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Gaol Inn, Halifax
A popular name for the Duke of Leeds' Arms because, from 1662, the debtors' jail was next to the pub, and the landlord was also the gaoler

Garden Plough Beerhouse, Elland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Gardeners' Arms, Elland
New Street Opened in 18??

The pub closed in 19??

Gardeners' Arms, Stainland
High Street. The pub closed in 19??. It is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Gardeners', Illingworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: Ellis Hodgson

 

Garibaldi Tavern, Stone Chair
Opened in 1868.

It was a Fielding pub

The pub closed in 1913

Garrick's Head, Halifax
Cow Green.

Recorded in the 1871 census, when Joshua Wilson was licensee and the census showed it as between Copper Street and Hanson's Passage.


Question: Does anyone know anything more about the Pub?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Gas House Inn, Halifax
Bank Bottom. This is one of the beerhouses at Bank Bottom, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: Joseph Jubb

 

Gatsby Wine Bar, Elland
Northgate.

When the former Elland branch of the Halifax & Huddersfield Union Banking Company moved to Britannia House in 1895, the building became successively Lloyds Bank, the Caddyshack bar and restaurant and the Gatsby Wine Bar [2013]

General Havelock, Halifax
Recorded in 1873, when it was a Stocks pub

General Rawdon, Luddendenfoot
Burnley Road.

It was built to replace the Red Lion, Luddendenfoot which had been demolished in 1879.

It was named for Major General E. A. G Rawdon / General Rawdon.

An advertisement for the business in 1888 included the verse

The "GENERAL'S" a very particular Inn,
Whatever is wanted – enquire within,
And, if it be not very much out of the way,
You'll be certain to got it, at moderate pay.

The "GENERAL'S" a general who cares for his men,
And treats 'em so, that they'll look at him again;
This you may be sure, is the very best way,
To get them to visit him day after day

The Luddendenfoot Local Board met here.

It is now the Coach & Horses.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Grove Brewery, Brearley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

George & Dragon, Elland
Or St George & the Dragon.

Castlegate, Huddersfield Road

Built by Thomas Casson on land known as Sheep Croft.

The licence was transferred here from the Bird in Hand.

The pub was owned by Joseph Carter who sold it to Whitaker's in 1896.

Later, the pub was known as the Old Bailey.

It was up for sale [2011].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

George, Brighouse
Stands on the corner of the junction of Bradford Road and Commercial Street.

Built in 1815 by Dr Day.

There was a brewery behind the pub. In 1890, buildings were added at the rear.

It was used as the Coroner's Court and also by Brighouse Cycling Club and Brighouse Football Club.

It had its own brewery

In 1904, the new tram terminus for the service from Halifax – Route Number 3 – was here.

On 5th April 1933, a test case in the High Court was brought by the Performing Rights Society against the Hotel. The hotel was banned from

allowing the public performance (by radio) of any musical work

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

George III, Queensbury
Chapel Street, Queensbury


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1917: Irving Cockroft

 

George IV, Halifax
8 Woolshops. Opened in 1830.

The pub closed in 1909 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: James Hiley

 

George, Mill Bank
42 Lower Mill Bank Road.

This and Minstrel Cottage were probably a single mid 18th century house

See Joseph Carter

George, Rastrick
The records mention several pubs with this name – the Upper George, Rastrick [aka The George] and the Lower George, Rastrick

George, Rastrick

George, Rochdale Road

Gibbet Tavern, Halifax
28 Gibbet Street. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1909 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Samuel Longbottom
  • 1905: Dyson Jackson

 

Gibson's, Halifax
Haley Hill.

Recorded in 1868.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, Gibson's (Haley Hill) applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence

Glen View, Todmorden
Burnley Road, Portsmouth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Globe, Halifax
7 Cow Green / 6 / 44 Silver Street. Opened in 1788.

It was demolished in 1878-1879. The Halifax Equitable Benefit Building Society Offices were built on the site

This is discussed in the books the collection of Prints by J. R. Smith and Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Globe Hotel, Halifax
3 North Bridge Street / Northgate. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1897.

