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Pubs & inns

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Pack Horse, Halifax
Charlestown Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Pack Horse, Southowram
Cain Lane.

Recorded in 1822.

The Southowram Annual Subscription Concert was held here [1825]

Planning applications show that this was a Ramsden pub [June 1897].

Since 2011, there have been proposals to convert the building into housing, a tapas bar, and an indian restaurant.

See Ancient Order of Foresters and Southowram stocks


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Pack Horse, Todmorden
Established in a house at Whirlaw.

In 1765, the licence was transferred to the Bay Horse Inn, Cross Stone

Pack Horse, Wadsworth
Aka The Ridge, Wadsworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Pack Horse, Widdop
Colne Road.

Originally called The Ridge.

It claims to be the highest and most isolated pub in the Upper Calder Valley.

In January 2004, the pub won the National Civic Pride gold standard award, as the most scenic pub in Britain, beating 200 other pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Park Hotel Beerhouse, Halifax
West Parade. Recorded in 1869 and 1877.

See Joseph Baxendale

Parker's Hotel, Brighouse
Bradford Road. Recorded in 1922.

See Parker's Café, Brighouse

Patmos, Todmorden
Burnley Road.

The pub closed and the licence was transferred to the Black Swan, Todmorden [1790s].

It was demolished by John Buckley in 18?? to build a weaving shed.

Peacock, Halifax
2 Union Street / 42 Market Street / Albion Street. This was originally a beer house. It was granted a licence in 1835.

The pub was demolished after 1894.

A new pub opened in 1898 as a part of the south-east corner of Halifax Borough Market.

The pub closed in 1961.

The premises were subsequently occupied by The Daily Tailors [the fitting room and work room signs can still be seen on the windows], Bradley's Record Shop, and a jeweller's shop


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Peacock Hotel, Warley
46 Windle Royd Lane, Cote Hill.

The front of the building was altered in 1954.

In November 2011, there were reports of the pub being converted into a wine bar and beauty salon.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Peacock, Todmorden
York Street.

This was originally a beer house. It was one of a number of cottages owned by John Suthers, and was subsequently run by the Suthers family and others.

On 24th November 1897, the pub was sold at auction to Messrs Greenwood Brothers of Bradford for £2,750.

In February 1908, compensation was paid to the pub under the terms of the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Pear Inn, Sowerby Bridge
22 Sowerby Street.

Aka Pear Tree.

This was originally a beer house.

Branwell Brontë stayed here with the Bates family when he was working at Sowerby Bridge railway station.

In 1886, The Pear Inn, Sowerby Bridge was tied to Stocks & Company, Northowram. It was a Stocks pub [1898].

The pub closed in 1927 when the Bogden area was cleared.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Pear Tree, Norwood Green


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: George Booth

 

Peat Pitts, Bradshaw
Keighley Road. Recorded in 1789.

In 1895, the pub is recorded as The Peach Pitts Inn.

It was a Whitaker pub [1923].

In 1984, it became a free house.

It became the Moorlands, Halifax.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Peeping Tom, Cornholme
550 Burnley Road / Knotts Grove, Lydgate. This was originally a beer house. Built in the 1840s by Thomas Crossley.

See Peeping Tom of Coventry, Todmorden and Staff of Life, Cornholme


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Peeping Tom of Coventry, Todmorden
A beerhouse.

It was kept by Thomas Crossley.

Around 1840, Crossley built a house nearby which he called the Peeping Tom.

The original pub was renamed the Staff of Life

Pig's Eye, Halifax
Copper Street. Opened in 1838.

The pub closed in 1920

Pigeons
See Old Three Pigeons and Three Pigeons

Pine Apple, Halifax
2 New Bank / Charlestown Road.

Built by William Baxter. The pub opened in 1772, and was originally the New North Bridge Inn – named for the newly-built North Bridge. Baxter changed its name to Pine Apple in 1779.

The name was usually written as 2 words, Pine Apple, rather than Pineapple.

It was famous for its 6 Venetian windows which looked onto North Bridge.

The pub was bought by Brear & Brown [1897].

The pub closed in 1903.

It reopened in 19??.

It was a Whitaker pub [1926].

The pub finally closed in 1968 and was demolished for the Burdock Way development.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Newton


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Pineberry Tavern, Halifax
Aka The Pineberry Hill Tavern. 34 Pineberry Hill / Southowram Bank. This was originally a beer house.

On 3rd March 1924, this was one of 3 public houses which were referred for compensation at Halifax Brewster Sessions. The others were the Delver Arms, Boothtown and Bay Horse, Pleasant View. The pub closed in 1925 and was demolished


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1851: Jeremiah Jennings
  • 1871: Catherine Burke
  • 1881: Catherine Burke – [1843-1892] / [1835-1892]
  • 1891: Frank Shaw – coal merchant
  • 1894: Walter Haigh
  • 1896: Thomas Kelly
  • 1897: John Young
  • 1901: Sarah Haigh
  • 1905: Sarah Casson

 

Pitchers, Halifax
George Street

Plummet Line, Halifax
19 Bull Green / 15 Bull Close Lane. The original pub was built in 1???.

