Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Pubs & inns

C



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Caddyshack, Elland
Northgate.

When the former Elland branch of the Halifax & Huddersfield Union Banking Company moved to Britannia House in 1895, the building became successively Lloyds Bank, the Caddyshack bar and restaurant and the Gatsby Wine Bar [2013]

Calder & Hebble, Salterhebble
The inn stood on an island of land – surrounded by 3 roads – near the Salterhebble Branch of the Calder & Hebble Navigation.

The building was demolished in 1997 when the road junction was reconstructed


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Calder Bank, Sowerby Bridge
Occupies the former Yorkshire Penny Bank Building.

In 2008, it was known as The Vine

Calder, Brighouse
Opened in 2008 to supersede the Barracuda in the building which was formerly the Albert Theatre & Opera House

California, Halifax
Brinton Terrace. Opened in 1897.

It was a Whitaker pub.

In 1901, Whitaker's offered to surrender the licences of the Horse & Trumpet and the California in order to be granted a licence for their new West End Hotel

The pub closed on 20th September 2001

Canterbury, Ripponden
Old Bank.

Popularly known as the Old Cant.

It was one of a number of cottages built here in the late 1700s by Richard Jackson.

When nearby Ripponden Railway Station opened in 1878, the pub became the Railway Hotel.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two

Carlton Hotel, Hebden Bridge
Established in 1983 on the 2nd and 3rd floors of the Central Premises of the Hebden Bridge Industrial Co-operative.

It opened on 20th November 1986.

The hotel closed in 2002. It has been converted into private apartments

Carrington's, Halifax
Ward's End. This was originally Holly House. Carrington's opened in 1985

Casa del Lago, Brighouse
Elland Road. In 2001, the Lakeside Lodge was refurbished and renamed. The name was later reduced to Casa.

In 2008, there were proposals to extend the facilities by building extra accommodation and car parking on land across the road from the main building

Castle Hotel, Halifax
122 Hanson Lane.

Opened in 1887 [?].

In 1897, it took over the licence of the Marquis of Granby in Copper Street.

It was a Brear & Brown pub, then later it was a Whitaker pub [1916].

Because of its proximity to the Victoria Cattle Market, the pub had a licence to open at 10:00 am for those attending the market.

In the 1980s, it was known as the Armada.

The pub was known as the Buccaneer when it closed in 2009.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Castle Hotel, Sowerby Bridge
Bridge Street / Broad Street. Opened in 1867.

It was a Ramsden pub.

The pub closed in 1955

See Bogden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Castle, Todmorden
Longfield Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Abraham Ashworth
  • 188?: John William Blacka
  • 1897: John William Blacka
  • 1907: William Tillotson Blacka

 

Cat & Fiddle, Halifax
Cheapside.

Formerly the Brass Cat

Cat Heads, Southowram


Question: Does anyone know exactly where the pub was located, or anything else about it?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: William Naylor

 

T' Cat i' th' Well, Luddenden Dean
Wainstalls Lane, Lower Saltonstall.

Recorded in 1783.

There is a legend relating to the white rock – Cat Rocks – behind the pub which says that ...

the licensee must paint the rock white on a certain day of the year
If he fails to do this, the pub will fail.

The story says that ...

Robin Hood started this custom after he befriended the landlord of the pub on his travels between Nottingham and Carlisle. The landlord had hidden Robin Hood in the pub – some say it was a priest's hole – when the authorities were following him. The landlord's reward was a share in some of Robin's ill-gotten gains. The money was hidden near to the rock, and the only way the landlord could find the money was to paint it yearly so that Robin Hood on his travels could see that the hoard was being looked after, because the stone was newly-painted.
One year, as a joke, the landlord painted the stone pink not believing the legend. There was an uproar in Halifax and the pub went out of business later that year

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Castle Carr, Caty Well Brook, Loyal Travellers Lodge and John Preston


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

T' Cat i' th' Window, Halifax
8/10 Lower Kirkgate.

Stood on the corner of Lower Kirkgate and Berry Lane.

Opened in 1822

A spring in the cellar of the pub – the water of which flowed through the nearby Parish Church graveyard – fed a well used by a community of 800 people in the nearby Berry Lane area.

In 1858, the Inn was referred to as The Cat Inn when Ellen Ellison was found guilty of stealing 2/- from Mr Denton here.

