Search billions of records on Ancestry.com
   

Pubs & inns

B



A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Bacchus Tavern, Halifax
2/10/20/21 King Street.

Aka Bacchus Arms.

Opened in 1769.

In the 18th century, the inn was the meeting place for gangs of coiners. Some coiners were (possibly) members of the Bacchus Lodge which was established here [1769]. This was disbanded in 1783.

In 1794, the Harmony Masonic Lodge, Halifax moved from the Angel, Halifax to the Bacchus.

The inn sign consisted of an iron framework on which hung a barrel with a figure of Bacchus astride it.

It was a Whitaker pub [around 1890].

On 4th June 1928, the Bacchus Tavern, the King of Belgium, and the Waterhouse Arms were referred for closure. The pub closed in 1928.

In 1935, the building was sold to Halifax Corporation for slum clearance for £100.

It was demolished in 1937.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See James Shuttleworth


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bailiff Bridge Inn
In 1813, the inn, (possibly) the Punch Bowl, was referred to as
the House of Mr James Pollard, the Bailiff Bridge Inn, in the township of Wike, in the Parish of Birstal

in connection with meetings relating to

An Act for Inclosing Lands in the Manor and Township of Wike, in the County of York

Bank Top, Lee Mount
2 Ovenden Road. This was originally a beer house. Leased by Websters from around 1875.

The pub closed in 1971.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bar 15, Halifax
Bull Green. A later manifestation of WC's, Halifax

Bar Eleven, Halifax
Occupied what had been the Borough Club, Halifax and Flashman's on Harrison Road

Bar With No Name, Halifax

Barbara's

Barbary's, Mytholmroyd
Aka Broadbent's or Barbara's.

A drinking place which stood opposite what is now The Dusty Miller Inn, Mytholmroyd, and where the coiners plotted the murder of the exciseman William Deighton who was looking into their activities.

At the time of the incidents, the licensee was James Broadbent and his wife, Barbara

Barcentro, Halifax
Barum Top.

The former Comet store at Barum Top became a pub, known successively as the Barcentro, Halifax, the Barracuda [February 2002], and the Salvation [2013]

Barge & Barrel, Elland
Park Road. The building was originally the Station Hotel and served Elland Railway Station. In the 1970s, it was the Barbados disco. It became the Barge and Barrel in 1980. The pub now brews its own beer,

See Barge & Barrel Brewing Company

Barge, Brighouse
37 Brighouse Mill Lane. Formerly known as the New Tavern and the Victoria Tavern

Barley Mow, Elland
86 Westgate. This was a beer house [1889].

The pub closed on 20th October 1898. It was owned by John Naylor, Victoria Brewery, Cote Hill, then Halifax Brewing Company, then Windmill Hill Brewery. It closed on 20th October 1898 after being refused a licence on account of its being

of a disorderly character


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Barley Mow, Halifax
Recorded in 1868.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence. From the licensing report, it is not clear whether the Inn was in Halifax or whether it could have been the Barley Mow, Elland

Barracks Tavern, Halifax
15 Charles Street, Causeway. Aka Barrack Tavern.

When the Halifax Infirmary & Dispensary moved to Harrison Road, the building was used as a barracks for a time before becoming an inn and lodging house, the Barrack Tavern Lodge. Recorded in January 1857.

A newspaper notice in April 1897 announced


Tenders invited for taking down the BARRACK TAVERN in Charles Street/Causeway and erecting upon the site additions to the premises of the Automatic Standard Screw Company Limited
 

The pub closed on 20th May 1897.

See


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Barracuda, Brighouse
In late 2007, the pub opened in what was originally the Albert Theatre & Opera House. In 2008, because of nuisances caused by the clientele, the pub was closed and reopened a short time afterwards as The Calder

Barracuda, Halifax
Barum Top.

The former Comet store at Barum Top became a pub, known successively as the Barcentro, Halifax, the Barracuda [February 2002], and the Salvation [2013]

Barum Top, Halifax
Bull Green.

Purpose-built pub opened on the site formerly occupied by Olympia Garage, of former shops: a dry cleaners, and Millman's carpet store. Opened in 2000

Bass House, Halifax
Ward's End. This was originally Holly House, then Carrington's pub. In 2001, the name was changed to The Courtyard

Bath, Elland
Ainley Road.

