Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Pubs & inns

W



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Waggon & Horses, Bottoms
Burnley Road, Stansfield. Built by John Mitchell. He was landlord of the Inn


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: George Pickles

 

Waggon & Horses, Cornholme
Redwater Foot / Burnley Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: Arthur Hirst

  • 1896: Arthur Hirst

  • 1897: Mr Marshall

  • 1900: Barton Greenwood

  • 1917: James Fitzpatrick

 

Waggon & Horses, Halifax
Berry Lane. Aka the Dublin Arms.

The pub closed in 1905 following the Licensing Act [1904]

Waggon & Horses, Holywell Green
Station Road. In the 1870s, it became the Station Hotel when the railway came to Stainland.

In 1977, it became the Holywell Inn.

There was a toll booth near the Inn for the Stainland to Sowerby Bridge Turnpike.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Ruth Morton

  • 1861: Mrs Hannah Hepworth

  • 1864: Mrs Hannah Hepworth

 

Waggon & Horses, Rastrick
Snake Hill


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Waggon & Horses, Ripponden

It was a Stocks pub [1869].

It later became the White Swan.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two.

See Waggon & Horses, Soyland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Waggon & Horses, Sowerby Bridge
72/74 West Street. Opened in 1890.

The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904].

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1860: Anthony Whitehead

  • 1881: George Pennington

  • 1891: George Pennington

  • 1903: Willie Heron

  • 1905: Henry Butterworth

 

Waggon & Horses, Soyland
Nether Royd

See Waggon & Horses, Ripponden

Waggon & Horses, Stainland
Bottoms


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: (possibly) Luke Haigh

  • 1845: George Pickles

 

Waggon & Horses, Stainland
Outlane


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Waggon & Horses, Walsden
786 Rochdale Road.

See Carr Terrace, Bottoms and Todmorden & District Carriage Company


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 18??: ? Hill

  • 18??: Jinny & John Hill

  • 18??: Jinny Hill

  • 18??: Jinny Fielden

  • 18??: Ogden Mitchell – [18??-1899]

  • 1891: Stansfield Greenwood

  • 1905: Elizabeth Greenwood

  • 1905: Richard Halstead

  • 1917: Abraham Buckley

  • 1917: Abraham Buckley

 

Waggoners', Halifax
13/15 Northgate. This was one of the town's main coaching inns

Joseph Rideal Smith was born here and the building appears in one of his prints.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Waggoners', Halifax
8 Gibbet Street. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Thomas Birtwhistle

  • 1905: Sarah Dyson

 

Waggoners', Ovenden
Peat Pitts.

See Wagon & Horses, Ovenden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: John Wainhouse

  • 1853: James Hemmingway

 

Waggoners' Rest, Mount Tabor
Stocks Lane.

The building was originally a row of weavers' cottages [around 1740].

Around 1800, the property was converted into a smallholding called Brock Top Farm, Mount Tabor.

In the late 19th century, it was converted into a pub to serve the trade passing up and down Stocks Lane on their way to and from the quarries in Mount Tabor. This was originally a beer house. It opened in 1902.

There is a stone horse trough on the roadside by the property for the horses on their way up Stocks Lane.

The pub closed in 1952.

When the quarries stopped production, the pub was split into two properties: Breck Top Farm and Breck Top Cottage.

The electrical box on the street lamp outside still reads Waggoners' Rest.

For many years, occupants and visitors have reported sightings of a man wearing a brimmed hat and long coat in the upstairs rear of the property


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1901: Joseph Bedford – who lived at 3 Jumples Crag

  • 1905: Emma A. Whalley

 

Waggoners', Skircoat Green
This was originally a beer house. The pub was renamed the Standard of Freedom

Waggoners', Stainland
Holywell Green


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: John Shaw

 

Wagon & Horses, Ovenden


Question: Does anyone know anything about this hostelry? Could it be the another name for the Waggoners', Ovenden?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Wainhouse Tavern
Pye Nest.

J. E. Wainhouse's home at West Air was converted into a pub, known successively as the Royal, Pye Nest, the Folly, and the Wainhouse Tavern [by 2014]

Waiters' Arms, Sowerby Bridge
Tuel Lane.

It is mentioned in a bond dated 1598.

Planning applications show that this was a Halifax Brewery Company pub [March 1907].

At one time, It was a Ramsden pub LC.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1903: E. Turner

  • 1905: Mrs Emma Turner

  • 19??: Sarah Hannah Wright

 

Walkers' Arms, Shelf


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: Jane Mansfield

 

Wappy Spring, Outlane
Lindley Moor Road.

See Wappy Spring Brewery, Outlane


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1896: John Holroyd

 

Ward's Temperance Hotel, Halifax
5 North Bridge.

See Jonathan Butterfield


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Warren House Inn, Fixby
Recorded in 1873, when
Harriet, relict of Saville Crowther, formerly of the Warren House Inn, Fixby, was buried at Blackley Baptist Church

Waterfront, Brighouse
The hotel/restaurant was originally Perseverance Mill

Waterhouse Arms, Halifax
King Street / 2 Nelson Street.

On 4th June 1928, the Waterhouse Arms, the Bacchus Tavern, and the King of Belgium were referred for closure.

The pub was demolished in 19??.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs

See Flogging and Halifax Orange Club, No. 10


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Waverley Temperance Hotel, Halifax
43 Horton Street.