It was a Webster pub [1864, 1866].

On 18th April 1928, the property was sold to Halifax Corporation and the licence was transferred to the Shay Hotel.

The pub closed on 16th July 1928.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Cat Fold, Halifax and Halifax Parish Church Railings


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cattle Market Hotel, Todmorden
North Street


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Frank Halstead

 

Causeway Foot, Ogden
In the 1990s, it was known as The Whole Hog.

It has now reverted back to the Causeway Foot.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cavendish Inn, Ambler Thorn
Opened in 1887.

It was a Stocks pub [1898].

The pub closed on 30th April 1956


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1887: William H. Wright
  • 1894: Job Whiteley
  • 1917: George William Scott

 

Central Commercial Temperance Hotel, Todmorden
York Street / Water Street / Halifax Road. Aka Central Temperance Hotel, Wild's Temperance Hotel.

It was demolished in 1922


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 18??: George Stansfield
  • 18??: George Harding
  • 1896: F. A. E. Stocker
  • 1900: Walter Wild
  • 1905: W. Wild

 

Chapel House, Coley
Formerly the farm Chapel House, Coley.

It became the Malt Shovel, Coley

Chatburn & Jennings, Luddendenfoot
Opened in 1861. It was popularly known as the Bog Trap, the Bug Trap, and the Buck Trap.

On 7th February 1923, the licence was revoked. It closed in 1923.

Public toilets were built on the site.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Chequer, Southowram
Bank Top / Binns Top [?].


Question: Does anyone know exactly where the pub was located, or anything else about it?

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: John Dixon
  • 1829: Thomas Thompson

 

Cherry Tree, Barkisland
Wall Nook.

The pub closed in 19??.

It is now Cherry Tree Cottages


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: Joseph Whiteley

 

Cherry Tree, Elland
New Street Opened in 18??

The pub closed in 19??

Cherry Tree, Halifax
179 Pellon Lane.

The original pub was built in 1???

In 1891, this was replaced by the present larger building.

The pub closed in 19??


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cherry Tree, Stone Chair
Opened in 1882 at Cherry Tree Farm, Stone Chair.

On 11th November 1882, the Inn was sold, together with 4 adjoining cottages and 2 closes of land. It was sold again in December 1882, and in 1886

The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904]

Cherry Tree, Walsden
Bottoms / Allescholes Road, Moverley. This was originally a beer house. The pub was demolished in 18?? and Moverley Cottage was built on the site


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Church Stile, Sowerby
Sowerby New Road/Stocks Lane. Stands opposite St Peter's Church and is named for the Church Stile which led to the Church. It was rebuilt in 1884. This was originally a beer house.

It was owned by John Selwyn Rawson [1903] and Whitaker's [1915].

Planning applications show that this was a Bentley's Yorkshire Breweries pub [1926].

The pub acquired a full licence in 1951.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Church Tavern, Halifax
1 Church Yard.

This was a timber-framed building – the Old Hall – which stood next to the Moot Hall and adjacent to Halifax Parish Church on the site now occupied by the Sunday school.

The pub closed in 1892. It was demolished in 1898


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Church Tavern, Sowerby Bridge
Wharf Street. John Stansfield lived here and changed the name to the Musical Tavern

Church Tavern, Warley
The pub closed in 1869

Claremount Inn, Halifax
52 St Thomas's Street, between Earl Street and Dover Street. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1875.

It was a Ramsden pub.

The pub closed on 14th January 1969.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Clarence Hotel, Halifax
77 Lister Lane / New Bond Street. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in July 2004.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Room at the Top


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Clarence, Mytholmroyd
Brearley Lane.

Originally called the Mill Inn.

The pub closed in 1923

See Abraham Lumb


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Clarence, Todmorden
Dobroyd / 11 Higher Crescent.

On 18th October 1866, John Suthers began selling drink here


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Clarendon Hotel, Stone Chair
Built in 18??.

In January 1903, it was bought by Tom Barker of Halifax

Clifton Arms, Brighouse
10 Park Street. The building was part of a row of back-to-back terraced houses. It was converted into a pub in 1???.

The pub closed for several periods during 2003.

The pub closed for good in 2004.

