundial over the doorway.

Owners and tenants have included

See Elland Floral & Horticultural Society

The Whitworth family of Luddendenfoot
Mill-owning family in and around Luddendenfoot.

Significant members of the family have included John Whitworth, Robert Whitworth, Richard Whitworth, and John Whitworth.

Businesses such as Whitworth, Ashforth & Ashforth, John & William Whitworth, Joseph W. Whitworth Limited and Robert Whitworth & Company were important in the area.

In December 1860, the family's mills at Luddendenfoot employed a large number of pauper factory apprentices who had been sent by the Poor Law Unions in the south of England. The system of apprenticing poor children caused umbrage in the district, and the locals were in the habit of insulting the apprentices, calling them white slaves and other degrading names

The Whitworth family of the Ryburn Valley
It is recorded that the Whitworth family of the Ryburn Valley were well-known as makers of hats and bonnets.


Question: Can anyone confirm that the family were makers of hats and bonnets? Were they connected to the Whitworth family of Luddendenfoot?

 

See Charles Whitworth

Whitworth, Abraham
[18??-18??] Partner in J. & S. L. Taylor Limited

Whitworth, Ashforth & Ashforth
Fustian manufacturers at Watson Mill, Sowerby Bridge around 1805. Partners included William Whitworth

Whitworth, Charles
[17??-18??] A member of the Whitworth family of the Ryburn Valley.

He married Unknown.

Children: Mary [1802-1838] who married Moses Habergham

Whitworth, H.
[17??-17??] Curate at Halifax [1756]

Whitworth, Henry
[1???-18??] He was a wool comb manufacturer [1851].

He lived at Brearley Hall, Midgley [1851]

Living with him in 1851 was apprentice Jonas, son of Levi Harwood

Whitworth, Rev Henry
[17??-1768] Vicar of Coley [1747]

Whitworth, Henry
[1822-1904] Innkeeper at the Ship Inn, Halifax [1861, 1887]

In 1843, he married Mary Thomas [1822-1876] in Halifax.

Children: Robert.

The family lived at Elba House, Siddal [1904].

Members of the family were buried at Christ Church, Pellon.

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1904

Whitworth, Herbert
[18??-19??] Partner in Kitson & Whitworth.

He lived at Woodman House, Elland [1905]

Whitworth, Isaac
[18??-19??] He was a Deacon at Blackley Baptist Chapel. In 1911, he was recorded as a Past Deacon

Whitworth, James
[1827-1???] Son of John Whitworth.

He was a coal miner [1851].

In 1851, he married Hannah Tyrey Mallinson


Hannah was the daughter of Thomas Mallinson
 

Whitworth, James Alfred
[1870-1941] Born in Sowerby.

He was a cotton spinner [1894].

In 1894, he married Fanny Hollas in Halifax.


Fanny was the daughter of
Sidney Hollas
 

Children: Elsie [b 1906].

Fanny & James had lived at 6 Finkle Street, Sowerby all their married life

Whitworth, John
[1???-18??] He was miner of Northowram [1851].

He married Unknown.

Children: James

Whitworth, John
[17??-17??] He was an early member of the Whitworth family.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Richard; (2) Sally [1766-1821].

Members of the family were buried at Saint Mary's, Luddenden

Whitworth, John
[1813-1861] Son of Richard Whitworth.

He worked with the family business, Robert Whitworth & Company.

In 1846, he married Mary Ward, daughter of Mr Whiteley

Children: (1) Joseph; (2) son; (3) Robert; (4) son; (5) daughter.

The family lived at Peel House, Luddenden; Kirby Leas.

He was a member of the Luddenden Reading Society where he met Branwell Brontë during his employment at Luddendenfoot Station.

He was a prime mover in the construction of Luddendenfoot Congregational Church which was built by the family. He was Mayor of Halifax [1856-1857]. He was Vice-Chairman of Halifax Mechanics' Institute.

He died whilst out riding at Barmouth, North Wales [5th August 1861]. He was taken ill and died on the road. His body was found next morning seated on the ground, with his pony tied to a gatepost nearby.

His death was recorded as being

one of the worst things that could have happened to Luddendenfoot

See Denholme United Methodist School, Luddendenfoot, Luddendenfoot Congregational Church, Luddendenfoot Sunday School and West Yorkshire Railway Company

He was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 191]

Whitworth's: John & William Whitworth
Worsted spinners and manufacturers at Lee Mill, Halifax [1845]. Both partners lived at Saint James's Road, Halifax [1845].

Around 1850, they moved to Luddendenfoot and occupied Cooper House Mill and then Old Boy Mill which they rebuilt in 1858. In 1862, they built Wood Bottom Dye Works.

There move to Luddendenfoot led to considerable expansion in housing in the area

Whitworth, John Nesbit
[1898-1940] RA. Second son of Robert Whitworth. Born in Halifax [3rd August 1898].

He was educated at Wellington where he played rugby and cricket.

He entered the Royal Academy, Woolwich when he played for the regiment. During World War I, he served in France. He subsequently served in Germany, Ireland and Egypt.

In [Q2] 1923, he married Kathleen St John Gorman [1898 in Halifax.


Kathleen was born in Dover
 

They had no children.

The family lived at Ripon [1940].

In 1938, he retired from the Army and joined the family firm, Robert Whitworth & Company.

He returned to the Army in 1939 as Staff Captain, then Major, with the Royal Artillery.

He was killed in action at Dunkirk [31st May 1940]. He was buried at the De Panne Communal Cemetery, Belgium [3 B 3]

Whitworth's: Joseph W. Whitworth Limited
Cotton manufacturers established by Joseph W. Whitworth. They were at Longbottom Mills, Luddendenfoot [1905] which Joseph had bought from his uncle William.

In 1920, Dr John Appleyard sold Magson House, Luddendenfoot to the Whitworths

Whitworth, Joseph Whiteley
[1848-1894] Eldest son of John Whitworth.

He established Joseph W. Whitworth Limited at Longbottom Mills, Luddendenfoot.

He was a member of the Luddendenfoot Local Board [1868].

He lived at Westroyd House, Luddendenfoot [1894].

He died after a fall from his horse [28th March 1894].

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1894

Whitworth, Mr
[18??-1???] In June 1882, he placed a bet that he could run from the Railway Hotel, Walsden to Stoodley Pike and back in less than an hour. He won when he completed the task in 52 minutes

Whitworth, Richard
[1750-1819] Son of John Whitworth.

Born in Luddenden.

On 27th April 1784, he married Ellen Patchett, in Halifax Parish Church.


Ellen was the daughter of Benjamin Patchett
 

Children: (1) Richard; (2) Robert

The family lived at Saltonstall [1819].

Members of the family were buried at Saint Mary's, Luddenden

Whitworth, Richard
[1779-1826] Son of Richard Whitworth.

In 1818, he occupied a small farm at Wainstalls and engaged in a small way of business as spinner and manufacturer.

With his brother, Robert, he was a partner in Robert Whitworth & Company [1795].

A business Richard Whitworth & Company is recorded in the proceedings of the Cold Edge Dam Company [1827].

He married Mary [1777-1824].

Children: (1) John; (2) William; (3) Sarah

The family lived at Wainstalls [1818]; Little Peel House, Warley [1820].

Members of the family were buried at Saint Mary's, Luddenden

See William Illingworth

Whitworth, Robert
[1733-1799] Born in Sowerby. Engineer who was involved in the construction of canals and bridges, and who became surveyor and draughtsman for James Brindley

Whitworth, Robert
[1781-1854] Son of Richard Whitworth.

Born in Midgley.

Senior partner in Robert Whitworth & Company

He was the first worsted spinner in the Calder Valley to mechanise wool combing [1851]

Robert died in Halifax [17th February 1854] (aged 71).

He was buried at Saint Mary's, Luddenden

Whitworth, Robert
[1847-1894] Son of Henry Whitworth.

He was a beer retailer at the Railway Hotel, Bowling Dyke, Halifax [1894].

In 1841, he married Elizabeth Jenkinson [1846-1913] in Halifax.

The couple were buried at Christ Church, Pellon with Robert's parents.

They are mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1894

Whitworth, Robert
[1854-1923] Son of John Whitworth.

Born in Halifax [6th October 1854].

He worked for the family business, Robert Whitworth & Company, and became a director of the firm.

He owned and showed a stallion called Beckenham Squire 8070 [1909].

He was known as a philanthropist. He established a convalescent home in Lytham for

women in need of a rest

On 3rd October 1894, he married Hilda Beatrice Baldwin [1871-1963] at Marylebone, London.


Hilda Beatrice was born in Greetland, the daughter of John Baldwin
 

Children: (1) Robert; (2) John Nesbit; (3) Hilda Elizabeth / Betty [1903-1981] who married Raymond Morton Shaw.

The family lived at Southwood End, Halifax.

Robert died at Southwood End [27th April 1923].

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £134,719 6/4d.

After his death, Hilda Beatrice married Anatole Shister at Saint George's Church, Hanover Square, London [Q3 1931].

Hilda Beatrice died in Lewes, Sussex [Q1 1963]

Whitworth, Robert Baldwin
[1895-1983] Son of Robert Whitworth

Born in Halifax [21st July 1895].

He lived at Magson House, Warley.

He went to live at Thirsk.

He died at Claro [11th October 1983]

Whitworth's: Robert Whitworth & Company
Woollen and worsted spinners and manufacturers.

The business was originally set up around 1795 by Richard Whitworth at Peel House Mill, Luddendenfoot.

After his death, the company was established around 1827 by his brother Robert Whitworth, and nephew William Illingworth.

Richard's orphaned sons John and William Whitworth were made partners when they came of age.

Around 1834, they moved to newly-erected premises at Lee Mills, Halifax. On 2nd August 1858, several workers were injured when a gas-holder fell.

They moved to Cooper House Mills, Luddendenfoot [1851]. In 1862, they rebuilt the mill.

They also occupied a part of Boy Mill, Luddendenfoot. In 1858, they rebuilt the mill.