See Richard's Temperance Hotel, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Mrs Florence Anderson

 

WC's, Halifax
In the 1980s, the public toilets in Bull Green were closed and converted into this wine bar.

It later became known as Bar 15

Weavers' Arms, Luddendenfoot
Burnley Road / Luddenden Lane.

Built on the site of Farrar's Mill.

This was originally a beer house.

The pub appears to be unoccupied [2008].

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs.

See Luddendenfoot Economic Stores


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Weavers' Arms, Midgley
Formerly the Horse & Shoes, Midgley.

The pub closed on 11th September 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904]

Weavers' Arms, Todmorden
Blind Lane


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1888: Mrs Sutcliffe »» »»

  • 1905: Mrs Martha Jane Sutcliffe

 

Weavers, Halifax

Wellington, Elland
55 Southgate. Mid 17th century timber-framed building. It was originally a farmhouse. It was rebuilt in the 19th century.

It was popularly known as the Glue Pot.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: George Hemingway

  • 1829: George Hemingway

  • 1834: William Hemingway

  • 1845: Benjamin Milne

  • 1861: John Tweed – who was also a clog and patten maker

  • 1864: John Tweed

  • 1874: Allen Beaumont

  • 1881: Benjamin & Delia Bottomley [??]

  • 1887: Allen Beaumont

  • 1894: Sam Bowes Beaumont

  • 1905: Sam Bowes Beaumont

  • 1917: Herbert Lancaster

 

Wellington, Halifax
66 Rochdale Road, King Cross. This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Wellington Hotel, Brighouse
Stood at 43 Commercial Street on the corner with Briggate. Opened in 1821. In 1821, this, the Black Bull, the Black Swan and the Anchor were the only pubs in Brighouse.

The Irish workers staying here were one focus for the Irish riots of 1882.

The pub closed in 1946 and was demolished in 1949. A small memorial garden was built on the site. The name remains in the Wellington Arcade shopping precinct which now stands on the site.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs.

See Mark Morrell


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: S. H. Mallinson

  • 1829: Hugh Mallinson

  • 1834: Hugh Mallinson

  • 1840: Samuel & Ann Mallinson

  • 1845: Ann Mallinson

  • 1861: Richard Greaves

  • 1874: George Woodhouse

  • 1881: Frederick Pearson

  • 1891: Sarah Dyson

  • 1894: Secker Blackburn

  • 1901: Secker Blackburn

  • 1905: Victor Holland

  • 1916: Charles Poole

  • 1922: Vincent Hodgson

  • 1922: Tom Else

  • 1926: Fred Brookless

  • 19??: G. B. Benton

  • 19??: Mr Hartland

  • 19??: George Main

  • 19??: Mr Gledhill

  • 1917: James Poole

 

Wellington Hotel, Halifax
14 New Bank. Opened in 1844.

This was recorded as a Public Beer house [March 1847].

It was a Ramsden's pub.

The pub closed on 14th August 1968 and was demolished for the Burdock Way development.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1847: William Riley

  • 1905: Shaw W. Wilcock

  • 1936: L. Sladdin

 

Wellington Inn, Queensbury


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1874: Timothy Briggs

 

Wellington, Todmorden
Halifax Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

West Bottom Tavern, Norland
Hob Lane.

In 1881, this was a row of 3 cottages for workers in the local quarries, the middle one of which was a beer house.

In 1???, it was converted into a pub.

The name was changed to The Hobbit when the property was restored in 1975.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs

See Watson Mill Lane, Sowerby Bridge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Joe Crossley

  • 1905: Sam Turner

  • 1906: Samuel Turner

  • 1906: Amelia Robinson

 

West End Hotel, Halifax
Parkinson Lane. Aka West End Tavern. Designed by Petty & Ives. It was built in 1899.

It was a Whitaker pub, and one of their purpose-built pubs.

The pub was originally run as a refreshment house, selling non-alcoholic drinks, because the licence was not granted until October 1901, when Whitaker's offered to surrender the licences of the Horse & Trumpet and the California.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: William Redfearn

  • 1917: John E. McKelvin

  • 1936: William H. Turner

 

West End Tavern, Sowerby Bridge
56 West Street. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1914.

Mentioned again in 1924.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

West Hill, Halifax
64 Hanson Lane. This was originally a beer house at California. Opened in August 1859 as a tavern selling wines and spirits, with Richard Edmondson as licensee.

On 19th September 1872, smoke from the chimney of the brew-house adjoining the pub was considered a nuisance.

The front of the pub was destroyed when the Hanson Lane bomb fell on 22nd November 1940. 3 customers at the pub – and 8 other people – were killed.

The pub had to be demolished on account of the bomb damage. It reopened in 1950.

The pub closed in 1969 and was finally demolished.

See West End Glee Union


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1859: Richard Edmondson »»

  • 1874: Richard Edmondson

  • 1887: Robert James Pearson

  • 1894: Thomas Greenwood

  • 1896: Councillor Thomas Greenwood

  • 1897: Harry Wilkinson »» »»

  • 1917: Harry Wilkinson

  • 1936: Clement Garforth

  • 1937: Clement Garforth

 

West Riding Hotel, Halifax
Fountain Street. Opened in 1862.

The pub closed in 1865


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1864: William Hallawell

 

West Vale Inn

West Vale Tavern

West Ward Hotel, Halifax
Hanson Lane.

