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Nag's Head, Ainley Top
A coaching inn


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Nag's Head, Halifax
68 King Cross Street.

Stood immediately below Hopwood Hall on the site of an earlier building called Hill Top House.

During repair work on a chimney in July 1867, an orange banner with a blue border was discovered concealed in a hole. This was dated 1688 and bore a picture of the Protestant King William III on horseback with the mottoes

Deliver from Church and State

and

To the glorious memory of 1688 and 1690

In the corners were smaller devices, and on each side were written the names of the places where the English were victorious, including the Boyne, Anglicum, Deny and Enniskillen.

The pub was rebuilt in 1845.

It was demolished in 1884.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Nag's Head, Halifax
Mytholme, Shibden.


Question: Is this the same place as the Lister's Arms and/or the Stag's Head, Shibden?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Nag's Head, Shelf
Carr House Road. The Inn was probably where the Revive Café now [2008] stands. It is known that there was an inn here on account of the beer casks in the cellar


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Navigation, Gauxholme
Built around 1769 by Robert Hardman, it was originally called the Hare & Hounds, Gauxholme.

In the mid-19th century, the landlord, Luke Dewhirst, gave an annual treat to

the aged men in Todmorden and neighbourhood

The building is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Navigation, Salterhebble
Waterside / Bottom of Salterhebble Hill. This was originally a beer house. It was demolished in 1901.

A petrol station now stands on the site.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: James Richardson
  • 1834: James Richardson
  • 1837: James Richardson
  • 1845: James Richardson
  • 1881: Harriet Cryer – [aged 41]
  • 1894: Joseph Stead
  • 1901: Fred Whitaker

 

Navigation, Sowerby Bridge
Chain Lane / Chapel Lane.

There was a mill here in 1300.

There was a house here in 1521.

In the 17th century, it was owned by the Waterhouse family.

The present building is early 17th century.

A fireplace is dated IMW 1722 for John and Mary Wainhouse.

In the late 18th century, it was converted into cottages for a time.

Planning applications show that this was a Halifax Brewery Company pub.

At one time, it was known as The Link because of a chain bar across the canal here.

It was a Ramsden pub [1903, 1944].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Nelson's Arms, Halifax
See Lord Nelson, Halifax

Admiral Nelson, Halifax
See Lord Nelson, Halifax

Neptune, Brighouse
Brookfoot Hill. Opened in 1822.

It was a part of the Freeman's estate.

Planning applications show that this was a Ramsden pub [January 1904].

The pub closed on 30th December 1930.

The building stands at the junction of the first short section of the hill from Brookfoot.

The building was used as a mortuary for a time.

It is now private housing.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Neptune, Hebden Bridge
Early 19th century pub at Hebble End Basin.

One of a number of pubs which provided facilities for the workers on the Rochdale Canal.

In the 19th century, the bargees working on the Rochdale Canal sang a song of which the first verse was


It's a long haul up from Brighouse and a longer one ahead.
We have to get our strength back and the horse has to be fed.
He just can't face the tunnel without a bite to eat.
So we'll tie up at the Neptune and we'll let him rest his feet

Planning applications show that this was a Whitaker pub [February 1923].

The pub closed in the 1970s. It is now 2 private dwellings: Numbers 1 & 2 Hebble End.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See Female Sisterly Society and Neptune Bridge, Hebden Bridge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Nest, Elland

New Bank Tavern, Halifax
Recorded in 1868.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence

New Coffee Tavern, Todmorden
Aka the Fielden Temperance Hotel & Coffee Tavern

New Delight, Boothtown
Boothtown Road / Ploughcroft


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Delight, Colden
Jack Bridge, Burnley Road. Formerly known as the Sportsman.

It is known locally as The Newdy

New Delight, Triangle
Mill Bank.

The pub closed in 1932 and was converted into 2 cottages by Websters.

The Greenwood family ran the pub for at least 72 years: 1851-1923


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Delight, Wainstalls
Withens Road / Cold Edge Road / Warley.

Aka the Oddfellows Arms [1845, 1860].