In April 2006, plans were announced for converting the pub into 2 restaurants. It became an Asian restaurant called The Street


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1891: John William Lockwood
  • 1901: Charles S. Cardwell
  • 1902: W. Parsons
  • 1906: A. Greenwood
  • 1909: B. Wilson
  • 1912: J. Bottomley
  • 1928: T. Newton
  • 1936: Sam Sunderland
  • 1937: M. Page
  • 1941: Mr Walton
  • 1948: A. Walker
  • 1949: Mr Newby
  • 1958: J. Waterhouse

 

Clog Inn, Halifax
Recorded on 31st July 1875, when Davis & Shoesmith advertised a sale at auction of

A well established BEERHOUSE known as the Clog Inn having frontage to King Cross Lane and in the occupation of William Hodgson


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cloggers' Arms, Walsden
10 Square Road.

This was originally a beer house opened at Nip Square, Walsden about 1830, by Abraham Law, a Walsden clogger.

When the new highway (now Rochdale Road Walsden) was built by the railroad company his beerhouse lost the passing trade so he built another beerhouse with 4 cottages facing the old beerhouse on the new highway.

Initially it was called the Cloggers Arms but in 1848, it was renamed the Cross Keys.

See Dusty Miller, Walsden

Clothiers' Arms, Greetland
Brow Bridge, Rochdale Road. Part of a row of cottages (on the left going towards Norland).

The pub closed on 24th December 1926.

The house became a fish shop.

The property was demolished in the 1970s


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Jonas Ratcliffe
  • 1891: Thomas Bottomley
  • 1901: Frank Crossley – [aged 48]
  • 1905: Frank Crossley
  • 1926: Frank Crossley Crowther

 

Clough House Inn, Rastrick
56 Clough Lane.

In 2016, it was acquired by Rick & Maggie Starkey and renamed The Four Sons.

See Clough House, Rastrick


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Richard Hepworth
  • 1874: John Taylor
  • 1887: Francis Whatmough
  • 1893: Jack Holdroyd
  • 1894: Robert Jagger
  • 1894: Joah Holroyd
  • 1905: Alfred/Albert Tordoff
  • 1906: Alfred/Albert Tordoff
  • 1909: Samuel Clough
  • 1911: Samuel Clough
  • 1917: Samuel Clough
  • 1919: Edgar Marsden
  • 1923: J. W. Barker
  • 1923: Fred Mitchell
  • 1923: Geoffrey S. Mitchell
  • 1924: E. Dyson

 

Coach & Horses, Blackstone Edge
Built in 1671.

On 5th May 1888, thousands of people from Rochdale, Blackburn, Bolton, Heywood and other town in Lancashire and several towns in Yorkshire, attended a meeting of Socialists near here.

In 1930, the pub was named The White House


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Peter McIntyre

 

Coach & Horses, Halifax
83 Haley Hill.

It was a Whitaker pub [1886].

The pub was demolished [2008].

A supermarket and fast-food outlet were built on the site.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Ancient Order of Foresters and Stephen Keegan


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Coach & Horses, Luddendenfoot
Burnley Road.

Originally the General Rawdon.

The car park occupies the site of an earlier mill.

The pub closed in 2007.

There are proposals to convert the property into apartments


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Coach & Horses, Mixenden
The pub has had several names, including

Details in the entry for the Rose & Crown

Coach & Horses, Rishworth
In the 1840s, the Booth Wood Inn became The Coach & Horses.

In 1857, it became The Oddfellows' Arms


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Coach & Horses, Todmorden
The pub stood at Dobroyd Bridge. John Fielden bought the building and renamed it Dawson Weir

Coach House, Todmorden
Scaitcliffe

Cock & Bottle, Southowram
Bank Top. Built in 1645.

In September 1881, it was sold to Charles Stott at auction for £1,060.

Planning applications show that this was a Whitaker pub [April 1903].

In 2009, it closed. It re-opened in 2010


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cock & Crown, Halifax

Cocoa Taverns

Coiners, Halifax
Silver Street.

Pub in the building which was formerly Farrow's Bank Limited and the headquarters of the Halifax Equitable Benefit Building Society.

In 200?, the name changed to Silvers Bar

Cold Harbour, Northowram
See Swalesmoor Inn, Boothtown

Coley Chapel House

See Malt Shovel, Coley

Coliseum, Halifax
Night club. This opened in what was originally the Picture House cinema In 1987.