The name came from the springs at nearby Canker Dyke


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bath Hotel, Halifax
Lilly Lane Baths, Waterside


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bath Street Tavern, Halifax
13 Wesley Street / 12-13 Bath Parade. Aka The Bath Tavern, Bath Parade Tavern, and Bath Street Tavern.

Built around 1790. The pub stood near Lilly Lane Baths.

In 1795, it was the meeting place for the Lodge of Probity.

The 1851 census suggests that it was a lodging house, rather than an Inn at that time. One of the lodgers was Rachel Jones who was injured in the explosion at Firth's Mill In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1901 and the licence was transferred to the Brown Cow Hotel.

See Probity [No 61] Masonic Lodge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Battleship, Brighouse
Popular name for the Prince of Wales after it was rebuilt in 1926 using materials taken from the 19th century wooden battleship HMS Donegal

Bay Horse, Boothtown
8 Pleasant View / John Scott's Houses, New Road Side, Northowram. This was originally a beer house.


Question: In 1881, the address of the Bay Horse Inn was shown as

John Scotts Houses, New Road Side, Northowram

Could John Scott have built the property?

 

On 3rd March 1924, this was one of 3 public houses which were referred for compensation at Halifax Brewster Sessions. The others were the Delver Arms, Boothtown and Pineberry Hill Tavern, Southowram Bank. The pub closed in 1925


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bay Horse, Cross Stone
Recorded in 1714.

In 1765, the licence was transferred here from the Pack Horse, Todmorden.

When James Sutcliffe was landlord, he rented out part of the premises as lock-up cells for a term of 14 years at an annual rent of £1 12/-. These cells were used to house offenders from the Yorkshire side of the border.

In 1987, it was renamed Berghof Brandstatter and became an hotel and Austrian restaurant


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bay Horse, Halifax
Catherine Slack.

Recorded in 1897, when Holdsworth Haigh, butcher, of the Bay Horse Inn, Catherine Slack, Halifax was mentioned in the List of Local Wills


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bay Horse, Halifax
19 Lee Bridge. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1905 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bay Horse, Sowerby Bridge
17 Causeway Head, Burnley Road. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1905 following the Licensing Act [1904].

Reopened by 1911.

The pub was for sale at an asking price of £125,000 [2010].

The Travellers' Rest, Elland and the Red Lion, Stainland were also up for sale after the owners Deepclear Limited went into administration [September 2010]

It was renamed The Brothers Grimm in the early 1990s when the Beardow brothers bought it. The name changed back when the pub company acquired it


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bay Horse, Stainland
846 Outlane.

See Outlane Gas Company


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bay Horse, Todmorden
Bacup Road, Dulesgate / Midgelden pasture [1837]

In records, it is frequently described as

between Ouzel Brink and Center Rock

The pub was built around 1837 by William Earnshaw of the Old Banks, Dulesgate.

On 10th May 1888, the Inn was sold to John Bulcock at auction.

The pub closed in 1937 and is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Beacon Tavern, Claremount
Aka The Beaconsfield, the Three Horse Shoes, Claremount

2 St Thomas Street / 3 Horley Green Road.

It stood opposite the Albion Hotel.

Recorded in 1936.

The pub closed on 2nd December 1968.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See John Briggs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Beaconsfield, Claremount
Aka Beacon Tavern

Bear's Head, Carr House

Beck, Brighouse

The New Inn, Brighouse became the Beck, Brighouse [2013]

Bee-hive, Halifax
12/14/27 King Cross Street. The pub stood exactly opposite Hanover Chapel.

The Swift family ran this pub and the Cross Keys and the Beehive Inn.

This and the Cross Keys were both demolished in 1932 when the road was widened and the Beehive & Cross Keys was built some yards further from the road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Beehive & Cross Keys, Halifax
31-33 King Cross Street.

Designed by Walsh & Maddock.

The pub was built in 1932 when the earlier Cross Keys and the Bee Hive Inn – both owned by the Swift family – were demolished for road widening.

It was a Whitaker pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1871: William Turner – [aged 28]
  • 1894: William Swift
  • 1905: John E. McKelvin
  • 1917: Joseph Newdall
  • 1936: J. S. Thompson

 

Beehive, Soyland
/ Ripponden. Hob Lane / Royd Lane. Described as
between Platt Head and New Moor, Soyland [1871]

This was originally a beer house.