In 1987, the name was changed to the Delvers.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: John Barker – when it was listed as the Oddfellows Arms
  • 1851: John Barker
  • 1861: Sampson Sunderland – who was also a stone merchant
  • 1871: David Barker
  • 1874: John Wilson
  • 1875: John Wilson
  • 1881: Harry Skelton
  • 1887: John Shackleton
  • 1905: Arthur Howarth
  • 1905: Richard Hardacre
  • 1917: David Wade

 

New Dolphin, Ambler Thorn

See Old Dolphin, Queensbury


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1864: Thomas Firth
  • 1887: William Hainsworth
  • 1905: William Spencer
  • 1917: H. Thackray

 

New Dolphin, Northowram
Ford


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Peter Wharton
  • 1845: Joseph Pollard

 

New Dumb Mill, Hipperholme

On 13th February 1858, the Halifax Guardian announced


TO BE LET and may be entered upon immediately NEW DUMB MILL INN at Hipperholme situated about 3 minutes walk from the Railway Station, &c. There is a good supply of water and well adapted for brewing.

Apply: Jackson & Casson, Surveyors, 17 George Street, Halifax

 

The pub closed in 1946

See Dumb Mill, Hipperholme and Old Dumb Mill, Hipperholme


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: William Schofield
  • 1857: James Lister
  • 1858: Thomas Helliwell

 

New Inn, Boothtown
117 Boothtown Road. Opened in 18??.

It was a Webster pub [1877].

The pub closed in 2006.

In December 2007, a proposal was approved to convert the building into shops and flats. In May 2008, a proposal was made to convert it into 2 houses. It was converted into retail premises [November 2008].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Brighouse
137 Bradford Road / Thornhill Briggs.

This was one of the first inns to operate under the terms of the Beerhouse Act [1830].

The Brighouse Lark Singing Association held their meetings here.

The pub became the Beck, Brighouse [2013]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Caddy Field
9 Calder Street / Coal Street. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: James Scott

 

New Inn, Elland
Stood on the left as you ascend Briggate from Elland Bridge. Opened in 1834.

The pub closed on 29th April 1957.

The pub has been converted into flats.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829?: Thomas Casson
  • 1834: Thomas Chambers
  • 1845: Elizabeth Hanson
  • 1861: Mrs Mary Rookes
  • 1874: John Beaumont
  • 1887: George Jackson
  • 1891: James Robinson Exley
  • 1894: James Greenwood
  • 1901: Abraham Lumb
  • 1905: Jonathan T. Hall
  • 1917: Mrs Lavinia Hardy

 

New Inn, Halifax
Waterhouse Street


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: Riley Kitson
  • 1837: Riley Kitson
  • 1845: Joseph Simpson
  • 1864: Michael John Holroyd

 

New Inn, Halifax
Holdsworth Street, Lower Shaw Hill. In 1888, this and the Shears Inn, Paris Gates were sold by Clement Holdsworth.

The pub closed in 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Halifax
17 Gibbet Street. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1869.

The pub closed in 1946


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Halifax
11 Lee Bridge. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1872.

The pub closed in 1946


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Hartshead


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: William Hutchinson

 

New Inn, Holme

Opened in the 1820s.

Stood near Holme Meadow, Todmorden.

It became the Hare & Hounds, Stansfield.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two

New Inn, Mount Tabor
22 Heath Hill / Moor End Road.

It was a Spring Head Brewery pub. It is said that there was an underground passage leading to the Brewery.

The pub closed in 1932.

It (possibly) reopened in 19??.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Outlane

New Inn, Ovenden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: John Aspinall
  • 1853: Mary Aspinall

 

New Inn, Queensbury
The pub closed in 1909 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Ripponden
Baitings / Rochdale Road. Built around 1750 for the turnpike – see Blue Ball, Soyland.

There is a sundial dated 1764 and an inscription:


   G
J F Ab hoc Momento pendet Æternitas Latitude – 53, 45 J764 Eternity hangs on this moment

In 2002, the pub closed and the building was converted back into private dwellings.