It was a Brear & Brown pub. In 1916, it was bought by Whitaker's.

The pub was used by artistes appearing at the Grand Theatre which stood opposite the pub. Trade was affected by the theatre's closing in 1956.

The pub closed in April 1958.

It was demolished in 19?? for the redevelopment of Northgate.

The Hotel is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Globe, Rastrick
66/68 Rastrick Common. The building was originally 3 houses.

The pub is said to be haunted by poltergeist activity and the ghost of Albert Marshall who hanged himself


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Globe, Stainland
Outlane


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Globe Vaults, Halifax
Copper Street. Opened in 1838.

The pub closed in 1920

Golden Ball, Halifax
6 Jemmy Lane, Bowling Dyke, North Bridge

See Blue Ball


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1837: George Greenwood
  • 1845: George Greenwood

 

Golden Balls, Clifton
An Inn is recorded near the Armytage Arms. Opened in 1???. It is said that 3 golden balls hung as a sign outside the Inn.

The pub closed in 19??

Golden Eagle, Halifax
6 Woolshops.

On December 19th 1852, Bell's London Life & Sporting Chronicle announced a knur & spell match with stakes to be sent to the Golden Eagle.

On 8th January 1854, Henry Greenwood of Northowram challenged John Brown of Ovenden and Jubel Settle of Brighouse to a pigeon-shooting match on Skircoat Moor. Stakes were to be given at the Golden Eagle


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Golden Fleece, Blackley
Or The Fleece Inn.

Recorded in the 16th century, when it was a farm. It is the oldest building in the village.

In 1898, a one-roomed cottage was incorporated into the pub.

It was an Ainley pub.

In 1957, Webster's acquired the brewery and the pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Golden Fleece, Boothtown
14 Haley Hill. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904] It was a Stocks pub [until 1914]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Golden Fleece, Bradshaw
It was owned by Daniel Fielding's, and passed to Samuel Webster's in June 1961


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1837: J. Holmes
  • 1845: Elkanah Turner
  • 1854: Henry G. Spencer
  • 1861: Henry Spencer
  • 1866: Joseph Atkinson
  • 1881: John Birch
  • 1887: Joseph Town
  • 1891: Joseph Town
  • 1901: William Dean
  • 1905: Jonas Shackleton
  • 1917: Samuel Shackleton

 

Golden Fleece, Elland

See Fleece, Elland

Golden Fleece, Greetland

See Fleece, Greetland

Golden Fleece, Sowerby
Originally, this was Quickstavers. It was a pub until 1822.

The pub was said to have had an illicit whisky still.

In the early 19th century, Titus Spencer lived here

Golden Lion, Halifax
Aka Ye Golden Lion. 20-22 / 16 Cheapside. The building dates possibly to the 17th century. The pub has been there since the 18th century.

In 1981, it became The Brass Cat.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Elizabeth Newby
  • 1829: Elizabeth Newby
  • 1830: Elizabeth Newby
  • 1834: Elizabeth Newby
  • 1837: Thomas Crossland
  • 1845: Joseph Ibberson
  • 1864: Joseph Ibberson
  • 1871: David Morton – [aged 26]
  • 1874: David Morton
  • 1887: David Morton
  • 1894: Josiah Ganson
  • 1905: John Jagger
  • 1911: Mrs Lily Jagger
  • 1917: Joseph E. Farrar
  • 1936: Andrew K. Fillan

 

Golden Lion, Highroad Well
Warley Road / 515 Gibbet Street / 515 Highroad Well Lane. Opened in 1834.

The pub closed in 1887. It was demolished in 1901.

A new pub with the same name was built on almost the same site [1902].

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1837: Joseph Gledhill
  • 1845: Samuel Heavysedge
  • 1850: William Gledhill
  • 1864: James Pickles
  • 1871: Elizabeth Pickles – [aged 69]
  • 1874: Elizabeth Pickles
  • 1881: Wilson Gaukroger – [aged 36]
  • 1887: Richard Mullinson
  • 1891: James Horsfall – [aged 31]
  • 1894: James Horsfall
  • 1905: Fred Walton
  • 1908: Fred Walton
  • 1917: Fred Horsfall
  • 1936: Edward Henry Hamer

 

Golden Lion, Luddendenfoot


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1835: Mr Senior

 

Golden Lion, Rastrick


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: Abraham Horsfall

 

Golden Lion, Ripponden
Halifax Road. Built in 1754. It was originally Spout Farm. Owned by Sam Hill.