Recorded in 1891, when Mary E. Morton was barmaid here


Question: Could this be the West Ward Liberal Club?

 

Western, Halifax
Lansdown Place.

It was a Fielding pub.

Westgate, Halifax
18 Westgate.

See Town Hall Tavern, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1866: Joshua Swift

  • 1871: Martha Swift – [aged 55]

  • 1874: Michael Pearson »» »» »» »»

  • 1895: Michael Pearson

  • 1905: Mrs Emma Wood

  • 1911: Lewis Renshaw Greenwood

  • 1911: Norman Bennett

  • 1917: Norman Bennett

  • 1927: Ralph Jordinson

  • 1936: Lewis Barrett

  • 1989: Arthur & Madeleine Childs

 

Weston Hotel, Halifax
Abel Street / 2 Lansdowne Place, Pellon Lane. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1967


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: William H. Spenser – [aged 30]

  • 1905: George Yates

  • 1936: Richard R. Hanson

 

Westward Ho, Ovenden
Church Mill Lane

Westward Tavern, Halifax
Aka West Ward Tavern. Pellon Lane / 83/89 Crossley Terrace. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1897.

The pub closed in October 1969.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two.

See John Birtwhistle


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1903: Samuel Walker

  • 1905: Samuel Walker

  • 1936: Samuel Ackroyd

 

Wharf, Brighouse
Brookfoot. Opened around 1833 for the workers at Brookfoot and Brookfoot Wharf.

It was a Webster pub.

In 1983, it was acquired by The Fighting Cock group and was renamed The Red Rooster.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Wharf Hotel, Sowerby Bridge
75 Wharf Street.

In August 1897, the licence from the Wharf Inn, Sowerby Bridge was transferred to the Wharf House on the opposite side of Wharf Street.

The new hostelry was known as the Wharf House Hotel.

It was later known as the Wharf Hotel

It subsequently became the Ash Tree [1983], the Java ethnic restaurant, and the Village Indonesian/Asian restaurant [2010].

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs: Volume Two.

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1900].


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Wharf House Hotel Sowerby Bridge
In August 1897, the licence from the Wharf Inn, Sowerby Bridge was transferred to the Wharf House on the opposite side of Wharf Street. The new hostelry was known as the Wharf House Hotel.

It was later known as the Wharf Hotel

Wharf Inn, Sowerby Bridge
Formerly the Mermaid, Sowerby Bridge. This was originally a beer house.

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1896].

In 1897, it was described as one of the oldest licensed houses in the district.

In August 1897, the licence from the Wharf Inn was transferred to the Wharf House on the opposite side of Wharf Street.

The new hostelry was known as the Wharf House Hotel.

It was later known as the Wharf Hotel

It was demolished in 19??. The Wharf Garage now stands on the site.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two

See Wharf Inn Family Funeral Brief and Wharf Inn Smoke Club


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Wharf, Sowerby Bridge
Formerly known as the Commercial, Sowerby Bridge and the Lock Keepers' Tavern, Sowerby Bridge.

In December 2013, J. D. Wetherspoon reopened the pub as The Commercial

Wheat Sheaf, Elland
Church Street / Briggate. Opened in 1824.

The pub closed on 28th December 1935

It was known as the Three Bonnie Lasses on account of the wife and daughters of the landlord.

See John Edward Briggs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Abraham Howarth »»

  • 1834: Abraham Howarth

  • 1845: Hartley Howarth

  • 1861: Eli Etherington »»

  • 1874: Eli Etherington

  • 1881: George Woffenden – [1840-1886]

  • 1887: Mrs M. A. Woffenden

  • 1891: Mary A. Davenport

  • 1894: Mrs Mary A. Woffenden

  • 1901: James Clegg »» »» »»

  • 1918: James Clegg

  • 1935: Frederick Henry Wade

 

Wheat Sheaf, Ovenden
Or Wheatsheaf


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Wheat Sheaf, Pellon
Brackenbed Lane, Mount Pellon.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Joseph Holdsworth

  • 1845: John Boyd

  • 1861: James Webster »»

  • 1871: James Webster

  • 1874: Bessy Webster

  • 1887: Mrs S. A. Boocock

  • 1890: Edwin Wild »» »»

  • 1905: Edwin Wild

  • 1917: Tom Birtwhistle

  • 1936: Henry G. Royston

 

Wheatley Wells, Wheatley
30 / 106-110 Wheatley Road. This was originally a beer house in a row of weavers' cottages.

It was a Brear & Brown pub, then later it was a Whitaker pub [1916].

It closed in 2009.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two.

See Wheatley Wells, Wheatley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: John Greenwood – [aged 34]

  • 1888: John Jack Backhouse

  • 1905: A. W. Oldfield

  • 1917: Walter A. Ingle

  • 1936: Richard Sweeting

 

Wheatsheaf, Halifax
14 / 18 Market Street. Built in 1891 as a part of Halifax Borough Market.


Question: The pub is recorded as early as 1816 when Thomas Carver was landlord. Does anyone know anything about the pub between then and 1891 when it was incorporated into the Borough Market? Was it a separate building on the same site?

 

Around 1970, the name was changed to William Deighton.