They employed around 3,000 workers and employed most of workers in Luddendenfoot.

In the 1830s, they are recorded as paying double-pay for overtime work by their young employees – see Child labour.

In 1851, Robert Whitworth was the first worsted spinner in the Calder Valley to mechanise wool combing.

In October 1858, they were charged with working their employees too late in the evening. They were charged with working 75 females and young persons after the legal time at night. 38 of these charges were withdrawn and a total of £58 3/- in fines and costs was imposed.

In 1859, the brothers built Luddendenfoot Congregational Church and a dwelling house costing around £5,500 near their factory.

In 1862, they built Wood Bottom Dye Works.

In 1864, they took over Swamp Mills and Longbottom Mill.

In April 1874, they were reported to have liabilities of £280,000. Business was suspended and a meeting of creditors was arranged. The Luddendenfoot Industrial Co-operative Society used Whitworths as their bankers, and lost £1,881 when the Company failed. Using figures for average earnings, £1,881 in 1874 is roughly the equivalent of £971,000.00 today.

In 1905, they are recorded at Swamp Mill, Sowerby.

Several members of the family were involved in the company, including Robert Whitworth, John Whitworth, William Whitworth, Robert Whitworth, and Robert Whitworth.

See Mitchell's School, Sowerby

Whitworth, Samuel
[1828-1876] Born in Ashton-under-Lyne.

He was a cotton spinner [1861]; landlord of the Castle Hotel, Sowerby Bridge [from 1871 until his death].

In June 1849, he married Maria Williams [1821-1888] from Manchester, at Hyde Parish Church.


Maria already had a son John Williams [b 1844] when she married
 

Children: (1) William [1850-1914]; (2) Mary Ann [1853-1929]; (3) Rachel [1855-1936]; (4) Robert [1858-1939]; (5) Maria [1860-1927]; (6) Elizabeth Ann [1862-1943].

The family lived at 11 Blackwood Hall, Sowerby [1861]

Whitworth, William
[1689-1762] Halifax attorney

Whitworth, William
[17??-18??] Partner in Whitworth, Ashforth & Ashforth. After the partnership was dissolved in 1805, he continued cotton spinning at Watson Mill, Sowerby Bridge until around 1816

Whitworth, William
[18??-18??] Son of Richard Whitworth, and brother of John. He worked with the family business, Robert Whitworth & Company.

See Luddendenfoot Congregational Church

Whitworth, William Raglan
[1854-1903] Born in Chorlton.

He was a mechanical labourer [1890].

On 7th June 1890, he married Emma Hopkinson at Mount Pellon.


Emma was the daughter of
Thomas Hopkinson
 

They had no children.

The couple died in Halifax

Whitworths & Illingworth
Worsted spinners at Halifax. Partners included Robert Whitworth, John Whitworth, William Whitworth and William Illingworth.

The partnership was dissolved in October 1843

Whole Stone Moor
Aka Holy Stone Moor or Hole Stone Moor. Moorland above Barkisland which may have been used in prehistoric times

Whone, Dennis
[1868-1934] Born in Micklethwaite

He was a boot maker [1899].

In 1899, he married Martha Greenroyd in Keighley.


Martha was the daughter of
John Greenroyd
 

Children: Hartley [1900-1962]

Dennis & Martha died in Bingley: Dennis [1934]; Martha [9th March 1937]

Whorlow, Rev Alfred
[18??-19??] BA. He was educated at Corpus Christi College Cambridge and ordained at Brighouse [1892] before becoming Deacon of Saint Mary's, Halifax [1892]

Whytock, Richard
[1792-18??] Invented a technique for printing a design on textiles and carpets which was subsequently exploited by Crossley's Carpets

Wicken Clough, Hebden Bridge

Wicken Clough, Ripponden
A Mesolithic site

Wicken Hill Earth Circle, Wadsworth
Bronze Age circle about 130 ft in diameter. Excavations in 1897 found fragments of human bone

Wicken Hill Farm, Hebden Bridge
Height Road. Early 18th century house

Wickenberry Clough, Todmorden
The Helliwell family of Todmorden had a small water-powered wool carding and drawing factory at their Greenhurst Hey Mill here

Wickenbury Cottage, Todmorden
Broad Gate. Late 18th century house. Now 2 dwellings: Latchford Cottage and Wickenbury Cottage

Wickham's
Machine tool makers at Crown Works, Halifax. They closed in 1981

Wickham, Henry Wickham
[1800-1867] JP, DL.

He was a tenant of Kirklees Hall [1844, 1850]; a partner in Low Moor Iron Company, Norwood Green Conservative MP for Bradford [1852-1867].

He helped raise money for the construction of a church in Clifton

Wickham, Lamplugh
[17??-18??] JP. A tenant of Holme House, Lightcliffe

Wickman Limited
Coventry machine-tool company who acquired several local companies, including

See Kitchen & Walker and John Stirk & Sons Limited

Widdison, John
[1860-1943] Master at Stainland Board School.

In February 1885, Miss Augusta Annie Lewis, aged 26, of Barnsley, sued him for breach of promise. The jury awarded Miss Lewis £160 damages

Widdop
District of west Calderdale, which has yielded many Neolithic tools.

It stands about 1220 ft above sea-level.

The name is derived from the wide and hope or op [a shallow shelf or valley] and probably means a wide valley.

Wesley's Pulpit, a rock where John Wesley preached, is inscribed JW 1766

See Rocking Pig Rock

Widdop
Other forms of the surname include Waddoup, Waddoups, Waddup, Weedop and Widdup.

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Robert Mydop [Wydop] is recorded in 1379.

The name originated in Widdop.

There are currently around 20 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Widdop. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Widdop, Abraham
[1???-1631] Of Heptonstall. He and his wife died in the local outbreak of the plague in 1631

Widdop, Abraham
[1860-1901] He was landlord of the Duke of Edinburgh, Halifax [1891, 1895, 1901].

He married Clara Butterworth [1864-1932] at Saint Thomas's, Charlestown, Halifax.

Children: (1) John William [b 1889]; (2) Norman [b 1892].

Abraham died at the Duke of Edinburgh [4th June 1901].

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £137 15/-. Probate was granted to his widow Clara.

After his death, Clara took over at the Duke of Edinburgh, and was hotel proprietress there [1905, 1911]

Widdop, Abram
[17??-1???] He married Unknown.

Children: Accepted

Widdop, Accepted
[1750-1801] Aka Cep Widdop.

Son of Abram Widdop.

Wool-comber at Ovenden/Wheatley.

It is said that he was born a considerable time after his parents' marriage, and the birth was such a welcome event that he was named Accepted.

He was a singer and composer of sacred music. Some of his work – includes Joseph – an oratorio promoted by George Moss and Creation – which appeared in Holdsworth's Cheetham's Psalmody and Birstall, Halifax, Ossett, Plymouth, Sweden, and Widdop's Hundred.

In 1770, he married Betty Ayrton.

The couple were buried at Illingworth Church: Betty [24th September 1800]; Accepted [11th March 1801].

He is mentioned in Graptolite's Historical Notes on the Church at Illingworth.

Illingworth church records include

  • a Nancy Accepted Widop of Ovenden who was buried 30th September 1777

  • a Sarah Accepted Widop of Ovenden who was buried 30th May 1800

Widdop & Farrar
Card makers at Brighouse. Partners included William W. Widdop, John Farrar and Joseph Farrar.

The partnership was dissolved in June 1858

Widdop China Tea Mart
Hebden Bridge tea-dealers and grocers of the 19th century

Widdop Gate Hostel, Heptonstall
In 1950, Henry Mitchell Ingham left this and other property at Hardcastle Crags to the National Trust.

From 1957, the building was used by the 16th Bradford Scouts – the Clayton Diehards – as a scout hostel. In 2009, when the Scouts could not afford the upkeep on the building, the National Trust submitted proposals to convert it into housing

Widdop, George
[17??-18??] Of Stansfield. Partner in George Widdop & Company

Widdop's: George Widdop & Company
Cotton spinners at Hudson's Mill, Heptonstall. Partners included George Widdop William Sutcliffe and Michael Heaton. The partnership was dissolved in 1799

Widdop, Henry
[1857-1933] Son of William Wrigley Widdop.

He was an iron merchant [1886].

On 4th April 1888, he married Mary Louisa Hall [1867-1939] in Halifax.

They had no children

Widdop, John
[1???-18??] On 8th June 1839, he married Mary Batty.


Mary was the daughter of
John Batty
 

Mary died 17th June 1873

Widdop, John
[17??-18??] Basket maker & cooper at Woolshops, Halifax [1850]

Widdop, John Henry
[1853-1933] Son of Thomas Widdop.

Born in Norland.

He was a stone quarrier [1871]; a delver [1876]; a quarryman [1891]; a quarryman hewer [1901]; a quarryman [1911].

On 24th November 1876, he married Charlotte Culpan [1854-1???] at Halifax Parish Church.


Charlotte, born in Norland, was the daughter of Edwin Culpan, plumber & glazier.

She was shown as Lotty [on the 1891 census]

 

Children: (1) Fred [b 1877] who was a worsted spinner [1901], a woollen cloth finisher [1901]; (2) Mary Louisa [b 1882] who was a worsted twister [1901] and married George Gaukroger; (3) Harold [b 1885] who was a woollen cloth miller [1901]; (4) Walter.

The family lived at 21 Sparkhouse Lane, Norland [1891]; Sparkhouse Lane, Norland [1892]; Upper Watt Ing, Norland [1901]; 28 Green Terrace Square, Halifax [1918].

Living with them in 1891 was Arthur Milner [aged 23] (labourer).

The couple were buried at Saint Luke's Church, Norland: Charlotte [2nd March 1918]; John Henry [30th May 1933]

Widdop, Joseph Hiley
[1825-1859] Son of Solomon Widdop

He was a violinist and conductor.

He married Unknown.

Children: Frederick Charles

Widdop, Matthew
[1770-18??] Baptised 29th July 1770.