It subsequently became night-club then Liquid

Colliers' Arms, Elland
66 Park Road.

This was originally a beer house (possibly) known as the Waterloo. Around 1871, the name is recorded as the Colliers' Arms.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two

See Waterloo, Elland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Commercial, Copley
Recorded in 1922.

It is listed separately from the Commercial Hotel, Skircoat Green

Commercial, Halifax
Southgate. This was originally a beer house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Mrs Mary Green

 

Commercial, Halifax
93 Northgate.

It was a Whitaker pub [1918].

The pub closed in 1973.

It has subsequently been a wood-work shop and a Greek restaurant.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See John Cain


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Commercial Hotel, Halifax
31 Horton Street Temperance Hotel & Lodging house [1881]

See Bentley's Commercial Hotel, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Henry Mitchell – [aged 50]
  • 1891: Thomas H. Richardson – [aged 62]

 

Commercial, Illingworth
79 Keighley Road.

It was a Fielding pub.

The pub was rebuilt by William Henry Wilkinson of Walsh & Maddock in 1935.

It was demolished in 2000.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Commercial Inn, Sowerby Bridge
31 Wharf Street / Tuel Lane.

Planning applications show that this was a Stocks pub [October 1924].

It became the Lock Keeper's Tavern then the Wharf.

In December 2013, J. D. Wetherspoon reopened the pub as The Commercial

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 18??: Miss Martha Thornton
  • 1861: Hannah Hobson
  • 1864: Joshua Hobson
  • 1874: Joseph Hobson
  • 1887: Joe Exley
  • 1891: Joe Exley
  • 1900: John Bulcock
  • 1901: Mrs Bulcock
  • 1902: Arthur Edward Jones
  • 1907: Arthur Edward Jones
  • 1907: Walter Thomas Makepeace
  • 1910: Walter Thomas Makepeace
  • 1910: Thomas Whitaker
  • 1911: Thomas Whitaker
  • 1914: Thomas Whitaker
  • 1914: Eliza Walls
  • 1917: Mrs E. Whitaker
  • 1925: Eliza Walls
  • 1925: Martin Devereux
  • 1930: Martin Devereux
  • 1930: John Harold Clow
  • 1931: John Harold Clow
  • 1931: Noah Taylor
  • 1934: Noah Taylor
  • 1934: Thomas Vernon Riley
  • 1935: Thomas Vernon Riley
  • 1935: Edward Bennett
  • 1937: Edward Bennett
  • 1937: Charles Hutton
  • 1937: Charles Hutton
  • 1937: Albert Stancliffe
  • 1940: Albert Stancliffe
  • 1940: Victor Naylor Smith
  • 1943: Victor Naylor Smith
  • 1943: Samuel Simpson Clark
  • 1946: Samuel Simpson Clark
  • 1946: Sidney Dewhirst Firth
  • 1950: Ernest Crowther

 

Commercial, Rastrick
1 Gooder Lane / Huddersfield Road. Described as
close to the Railway Station entrance

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1861: James Brook
  • 1887: Ellis Greenwood
  • 1894: John Wood
  • 1895: Mrs Hannah Wood
  • 1900: W. L. Dyson
  • 1917: Thomas H. Hughes
  • 19??: J. Broadbent
  • 19??: H. Turner
  • 1962: Don Riach

 

Commercial, Ripponden
115 Oldham Road. Originally a beerhouse known as Glenhaven Cottage.

It became the Commercial and was popularly known The Besom.

It became the Silk Mill [2011].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Commercial, Skircoat Green
23 Lower Skircoat Green. This was originally a beer house.

It was a Naylor pub, then later it was a Whitaker pub [1897].

The pub closed in February 2004.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Common House Inn, Halifax
Woolshops. Recorded in 1735

Compass, Illingworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: William Wigglesworth

 

Coopers' Arms, Halifax
Swine Market. Formerly, The Rose & Crown.

Coopers' Arms is recorded in August 1808.

Later, The Sportsman


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Elizabeth Crabtree

 

Copley Arms, Skircoat
New Road / Wakefield Road.


The pub was listed next to 8 Copley Terrace [1861 census].

It was listed between Copley Wood Lodge and Oats Royd, Copley Lane [1871 census]

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Corporation Arms, Halifax
46 Gibbet Street. Opened in 1856.