In 199?, it was renamed Portman & Pickles


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1816: Thomas Carver

  • 1822: John Bottomley »» »»

  • 1837: John Bottomley

  • 1845: Thomas Sutcliffe

  • 1850: Thomas Bottomley Sutcliffe »»

  • 1874: Thomas Bottomley Sutcliffe

  • 1881: Thomas B. Sutcliffe

  • 1887: Samuel Hanson

  • 1891: William Fawcett

  • 1894: John Ambler

  • 189?: John Cockroft Hardman

  • 1905: Modley Foster

  • 1917: George Beaumont

  • 1936: Ferella Proud

 

Wheatsheaf, Queensbury


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Mrs Emma Fearnley

  • 1941: Wilfred Hartley

  • 1942: Edith Hartley

 

T' Wheel Hoile, Norwood Green
Aka Old Coley Mill Inn. Opened in 1830.

The pub closed in 192?.

The pub stood near Coley corn mill and, when this fell into disuse, the mill wheel became unsafe and was removed in the 1940s – leaving only the wheel hole.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs.

See Hoile

Whiskam Dandy, Halifax
Godley. A house and pub with this name stood at Whiskam Dandy on the top of Bairstow, and displayed a sign:


This is Whiskam Dandy
where we sell good ale and brandy

Whisket, Todmorden
Shade. This was originally a beer house built by William Fielden. He was a basket-maker; a whisket is a basket.

The pub closed in 1869

White Bear, Halifax
11 Cow Green. Opened in 1822.

The pub closed in 1865


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Bear, Skircoat Green
Opened in 1869.

The pub closed in 1869

White Bear, Sowerby


Question: Could this be the same as the White Bear, Triangle?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: James Bates

 

White Bear, Triangle
The Triangle Cricket Club was founded at the pub. The Triangle Reading Society was founded at the pub. The pub was used as a Coroner's Court


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: John Bates

  • 1834: Jonas Earnshaw

  • 1845: Mrs Amelia Burley

  • 1861: William Crowther – who was also a blacksmith

 

White Hart, Halifax
2/34/41 Bull Green.

It was a Whitaker pub.

It stood next to (and east of) Scratcherd & Company's premises at Bull Green. Halifax Corporation bought the building for £9,000. It was demolished around 1897 when the area was redeveloped and the lines for the new tramway system were laid in Halifax.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two.

See Coaches


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Hart, Hipperholme


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: William Berry – [aged 45]

 

White Hart, Queensbury
The pub closed in 1926

White Hart, Rastrick


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Eli Taylor

  • 1829: Jonathan Howorth

  • 1834: Elijah Smith

  • 1881: William Berry

 

White Hart, Soyland
Dyson Lane / Rochdale Road.

Mid 18th century public house with an older barn dated RWIM 1630. The property was built by the Whiteley family.

The pub closed in the 1990s.

It is now private housing.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Hart, Todmorden
Market Place. Originally a farm and outbuildings. In 1728, it was opened as the New Inn by Tamar and John Fielden of Todmorden Hall. John gave the inn and farm to his nephew, Samuel Fielden of Bottomley. Samuel sold the inn at the end of the 18th century, leaving the proceeds to his son, Samuel.

The cattle fair was held at White Hart Fold, and the town market was held at Eccles's Fold in the 19th century. The market later moved to the Royal George, Todmorden.

In the mid-19th century, the Court of Petty Sessions was held at the inn. The court room was reach by a flight of steps up the outside the building, and appearance at court was known as going up Eccles's steps. The court moved to the Queens Hotel in January 1847.

In 1899, the inn was extended.

In 1935, it was demolished and the present 3-storey, mock-Tudor building erected

See Todmorden Botanical Society and Todmorden Market


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Horse, Halifax
33/39 Southgate. Opened in 1819. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed and was demolished in 1898.

The present building and shops were erected on the site after Southgate was widened.

The new pub – designed by Jackson & Fox – opened on 24th June 1899


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: James Swaine

  • 1829: Maria Swaine

  • 1834: James Brier

  • 1837: James Brier

  • 1845: Mrs Maria Brier

  • 1850: Mrs Maria Brier

  • 1864: Robert Brier

  • 1871: George Yeates – [aged 36]

  • 1874: George Yeates

  • 1881: Thomas Swaine

  • 1887: Josiah Sutcliffe

  • 1894: Josiah Sutcliffe

  • 1898: Friend Foster

  • 1905: Frank Crawshaw

  • 1917: John J. Denton

  • 1936: B. Lincoln Taylor

  • 1938: Thomas Edward Healey

 

White Horse, Hebden Bridge
Saint George's Square.

Mr Bannister farmed here in the 16th century.

At one time, it was occupied by a Mr Lees and Lees Yard was built in his garden.

In 1786, William Patchett opened an inn here. William built Garden Street in the garden of the inn to link Commercial Street and Bridge Gate and bypass the White Lion which was owned by his brother, Richard.

The Inn was a popular venue for public meetings and inquests.

In the 1800s, it served as parish hall for the parish of Wadsworth.

It was a Whitaker pub [1921].

The inn closed in 1960.

In 1961, the council bought the site for £3500.

It was demolished on 26th November 1962.

It is now a car park.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Horse Hotel, Heptonstall
Recorded on 14th February 1891, when the Heptonstall Brass Band had a social evening here

White Horse, Lightcliffe
Bramley Lane.

It was a Stocks pub [1903], then later it was a Webster pub [1933].