On 12th February 1797, he married Hannah Highley [1768-18??].

Children: Solomon

Widdop Reservoir
On Widdop Stream, above Heptonstall.

The reservoir was designed by J. F. Bateman for Halifax Corporation to provide a water supply from Widdop to Halifax, 8 miles away.

See Clubbers, Greave Clough, Hebden Bridge, Navvyopolis, Old Traveller's Rest, Widdop, Pisser Clough, Hebden Bridge and Wadsworth Moor

Widdop, Solomon
[1802-1868] Son of Matthew Widdop.

Born at Mixenden [22nd October 1802].

He was related to Accepted Widdop.

Musician. He played clarinet and led the Old Talbot Band in Halifax.

In 1824 [?], he (possibly) married Ellen Richardson [1804-1882].


Ellen was the daughter of William Richardson
 

Children: (1) Joseph Hiley; (2) Matthew [b 1827]; (3) William; (4) Mary H [b 1832]; (5) Martha Sutcliff [b 1832]; (6) John [b 1836]; (7) George [b 1837]; (8) Solomon [b 1844]

Widdop, Thomas
[18??-1???] Beerhouse keeper at the New Inn, Brighouse [1873].

On 28th December 1872, he was fined £3 7/6d for having his house open at improper hours, and then giving 5/6d to a policeman to overlook the offence.

In June 1875, he was fined £2 7/6d for permitting drunkenness in his house

Widdop, Thomas
[1830-1879] Son of Samuel Widdop, a mason.

He was a delver of Norland [1853]; a stone delver [1861]; a stone dresser [1871].

On 6th June 1853, he married Ellen Riley [1834-1???] at Halifax Parish Church.


Ellen was born in Warley, the daughter of John Riley, a twister
 

Children: (1) John Henry; (2) Mary [b 1856] who was a weaver [1891]; (3) Emma Louisa [b 1869].

The family lived at Sowerby Croft, Norland [1861, 1871]; Clough Head [?], Norland [1881]

Widdop, W.
[18??-19??] In 1882, he established business as a watchmaker and jeweller on the corner of Daisy Croft at 34 Briggate, Brighouse

Widdop, Walter
[1892-1949] Operatic tenor born at Norland

Widdop Water
Aka Widdop Stream. Stream which feeds Widdop Reservoir

Widdop, William
[1???-18??] He was appointed Surveyor of the Highways for Brighouse [1835]

Widdop, William
[1828-18??] Son of Solomon Widdop

He was a pianist

Widdop, William
[1854-1903] Eldest son of William Wrigley Widdop. Born in Brighouse.

He was an iron merchant [1886, 1891].

On 29th August 1879, he married Emily Ann Sowden, at Saint Martin's Church, Brighouse.


Emily Ann was the daughter of Rhodes Sowden
 

They had no children.

They lived at Perth House, Lightcliffe [1891]

He died at Queen Villas, Harrogate, and was buried at Harlow Church, Harrogate

Widdop, William Wrigley
[1825-1886] Born in Brighouse.

He was an iron merchant [1886].

In 1849, he married Charlotte Robinson [1828-1918].

Children: (1) Charlotte [1852-1903] who married Frederick James Thairlwall; (2) William; (3) Henry; (4) Fanny [1860-1899] who never married; (5) Mary [1863-1946] who never married; (6) Edith [1872-1929] who never married.

The family lived at Rastrick House [1878]; Daisy Hill, Rawdon [1903]

He died at Daisy Hill, Rawdon [13th February 1886].

Probate records show that he left to his wife Charlotte and sons William & Henry

Widdows, Rev Kit
[1946-2007] Born in Bradford. He studied theology at Cambridge University before moving to Halifax.

He was Vicar of Saint Hilda's Church for 15 years in the 1980s and 1990s.

He was Rural Dean of Halifax; Chairman of Calderdale Social Democrat party; Vice-chairman of the governors at Crossley-Heath School; Chairman at Warley Road Primary. He was instrumental in the formation of Calderdale Churches Partnership.

He moved to take up a post in Newcastle.

In December 2007, he collapsed while giving a speech at a Newcastle church and died on the way to hospital

Widdowson, Walter
[1838-1930] Born in Ratcliffe-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire.

He was a master saddler and harness-maker at Northgate, Halifax [1881]. He was retired in 1901.

In 1877, he married Betsy Leedham, from Ovenden, in Halifax.

Children: (1) Ernest Leedham [b 1878]; (2) Mary Jane [b 1885].

The family lived at 20 Holden Street, Halifax [where he was a boarder with Jemima Lee: 1871]; Akroyd's Buildings, North Parade, Halifax [1881]; 89 Northgate, Halifax [1891]; 20 Chester Road, Halifax [1901]

Widdup
A variant of the surname Widdop

See the Foldout for a composite list of individuals with this and all similar surnames

Widdup, George William
[18??-19??] Brewer and bottler at Gauxholme [1905]

Wiggins, John
[16??-17??] Curate at Cross Stone [1722]

Wigglesworth & Parker
Halifax solicitors. From 1823 to 1826, James Wigglesworth and Robert Parker were in partnership.

See Finn Gledhill & Company

Wigglesworth & Sutcliffe
Woolstapler at Cheapside, Halifax [1834]

Wigglesworth & Thompson
Law firm established by James Wigglesworth and James Thompson. They were at Square, Halifax [1809].

See Thomas Adam and Finn Gledhill & Company

Wigglesworth, James
[1759-1826] Halifax solicitor. Son of James Wigglesworth of Townhead, Slaidburn.

From 1776, he was articled to Robert Parker for 5 years, and was his managing clerk from 1781 to 1785. He practised as an attorney from 1785 to 1826, and purchased the practice of Robert Parker on his death in 1796. He was in partnership with James Thompson from 1798 to 1815, and with James Stansfeld from 1815 to 1824, as Thompson, Wigglesworth & Stansfeld. He was with Robert Parker from 1823 to 1826, as Wigglesworth & Parker.

He married Unknown.

Children: James [1788-1793].

He lived at Number 6, The Square and had offices there.

He died 20th November 1826 [aged 67]. He was buried in Halifax Parish Church.

The epitaph on the family memorial in Halifax Parish Church is recorded in the book Monumental & Other Inscriptions

See Finn Gledhill & Company

Wightman, William
[18??-18??] He married (1) Unknown.

Children: Amy Olivia [b 1861].

In [Q3] 1868, he married (2) Frances Freeman in Halifax.


Frances was the daughter of
Samuel Freeman
 

Frances died in Bideford, Devonshire [19th May 1890].

She was buried at Saint Anne's Church, Southowram.

Probate records show that she left an estate valued at £9,532 13/5d to her stepdaughter Amy & Walter Freeman

Wightman, Dr William
[1817-1879] MD.

He was a member of Halifax Town Council [1860-1871]; Mayor of Halifax [1865-1866].

He died 29th January 1879

Wigney, John
[1???-1???] Of Skircoat.

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) Alice [17??-1846] who married George Otto Cronhelm; (2) Elizabeth [1794-1846] who married Frederick William Cronhelm

Wigzell, Eustace
[1822-1899] Born in Greenwich. When he was 12 years old, he won a prize from the Greenwich Observatory for the best design for the ball which signalled the time; his design was adopted. He became a marine engineer, and engineer to the Russian government engineering works at Ekaterinberg. In 1854, he returned to England to secure a plant for the production of iron for railway bars. The Crimean War broke out and he did not return to Russia. He returned to John Penn & Sons, Greenwich and he supervised the construction and trials of two-thirds of the navies of the world.

In 1865, he became a partner with Joseph Pollit in Pollit & Wigzell.

He lived at Beech House, Sowerby Bridge.

He died 2nd October 1899 [aged 77]. He was cremated in Manchester.

There is a memorial at Christ Church, Sowerby Bridge, next to that of Edward Ernest Pollit and his wife

Wike
An earlier spelling of Wyke. Recorded in 1837

Wilbefort's
Rainwear and outdoor-wear retailers at Halifax. Their shop stood on Southgate north of the entrance to Albany Arcade.

In 198?, the business moved into the old Shaw Hardcastle premises at Old Market.

The Southgate premises has since had a number of occupants

Wilber
[Surname]

Wilberforce, William
[1759-1833] Reformer and anti-slavery campaigner.

In 1784, he was MP for Yorkshire.

In February 1806, he visited the district and stayed with John Edwards at Pye Nest. He addressed a crowd at the Piece Hall

Wilby
[Surname]

There are currently only around 5 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wilby. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Wilby, Rev G. S.
[19??-19??] Curate at Lightcliffe [1954]. In 1954, he was appointed vicar of Woolley

Wilby, Philip
[1949-] Composer. Born in Pontefract. He lives in Halifax.

He was a violinist in the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain, at Covent Garden, and the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.

He is Principal Lecturer in Composition at the University of Leeds.

He has written much music for wind instruments and brass bands.

His work includes music for the Choir of Saint Paul's Cathedral, music for the Norwich Festival of Contemporary Church Music [1992], The Cry of Iona for the BBC2 [1992], his second symphony Voyaging for the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra [April 1993], Partita for the Fine Arts Brass Ensemble [August 1993], An Imagined Fable for the Athelas Ensemble [October 1993], a Percussion Concerto for the English Northern Philharmonia and Yorkshire Youth and Music [November 1993], Northern Lights a ballet, and incidental music for television

Wilby, Robert
[1???-1???] Police Constable in Rastrick [1857]

Wilby, Rev Wendy
[1949-] The first female Vicar of Halifax [2001-2006].

She comes from Middlesex and was a freelance musician before being ordained as a deacon in 1990. She was ordained as a priest at Ripon in 1994. Before coming to Halifax in 2001, she was a parish deacon, a curate at Saint Peter's, Harrogate, chaplain to Harrogate Theatre and Priest-in-Charge at Saint James's Church, Birstwith, in Nidderdale. She left Halifax to be canon precentor at Bristol Cathedral.