It was owned by Victoria Brewery, Cote Hill, then Halifax Brewing Company, then Windmill Hill Brewery

The inquest on the body of Betty Hellowell was held here [1862]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bell's Arms, Walsden
Glen View.

Originally the Woodcock, Walsden.

It is said that the pub was named for Bell Parkin.

The pub closed in the 1930s and was demolished by 1980


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bell Hotel, Sowerby


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bentley's Commercial Hotel, Halifax
Horton Street

The hotel was run by Walter Bentley.

The building is now known as Wards End Chambers.

See Commercial Hotel, Halifax

Berghof Brandstatter, Cross Stone
The 1987 manifestation of the Bay Horse created by Austrian Peter Brandstatter and his wife Kathy

Besom Brush, Ripponden
Oldham Road. The Commercial Inn, Ripponden was popularly known as The Besom.

It was frequented by the workers at Ripponden & District Motors. There was a collection of company memoribilia in the pub.

In the 1980s, it was refurbished and called The Besom Brush.

It subsequently reverted to The Besom.

It is currently [Autumn 2010] closed

Big D's
In 200?, the Rose & Crown, Stansfield reopened as Big D's with landlord Darren Fawthrop. It closed in 200?

Big Six, Halifax
Another name for the Bowling Green Inn.

See Horsfall Brothers

Bird-i-th-Hand, Calf Holes
Todmorden.

Opened in 1???.

Closed around 1825. It was superseded by the Bird-i-th-Hand, Warland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bird-i-th-Hand, Warland
Aka Bird in Hand. Rochdale Road.

Opened around 1825. It superseded the earlier Bird-i-th-Hand, Calf Holes.

In 1898, it was sold to Whitaker's.

During World War II, a bomb fell behind the pub. The only casualties were a burst water main ... and 2 ducks.

Currently [2011] up for sale.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Grove Brewery, Brearley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bird In Hand, Elland
23/27 New Street. The licence was transferred from here to the new George & Dragon, and the pub became a beerhouse known as The Forester's Arms. It subsequently reverted to the original name.

The pub closed in 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bird in Hand, Sowerby Bridge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: John Morley

 

Bird in the Hand, Halifax
29 Bank Bottom. This is one of the beerhouses at Bank Bottom, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bird-in-the-Hand, Midgley
Upper High Lees / High Lees Head. This was originally a beer house. A popular pub with the local stone workers.

The pub closed in 1894 after it had been condemned as

a disorderly place


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: George Broadbent

 

Black Boy, Halifax
40 King Cross Street. This was originally a beer house. It was owned by Victoria Brewery, Cote Hill, then Halifax Brewing Company, then Windmill Hill Brewery.

The pub closed in 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Boy, Halifax
Gaol Lane.

The pub closed in 1908 following the Licensing Act [1904]

Black Boy Inn, Claremount
Blake Hill.

Aka Black Boy House, Claremount


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1833: Joseph Wilkinson – [1803-1833]
  • 1841: John Holdsworth

 

Black Bull, Brighouse
46 Briggate [1911] / Owler Ings.

Built in 1740.

There was a cricket ground at the back of the pub in the mid-19th century. In 1821, this, the Black Swan, the Wellington and the Anchor were the only pubs in Brighouse.

In 1936, the pub retained its licence when it was one of several local pubs whose licences were reviewed on grounds of non-necessity.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Brighouse rush-bearing and Lodge of Shepherdesses


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Bull, Clifton
Towngate. Opened in 18??.

It was a Whitaker pub [1898] who leased it from Sir George Armytage.

The pub closed in 1933 and became Black Bull Farm.

This is discussed in the books Down the Acres and Halifax Pubs.

See Collier Row, Clifton


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Bull, Elland
Pinfold Lane, Upper Edge.

The pub is also listed as

the Black Bull, Fixby, between Ridge End and Ridge Edge [1861]

The pub gave its name to Bull Lane, Elland.

The pub closed in 1909 following the Licensing Act [1904].

It was converted into 2 houses, and is now the Pinfold Guest House.