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1840: S. Sunderland

  • 1845: Samuel Sunderland

  • 1845: Jonas Riley

  • 1861: Elizabeth Sockman

  • 1861: Joseph Woodhead

  • 1874: Hannah Sellers

  • 1881: Hannah Sellers

  • 1887: Joseph Parkinson

  • 1904: Rose Womersley

  • 1917: Mrs Rose E. Womersley

 

White Horse, Luddendenfoot
Spring Gardens / Burnley Road / Friendly.

In 1829, the property was Number 17 Spring Gardens and was owned by Robert Sutcliffe and occupied by George Pickles.

In 1840, a beerhouse is recorded on the site. The names White House and White Horse are used.

The ghost of Elizabeth – wife of landlord James Baldwin – is said to haunt the pub


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1840: Naylor Bentley

  • 1842: Naylor Bentley

  • 1847: James Baldwin

  • 1851: George Bolmer

  • 1853: George Bolmer

  • 1865: Richard Foxton – owner

  • 1865: Sam Highley – tenant

  • 1871: Richard Harwood

  • 1880: John Naylor – of the Albion Brewery – owner

  • 1885: William Taylor – tenant

  • 1893: Mrs Ruth Taylor – who was also a joiner

  • 1901: Joseph Yewdall – who was also an iron turner

  • 1905: Harry Ingham

  • 1905: Joseph Grice

  • 1906: Joseph Grice

  • 1906: George Stansfield

  • 1944: John Eames

  • 1945: Harold Shepley

  • 1961: Dick Turnpenny

  • 1963: Ernest Marsh

  • 1977: Ron Green

  • 1980: Donald Moorhouse

  • ?: Steve Warwick

  • ?: Colin & Susie ?

  • ?: Mr Mitch?

  • 1991: Mick Crabtree

  • 1993: Bruce Clark

  • 2007: Jacqueline Clark

 

White Horse, Northowram
Lands End. Built around 1580. This was a beer house [1905].

It was converted to a private house known as Lands Head in 1913


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Thomas Marston

 

White Horse, Queensbury


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1896: Henry Walker Smith

 

White Horse, Rastrick
46 Rastrick Common.

It was a Whitaker pub [1869].

The pub was up for sale [June 2010].

There were proposals to convert the building into a house [2011].

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Horse, Rishworth
One of a number of cottages in Turner Bottom Row


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Thomas Lumb

 

White Horse, Triangle
Stile.

A beerhouse is recorded here [1851, 1861].

The pub opened in 1865.

The pub closed in 1955.

It was demolished in 19??


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White House, Blackstone Edge
Stands on the A58 at Blackstone Edge. Formerly known as the Coach & Horses, Blackstone Edge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 19??: J. Palmer

 

White Lion, Elland
Church Street / Huddersfield Road

It was a Stocks pub [1898].

The pub closed in 1920. It is mentioned again in 1924


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: James Pilling »»

  • 1901: James Pilling

  • 1905: John H. Lumb

 

White Lion, Heptonstall
58 Towngate / Main Street. Early 17th century building. The front was added in the 19th century.

See Grove Brewery, Brearley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Susan Uttley

  • 1829: Jonas Crook

  • 1834: Jonas Crook

  • 1845: Alice Crook

  • 1861: John Greenwood

  • 1864: John Greenwood

  • 1869: Hinchliffe Booth

  • 1874: George Greenwood

  • 1879: (possibly) Hinchliffe Booth

  • 1894: James Hoyle

  • 1905: Paul Taylor

  • 1917: Paul Taylor

 

White Lion Hotel & Posting House, Halifax
7 Silver Street. The property was owned by William Ferguson. The pub opened in 1735.

The pub closed in 1882. The buildings were demolished when Silver Street was redeveloped. H. C. McCrea, the owner, received £8,926 10/- for the property

This is discussed in the collection of Prints by J. R. Smith and Halifax Pubs.

See Halifax Joint Stock Banking Company, Thomas Simpson & Sons Limited and White Lion Yard, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1760s: James Murgatroyd

  • 1807: Charles Kershaw

  • 1809: John Jenkinson »»

  • 1822: John Jenkinson

  • 1828: Miss Susan Jenkinson »»

  • 1837: Miss Susan Jenkinson

  • 1845: Thomas Crossland

  • 1850: William Adamson

  • 1864: Ruth Adamson

  • 1874: Mrs Ruth Adamson

 

White Lion Hotel & Posting House, Hebden Bridge
Hollins Place / Bridge Gate.

Originally it was a house owned by the King family and known as King's Farm. Dated 1657, it is the oldest building in Hebden Bridge.

It was built to serve the river crossing here.

It had its own brewhouse and livery stables.

It was a public house from the mid-18th century.

At each side of the fireplace there is carved a spiral which was believed to protect the building from harm by fire.

In 1786, it was owned by Richard Patchett, whose brother William owned the White Horse

In 1845, a post office is recorded here.

In July 1897, Whitaker's bought the pub at auction for £6,825, plus 655 yards of land adjoining for 22/- a yard.

Planning applications show that this was a Whitaker pub [March 1902].

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two.

See Franz Liszt, Old White Lion Society, White Lion Toll Bar, Hebden Bridge and Thomas Wilcock


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Lion, Illingworth
Originally The Cross


Question: Does anyone know if this really was the same establishment as the Ovenden Cross Inn? They seem to have separate landlords in the 1840s

 

See Illingworth House

White Lion, Luddendenfoot
Friendly.