Her husband, Philip, was the church's musical director and choirmaster at Halifax Parish Church. He is a composer and professor in music at Leeds University. He is the conductor of Hebden Bridge Band, and had a long association with Black Dike Band, Queensbury

Wilby, William Wallace
[1836-1895] He married Ruth [1839-1882].

The couple were buried at Bethesda Primitive Methodist Chapel, Bank Top

Wilcock, 1898 Thomas Harold
[1898-1972] Born in Mytholmroyd.

On 9th September 1929, he married Alice Walmsley in Hebden.


Alice was the daughter of
Arthur Walmsley
 

Thomas Harold died in Hastings [1972]

Wilcock, Abimelech
[18??-1927] Son of David Wilcock

He married Sarah Hannah Greenwood.

Children: (1) Harry; (2) Herbert Wesley.

Abimelech's father, David, died after a brawl in the Robin Hood, Cragg Vale on 27th June 1869. Possibly because of the nature of his father's death, Abimelech became a strict Methodist, and raised his children with the rule that going to the pub was forbidden.

One night, his youngest son, Herbert Wesley, got drunk and rather than go home and face his father, he stayed outside all night and, as it was early January, he became ill. Herbert Wesley died on 5th January 1927, and Abimelech died within a week – the story is that he died of a broken heart.

Abimelech, his wife and sons are buried at the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Mytholmroyd

Wilcock & Mallinson
Worsted spinners at Brighouse. Partners included George Wilcock and John Mallinson.

In August 1839, the partnership was declared bankrupt

Wilcock, Pte Arthur
[1891-1915] Son of Samuel Wilcock.

He was a cotton operative employed by Eli Whiteley & Sons at Hollins Mill, Sowerby Bridge; a member of the Tuel Lane Wesleyan Methodist Church and Sunday School.

He lived at 28 Mitchell Street, Sowerby Bridge.

He was a Private in the Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment during World War I. He was shot in the head by a sniper [23rd November 1915]. He was buried in the Talana Farm Cemetery, Boezinge, Belgium [IV G 8]

Wilcock, Bert
[1???-19??] Bowler with King Cross Cricket Club [1940s]. In 1949, he took 107 wickets at an average of 11.34

Wilcock, David
[1833-1869] Son of William Wilcock.

Stone-mason's labourer of Hollock Lee, Cragg Vale.

He married Nancy Oldfield [1836-1907].

Children: (1) William Henry; (2) John; (3) Abimelech; (4) Riley; (5) Ada; (6) Alice.

On 27th June 1869, the landlord of the Robin Hood, Cragg Vale, Joseph Barrett, hit Wilcock with a poker. Wilcock died on 30th June 1869 from the head injuries, and Barrett was imprisoned for manslaughter

Wilcock, Edmund
[1853-1913] Son of Henry Wilcock.

He married Hannah Shepley [1855-1910].

Children: Fred.

Edmund & Hannah were buried at Sowerby Bridge Cemetery

Wilcock, Fred
[1891-1918] Son of Edmund Wilcock.

He was a blanket raiser employed by J. Riley Atkinson.

In [Q2] 1914, he married Ethel Beckwith [1890-1971] in Halifax.

They lived at 13 Sowerby street, Sowerby Bridge [1918].

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 15th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own).

He died from wounds [20th June 1918].

He is buried in the Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France [V C 29]. He is also remembered on Norland War Memorial

Wilcock, George
[18??-18??] Worsted spinner at Rastrick. Partner in Wilcock & Mallinson.

In November 1839, he was declared bankrupt

Wilcock, Harold
[1896-1918] Son of William Henry Wilcock.

He was a Private in the Durham Light Infantry, 84th Battalion, secondary unit: 369th Labour Corps.

He died 23rd October 1918.

He was buried at the Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension, France [IV J 3]

Wilcock, Henry
[1791-1840] Son of William Wilcock.

He married Betty Helliwell [1794-1849].

Children: (1) Henry; (2) Betty [b 1820]; (3) Hannah [b 1823]; (4) Susannah [b 1828]; (5) Martha [b 1830]; (6) David; (7) Fanny [b 1836]

Wilcock, Henry
[1814-1893] Son of William Wilcock.

He married Phanney (FannyFields [1819-1876]

Children: (1) William Henry; (2) Thomas [b 1841]; (3) John; (4) William; (5) Mary [b 1849]; (6) Joseph [b 1850]; (7) Edmund; (8) Betty [b 1855]; (9) Enoch [1858-1876]; (10) Samuel.

Members of the family were buried at Sowerby Bridge Cemetery

Wilcock, Herbert Wesley
[1904-1927] Youngest son of Abimelech Wilcock.

Abimelech's father, David, died after a brawl in the Robin Hood, Cragg Vale. Possibly because of the nature of his father's death, Abimelech became a strict Methodist, and raised his children with the rule that going to the pub was forbidden.

One night, Herbert Wesley, got drunk and rather than go home and face his father, he stayed outside all night and, as it was early January, he became ill. Herbert Wesley died on 5th January 1927, aged 23 years, and his father, Abimelech, died within a week – the story is that he died of a broken heart.

Herbert Wesley is buried with his parents and his brother, Harry, at the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Mytholmroyd

Wilcock, James
[1836-1???] Born in Erringden.

He was a farmer of 23 acres.

He married Jane [1844-1???] from Keighley.

Children: (1) John Thomas [b 1873]; (2) Rose Anne [b 1880].

The family lived at Great Greave, Soyland [1881]

See Little Greave, Soyland

Wilcock's: James Wilcock & Son
Cotton fustian manufacturer at Square Mill, Mytholmroyd [1860s]

Wilcock, John
[1739-17??] Weaver of Keelham Farm, Cragg Vale. He was one of the coiners.

The official notice of 1769 for his arrest described him as

JOHN WILCOCK, late of Keelliam, in Erringden, in the same Parish, Weaver, about 30 years old, 5 ft 7 ins high, broad-set, black complexioned, wears his own Hair, dark-coloured, and generally a stripp'd Waistcoat and brown Coat

Wilcock, John
[1836-1904] He married Unknown.

Children: (possibly) John Edward [b 1870] who was a cotton turner [1904].

He lived at Barkisland Hall [1904].

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1904

Wilcock, John
[1843-18??] Son of Henry Wilcock.

In [Q4] 1869, he married Mary Whiteley [1849-1917] in Halifax.

Children: John Edward.

The family lived at 19 Hollins Lane, Tuel Lane, Sowerby Bridge [1917]

Wilcock, John Edward
[1889-1917] Son of John Wilcock.

During World War I, he served as a Private with Lancashire Fusiliers and Leicestershire, the 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment.

He died of wounds, at the Stationary Hospital, Boulogne, France [9th May 1917].

He was buried in the Boulogne Eastern Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France [IV B 9]

Wilcock's: John Wilcock & Sons
They had business at Wadsworth.

There was a fire at their works on 13th August 1873

Wilcock, Pte Marjorie
[19??-1942] Daughter of Ada F. [née Cockcroft] and Joe Wilcock.

During World War II, she served with the Auxiliary Territorial Service.

She died 1st September 1942.

She is remembered on the Brookwood Memorial [Panel 23, Column 1], and also mentioned on the grave of her aunt Flora Wilcock at All Souls's Cemetery, Halifax

Wilcock, Mark
[1844-1915] Born in Halifax.

He was a tanner, currier and leather merchant of Sowerby Bridge.

Around 1877, he acquired the business of John Walters & Company.. Around 1877, he acquired the Hollins Tannery, Sowerby Bridge.

His business was known for their leather driving bands. He lived next to the tannery at 19 Hollins Mill Lane [1891, 1905]. He was Chairman of the Sowerby Bridge Local Board [15th April 1890-15th April 1891].

In 1876, he married Eliza Ann Walker [1850-1???] from Rastrick, at Halifax.

Children: (1) Helena [b 1876]; (2) George [b 1878] who was a tanner; (3) John [b 1880] who was a tanner; (4) Mark [b 1882] who was a tanner; (5) Sylvanus; (6) Hannah [b 1887] who married Henry Wharton Siddall; (7) Cornelius [b 1890].

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £16,067 5/6d

Wilcock, Mr
[18??-1???] Around 1880, he tried unsuccessfully to carry on the pottery business at Soil Hill Pottery. He finally used the premises for breeding poultry

Wilcock, Padget
[1823-1892] Landlord of the Victoria & Albert, Boothtown [1891].

On 13th February 1856, he married (1) Sarah Ann Dewhirst [1832-1879] at Halifax Parish Church.

In 1880, he married (2) Hannah Rebecca Stanley.

He died 13th April 1892.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £68 to his widow Hannah Rebecca.

Padgett & Sarah Ann were buried at Saint Thomas the Apostle, Claremount. After his death, Hannah Rebecca married Linnaeus Tasker

Wilcock Patent Cord & Calico Manufacturing Company Limited
Fustian manufacturers established by John and William Wilcock at Pecket Well Mill. They employed about 250 workers [1860s]

Wilcock, Samuel
[1860-1920] Son of Henry Wilcock.

He married Emma Jane Newell [1864-1955].

Children: Arthur

Wilcock, Septimus
[1877-1925] Born in Sowerby.

He was a wire drawer [1899].

In 1899, he married Henrietta Hollas in Halifax


Henrietta was the daughter of
William Hollas
 

Children: (1) Nellie [b 1899]; (2) Joseph [b 1901]; (3) Harold [b 1903]

Wilcock, Sylvanus Reynolds
[1885-1930] Son of Mark Wilcock.

Born in Sowerby Bridge.

Leather merchant.

He took over the Hollins Tannery, Sowerby Bridge.

In 1913, He married Frances A. Carter in Halifax

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £12,528

Wilcock, Thomas
[1753-18??] Of Bell House, Erringden. In September 1841, the Halifax Guardian reported that – then aged 88 – he
has mowed for the Patchett family of the White Lion, Hebden Bridge upwards to 60 years, and this year, he, his son, his grandson and his great-grandson, cut down 10 acres of grass there

Wilcock, William
[17??-1???] Coiner of Erringden

Wilcock, William
[17??-1823] Attorney at Halifax [1809].