See Daniel Holroyd and George Kershaw


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: James Travis
  • 1905: Charles Wood
  • 1975: the Diffin family
  • 2000: Helen Diffin

 

New Inn, Skircoat Green
6-8 Skircoat Green. This was originally a beer house In 1939, the licence was transferred here from the Murgatroyd's Arms, Luddenden and the name changed to the Murgatroyd Arms, Skircoat Green


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Sowerby Bridge
1 West Street.

Planning applications show that this was owned by Boardman's United Breweries of Bradford [October 1901].

In 19??, the name was changed to The Long Chimney.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See New Inn Smoke Club, Sowerby Bridge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Sowood
New Hey Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1941: Emily Jane Hewitt
  • 1942: Robert Hubron

 

New Inn, Soyland
Blackstone Edge.

In 1839, a coach stopped here as it was carrying members of a gang of highway robbers – who had been arrested in Burnley – back to Halifax where they were charged with the assault on Robert Crossley & Thomas Cockcroft. Some of the gang escaped, but they were quickly recaptured.

The Inn had 13 rooms [1911].

It was converted into private dwellings in 2000

See Robert Crossley and New Inn Workmen's Hostel


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Stainland
Forest Hill Road

New Inn, Todmorden
Holme. Opened in 1728

New Inn, Todmorden
Opened in 1728.

It was a farm owned by John and Tamar Fielden of Todmorden Hall. John gave the inn and farm to his nephew, Samuel Fielden of Bottomley. Samuel installed his son, Samuel, as tenant and sold the inn to John Greenwood of Langfield for the sum of £460 at the end of the 18th century.

The pub later became the White Hart


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Jesse Horsfall

 

New Inn, Todmorden
Roomfield Lane, Langfield / Halifax Road.

Established as a beerhouse in the 1840s.

In 1961, it obtained a full licence. It was popular with the audiences at the Hippodrome which was situated across the way.

On Friday, 13th October 1972, the building collapsed and had to be demolished. A car park occupies the site


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Inn, Warley
Opened in 1869

New North Bridge, Halifax
The original name of the Pine Apple, Halifax.

See North Bridge Tavern, Halifax

New Pack Horse, Clifton
Highmoor Lane, Clifton. There were 2 such Inns: The Old Pack Horse, and The New Pack Horse. It is said that the New was older than the Old


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: George Schorah

 

New Queen's Head, Northowram


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: William Lassey

 

New Ring O' Bells, Boothtown
38 Haley Hill. This was originally a beer house. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1913.

It was a Stocks pub [until 1914]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1864: Richard Booth
  • 1896: James Heap
  • 1897: Fred Royles
  • 1897: Dean Swift
  • 1905: Joe Ingham

 

New Road Hotel, Boothtown
St Mark's Street. This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Mrs Janet Wilson

 

New Road Inn, Southowram
Aka New Road Hotel [1891].

66 Blaithroyd Lane / Southowram Bank. Opened in 1869.

The pub closed in 1949.

See Titus Lightowler


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: Joseph Lightowler
  • 1881: James Crabtree – [aged 36]
  • 1891: John W. Green – who also had a grocer's shop here
  • 1905: Mary Ann Fawcett
  • 1936: George H. Metcalf

 

New Road Tavern, Halifax
15 St Mark Street / 25/26 New Road. This was originally a beer house.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

In 1891, it is listed as New Road Hotel, 15 St Mark Street, Northowram.

The pub closed in 1926


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Rock, Barkisland
Recorded in 1911 as the Brick Green Inn.

Later known as the Hard End.

Closed in 200?.

It has been converted into 2 dwellings


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Shop, Sowerby


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1839: James Heaps

 

New Spitfire, Rastrick
New Hey Road.

In late 2008, the Puff Inn, Rastrick became the New Spitfire

New Street Hotel, Pellon
3 Sutcliffe Street.

It was a Webster pub.

See Halifax Lark Singing Association


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Talbot, Halifax
Woolshops. The licence from The Woolpack was transferred to this new pub which stood on the site of the former Talbot Inn.

The new building was designed by Jackson & Fox. It opened on 22nd October 1926.