Kai Roberts tells the story of

Mr and Mrs Parker [who] moved into the building in the 1970s, and reported a fear of the cellar of the house – their dogs growled at the cellar door and refused to stay in the house alone.

They also experienced poltergeist activity such as footsteps on the stairs, a knocking from a wall of the sitting room, and objects hurtling across the room.

In a dream, Mrs Parker saw a fair-haired woman who took her to the cellar and indicated a loose stone in the wall. When she woke, Mr and Mrs Parker went into the cellar and found a loose stone, exactly as in the dream. The position of the stone was directly beneath the source of the knocking in the wall. They removed the stone and the knocking grew louder


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Bull, Gauxholme
In February 1908, compensation was paid to the pub under the terms of the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Bull, Halifax
9 Copper Street / 6 Mount Street. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, but was refused, a music and dancing licence.

The pub closed in 1904 following the Licensing Act [1904].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Bull, Hebden Bridge
Bridge Lanes.

On 19th July 1840, one man was killed during a row between Irishmen here


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Bull, Heptonstall
Main Street.

The pub closed in the 1920s.

It was subsequently used as Heptonstall Working Men's Club [until 1972].

It is now a private house.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Dog, Halifax
25/34 King Street.

The pub closed in 1903


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Horse, Clifton
Westgate. Originally a 16th century farm and a part of the hamlet of Clifton Woodhead, it became an inn in the 19th century. A brew house added later.

The inn was a meeting place for Luddites and was used by Clifton villagers to debate land rentals.

It was a Whitaker pub [1898] who leased it from Sir George Armytage.

It is now a popular pub and hotel incorporating 3 mid-16th century cottages – number 196, 198 and 200 Towngate. The brew house is now the restaurant.

This is discussed in the book Down the Acres

See T' Darblin' 'Oil, Clifton


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Horse, Halifax
48 Woolshops / 62 Woolshops [1871]. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

On 3rd March 1930, this, the Engineers Inn, Cross Hills, the Junction Inn, the Bishop Blaize Inn, Charlestown Road and the Victoria & Albert Inn, Haley Hill were referred for closure.

It was a Ramsden pub [1933].

The pub closed on payment of compensation [27th January 1933]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Horse, Hebden Bridge
23 Heptonstall Road. In February 1909, compensation was paid to the pub under the terms of the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Horse, Hove Edge
In the 1850s, Nether House, Hove Edge was a coaching inn.

It is said to have been named for the 17th century highwayman, Nevinson, who is said to have stayed – and hidden – at the inn

Black Horse, Rastrick
52/53 New Hey Road. Stood across the road from the Sun Inn.

The pub closed in 1913.

A shop now stands on the site


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Horse, Ripponden
Rochdale Road


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Horse, Soyland
The pub closed in 1919


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Horse, Stainland
Cold Well.

The pub closed [24th December 1927] – extinction of licence.

It was later used as a garage


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Horse, Walsden
Butcherhill.

Around 1831, James Dawson bought the building and opened it as a beerhouse known as the Black Horse.

The building was demolished in 19??


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Lion, Halifax
18 Silver Street [1851] / 17 Silver Street [1829, 1861] / 33 Silver Street

The pub closed in 1920.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Lion, Luddendenfoot
Burnley Road. Opened in January 1858.

It is now [2015] a private house called Black Lion House.

See Black Lion Buildings


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Lion, Ripponden
Old Ripponden Bank.

One of a number of cottages built here in the late 1700s by Richard Jackson.

Tim Bobbin was a regular here.

It was demolished in 19??

Black Rock, Midgley
Built in 1755.

After the Battle of Trafalgar, in 1805, it was renamed the Lord Nelson.

The Foldout presents summarising the history of the Inn was contributed by Neil Hubbard

See Gutter Houses, Midgley

Black Swan, Brighouse
43/47 Briggate. Formerly known as The Black Swan Hotel. The pub probably takes its name from the nearby Swan Fields.

In 1821, this, the Black Bull, the Wellington and the Anchor were the only pubs in Brighouse.

Around 1850, there was a bowling green here.

In 1884, the stables burnt down.

The pub appears to have been used for several auctions and other meetings, including Brighouse Cow Club [1805], the Trustees of the proposed Elland & Obelisk Turnpike [1815], and Brighouse Cage Bird Association.