See John Ridehalgh

Wilcock, William
[1758-1823] Of Thornhill, Dewsbury.

He became a Halifax attorney. Between 1782 and 1804, he practised as Howarth & Wilcock. He had offices in Cheapside, Halifax.

On 14th May 1808, he married Hannah Pickford, fourth daughter of Sir Joseph Radcliffe.

He lived at Savile Hall, Halifax [1816].

He died 20th May 1823.

A few days afterwards, Anne Lister visited Hannah and her sister Frances at Savile Hall

Wilcock, William
[1770-1836] He married Hannah Shackleton [1771-1828].

Children: (1) Henry; (2) Mark [b 1796]; (3) Sally [b 1802].

The couple were buried at Mytholmroyd Wesleyan Methodist Church

Wilcock, William
[18??-18??] With his brother, John, built Pecket Well Mill for their Wilcock Patent Cord & Calico Manufacturing Company Limited

Wilcock, William
[1845-1896] Son of Henry Wilcock.

He married Jane Briggs [1850-1921].

After William's death, Jane married John Cardwell

Wilcock, William Henry
[1839-1935] Son of Henry Wilcock.

He married Elizabeth Farrar [1870-1927].

Children: (1) Wright; (2) Harold

Wilcock, Wright
[1891-1919] Son of William Henry Wilcock.

He was a Driver with the Royal Field Artillery.

He was buried at Sowerby Bridge Cemetery [Grave E "U" 561]

Wild
[Surname]

There are currently around 19 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wild. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Wild & Crossley
Cotton manufacturers at Todmorden. Partners included W. Wild and S. Crossley.

In April 1862, the partnership was declared bankrupt

Wild, Arthur Vincent
[1852-1916] Of Halifax.

He was a carver; a gilder; a picture framer; a photographer [1901]. He produced photographs, several of which were used in the Lion Series of postcards.

In 1880, he married Lily, daughter of David Pickles.

Children: (1) William Cary; (2) Louis Edgar; (3) Wallace; (4) Millicent who married [1918] William Jacobs in Halifax

Wild, Charles Harold
[1897-1915] Son of William Wild.

Born at the Infantry Barracks, York.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He was killed in action [20th December 1915].

He was buried at the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium [II B 3].

He is remembered on his parents' grave at Christ Church, Pellon.

Wild, Elkanah
[17??-1???] See Wild's Yard, Halifax

Wild, Rev Harry
[18??-19??] LTh. He was educated at Durham. He was ordained Deacon at Thornhill Lees on 26th February 1893. Curate at Heptonstall [1893-1896]. He went on to serve at Saint Luke's, Cheetham Hill

Wild, Jack
[19??-] Local writer and member of the Halifax Authors' Circle

Wild, James
[1???-18??] On 29th December 1836, he appeared at Halifax Magistrate's Office before John Waterhouse and Rawdon Briggs and was charged with
performing plays etc, without having a license

The Halifax Guardian reported that

The charge was not pressed, on account of the penalty, which is large, but dismissed on his paying costs and promising to leave the town forthwith

Wild, James
[17??-18??] Brother-in-law of John Crossley.


Question: Does anyone know who married whom to make the 2 men brothers-in-law?

 

Wild, James
[18??-1???] Stone mason of Luddendenfoot. He constructed the stonework on the Station Road Bridge, Luddendenfoot

Wild, John
[18??-19??] Machinist at Whiteplatts Works, Todmorden [1905]

Wild, Jonas
[18??-1898] Farmer at Heyhead Farm, Mytholmroyd.

He committed suicide [June 1898]

Wild, Lucy Ann
[1872-1940] The 68-year-old was one of the 11 civilian casualties of the Hanson Lane bomb which fell on 22nd November 1940. She died on the same day

Wild, Luther
[1865-1935] Son of Arthur Vincent Wild.

He was a bookkeeper for a trunk manufacturer [1914]; a builder's clerk for Fred Pickles in Lancashire.

He married Elizabeth Greenwood [18??-1933] at Halifax.

The family lived at 21 Richardson Street, Halifax; 23 Belmont Place, Halifax; Ainsdale, Lancashire

Wild, Major
[1856-1???] Born in Sowerby. He was a member of the Calder Valley Poets

Wild, Miss Mary
[18??-18??] She ran a school in Halifax [around 1850]

Wild, Nathan
[1846-1925] Born in Alventhorpe.

He was a coal miner [1875].

In 1875, he married Jemima Furness in Wakefield.


Jemima was the daughter of
Moses Furness
 

They had no children

Wild, R.
[1???-19??] Dairy farmer at Little Scout Farm, Luddendenfoot

Wild's: R. Wild Limited
A subsidiary of Marshall's (Halifax) Limited

Wild, Sam
[18??-18??] 18th century showman who presented shows and public performances in Halifax.

In 1855, his Fall of Sebastopol featured two camels – Sultana and Mohammed – which were said to have been captured in the Crimea.

Sultana died during a visit to Skipton, and her skeleton was sold to Halifax Literary & Philosophical Society

Wild's Theatre, Halifax
A 19th century entertainment held at Ward's End to celebrate the Feast of Saint John the Baptist

Wild, Wallace
[18??-19??] Son of Arthur Vincent Wild.

He assisted his father [1901].

In 1916, he married Edna Mitchell in Halifax

Wild, William
[1867-1937] He married Margaret [1874-1952].

Children: Charles Harold.

The family lived at West Grove House, Hopwood Lane [1915].

William died 25th April 1937.

Margaret died 6th October 1952.

Members of the family were buried at Christ Church, Pellon

Wildblood, Rev Charles
[1854-1931] He was Minister at Halifax [?] [1900-1903] and at Pellon Wesleyan Church [1903-1906]. In 1906, he moved to Buxton Road, Huddersfield

Wilde
[Surname]

There are currently only around 8 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wilde. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

Wilde, Alfred Anthony
[1849-1933] Born in Sowerby / Norland.

He was a cabinet maker [1901].

He married (1) Sarah [1846-1901].

Children: (1) Ann [b 1872] who was a domestic [1901]; (2) Florence [b 1874] who was a cotton reeler [1901]; (3) Helena [b 1877] who was a cotton winder [1901]; (4) Priscilla [b 1881] who was a cotton worker [1901]; (5) Alice [b 1884] who was a cotton reeler [1901]; (6) Harold [b 1886] who was an apprentice iron moulder [1901]; (7) Irvine [b 1889] who was a cotton twiner piecer [1901].

On 20th January 1904, he married (2) Ann Winifred Hollas in Ripponden.


Ann Winifred was the daughter of
Peter Hollas
 

They had no children.

The family lived at Lion Cottage, Ripponden [1901]

Wilde, Edward Blackburn
[1869-1929] Son of Rev John Wilde.

He married Sarah Alice Taylor.


Sarah Alice was the daughter of Joseph Taylor

Sarah Alice's sister Mary married Edward's father

 

Children: Ethel Constance [1904-1938].

He died 12th May 1929 (aged 60).

Members of the family were buried at Providence Congregational Church, Stainland

Wilde, Israel
[1???-1???] Of Ball Green, Sowerby.

Wilde, Israel
[17??-1???] Of Deerplay, Sowerby. He was suspected of coining

Wilde, Jimmy
[1892-1969] Aka The Mighty Atom. World flyweight boxing champion. Born in Wales.

On 26th March 1934, he appeared at the Halifax Drill Hall

Wilde, John
[18??-18??] Around 1845, he ran a small school at Sowerby Bridge.

William Law may also have taught at the school

Wilde, Rev John
[1839-1917] He trained at Airedale College and served at Burley-in-Wharfedale before becoming Minister at Providence Congregational Church, Stainland for 34 years [1874-1908].

In [Q1] 1865, he married (1) Betsy / Betty Blackburn [1825-1899] in Todmorden.

Children: Edward Blackburn.

In [Q3] 1908, he married (2) Mary Parkinson Taylor [18??-1944] in Halifax (possibly at Providence Chapel).


Mary was the daughter of Joseph Taylor.

Mary's sister Sarah Alice married John's son Edward Blackburn Wilde

 

John died 4th January 1917 (aged 78).

Members of the family were buried at Providence Congregational Church, Stainland

John and his wives are mentioned in the Memorials at Providence Chapel, Stainland

Wilde, Rev R. W.
[1???-19??] MA, BSc. Lecturer in psychology. Minister at Todmorden Unitarian Church. In 1936, he wrote Health, Sickness & Psychology [publ OUP]

Wilde's Theatre, Brighouse
Opened 18??.

Closed 1???

Wilderness
Area between Upper Edge and Lower Edge, Elland

Wilding, Rev C.
[18??-18??] Curate at Parish Church of Saint Martin, Brighouse [1853]

Wildsmith, Mrs Betty
[19??-2008] She was Mayor of Calderdale [1979-1980]

Wiley Accessories Limited
Of Saint Peg Mills, Brighouse

Wilhelm, Auguste
[1827-18??] He practised as a German quack doctor in Halifax.

In July 1853, he was charged at York Crown Court with

having used a certain instrument with the intention of procuring the abortion of Mary Fielding

At the trial, the instrument – a syringe – was said to have contained a liquid, like porter in appearance, and Wilhelm indicated that he used it to cure her of

a loathsome disease

from which Mary's acquaintance, Moore, was suffering. Wilhelm was acquitted

See Margaret Simpson

Wilkin Royd House, Brighouse
Phoenix Street. 19th century building. It has Venetian windows and is a similar design to the Stott's Arms.

Owners and tenants have included

In 19??, the name was changed to Phoenix House.

See Wilkin Royd Mill, Brighouse

Wilkins, Samuel
[18??-19??] He married Martha Ann Naylor


Martha Ann was the daughter of
James Naylor
 

After her father's death, the couple continued to farm at Shepherd House

Wilkinson's
General stores.