In August 1859, a beerhouse named the Corporation Arms at North Corporation Street, Halifax. This may have referred to the Corporation Inn.

The pub was built by Halifax Corporation for visitors to the Victoria cattle market.

John Hartley was a member of the Beacon Club which was held here in the 19th century.

In 1968, the Halifax Sunday Football League was founded here.

The pub closed on 29th January 1969, and – along with the old fire station – was demolished shortly afterwards for the Burdock Way redevelopment


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Corporation Inn, Halifax
56 Corporation Street / Crib Lane. Opened in 1863.

It was a Ramsden pub.

The pub closed on 9th January 1969 and was demolished when Burdock Way was constructed.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Corporation Tap, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Corporation Tap, Halifax
30 Crib Lane. Opened in 1871.

The pub closed in 1903

See Corporation Inn, Halifax

Country Friends, Todmorden
A later name for the Dog & Partridge, Todmorden [2008]

Country House, Hipperholme
Originally called The Country House at Hipperholme.

In 1833, the licence was transferred here from the original Dumb Mill Inn.

It closed for a time and reopened as ????


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Courtyard, Halifax
Ward's End. Originally the Bass House

Cow & Calf, Halifax
Matthew Normanton had been drinking here on the night of the murder of William Deighton in November 1769

Crab Trees, Barkisland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: William Marsden

 

Cragg Vale Inn, Erringden
Church Bank Lane.

Recorded in 1898.

It was rebuilt in 1879.

It was a Stocks pub [1910].

In February 1912, Stocks sold the pub to Helen Simpson-Hinchcliffe.

In 1912, the name was changed to the Hinchliffe Arms.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Ruben Bramhall


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: William Haigh
  • 1851: Richard Hinchliffe
  • 1861: James Helliwell
  • 1874: Susey Helliwell
  • 1879: William Fletcher
  • 1887: William Fletcher
  • 1891: James Sutcliffe
  • 1897: William Henry Eastwood
  • 1905: Thomas Whittingham

 

Craven Heifer, Halifax
5 Cow Green / Back Street.

Opened in 1840. Stood next door to The King's Head.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed on 30th January 1920.

This and other buildings in the area were demolished for redevelopment in 1971


Question: Does anyone know how the opening date of 1840 reconciles with Samuel Whitaker being landlord in 1834? Could its earlier days have been as a beerhouse?

 

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See James Richardson


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Craven Heifer, Mytholmroyd
Hawksclough / Bethesda Row, Burnley Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Craven Heifer, Northowram
The Inn is listed at 1 Shop? Alley ("Craven Heifer") [1871], and next to Upper Shibden Hall and The School House, Northowram [1881 census]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cricketers' Arms, Halifax
29 Great Albion Street.

Opened in 1871.

The pub closed in 1898


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Crispin, Halifax
9/11 Charles Street.

In 1936, this was listed as

Old Crispin Inn, 9 Charles Street

See Old Crispin, Halifax, St Crispin, Halifax and Upper Crispin, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1874: John Whiteley
  • 1881: Fred Clayton – [aged 42]
  • 1887: Mrs M. E. Clayton
  • 1891: Aquilla Halstead – [1846-1907]
  • 1911: Isaac Webster
  • 1917: Isaac Webster
  • 1936: Wilfred Taylor

 

Cross, Elland
Westgate

See Britannia House, Lloyds Bank, Elland and Savile Arms Hotel


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1901: P. Thomas
  • 1905: Mrs Priscilla Crossley

 

Cross Hills Tavern, Halifax
21-23 Cross Hills. Opened in 18??.

On 24th August 1895, Charles Greenwood had his licence renewal refused after 21-22 years of being licensee.

The pub closed in 1895


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1875: Charles Greenwood
  • 1891: Charles Greenwood
  • 1895: Charles Greenwood

 

Cross Inn, Heptonstall

See Union Cross

Cross Keys, Halifax
71-73 King Cross Street. The Swift family ran this pub and the Beehive Inn. Henry Swift ran his brewery behind the pub.

The pub closed on 30th September 1931.

This and the Beehive Inn were both demolished in 1932 when the road was widened and the Beehive & Cross Keys was built.

See Beehive


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cross Keys, Siddal
3 Whitegate Road.

It was a Webster pub [1878].