In 1897, Bull Close Lane was redeveloped and the pub was rebuilt. The old pub could not be demolished, because it is said that there

must always be a Plummet Line on the site

so there were 2 pubs for a time until the new one opened in 1898.

In the 1960s, a folk music club – known as the Grass Roots – met in an upper room at the pub. Mike Harding frequently appeared at the club


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Portman & Pickles, Halifax
Market Street. The pub was previously known as the Wheatsheaf and the William Deighton.

In 199?, it was renamed in memory of Eric Portman and Wilfred Pickles.

On 1st June 2012, it was renamed The Jubilee to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of Elizabeth II.

Poultry Dealers Arms, Stansfield
Kitson View, Kitson Wood Road, Lydgate. Aka The Poults.

It was a Grove pub, then later it was a Whitaker pub [1905].

It is now a private house.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Grove Brewery, Brearley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1869: Mrs Pickles
  • 1881: Crossley Pickles
  • 1900: Mrs Pickles
  • 1905: Betty Pickles

 

Prescott Arms, Halifax
13/14 Gaol Lane. This was originally a beer house. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: Gaetano Rocca
  • 1894: Susannah Wadsworth
  • 1905: Mrs S. Wadsworth

 

Pressers' Arms, Elland
82 Huddersfield Road, South Lane / 2 South Lane


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Pressers' Arms, Halifax
Top of Shaw Hill. Recorded in May 1865, when James Flannigan tendered a bad 5/- piece

Prince Albert Beerhouse, Brighouse
It is not always clear which hostelry is referred to in the newspaper reports where these individuals are mentioned. It could be a distinct beerhouse, or one of

See William Nicholl


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince Albert, Brighouse
Waring Green.

The pub closed for a time in 2001

Prince Albert, Brighouse
59 Commercial Street / Zingo Nick.

It was here that one of the Irish Riots began in May 1882. The mob marched to St Joseph's Catholic Church, which they were intent on attacking and burning down. The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince Albert Hotel, Brighouse
5 New Street. The pub closed in 2001


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince of Blucher, Halifax
20 Church Street. Opened in 1785.

If the pub was named for Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, the Prussian general who fought with the Duke of Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo, it must have had a different name between 1785 and 1815.


Question: Does anyone know the earlier name for the pub?

 

During the window-breaking riots of 7th January 1835, the Pub was broken open by the mob, furniture was thrown into the street, windows were broken, and the taps of the spirit casks were opened, letting all the liquor run to waste. The Jury awarded George Metcalfe damages of £133.

The pub closed in 1927 After the explosion at Lilly Lane Mill, the bodies of the dead were carried to the Inn.

See Blücher Passage, Halifax and Blücher Yard, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince of Orange, Ripponden
Formerly The Stansfeld Arms, it was known as the Prince of Orange [1819].

In Crabtree's Tour of Calder Dale of 1832, he writes that when he told the host at the inn that he intended to call the inhabitants of Ripponden together to assess their feelings towards the Ten Hours Bill

[the host] gave us no encouragement and seemed to dread us as he would incendiaries, and it was with difficulty that we got consent for a bed there

and the landlady – whose disposition was soured towards Crabtree's party – said that

she durst not let us have a meeting there, for fear the chamber should fall in [on account of the number of people in the upper room]

It was later found that the house belonged to a mill ownerJohn Holroyd.

It eventually became the Queen Hotel


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: John Beesley
  • 1829: John Beesley
  • 1834: John Beesley

 

Prince of Orange, Shelf
Carr House Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince of Wales, Boothtown
1 Wood Street North / Mill Lane. Opened in 1899. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1968


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Albert Slater

 

Prince of Wales, Boothtown
71 Haley Hill. Opened in 1875. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1913.

It was a Stocks pub [until 1914].

See Mount Tavern, Boothtown


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince of Wales, Brighouse
34 Bethel Street.

The pub was bought by Websters from William Harrison on 17th June 1880.

In 1907 and 1919, local magistrates attempted to close the pub.

The pub was a bottle-neck for traffic going from Bethel Street into Briggate. In 1924, the original Tap & Spile pub was demolished and the front realigned. The brewery receive £750 compensation for the work.

It was rebuilt in 1926 using materials taken from the 19th century wooden battleship HMS Donegal, whence the pub was popularly known as The Battleship.

The new pub opened on 1st April 1927

Work on the front of the pub was done by Harry Percy Jackson who carved a set of four brackets in the form of owls representing the Wisdom of the Wise [a business man!], the Fool [a jester], Wine [Bacchus], and Women.