Jeremiah Normanton sold the pub to Ainley brewers of Huddersfield.

It became The Milestone.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Our Home & Country.

See Ripponden Cattle Market, Ripponden Post Office and Ripponden Reading Room


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Golden Lion, Todmorden
Fielden Square. It was a coaching inn, built around 1770, with later additions.

The Todmorden Book Club met here.

Todmorden's first Post Office was here.

In the 19th century, much local public business – such as meetings and inquests - was conducted at the pub.

David Cawthorne and John Crossley were amongst those who supported the Manchester-Halifax coach service for which the pub was a staging post [1760s].

The proposal to erect Stoodley Pike was first discussed here [1854].

The first meeting of the new company established to build Todmorden Town Hall was held here [1860].

The property was badly damaged by flooding in Summer 2012. It remained closed until major refurbishment was carried out in 2013.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Todmorden Football Club, Todmorden Book Club, Todmorden Prosecution Society and Todmorden Agricultural Society


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Golden Pheasant, Halifax
1 Pellon Lane / Spring Hall Lane.

Recorded in the 16th century.

This was originally a beer house.

The pub was demolished when Pellon Lane was redeveloped in the 1930s.

It was a Truman pub [1930s].

A new building, designed by Watkins & Maddox, was built. It opened on 6th July 1932.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Golden Plough, Elland
Elland Lane / Quebec Street.

In October 1894, licensee Fred Tatterson was declared Bankrupt.

The pub closed in 1907 following the Licensing Act [1904].

It is mentioned again in 1924


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Fred Tatterson
  • 1905: Arthur Sykes

 

Golden Plough, Halifax
23 /24 Cow Green / 32 Silver Street. Opened in 1822.

It was a Knowles pub.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1898.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Goose at the Arcade
A new pub created in 19?? out of the shops at the top of Arcade Royale, Halifax.

Around the end of 2012 the pub was renamed The Duke of Wellington

Goose, Denholme Cutting

Goose Nest, Luddenden Dean
Opened on 1885.

The pub closed in 1905 following the Licensing Act [1904]

Goose, Ogden
Keighley Road / Causeway Foot.

Now the Windmill Court Country House Hotel


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Granby Beerhouse, Brighouse
Recorded in 1869, when Sergeant Beevers was attacked by a group of disorderly Irishmen whom he had asked to disperse

Granby Hotel, Halifax
300 Gibbet Street


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Granby, Luddenden
High Street. Opened in 1909.

The pub closed in 1933.

It is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Granby, Queenshead


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Grand Hotel, Halifax
Wheatley Lane, Lee Mount

Grand Junction Hotel, Halifax
Swine Market / 4 Gibbet Street.

The new name for the New Brown Cow, Halifax when it was sold at auction and re-opened in 1880.

The pub/hotel was used as a meeting place for local architects and builders before the Halifax Buildings Trades Exchange was established.

The black building was a familiar landmark.

It was a Ramsden pub.

The pub closed on 28th January 1968.

It was demolished around 1971 for redevelopment of Broad Street.

The Hotel is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Grand View, Lee Mount
108 Lee Mount Road / Wheatley Lane / Wheatley Road.

In 1922, the Grand View, Lee Mount and the Grand View, Wheatley Lane are listed as 2 separate hostelries.

It was a Webster pub [1877].

Closed in ????.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Grapes, Todmorden
9 Rochdale Road / Church Street. Mentioned in 1769.

The pub closed in the 1960s.

It was demolished in 1969 when the road was redeveloped


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Gray Ox, Hartshead
Or Grey Ox. One of the oldest inns in the district.

See Hartshead Band


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Mrs Sarah Ann Flint

 

Great House, Elland
Formerly Great House Farm and The Fleece

Great Northern Hotel, Halifax
Opened in 1903. This was originally a beer house. The hotel stood at the junction of North Bridge and Range Bank. Named for the Great Northern Railway which served the nearby North Bridge Railway Station.