The present building has a datestone 1913


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cross Keys, Walsden
This was the name of the Clogger's Arms after it was changed in 1848.

St Peter's Church, Walsden was built around the same time – St Peter's emblem is a key


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cross, Ovenden

See Ovenden Cross

Cross Pipes, Halifax
10 Silver Street. The Halifax Smoke Club was established here. The name was changed to The Duke Wellington around 1815, and then to The Woodman.

The pub was a well-known meeting place for the coiners. In October 1769, the coiner, James Jagger, was arrested here

Cross Pipes, Rishworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: William Hitchen

 

Cross Roads, Wainstalls
Balkram Edge / Cross Road.

Built around 1864.

This was originally a beer house.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Wainstalls Cricket Club


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Susannah Beverley
  • 19??: John Hoyle
  • 1905: William Holland
  • 1937: Jack Baxendale

 

Cross, Sowerby Bridge
Barkisland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: John Hayley

 

Cross Stones, Todmorden
Stansfield


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: William Dawson

 

Crosse, Halifax
The original name of the Union Cross, Halifax

Crown & Anchor, Elland
Briggate. In March 1864, an advertisement appeared in the Halifax Guardian inviting tenders for quarrying of stone on a site adjacent to the Crown and Anchor Inn. Tenders for the construction of the new Royal appeared at the same time.

This was originally 2 cottages. It became a pub in 18??.

It was a Stocks pub [1890s].

The pub was demolished in the 1890s to make way for Britannia House.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: David Farrar
  • 1824: David Farrar
  • 1829: Joseph Hanson
  • 1834: Joseph Hanson
  • 1845: William Watson
  • 1861: William Watson
  • 1864: George Watson

 

Crown & Anchor, Halifax
Cheapside


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Crown & Anchor, Halifax
31 Bull Green / Cow Green.

The pub was known as The Smiling Mule [1910].

It was known as Scratcherd's when Scratcherd & Company occupied the pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Adega, Halifax and The Adega, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Crown & Anchor, Illingworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: William Horsfield
  • 1853: Benj. Tatham

 

Crown & Anchor, Luddendenfoot


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Crown & Anchor, Mixenden
The pub has had several names, including

Details in the entry for the Rose & Crown

Crown & Cushion, Halifax
32 Winding Road / Ann Street. Opened in 1888. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed on 16th January 1969


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Crown, Brighouse
6 Lightcliffe Road.

The Crown Hotel Beerhouse, Brighouse is recorded in 1869 when Squire Sykes was here.

The pub was built in 1878. In 1891, it was sold to Joshua Tetley & Sons Limited


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1869: Squire Sykes
  • 1878: John Roper
  • 1887: John Roper
  • 1891: John W. B. Clarkson
  • 1894: John W. B. Clarkson
  • 1917: George Dale
  • 1920: Ellen Dale
  • 1932: Wright Walker
  • 1948: F. Wood
  • 1960: G. Taylor
  • 1973: Don McEvoy

 

Crown, Halifax
Horton Street


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: Mr McLean

 

Crown, Halifax
45 Church Street / Blackledge.

It was a Brear & Brown pub [1897]

It is now the Imperial Crown Hotel

See John Aspinall & Sons


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: George Walker
  • 1887: William Johnson
  • 1887: William Brear
  • 1894: William Brear
  • 1897: William Brear
  • 1905: William Brear
  • 1905: Sam Wilson [Manager]
  • 1917: Abraham Pickles

 

Crown, Halifax
Aka Crown Tavern.

12 Charles Street. Opened in 1887.

The pub closed on 20th April 1949


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: James Dyson – [aged 37]
  • 1891: Fred Northrop
  • 1905: Fred Northrop
  • 1936: William Russell

 

Crown, Sowerby Bridge
Grange Place / Wharf Street. Opened in 1873.

Planning applications show that this was a Ramsden pub [July 1921].

The pub closed in 1950. It became Grange House


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Crown Tavern, Halifax
93 New Bank / Prospect Street.

It was a Stocks pub, then later it was a Webster pub.

The pub closed in 1963.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Cunning Corner, Rishworth
Oldham Road

In the 1880s, the Oddfellows' Arms became The Cunning Corner.

In 2004, the property was up for sale.

It became the Old Bore [2007].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 16:13 on 29th November 2017 / p200_c / 117