The pub closed in 1948


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Lion, Midgley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: James Greenwood

  • 1845: Abigail Patchett

 

White Lion, Mytholmroyd
Burnley Road.

On 4th November 1891, Ramsden's bought the pub for £2,260


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: James Turner

  • 1834: Henry Patchett

  • 1845: Abigail Patchett

  • 1861: John Starkie

  • 1871: Jonas Uttley

  • 1874: Grace Uttley

  • 1887: Mrs M. Greenwood

  • 1894: Mrs Mary Greenwood

  • 1905: Thomas Ingham

  • 1917: John George Broadbent

 

White Lion, Ovenden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Mark Chapman

  • 1853: Eli Collins

 

White Lion, Rastrick
23/25 Bridge End. The pub stood between Star, Rastrick and the railway viaduct.

It was a Halifax Brewery Company pub.

The pub closed on 14th February 1908.

A house was built on the site [2003].

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: Jonas Wilkinson »»

  • 1845: Jonas Wilkinson

  • 1859: Leah Wilkinson

  • 1860: Samuel Wilkinson – who was a farmer

  • 1861: Samuel Wilkinson

  • 1900: F. Tattersall

  • 1901: Thomas Malehane

  • 1901: Thomas Naylor

  • 1902: Henry Abbot

  • 1903: Sam Brooks

  • 1904: Gibson Wade

  • 1905: Joseph [Josias?] Bailey

 

White Lion, Rastrick
Clough House.

See Clough House Inn, Rastrick and Clough House, Rastrick


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Lion, Sowerby Bridge
123 Bolton Brow Opened in 1875.

The pub closed in 1920.

Mentioned again in 1924.

It closed in ????.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Lion, Todmorden
190 Rochdale Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1917: John William Sutherland

 

White Lion, Todmorden
Butcher Hill / Bridge End, Wadsworth Mill.

The pub closed in 1961 Aka Grinning Dog and Guerning Dog


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Lion, Warley
Water Hill Lane. Opened in 1902.

The pub closed on 31st December 1948


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: John Lumb

 

White Swan, Brighouse
Bradford Road / Commercial Street.

It was Denham's Tobacconists. It became a pub in 18??.

In August 1877, Webster's bought the pub from William Monks.

At the Brewster sessions in 1903, the police objected to renewal of the licences of this pub, the Anchor, Brighouse and the Black Swan, Brighouse, on account of the publican

habitually employing professional female musicians

The licence was renewed on the understanding that no female vocalists be employed and that no female pianist under the age of 21 be taken on.

It closed in 199?

It became a branch of Lloyds Bank.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: Ralph Bostock

  • 1898: Allan Marsden

  • 1901: Ira Ackroyd

  • 1904: H. R. Tallboys

  • 1905: E. Greenwood

  • 1912: H. E. Wilkinson

  • 1914: John Gledhill

  • 1915: J. W. Haigh

  • 1916: Fred Marsden

  • 1922: Fred Marsden

  • 19??: Mrs Marsden

  • 193?: Thomas Edward Healey

  • 19??: Aggie Cockcroft

 

White Swan, Hebden Bridge
This stands by the Old Bridge and was originally called the Bridge End. It was built in the 1770s.

On 11th September 1896, an

alarming explosion of gas

occurred in the snug at the Hotel, after a serving girl, Elizabeth Mary Bowden of Manchester, lit a match in her search for a gas leak. She and Samuel Dawson, the landlord, were badly burnt in the incident.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Sarah Thomas

  • 1825: William Appleyard

  • 1829: Mrs Thomas

  • 1834: Sarah Thomas

  • 1845: William Thomas

  • 1861: William Whitaker

  • 1864: William Whitaker

  • 1874: James Horsfall

  • 1887: Thomas Horsfall

  • 1894: Harry Heap

  • 1896: Samuel Dawson

  • 1901: Samuel Dawson

  • 1905: James Henry Crabtree

  • 1906: James E. Crabtree

  • 1917: John Crossley

  • 2012: Elizabeth Wood

 

White Swan, Heptonstall

White Swan, Hipperholme


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Swan, Holmfield
Aka the Swan Inn, Holdsworth.

15 Holdsworth Road / Lower Well Lane, Ovenden.

Opened in 1759.

It was a Webster pub when they bought it from John Henry Wadsworth [1878].

The pub closed in 1971.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

White Swan Hotel, Halifax
Princess Street.

See Halifax Permanent Benefit Building Society offices

White Swan Inn & Posting House, Halifax
31-35 Crown Street.

White Swan, Luddenden
The pub was renamed the Lord Nelson Inn after the Battle of Trafalgar [1805]

White Swan, Ripponden
Formerly the Waggon & Horses.

It was known as Ye Olde White Swan Hotel [1915].

Part of the building was used by D. Crossley as a barber's shop.

Around 1940, the West Riding Constabulary police station was in the building.

It became The Fox.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Whitegate, Stoney Royd
The pub closed in 1870

Whitehall, Hipperholme
Or White Hall Inn. Stands on the Leeds Road at the Hipperholme crossroads.

Built in the late 18th century. Took its name from nearby White Hall House. The inn gives its name to the Whitehall Road to Leeds.

It was a Stocks pub [1914].

The Southowram Annual Subscription Concert was held here in 18??.

On 16th July 1854, John Ramsden of Greetland challenged John Mallinson of Norland to a pigeon-shooting match. James Tasker of the Whitehall Inn would accept the stakes.