In 200?, the crew working on the TV series about Britain's hardest pubs refused to work there.

In 2006, there was a proposal to convert the building into offices.

In 2007, it reopened as a pub, The Old Ship Inn.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince of Wales Feathers, Halifax
5 Cow Green.

The pub closed in 1920


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince of Wales Feathers, Halifax
109 King Cross / 263 King Cross Road [1936].

Now known as The Feathers.

This was originally a beer house.

The Prescott Fountain stood outside the pub from 1898 until 1932.

It was a Stocks pub.

The pub was rebuilt in the 1920s. The new buildings was designed by Scott & Bagnall.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince of Wales, Halifax
96 Gibbet Street / Rhodes Street. Built around 1863.

It was a Whitaker pub. It was one of their earliest purpose-built pubs.

It was refurbished in 1946.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince of Wales, Salterhebble
33 Salterhebble Hill. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1897.

The pub closed 16th February 1962.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Samuel Crowther – [aged 27] – stoker in foundry.
  • 1894: Samuel Crowther
  • 1905: Mark Wilkinson
  • 1911: Mark Wilkinson
  • 1916: Mark Wilkinson
  • 1916: Ernest Bates
  • 1926: Ernest Bates
  • 1926: William Arthur Pratt
  • 1928: William Arthur Pratt
  • 1928: Albert Stott
  • 1932: Albert Stott
  • 1931: Walter Bloomer Spencer
  • 1932: Walter Bloomer Spencer
  • 1932: Harry Stead
  • 1934: Harry Stead
  • 1934: Jonathan Harry Whitworth
  • 1935: Jonathan Harry Whitworth
  • 1936: Jonathan H. Whitworth
  • 1935: Frederick Sheard
  • 1948: Fred Sheard
  • 1951: Frederick Sheard
  • 1951: James McHale
  • 1953: James McHale
  • 1953: Edward Etherington
  • 1955: Edward Etherington
  • 1955: Bernard Francis Riley
  • 1957: Bernard Francis Riley
  • 1957: William Watson
  • 1960: William Watson
  • 1960: Raymond Eastman
  • 1962: Raymond Eastman

 

Prince of Wales, West Vale
20/22 Stainland Road.

Recorded in August 1869.

Opened in 1919 [?].

Number 20 was (possibly) a shop.

It was owned by Bentley & Shaw of Lockwood [1926].

It was taken over by Bass Charrington [19??].

The pub closed on 31st December 1937.

The pub, and the small shop attached to it, were converted into private houses


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prince William, Ripponden
Previously the Prince of Orange, it was known as The Prince William Inn [1825], and eventually the Queen Hotel

Prospect, Halifax
Range Bank / 1 Cowroyd Place / Prospect Street, Claremount.

In 1795, this was a part of the Sour Milk Hall estate.

This was originally a beer house - (possibly) called the Hare & Hounds [1839]

It was a Fielding pub.

The pub is still in existence although the surrounding terraces of houses have long since gone, and have now been replaced – by a new development of terraces of houses.

It is now called the New Prospect Inn.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Prospect, Sowerby Bridge
1 Wakefield Road.

This is the distinctive flat-iron building at the junction of Wakefield Road and Bolton Brow.

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1885], then later it was a Ramsden pub [1928, 1947].

The pub closed in 19??.

The building is now [2008] a veterinary centre.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Publicans of local pubs

Pubs to houses

Puff Inn, Rastrick
New Hey Road. This name was given to the pub in protest against the ban in smoking in pubs imposed in July 2007.

The pub was later renamed The New Spitfire

Pump Room, Halifax
New Road.

Formerly called the Druid's Arms

In April 2014, the pub was boarded up in preparation for demolition and redevelopment of the site

Punch Bowl, Bailiff Bridge
Recorded in 1813 as The Bailiff Bridge Inn.

It has been shown as in Wike [1861] and in Wyke [1861].

The Bailiff Bridge fountain used to stand immediately in front of the pub.

In 1837, floods damaged ale at the pub.

The estate was owned by Sir Matthew Wilson of Gargrave.

On 26th July 1861, the estate was bought by Sir H. W. Ripley.

The property was sold to Richard Whitaker & Sons Limited.

The pub closed and became the offices for a pest control company [2011].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Punch Bowl, Boothtown
Ploughcroft / Booth Bank. The name appears in the 1841 census

The pub closed in 1957


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Punch Bowl, Cottonstones

Punch Bowl, Salterhebble
Exley Bank / Huddersfield Road.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Punch Bowl, Savile Green


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Puzzle Hall, Sowerby Bridge
21 Hollins Mill Lane. Early 18th century house.

It became a pub in the late 18th century.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See Puzzle Hall Brewery


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 


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© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 19:02 on 29th August 2017 / p200_p / 66