There are branches in Halifax and Brighouse [2010].

The Halifax branch occupies the Southgate building which was formerly Marks & Spencer.

The Brighouse branch occupies the building which was built on the site of the Astoria and subsequently occupied by Hillard's, Tesco's, and currently Wilkinson's

Wilkinson...
The entries for people with the surname Wilkinson are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Wilkinson
The surname means son of Wilkin. Wilkin is a diminutive form of William.

George Redmonds writes that the name occurred several time in the Poll Tax records in the West Riding by 1379.

John Wylkingson is recorded at Elland in 1431.

There are currently around 83 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wilkinson. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Wilkinson family of Elland
William Wilkinson was an early member of the family

Wilkinson & Airey
Silk spinners at Victoria Mills, Brighouse [1874] and at Britannia Mill, Brighouse [18??].

The partnership was dissolved in February 1886.

Partners included Samuel Wilkinson

Wilkinson & Wallace
Woolstaplers established in 1861 by Armitage Wilkinson and Mr Wallace at 27 Square Road, Halifax.

They also had business in Bradford

In 1885, Wilkinson went to establish a branch of the firm in Sydney, Australia

Wilkinson, Bentley & Company
Raincoat specialists at 35 Silver Street, Halifax [1936].

H. S. Wilkinson was proprietor [1936]

Wilkinson Brothers
Wholesale clothiers at Albert Works, Hebden Bridge [1905]

Wilkinson, Crossland & Company
They had business at Mitchell's Mill, Elland [1867]

Wilkinson's: J. Wilkinson & Son
Furrier, costumier and outfitter at Hudson Bay House, Halifax [1911, 1916]

Established by J. Wilkinson

Wilkinson's: Jubal Wilkinson & Company Limited
Maltsters at Brighouse and Rastrick.

The partnership was dissolved in March 1887

See Jubal Wilkinson

Wilkinson's: Moses Wilkinson & Company
Worsted spinner at Royal Mills, Halifax [1874]. He lived at Hopwood Lane [1874]

Wilkinson-Newsholme, Rev Joseph
[18??-19??] Or Joseph Wilkinson Newsholme. MA. He was educated at Cambridge before becoming Curate at Illingworth [1891-1893]

He left to serve at Long Preston and Pendleton

Wilkinson's: W. Wilkinson & Company
Soap manufacturers of Sowerby Bridge. Recorded in 1903

Wilkinson's: W. Wilkinson & Son
In 1841, they established a hairdressing and athletic outfitting business at 30 Bull Green, Halifax. In 1887, the business was acquired by Fred Boyes

Wilks, John
[1787-1855] Of Lodge, Triangle.

He married (1) Mary Ann [1787-1817].

Children: (1) child who died in infancy; (2) child who died in infancy.

He married (2) Hannah [1793-1874].

Children: (3) William George who married Eliza [1834-1860].

John and Hannah both died in Liverpool.

There is a tablet in memory of the family in Sowerby Church

Will Royd, Shibden
This was a part of the Shibden Hall Estate lying between Stump Cross and Hipperholme.

Owners and tenants have included

Willans, Dr
[18??-19??] Medical practitioner at Ovenden [1902]

On 23rd December 1902, Mathilde Bollwagen, a German servant employed by him, died after taking an opium pill from a bottle in the dispensary

Willans, Emily
[1828-1888] Daughter of William Willans.

She married Joseph Dixon Asquith [1825-1860] from Morley.

Children: Herbert Henry

Willans, Hannah Maria
[1829-1907] Daughter of William Willans.

She married Thomas Freeman Firth.

She died at The Flush, Heckmondwike.

She was buried at Upper Chapel, Heckmondwike

Willans, James Edward
[1842-1926] Youngest son of William Willans.

In 1869, he married (1) Cecelia Emma Cozens-Hardy [1841-1879] at Erpingham, Norfolk.

Children: (1) Ethel Mary [1870-]; (2) Gerald Cozens-Hardy [1872-1956] who married [1909] Mary Lindsay Goldthorp [18??-1975]; (3) Mabel Cecilia [1874-] who married Dr Herbert Miall Woodhead; (4) Mildred [1879-1879].

In 188?, he married (2) Kathleen Cozens-Hardy [1848-1898].

Children: (5) Hilda Mary [1883-1954]; (6) Winifred Kathleen [1885-1959]; (7) Margery [1886-] who married Robert Howard Goldthorp; (8) Lilian Muriel [1888-1969] who married Rev Frederick Seymour Horan; (9) Elsie Jean [1893-19??]

Willans, James Wetherell
[18??-19??] Todmorden solicitor.

In 1886, he married Martha Lord, daughter of Samuel Fielden.

On 7th December 1922, their daughter, Miss E. M. Willans married Major L. G. S. Molloy, MP for Blackpool

Willans, John Wrigley
[1832-1910] Son of William Willans.

He was brother-in-law of Thomas Freeman Firth.

In 1865, he married (1) Charlotte Baines [1830-1879].


Charlotte was the daughter of Edward Baines of The Leeds Mercury
 

In 188?, he married (2) Mary Knibb Milburn [1854-1941].

Children: Charlotte Mary Evelyn [1885-19??] who married Hivred Victor Gibson Rivington [1887-1936].

In 1867, he and Thomas Freeman Firth went into partnership as Firth, Willans & Company.

In 1875, he left the business in order to become proprietor and joint editor of The Leeds Mercury. He was prominent in the public life of Leeds.

He died at his home at West Hampstead, London

Willans, Rev Peter Russell
[1824-1863] Born in Leeds. He was Minister at Harrison Road Chapel, Carlton Street [1850]. He edited a book entitled The States System of Europe [1854]. In 1855, his health gave way. He died in York

Willans, Rev William
[18??-18??] Methodist New Connexion Minister at Bethel Chapel, Brighouse [1845]

Willans, William
[1800-1863] Huddersfield wool-merchant. In 1852, he was unsuccessful in his attempt to become Liberal MP for Huddersfield.

He married Elizabeth Wrigley [1800-1854].

Children: (1) Sarah Anne [1826-1903]; (2) Emily; (3) Hannah Maria; (4) John Wrigley; (5) William Henry [1833-1904] who married Marion Wright [1839-1934]; (6) Thomas Benjamin [1836-1897] who married Sarah Ashworth [1833-1879] and Elizabeth W. Robinson [1843-1908]; (7) Margaret Elizabeth [1840-1927] who married James Cullen [1810-1908]; (8) James Edward

Willans, William Stead
[1829-1870] He married Catharine Thwaite [1863].


Catharine was the daughter of
Samuel Thwaite
 

Children: (1) William Ernest [b 1865]; (2) Catherine Mable [b 1867]; (3) Charles Rudolph [b 1869]

Willcock, Sutcliffe
[18??-18??] Son of a local Sunday school teacher.

The 11-year-old boy worked in the Cragg Vale mills.

Rev Thomas Crowther told George Crabtree how ...

[Sutcliffe] died from overwork and beatings at one of the mills. He had worked a 17-hour day and had to be carried home by his father. He was unable to eat before he was put to bed. At 4:00 am, he woke and asked his brother if they could see the lights up in the mill as he didn't want to be late again. He died before he could get out of bed.

His 9-year-old brother died 2 weeks later

Willeby, John
[14??-1???] Endowed Willeby Chantry Chapel at Halifax Parish Church in 1494

Willeson, Robert
[13??-13??] He was elected Constable of Shelf [1365]

Willey & Pearson Limited
Woollen spinners of Scarborough Mills, King Cross, Halifax. Established in the 1870s. The business moved to Black Dike Mills, Queensbury in 1994. Their operations at Queensbury closed in June 2001

Willey & Son
Billiard table makers at 23 King Cross Street, Halifax [1905].

Partners included Richard H. Willey

Willey, Richard H.
[18??-19??] Partner in Willey & Son.

He lived at 5 Westbourne Grove, Halifax [1905]

William, 1st Earl
[1055-1088] Aka Sir William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, Guillaume de Warenne. Son of Rodolf de Warenne [1030-1074]

William, 2nd Earl
[1081-1138] William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey. Elder son of William, the 1st Earl and Gundrada of Flanders. Lord of the Manor of Wakefield. He began building the first Sandal Castle on the right bank of the river Calder at Sandal Magna. Beside his property in West Yorkshire, he held large tracts of land in East Anglia, the home counties, Hampshire, and Lincolnshire. He gave the church at Conisborough and the church at Wakefield to the Priory of Lewes.

In 1101, he was temporarily deprived of his earldom for his support of Robert, Duke of Normandy.

In 1106, he distinguished himself when he commanded at the Battle of Tinchebrai. In 1106, he was granted the sub-manor of Halifax-cum-Heptonstall by Henry I.

In 1135, he became Governor of Rouen.

He was a suitor for the hand of Matilda of Scotland who later married Henry I.

In 1118, he married Isabel Elizabeth de Vermandois.

Children: (1) William, the 3rd Earl; (2) Ralph; (3) Reginald who became a monk and married Alice de Wormegay; (4) Gundrada who married Roger, Earl of Warwick; (5) Ada (or Adeline) - who married King Henry of Scotland. He wore the Warren Shield. He was buried at the Priory of Lewes

William, 3rd Earl
[1118-1148] William de Warenne, 3rd Earl of Surrey. Eldest son of the William, the 2nd Earl. He succeeded his father in 1138.

He married (1) Adelia de Talvas (or Talvace) [1110-1174].

He married (2) Eva Talvas.

Children: Isabel.

In 1141, he fought at the Battle of Lincoln with his half-brother, Robert de Beaumont, Earl of Leicester.

In 1146, he went on the Crusades and was killed by the Turks near Laodicea in Palestine in 1148.

His estates passed to his daughter, Isabel.

See John Talvace

William, 4th Earl
[1???-1159] William de Warenne, 4th Earl of Surrey, William of Blois. The second son of King Stephen and Matilda of Boulogne.