In 1869, the trustees of Rev William Wilkinson sold the house to Major Stocks of Stocks for £1,225.

It was a Stocks pub.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs.

In August 2012, the pub was closed and up for sale.

See Hipperholme Local Board


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1802: Joshua Riley »»

  • 1834: Joshua Riley

  • 1839: John Riley

  • 1841: John Riley

  • 1853: James Tasker

  • 1854: James Tasker

  • 1861: Daniel Fletcher – who was also a cattle dealer

  • 1864: Daniel Fletcher

  • 1874: Sarah Fletcher

  • 1887: William Berry

  • 1902: George H. Gledhill

  • 1917: Arthur Gledhill

  • 1922: Charles Asquith

 

Who Could A' Thowt It, Brighouse
Elland Road.

On 10th June 1870, the Masons' Arms, Brighouse changed its name to Who Could A' Thowt It

See Who could a' thowt it, Southowram

Who could a' thowt it, Southowram
Formerly Clough Head Cottage at Clough Head, Sunny Bank Lane in the Walterclough Valley.

Aka Who would a thowt it, Ba gum who'd a' thowt it, and Ba gum who wad a' thowt it.

The pub is recorded in the 1860s.

On 27th May 1898, it was bought by James Alderson, and became one of his first tied houses. Planning applications show that this was an Alderson pub [December 1903].

It became a Ramsden house.

It is said that there was a passage between the cellars of the pub and the adjacent cottage. This provided a quick escape for illegal drinkers.

The pub closed on 27th December 1933, but continued to sell light refreshments.

It finally closed and, from 1941, it fell into a state of disrepair.

The building was demolished and the stone and roof slates went into the rebuilding of Coventry after World War II.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs and Our Home & Country.

See Who could a' thowt it, Brighouse


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Whole Hog, Halifax
The name of the Causeway Foot, Ogden for a time

Wild's Temperance Hotel, Todmorden
A name for the Central Commercial Temperance Hotel when it was run by Walter Wild [1900, 1905]

William Broad, Halifax
Carlton Street.


Question: There is some uncertainty about this pub: on one source, it is listed as the William Broad with John Cadney in charge, and on another, it is the Board with William Cadney. Both references are for 1837. Can anyone clarify the situation?

Does anyone know who William Board was?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

William Deighton, Halifax
Around 1970, the name of the Wheatsheaf, Halifax was changed to William Deighton, for William Deighton, the exciseman who was murdered by the coiners.

In 199?, it was renamed Portman & Pickles

William the 4th, Halifax
93 King Cross Road. This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: James Garside

  • 1905: James Garside

  • 1917: Tom Harrison

  • 1936: Harry Stansfield

 

William the 4th, Sowerby Bridge
80 Wharf Street. This was originally a beer house.

Planning applications show that this was a Brear & Brown pub [October 1893].

It stands almost opposite to the Wharf.

In 2011, it had a facelift and is now called William 5 or Williams.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Windmill, Northowram
1 Park Square / The Hough. This was originally a beer house.

On June 27th 1852, Bell's London Life & Sporting Chronicle announced

a game of knur & spell with William Scott, Simeon Best, John Kay, Squire Webster, Simon Ambler, James Foster, John Naylor, John Robinson, and Charles Naylor (all Northowram men). Stakes were to be sent to the Windmill Tavern

Windmill Hill Brewery, Northowram,

The pub is now also known as Jack's Bar.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: John Henry Priestley

 

Windmill, Shelf
Stanage Lane.

The present building of 1897 may have replaced an earlier one.

Tom Woodford was a beerseller here in 1891 when the name is first recorded.

The Inn was built in 1897 [?]. It is named for the mill at Windmill Mill, Shelf.

An extension by Joseph Frederick Walsh – in which he used turned stone – is now a function room.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Wine Pipe, Sowerby Bridge
Elland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: Joe Burley

 

Winterburn, Warley
Winterburn Lane. Originally called the Masons' Arms.

In 2005, Robert Mattock and Stuart Smith became tenants of the pub. They later stripped the contents and shipped them to Cyprus where they opened the Winterburn bar in Paphos.

In 2008, Mattock was jailed for 8 months, and Smith was given a suspended sentence and a community work order


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 2005: Robert Mattock & Stuart Smith

 

Withens Hotel, Wainstalls
Or Withins. Built as a farm in 1862. It stands 1,392 ft above sea-level.

This was a beer house [1864].

It was the highest pub in West Yorkshire, until 1974 when county boundary changes brought the Tan Hill pub – at 1,732 ft – from Durham into Yorkshire.

A stone in a field near the pub marks the graves of two greyhounds – Wallet and Dart – who were drowned in Thornton Conduit in 1891.

On 3rd October 1928, it was sold at auction for £725.

In 2001, the pub was badly damaged by fire. In 2002, there were plans to turn the pub into a private house, and a tea room during the summer months. The pub closed in 200? and was converted into private dwellings

See The Millennium Beacon, Wainstalls


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1864: Henry Eastwood

  • 1874: John Cockcroft

  • 1887: Miss S. Cockcroft

  • 1895: Riley Eastwood

  • 1905: Riley Eastwood

  • 1917: Joseph Watson

  • 1937: Charles Braisby

 

Wolf, Luddenden
Built in 1653.