The pub closed in 1974. It was demolished in 1979 as a part of the redevelopment of Woolshops

This is discussed in the book Sketches of Old Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

New Tavern, Brighouse
Later known as the Barge, Brighouse

Newlands, Rastrick


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1840: Abraham Horsfall
  • 1845: William Shaw

 

Nicholl's Temperance Hotel, Halifax
Around 1847, Mr Nicholl kept the Temperance Hotel, Broad Street, Halifax. It was a popular meeting place for Chartists and the National Land Company.

See Broad Street Temperance Hotels and Halifax Co-operative Trading Society

Noah's Ark, Elland
115 Lower Edge.

The pub closed on 14th February 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1901: Israel Farrar
  • 1902: James Wood
  • 1903: J. B. Shilitoe
  • 1905: Richard Smith

 

Noah's Ark, Ovenden
322-326 Ovenden Road. This was originally a beer house and said to be the last one to be opened in Halifax.

It later became a coaching inn.

It was a Webster pub [1860].

In 1999, it closed as a pub.

In 2000, it opened as a charity-run community Café and counselling centre.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

North Bridge Tavern, Halifax
84 Northgate.

See New North Bridge, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: Charles Whyment

 

North Ward Tavern, Claremount
11 Range Bank, Halifax / Horsfall's Yard. This was originally a beer house.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1915


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Northfield, Barkisland
Saddleworth Road.

Aka North Fields, North Field Inn


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Northgate Hotel, Halifax
Northgate.

Originally Northgate House

At the time, it was said to be

too far out of the town to succeed

Northgate Hall was built next-door as the Saloon for the hotel.

An advertisement in The Leeds Mercury of 22nd July 1837 announced


FAMILY HOTEL – TO BE LET

Recently erected and fitted up as an eligible and extensive FAMILY and COMMERCIAL HOTEL, conveniently situated in the populous and increasing town of Halifax, in the West Riding of the County of York.

The Hotel contains 50 Bed Rooms, several good private Sitting Rooms, good Kitchens, Larders, Cellars, &c, a Bath Room, with all other suitable Offices and Conveniences, a Coach Office, Tap Room, Stabling for 60 Horses, Close Coach Houses for 8 Carriages, open Sheds for Coaches &c, with extensive Granaries and Hay Chambers, a good Kitchen Court, and 2 Stables Courts &c &c.

One wing of the Hotel forms a handsome PUBLIC ROOM, capable of Dining 200 persons, and which may be conveniently used as a COFFEE ROOM, or NEWS ROOM. The Building has a handsome Stone Front, and is the only eligible Family Hotel in Halifax

 

In 1852, the licence was withdrawn

as a punishment for the keeper of a disorderly house

In 1856, Dr John Lister sold the hotel to George Watkinson and Mr T Parker.

In the 1940s, the property was acquired by Samuel Webster & Sons Limited.

The buildings were demolished in 1961 when the area was redeveloped.

When excavations were taking place for the Broad Street Complex [2010], the remains of the basement casino were discovered.

See Jonathan Akroyd and Northgate Hall, Halifax

At the time, it was said to be


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Northgate Tap, Halifax
Northgate Yard.

The pub closed in 1911 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Northgate Temperance Hotel, Halifax

See Sugden's Temperance Hotel, Halifax and Temperance Hotel, Northgate

Nudger, Hebden Bridge
Charlestown.

Stood next to the Woodman and was incorporated when that was rebuilt in 1902.

Tommy Stansfield was born here


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 18??: Mr Stansfield
  • 1897: George Taylor Stuttard

 

Number 15, Halifax
Bull Green

Nutclough House, Hebden Bridge
Keighley Road.

The pub closed in 2000 [?]. The pub is now private housing

Nutclough Tavern, Hebden Bridge
8 Keighley Road.

Built around 1820.

Planning applications show that this was a Ramsden pub [August 1902].

The pub closed in 2000 [?]. The pub has been converted into private housing


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: James Greenwood

 


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


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© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 11:18 on 26th September 2017 / p200_n / 70