It was a Brear & Brown pub and later became a Whitaker pub.

The pub closed in 1968 and was demolished for the Burdock Way development.

The Hotel is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Green Dragon, Elland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: James Sheard

 

Green Hill Tavern, Halifax
100 Pellon Lane. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1877.

It was a Whitaker pub.

The pub closed in 1967


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Green Man, Sowerby Bridge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Green Tree, Halifax
This was originally a beer house. Recorded in 1869 in connection with the poisoning of James Halstead

Greenwood, Hebden Bridge
Established in 1980 in what was originally Hebden Bridge Liberal Club.

It was for sale in 2004.

It became the B@R Place

Grey Horse, Holmfield
Perseverance Road, Soil Hill. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1905.

It was a Stocks pub, then later it was a Webster pub.

The pub closed on 28th January 1941.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Arthur Knowles
  • 1936: Charles B. Clarke

 

Grey Stones, Mixenden
Wheatley Road / Crag Lane. Samuel Varley is listed as a farmer at Grey Stones [1861] and as a beer retailer at Grey Stones [1881].

This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Greyhound, Halifax
27 Southgate. Stood at the corner of Albion Street. It was demolished in 1892 when Halifax Borough Market was built


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1864: James Cheetham
  • 1871: Thomas Scarf – [aged 53]
  • 1881: Martin Bowling – [aged 41]
  • 1891: Edward Roberts – [aged 38]

 

Greyhound, Rastrick
76 Crowtrees Lane / Oaks Green.

It was owned by brewers Joseph Shaw of Lindley [1877], then later it was a Whitaker pub [1889].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Greyhound, Todmorden
188 Rochdale Road / Bridge End / Shade / Wadsworth Mill. Built in 1832 by Martin Mitchell.

The Ancient Order of Druids held their meetings here.

The pub closed in 1939


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Greystones, Page Hill
Opened in 1903.

The pub closed in 1938

Griffin, Barkisland
Stainland Road. Dated 1642.

The pub has 3 ghosts

  • An old man who sits by the fire in the tap room
  • An old lady dressed in white who walks around carrying a bunch of keys
  • A cat

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Griffin, Halifax
Thornton Road.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Henry C. Garner

 

Griffin, Halifax
10 / 21 George Street / Barum Top.

It was a Whitaker pub [from 1898].

See Ancient Order of Foresters and West End Glee Union


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Grinning Dog, Todmorden
A popular name for the 18th century White Lion, Bridge End. The name arose because the inn sign was considered to be a poor representation of a lion.

This became known as the Guerning Dog

Grove, Brearley
Burnley Road. In the 1830s, the pub was built as a part of the Grove Brewery, and an archway is inscribed Grove Brewery.

In 1906, brewing was discontinued after the business – and around 13 of their houses – was taken over by Whitaker's. The property was sold.

The brewery was used by Harvey & Company.

The brew-house was used as a biscuit factory.


Question: Does anyone know who ran the biscuit factory?

 

The pub closed in 2008.

It was divided into 3 separate dwellings: Grove House, Grove Cottage, and Oakroyd.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two

See William Pickles


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: William Greenwood – [aged 57] Beer Seller
  • 1905: James Moore
  • 19??: E. & N. Ackroyd
  • 1965: Albert Allcott

 

Grove, Brighouse
Brookfoot / Elland Road.

It was a part of the Freeman's estate.

A newspaper notice in March 1897 announced

Sale by Auction of the Beerhouse known as the Grove Inn, Brookfoot, in the occupation of Joseph Hey

The name was changed to Lakeside Lodge [late 1990s]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Grove, Rastrick
39 Tofts Grove.

Opened in 18??

The pub closed in 2006. There are proposals to convert the pub into a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Guerning Dog, Todmorden
Local pronunciation of Grinning Dog, the popular name for the White Lion, Bridge End.

See Guerning Dog Bridge, Todmorden


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 13:49 on 22nd October 2017 / p200_g / 74