In 19??, the building, which was originally 3-storeys, was reduced to the present 2-storeys when structural problems were found with the roof.

Kidman's Boxing Academy was held here

The pub is said to be haunted by the ghost of a maid who committed suicide there

At the Brewster sessions in 1903, the police objected to renewal of the licences of this pub, the Black Swan, Brighouse and the White Swan, Brighouse, on account of the publican

habitually employing professional female musicians

The licence was renewed on the understanding that no female vocalists be employed and that no female pianist under the age of 21 be taken on.

The pub closed for a time around 2001.

It was subsequently acquired by the Atlas Mill Brewery, Brighouse.

It is now [2016] known as Millers Bar


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Swan, Halifax
10 Silver Street [1829] / 11 Silver Street / Black Swan Passage. Opened in 1822.

Around 1830, the Ferry Bridge Court Club held their meetings here.

In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

In 1895, it was owned by Messrs Noble & Collins.

The pub closed in 1921.

The building was subsequently used by George Feavers & Sons Limited and Yates's Wine Lodge [1990s].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Swan, Halifax
Cheapside / between George Street and Cheapside [1881]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Black Swan, Todmorden
North Street [1841, 1881, 1891] / 31 Burnley Road / Northgate.

The building was used as a carriers' warehouse.

The lockup for Todmorden & Walsden was once located in the building.

It became an inn in the 1790s when the licence was transferred from the Patmos Inn.

It was a Massey's Brewery pub [1932].

It was rebuilt in 1932.

For some reason, the name was The Polished Knob [2010].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bishop Blaize, Halifax
Westgate.

Recorded on Whit Monday, 1845 when The Knights of Malta held their annual meeting here

Bishop Blaize, Halifax
Aka Bishop Blaise. 4 Charlestown Road.

Named after Bishop Blaise, the patron St of woolcombers.

Opened in 1884. This was originally a beer house.

It was a Whitaker pub.

On 3rd March 1930, this, the Black Horse Inn, Woolshops, the Engineers Inn, Cross Hills, the Junction Inn and the Victoria & Albert Inn, Haley Hill were referred for closure. The pub closed in 1935


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blazing Rag, Brighouse
Popular name for the Bridge Tavern

Blind Pig, Sowerby Bridge
By 2014, the Vine, Sowerby Bridge was known as the Blind Pig

Blucher, Halifax

See Prince of Blucher

Blue Ball, Banks
Todmorden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1837: William Chadwick

 

Blue Ball, Blackshawhead
Badger Lane. Formerly known as the Friendly Inn. The inn was recorded in 1819.

It was converted to Blue Ball House


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: William Sutcliffe
  • 1834: John Thomas
  • 1845: John Holdsworth
  • 1861: John Holdsworth
  • 1864: John Houldsworth
  • 1905: Richard Lord

 

Blue Ball, Brighouse
Briggate.

At some point, Daisy Croft House was a pub known as the Blue Ball

Blue Ball, Cloughfoot
Dulesgate.

Robert Barker of the British Queen, Todmorden won the battle for trade and the Blue Ball sold their full licence to the British Queen and closed [around 1861]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Ball, Halifax
1 & 2 Jemmy Lane, Bowling Dyke, North Bridge

Opened in 1822.

It was owned by Victoria Brewery, Cote Hill, then Halifax Brewing Company, then Windmill Hill Brewery.

The pub closed in 1915.

This is discussed in the book Sketches of Old Halifax.

See Golden Ball


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Ball, Norland
The inn was used by packhorse teams before the turnpikes came along.

The name is said to come from a ball which was used by an old woman who was a fortune-teller here.

In 1914, it was owned by the Halifax Brewery Company.

In May 2008, there were proposals to close the pub and convert the building into houses.

It closed in December 2009.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Our Home & Country

See Norland Stocks and James Ratcliffe


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Ball, Soyland
Old Lane. The building was originally a group of weavers' cottages dating from 1672. The building was extended in the 19th century.

A board outside the Inn carries the verse

The Fortune-Teller's ball was blue
 A ghostly crystal awful hue,
A name on high for inns a few
 Where liquor, food and horses new
Could help the Romans' chariots
 Through Blackstone Edge to Deva's view

This originally stood on the packhorse route over Blackstone Edge.