In the early 18th century, the Inn was said to be a rendezvous for army recruiting officers.

Local legend says that, in 1745, Janet, a Scottish maid at the Inn gave sanctuary to a soldier from Bonnie Prince Charlie's army who was being pursued by the English army after defeat in battle.

In 1877, the property was acquired by the Luddenden Co-operative Society.

The Luddenden Working Men's Club & Institute was here from 1880 until 1946.

Astin Brothers used the building.

The building was demolished in 1959.

This is discussed in Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions and Halifax Pubs

Wood Mill, Stainland
Eastwood


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: James Dugdale

 

Wood Mill, Todmorden
Bottoms, Stansfield. Built around 182?

See Edward Crossley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Rd. Horsfall

  • 1845: James Dugdale

  • 1861: James Dugdale

 

Wood Turners', Warley
Opened in 1869.

The pub closed in 1869

Woodcock, Halifax
Gibbet Street. Originally the Bowling Green, Halifax

Woodcock, Walsden
It opened in 1825? and stood near to what is now the Bell Holme sports field.

In 1891, it became the Bell's Arms.

The pub closed in 19??.

See William Law


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Woodhead Tavern, Coley
Woodhead. In 1904, the property – then described as a beerhouse – was sold to Brear & Brown


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Joseph Wilkinson

  • 1904: William McCrea

  • 1933: Clara & John Dove

 

Woodland Hotel, Boothtown
40 Boothtown Road. Opened in 1879. They had a brewing facility on Iona Street.

It was a Webster pub.

It became the Woodland Tavern.

The pub closed in February 1971.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Woodland Tavern, Boothtown
A later name of the Woodland Hotel

Woodlands Hotel, Rastrick
River Street / Birds Royd. Opened in 18??.

Recorded in 1884.

The pub closed in 2001. Reopened in 200?.

Closed in July 2006

See John Tye


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1882: John Woodhouse

  • 1884: Edward Heaton

  • 1887: Henry Moore

  • 1917: Fred Tattersall

 

Woodlands, Northowram


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: George Mansfield

 

Woodman, Brighouse
Purlwell, Elland Road, Brookfoot. Stood at the entrance to the road leading to Brookfoot Mill.

Planning applications show that this was a Halifax Brewery Company pub [July 1898].

The pub was declared redundant in 1938 and closed on 11th April 1940.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Woodman, Halifax
29 Silver Street. Formerly the Duke Wellington.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: William Crowther

  • 1845: Susanna Clegg

  • 1850: George Hudson

  • 1859: Benjamin Swallow

  • 1861: James Gaukroger

  • 1864: Nathan Walker Schofield

  • 1871: James Jowett

  • 1874: William Crossley

 

Woodman, Hebden Bridge
Built about 1830.

When it was rebuilt in 1820, it incorporated the Nudger Inn.

The pub closed in 199?. There are plans to build houses on the site


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Woodman, Hebden Bridge
Charlestown / Booth Hill. Opened in 1843.

In June 1860, the Inn was sold at Auction to B. Platt of Midgehole for £460.

The pub closed on 31st December 1949.

See Todmorden & District Carriage Company


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1861: John Dugdale

  • 1887: William Lumb

  • 1905: George Edmundson

  • 1917: Samuel Fielden

 

Woodman, Hipperholme
Wood Head. Opened in 1904.

The pub closed in 1932

Woodman Inn, Stansfield


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Roseanna Dugdale – [aged 33]

 

Woodman, Luddendenfoot
Burnley Road. Opened in 1902.

The property is recorded as having 6 rooms [1911].

It was a Ramsden pub.

The pub closed in 1936. It was converted into 2 cottages.

These were demolished in the 1960s when property on Burnley Road was cleared.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs: Volume Two.

See Luddendenfoot Post Office


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Woodman, Midgley
Booth.

The pub closed in 2000?


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: Robert Midgley

  • 1861: John Midgley

  • 1905: Benjamin Feather

  • 1917: William Stringer

 

Woodman, Todmorden
Underbank


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1841: Luke Horsfall

  • 1845: Thomas Dearden

  • 1891: Susan Lumb

 

Woodnook, Sowerby Bridge
Victoria Avenue.

This was originally Sowerby Bridge Vicarage.

It closed in 19??. It was demolished in 200?

Woodpecker, Todmorden
Rochdale Road, Shade. This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Wool Merchant, Halifax
King Street / Mulcture Hall Road. Originally, the wool warehouse of H. Holdsworth. It was converted into a hotel in 19??

Woolpack, Halifax
28 / 32 Woolshops. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The inn was demolished in 1931 during redevelopment of Woolshops. When the pub closed, the licence was transferred to The New Talbot


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Woolpack, Sowerby Bridge
58 West Street / Foundry Street.

Planning applications show that this was a Webster pub [April 1918].

The pub closed in 1958.

The building was derelict for a time and eventually demolished.

The site is now [2014] empty.

This is discussed in Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Woolsorters' Arms, Halifax
Chapeltown. This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

The Works, Sowerby Bridge
Hollins Mill Lane

Wyke Lion, Wyke
Formerly Ruby's at Hellfire crossroads

Wynn Inn, Hebden Bridge
A 16th century name for the Fox & Goose, Hebden Bridge


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


search tips advanced search
search engine by freefind


© Malcolm Bull 2014 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 17:36 on 16th July 2014 / p200_w / 154