In 1150, he acquired the title when married Isabel de Warenne

William, 6th Earl
[11??-1240] William de Warenne, Earl of Warren, 6th Earl of Surrey. Son of Isabel de Warenne and the 5th Earl of Surrey.

He advised King John with regard to the Magna Carta. He took part in the Crusades.

He married (1) Matilda / Maud d'Aubigny.


Matilda was the daughter of William d'Aubigny, 2nd Earl of Arundel
 

He married (2) Matilda / Maud [1194-1248].


Matilda was the daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, and widow of Hugh Bigod, 3rd Earl of Norfolk
 

Children: (1) Isabel; (2) Griffin; (3) John, the 7th Earl.

William Hopkinson Lifeboat
Lifeboat which was the gift of Miss Hopkinson of Brighouse in memory of her late brother, William Hopkinson. The lifeboat was launched at Newbiggin, Northumberland on Saturday, 13th January 1866.

See Royal National Lifeboat Institute

William James Gregory
[1???-18???] Tea & tallow chandlers, hop merchants and wholesale dealers at 6 Corn Market, Halifax [1842]

William Royd, Stansfield
Owners and tenants have included

  • James Roberts [1738]

William Royde House
Another name for Ellen Royde House, Midgley

William, Watkin
[18??-18??] Of Halifax.

In [Q4] 1849, he married Love Stewart [1823-1862] in Halifax.

Love was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery

Williams, A. G.
[19??-19??] Deacon of Todmorden [1959]

Williams & Heron
Hatters at Wharf Street, Sowerby Bridge [1874]

Williams, Arnold
[1890-1958] Liberal MP for Sowerby [1923-1924].

He lived at Thorpe House, Triangle

Williams's: Clement Williams & Sons
Halifax architectural practice established by W. Clement Williams.

In 1913, the Company were subscribers to The Old Halls & Manor Houses of Yorkshire.

See Percy Williams

Williams, Rev Daniel
[18??-19??] Curate at Ripponden [1913] and Perpetual curate at Saint Michael & All Angels' Church, Cornholme [1914]

Williams, Rev E. O.
[18??-19??] Curate-in-Charge of Saint Michael's Mission, Halifax, Curate at Halifax Parish Church [1906], and Vicar of Heptonstall [1907] In 1912, he was appointed vicar of Lindley [Huddersfield]

Williams, E. W.
[18??-19??] Tailor at Brighouse.

In October 1885, he was declared bankrupt

Williams, Emma
[1983-] Actress, singer and dancer from Illingworth.

She has made many appearances on TV, film and stage

Williams, Frank
[18??-19??] Player with Halifax RLFC [1914]. He won caps for Wales and for Great Britain while at Halifax

Williams, Rev G. M.
[19??-19??] Baptist minister at Todmorden. In September 1959, he moved to Barnstaple, Devon

Williams, Rev George John
[18??-19??] He trained at Hackney College before becoming Minister at Sion Congregational Church, Halifax [1902, 1905]. He lived at 4 Heathfield Terrace, Skircoat Green Road

Williams, George Mansell
[1876-1???] Born in Gloucestershire. He lived in Mytholmroyd. He was a member of the Calder Valley Poets

Williams, Rev H.
[18??-19??] Vicar of Siddal [19??]

Williams, Rev John
[17??-18??] He served at Norton, Derbyshire before becoming Minister at Northgate End Chapel [1804-1811]. In 1810 [or 1811], he moved to Mansfield

Williams, John
[1858-19??] He was a farmer at Sunny Bank Farm, Southowram [1911]

He married Unknown.

Children: (1) child; (2) child; (3) child; (4) child; (5) child

Williams, Rev John Pandy
[1850-1907] Born in Upper Boat, Glamorganshire.

He trained at Brecon College and served at Llannelli and other places in Wales [1873] before becoming Minister at West End Congregational Church, Sowerby Bridge [1885].

He was pastor of London Road Congregational Church, Derby [1900]

He married Mary [1852-19??].


Mary [1852-19??] was born in Teley Bont, Brecknockshire
 

Children: (1) Annie [b 1875] who married [25th September 1900] Harry Sturgess [b 1878] (mineral water manufacturer from Derby); (2) Bessie [b 1878]; (3) John T [b 1880].

The family lived at Heather Brac, Whitaker Road, Derby [1901].

Living with them in 1901 was niece Annie Williams [aged 16]

He moved to Rhyl.

On 19th July 1907, he was driving in a carriage with his daughter Annie and a cousin when the pony was frightened by a cyclist and took fright. The entire party was thrown out of the conveyance. Rev Williams later complained of acute pain and died. Doctors attributed the death to peritonitis caused by his injuries

Williams, Mr
[17??-1808] Artist. He taught drawing at several academies in Halifax

Williams, Percy
[1878-1950] FRIBA. Principal of Clement Williams & Sons.

He married Edith Miranda

Williams, Samson
[19??-19??] JP. He was Mayor of Brighouse [1961-1962]

Williams's: T. H. Williams & Company Limited
Paint and varnish manufacturers and paper-hanging dealers at 6 Cheapside, Halifax [1900, 1905]. They were also at Rochdale [their head office], Bolton, Burnley, Manchester and Wigan

Williams, W. Clement
[18??-19??] FRIBA. Architect whose practice designed many local buildings, including Alexandra Hall, Halifax, Arcade Royale, Halifax, Rosemont, Bradshaw, Saint Luke's Hospital, Salterhebble, Victoria Theatre, Halifax and York Buildings, Halifax.

He lived at 13 Aked's Road, Halifax [1905].

See Horsfall & Williams and Clement Williams & Sons

Williams, William
[17??-17??] FSA. Originally a strolling player. He settled in Halifax where he worked as a printer and draughtsman. He became a well-known portrait and landscape painter. He taught several local artists, including John Horner and Nathan Fielding. In 1770, he exhibited at the Royal Academy. In 1775, he produced the illustrations for Watson's History & Antiquities of The Parish of Halifax in Yorkshire. In 1791, he wrote An Essay On Halifax which was published anonymously

Williams, William J.
[18??-19??] Player with Halifax RLFC [1908-1910]. He won caps for Wales while at Halifax

Williams, Mrs Winifred
[1???-19??] She was born at Stainland. She was a teacher at Bolton Brow School, Sowerby Bridge. In 1936, she wrote a collection of psychological short stories published by Constable entitled Fellow Mortals. She went to live in Leeds

Williamson, Henry
[18??-18??] A common brewer at Warley. Partner in Bates & Williamson

Williamson, John
[15??-16??] William Cawan [aged 25] of Stockton, near York, and William Hall [26] of Dunnington, near York, were charged with house breaking and the attempted murder of Williamson, his wife, Ellen, and two children, at Halifax, on the night of 10th December 1626

On 30th March 1627, Cawan and Hall were executed at the Tyburn. Their bodies were afterwards buried in the churchyard of Saint George's, Bean Hill, without Fishergate Postern, York

Williamson, John
[17??-18??] Barrister at law.

On 17th April 1802, he married a daughter of Edmund Lodge

Williamson, John
[19??-] He and his wife were Deputy Mayor and Mayoress of Calderdale in 1993, and Mayor of Calderdale [2005-2006]

Williamson, Margaret Victoria
[1901-1964] Of Wood End, Barkisland.

Her partly-clothed body was found in a field on Christmas morning 1964. An inquest returned a verdict of murder, but, after interviewing 30,000 people, there was not sufficient evidence to lead to any arrests

Williamson, Mary
[1892-1969] Daughter of Sarah Ann [née Hudson] and Robert Williamson. Born in Oldham.

Her family moved to Halifax in 1902. They lived at Birks Hall.

She was a sickly child, suffering from typhoid fever and brain fever, but this changed when she took up swimming at Battinson Road School. By 1913, she had won over 60 prizes.

She worked at Crossley's Carpets.

In 1913, she met American fitness enthusiast – Bernarr Macfadden - who organised a contest to find the most perfect specimen of British womanhood. Mary won and was declared to have the ideal female form and was proclaimed Great Britain's perfect woman.

Bernarr and Mary married and toured Britain as the world's fittest man and woman. During World War I, they went to America and lived in Nyack, New York State.

They had several children.

They published True Story magazine, telling stories of people who had overcome health problems by healthy living. Other magazines followed, and Macfadden became a multi-millionaire.

The couple separated in 1932, and divorced in 1946. He remarried.

She went to live in New Jersey where she died

Williamson, Mr
[1???-1???] A partner in Taylor, Hulme & Williamson. Around 1889, when Williamson became sole proprietor, the company name was changed to Calderside Dyeing Company

Williamson, Thomas
[1786-1853] Collector of Inland Revenue for Halifax

Willicombe, David
[19??-19??] Player with Halifax RLFC [1970]. He won caps for Wales against England while at Halifax

Willis & Bates Limited
Metal spinners and stampers. They were at Pelicon Metal Works, Halifax [1905] and Spring Hall Lane [1936].

Their products included Vapalux paraffin lamps, lanterns, lamp fittings, gas burners and taps, and many more. They also did munitions work during World War II.

The Company ceased trading in 1997, and the business was taken over by Bairstow Brothers (1985) Limited.

See Miss Mary Pickles

Willis, Christopher
[1847-1???] Son of John Willis.

Born in Bradford.

He married Martha Ann Ingle in Bradford [11th April 1874].


Martha Ann was the daughter of Thomas Ingle
 

Children: (1) Lillian [b 1875]; (2) Alice [b 1877]

Willis, John
[18??-1???] In [Q4] 1845, he married Caroline Armitage [1818-1867] in Bradford.

Children: Christopher

Willmott, Rev William
[17??-1835] MA. He was a Clerk in Holy Orders at Halifax [1800]; a Curate at Halifax [1802]; Perpetual Curate at Saint Anne's, Southowram [1802]; Perpetual Curate at Holy Trinity, Halifax [1819] for 16 years.

He lived at Blackwall, Halifax.

On 12th September 1804, he married Miss Whitworth of Halifax.