In the 18th century, there was a gang of coiners and highwaymen based here with leaders Iron Ned – the landlord – and Fat Anne, his 19-stone accomplice.

In 1750, the turnpike took traffic away from the Blue Ball and the New Inn was built to fill the niche.

The apparition of a woman known as Faith, a worker at the Inn, has been reported at the pub. She drowned after an affair with the landlord ended in an unwanted pregnancy. The woman can be heard running along the corridor's of the pub, protesting that while everyone knew that her death was murder, no one questioned the official finding that it was suicide.

In 2002, the pub was converted into private accommodation.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions and Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See James Procter


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Ball, Triangle
/ Stile. Opened in 18??.

It was owned by John Selwyn Rawson [1910].

The pub closed in 1910 following the Licensing Act [1904].

In the 1940s, it became a private house.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See Triangle, Sowerby


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Barrel, Elland
Corner of Taylors Row / 37 Southgate / Portland Street.

Built in 1830.

A room in the pub – known as the House of Lords – was used by local mill-owners for meetings.

It was a Hammond's pub [1950s].

The pub closed in 1965.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Bell, Blackshawhead
Closed in 19??


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1842: John Holdsworth

 

Blue Bell, Elland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1887: Joseph Carter

 

Blue Bell, Halifax
30 Gaol Lane / Woolshops This was originally a beer house.

It was a Knowles pub.

The pub closed in 1909 following the Licensing Act [1904].

See Blue Bell Buildings, Halifax


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Bell, Halifax
Bowling Dyke / Cross Hills


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1850: James Riley

 

Blue Bell, Midgley
This was one of a row of 6 houses which stood in Towngate.

A Blew Bell is mentioned here in 1720. A headstone over the door was dated 1739 and inscribed with a bell which was painted blue.

The property was demolished in the 1890s.

After the houses were demolished, the stone was re-used in a wall nearby.

A row of houses known as Black Rock stood nearby.

See Gutter Houses, Midgley

Blue Bell, Ripponden


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1829: James Procter

 

Blue Bell, Southowram
3 Bank Top / Common Lane.

On 8th May 1877, John Tillotson sold the pub to Websters. Planning applications show that this was a Webster pub [January 1904].

The pub closed in 1906 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Question: From my childhood memories, I seem to recall that the building was later a fish and chip shop, and that this burnt down in the 1950s [?].

The same building was later converted into a ladies' hairdressers.

It was demolished in the 1980s [?].

Can anyone confirm any of this?

 

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Harry Ibberson


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Bell, Sowerby
Towngate

Blue Bells, Mill Bank
The pub closed in 1948


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Blue Lion, Mytholmroyd
Recorded on OS Maps of 1851-1855 at the place where the Rochdale Canal goes beneath the A646 Burnley Road.


Question: Does anyone know if this was a forerunner of the White Lion, Mytholmroyd?

 

Boar's Head Hotel, Halifax
5/7 Southgate. Recorded in 1783, when an incident in the Corn Riots took place here.

The new Boar's Head – designed by J. F. Walsh – was built as a hotel for Richard Whitaker in 1891 as a part of Halifax Borough Market. The hotel had 11 bedrooms.

A datestone carries the initials Thomas Whitaker and masonic symbols, recalling that he was Chairman of Whitaker's Brewery and a Freemason when the building was erected.

When it closed, the building was subsequently occupied by a Berni Inn restaurant, offices for the Bradford & Bingley Building Society [1992], and offices for Santander


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Boar's Head, Stansfield
Carr House Fold, Lower Cross Stone, Stansfield


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Board Inn, Shibden
This was probably an alternative name for the Shibden Mill Inn in the early 19th century


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1838: Sarah Bottomley

 

Bog Trap, Luddendenfoot
A popular name for the Chatburn & Jennings, Luddendenfoot

Boot & Shoe, Elland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Joseph Thornton

 

Boot & Shoe, Halifax
Swine Market


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Booth Wood, Rishworth
Built in the early 1800s for the turnpike traffic.

It became The Coach & Horses [1840s], The Oddfellows' Arms [1857], The Cunning Corner [1880s], and the Old Bore [2007].

After these many reincarnations, it was bought by John Oates and the name reverted to the Booth Wood Inn [May 2012]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Border Rose, Walsden
Originally the Butcher's Arms, Walsden

Bottomley's Arms, Shelf
Wade House Road / Wade House Lane.