His wife was a milliner
 

Children: (1) Mary Ann [180?-1860] who married Rev John Warburton; (2) daughter; (3) daughter

Willocks, Christopher
[1836-1879] He married Unknown.

They had no children.

Christopher was killed in the explosion at Balme & Pritchard [9th October 1879].

He was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 1747]

Willow Clough, Sowerby Bridge
Steps Lane. 18th century house. It is now 2 private dwellings – Willow Clough and Willow Lodge

Willow Edge, Skircoat
Owners and tenants have included

Willow Field, Skircoat
Owners and tenants have included

Willow Gate, Hebden Bridge
A packhorse route to Shackleton

Willow Hall, Cote Hill
Willowfield, King Cross, Halifax. Aka Upper Willow Hall.

House built around 1610.

It was owned by the King family.

An inscription records:

James Kynge builded this

Samuel King of Willow Hall is mentioned in 1640. Subsequent owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in Ancient Halls in & about Halifax and Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions.

See James King, Lower Willow Hall, Willow Hall Cottage, Halifax, Willow Hall Laundry, Halifax, Willow Hall Lodge, Halifax and Willow House

Willow Hall Cottage, Halifax
Owners and tenants have included


Question: Does anyone know if this is the same property as Willow Hall Lodge, Halifax?

 

See Willow Hall, Cote Hill

Willow Hall Laundry, Halifax
Recorded in 1905 at 5 Willow Hall when Albert C. Bolton was proprietor

Willow Hall Lodge, Halifax
Owners and tenants have included

  • Mrs Sally Taylor [1851]

See Willow Hall, Cote Hill

Willow House, Sowerby Bridge
Willow Hall / Bolton Brow. This was an outbuilding to Willow Hall, Cote Hill.

Owners and tenants have included

Willow Lodge, Sowerby Bridge
Steps Lane. House built about 1800 on an earlier site.

Owners and tenants have included

It is now 2 dwellings

Willow Royd, West Vale
Rochdale Road. Built around 1883.

Owners and tenants have included

In 1926, the house was bought for £760 for use as a Masonic Hall by the Savile Lodge of the Freemasons.

See Willow Terrace, West Vale

Willowfield
Sowerby Bridge. District to the west of Halifax

Wills, Misses
In 1905, they had a school in Elland

Willson, G. H.
[18??-19??] On 21st July 1924, Halifax Corporation were sued at Leeds Assizes for alleged malicious prosecution. £300 damages were awarded to Willson and £71 2/3d to John Richardson

Willson, George
[18??-19??] Halifax engineer. Trained at the Halifax Mechanics' Institute. He married suffragette Laura Willson. He was a partner in Smith, Barker & Willson Limited

Willson, James
[1837-1863] He married Ann Elizabeth [1838-1862].

Children: Fred William [1860-1861].

The family lived at Brockwell, Sowerby Bridge [1861].

Members of the family were buried at Rooley Lane Wesleyan Methodist Church, Sowerby.

He was found drowned in the River Irwell, Manchester [6th March 1863]. He was buried at Newton Heath Cemetery the following day

Willson Lathes Limited
In 1932, the partnership of Smith, Barker & Willson was dissolved and Willson Lathes established.

They had a branch at Keighley [1935].

In 1945, it became a public company with Albert Kitchen as Chairman.

In November 1964, it was acquired by Meggitt Engineering Limited of Bournemouth.

In 1965, it was bought by the B. Elliott Machine Tool Company and became Elliott Willson Limited

Willson, Mrs Laura
[18??-19??] OBE. Wife of George Willson.

She was an active suffragette and secretary of the Halifax branch of the Women's Social & Political Union. In February 1907, she was imprisoned for 2 weeks in Armley Jail, Leeds.

In 1918, she was president of the Women's Engineering Society.

She monitored women working for her husband's business and others engaged in munitions work for World War I.

In 192?, she and her husband helped Labour activists and trades unionists to buy homes in Atalanta Terrace, Pye Nest

Wilman, John
[16??-17??] He was Constable of Northowram [1716]

Wilmot, Mr
[1???-18??] Curate at Halifax Parish Church

Wilmut, Rev Ronald William
[1???-19??] Minister of Bridge End Congregational Church [1949]

Wilson's
Bottlers/brewers at High Level Mineral Water Works, Pellon

Wilson...
The entries for people with the surname Wilson are gathered together in a separate Sidetrack.

The individuals listed here are not necessarily related to each other.

Wilson
The surname means son of Will / son of William.

George Redmonds writes that the name was widely distributed in the West Riding by 1545.

John Wilson is recorded at Elland in 1402.

There are currently around 82 entries on the Calderdale Companion for people with the surname Wilson. This count does not include other forms of the surname. The individuals are not necessarily related to each other

The Wilson family of Halifax
There was a branch in Liverpool

The Wilson family of Sowerby Bridge
A branch of the family emigrated to Baltimore

Wilson & Another vs the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Company
On 21st October 1870, 2 trains collided at Brighouse Station. In August 1871, Mr Wilson, whose wife had her leg broken and her collar-bone injured in the accident sued the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway Company, for compensation. The verdict awarded Mr Wilson £400 plus £250 paid into court

Wilson & Company
Tanners and curriers of Bailiff Bridge. Recorded in 1900

Wilson & Haigh
Stone merchants at Moor End Quarry, Mount Tabor [1905]. Partners included Harry Wilson and Abraham Haigh

Wilson & Peel
Power loom cloth manufacturers at Hebden Bridge. Partners included J. Wilson and E. Peel.

The partnership was dissolved in May 1867

Wilson & Price Limited
Woollen manufacturers. Recorded in 1893

Wilson Brothers Bobbin Company Limited
Bobbin makers and timber merchants at Wilson's Bobbin Mill, Cornholme, Garston, 14 Market Place, Manchester and Athlone, Ireland. Established in 1823.

Partners included John Greenwood, Joshua Henry Wilson, and Lawrence Wilson.

In January 1879, their workers went on strike against a proposed reduction of 10% in their wages.

In May 1885, they won the Gold Medal at the New Orleans Exhibition for

their improvements in the manufacture of bobbins used in preparing and spinning cotton and other fibres

The partnership was dissolved in October 1887 when Lawrence Wilson retired.

On 27th March 1888 their mill was destroyed by fire. The firm was in the process of extending the mill. They employed around 400 men at the time.

In August 1893 and again in August 1894, their Shannon Saw Mills, Athlone, Ireland – extensive steam saw and turning mills – were advertised for sale because

in consequence of important changes of their business in England, and their business being moved to Liverpool, they find that they will not require the works in Ireland

In 1900, they built a club for their workers. This had a new room and a billiards room.

In October 1911, they won Grands Prix at Turin for their bobbins and shuttles, and another for their chemical bye-products

Wilson's Cap & Hat Emporium
14 Corn Market, Halifax. Established by Alfred Wilson. The shop had a large illuminated clock hanging outside the front and was known as The Clock.

A poem on the Halifax Fair included the lines

Of money, I'd a decent stock
So I bowt a hat at Wilson's Clock

See Whiteley's Hat Shop

Wilson's hardware shop
The shop stood on the corner of Horton Street and Union Street, Halifax.

In 1999, the business closed down and Jewson's Gun Shop moved into the premises

Wilson's: J. Wilson & Company
Hatters at 6 Corn Market, Halifax [1881]

Wilson's: J. Wilson & Company
He had business at Rosemary Mills, Rastrick [1888]

Wilson's: James Wilson & Son (Ironmongers) Limited
Retailer of hardware, garden and other tools, and tiled fireplaces. They were at 14/16 Cheapside, Halifax [1950]

Wilson's: John Wilson
Damask fabric manufacturer at Forest Mill, Ovenden established by John Wilson. At the Great Exhibition of 1851, they exhibited many of their products. They received an honourable mention for their ponchos

Wilson's: Joshua Henry, J. & J. W. Wilson
Bobbin manufacturers at Cornholme and Barnsley. Partners included Joshua Henry Wilson, J. Wilson and J. W. Wilson.

The partnership was dissolved in February 1863

See Lawrence Wilson & Sons

Wilson's: Lawrence Wilson & Sons
Bobbin manufacturers at Cornholme and Barnsley. Partners included Joshua Henry Wilson, J. Wilson and J. W. Wilson.

The partnership was dissolved in February 1863

In June 1864, the Cornholme works were advertised for sale with the note that

the business is still being continued, the workpeople and connection kept together, so that there is open to any persons already in the same business, or willing to commence, a magnificent and rare opportunity

See Wilson's

Wilson's Pills
A patent medicine produced in New Zealand by Samuel Wilson. An advertisement of 1906 claimed that they would cure
Boils, Carbuncles, Headaches, Constipation, Biliousness, Lumbago, &c

Wilton
[Surname]

Wilton, Mary
[1663-1700] Or Marie.

Daughter of William Wilton.

In 1678 – at the age of 15 – she married John Mitchell.

After his death in 1696, she returned to the family home at Slead Syke and left both Scout Halls to tenants, including the Clarke family.

In 1697, she became the 2nd wife of John Smith – or Smyth – of Wakefield.

She died of smallpox. She was buried at Wakefield

Wilton, William
[16??-1692] Of Slead Syke.

Merchant and maltster.

He married Unknown.

Children: Mary who married John Mitchell

Wimpenny, James
[18??-18??] Grocer and tea dealer of West Street, Halifax [1843].

On 16th November 1843, he married Susan Longbottom at Sion Chapel, Halifax

Wimpenny, John
[17??-18??] Innkeeper at Elland.

In November 1802, he was declared bankrupt

Wimpy Bar, Halifax
1960s eatery which stood on the corner of Wards End and Horton Street. It was a part of the building which was erected on the site of the Palace Theatre.

Contributor Dave van de Gevel writes

The Wimpy Bar was the British precursor of all McDonalds and Burger Kings and the height of cool.

This was a time of frothy coffee served in glass cups and saucers and no choice of coffee types and most of us went home on a bus.

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