Named for the Bottomley family of Shelf

On October 23 1853, Bell's London Life & Sporting Chronicle announced a game of knur & spell with William Sharp of Shelf and Jonathan Green of Northowram. Stakes were to be sent to Samuel Bottomley's Bottomley Arms.

It was a Whitaker pub [1889]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bowling Green, Halifax
19 [in 1861] / 53-55 Winding Road. The first Halifax Post Office opened here in 1790

Musical concerts were held here in the 19th century.

On 1st January 1863, Thomas Crabtree sold the pub to Samuel Webster. In August 1868, under the terms of the Halifax Improvements Acts, the pub applied for, and was granted, a music and dancing licence.

It closed for a time in 2008 and reopened in 2010 as The Old Post Office


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bowling Green, Halifax
213 Gibbet Street. Aka Victoria Bowling Green Hotel.

The name was later changed to The Woodcock.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bowling Green, Skircoat
10 Horsfall Street / Thomas Street West, King Cross. This was originally a beer house.

On 4th March 1929, licensing magistrates refused to approve the transfer of the licence from the Bowling Green to a new inn – to be known as the Big Six Inn – which was to be built next to the Bowling Green. Instead, the licence for the Bowling Green was extended. The Big 6 was the trademark of Horsfall Brothers at their Tower Brewery, Halifax

In 1964, it was taken over by Tetley's when they amalgamated with Ramsden's.

In 1982, it was formally renamed the Big Six Inn.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

B@R Place, Hebden Bridge
Established around 2006 in what was originally Greenwood, Hebden Bridge and Hebden Bridge Liberal Club

Bradford Hotel, Halifax
15 Pellon Lane.

Aka the Bradford Arms [1901].

This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1910 following the Licensing Act [1904]

It was a Stocks pub [until 1914]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bradshaw Tavern
Bradshaw Lane. This was originally a beer house. In June 1961, Samuel Webster bought the pub from Daniel Fielding


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1905: Fred Sunderland

 

Bramble, Rastrick
Holly Bank Road / Field Lane.

In April 2007, there were proposals to demolish the pub and build houses on the site.

In November 2011, there were proposals to demolish the pub and build 9 town houses and 2 semi-detached houses on the site.

Bramsche Bar, Todmorden
It was closed in 2004

Branch Road Inn, Greetland

Owners and tenants have included

It was a Whitaker pub when they bought the pub for £1250 in 1919.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1858: Eli Hanson
  • 1859: Francis Calvert
  • 1861: Francis Calvert
  • 1864: Thomas Heap
  • 1874: Sidney Bowes
  • 1887: James Roberts
  • 1903: Joseph Wadsworth
  • 1904: John Needham
  • 1909: Tom Allen Kitchen
  • 1911: James Walker
  • 1912: James Walker
  • 1912: Lewis Lainton
  • 1917: Lewis Lainton
  • 1921: Abraham Barraclough
  • 1924: Harry Bray
  • 1926: Harry Smith
  • 1933: Arthur Bates Crowther
  • 1934: James William Coram
  • 1935: Arthur Brook
  • 1936: Crossley Ackroyd
  • 1940: Roland Moorhouse
  • 1941: Dorothy Moorhouse
  • 1946: Roland Moorhouse

 

Branch, Sowerby Bridge
15 Wharf Street.

Owners and tenants have included

The pub closed in 1949 as being redundant.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brass Cat, Halifax
Cheapside. Originally, the popular name of the Golden Lion.

It formally adopted the nickname in October 1981.

It 1987, it was refurbished and incorporated the neighbouring premises of Goodall & Mitchell which stood to the west.

It is now [2014] known as the Cat & Fiddle

Brewers' Arms, Halifax
22 Crib Lane.

The pub closed on 16th February 1962.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brewers' Arms, Halifax
8 St James's Road / Argyle Street. This was originally a beer house. Opened in 1893.

The pub closed in 1924


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brewers' Arms, Mount Tabor
18/19 Moor End Road / Clough Lane. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed in 1911 following the Licensing Act [1904].

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brewers' Cellar, Halifax
8 Wade Street. Built in 1629.

A stone relief carving of a malt shovel was taken from the neighbouring Malt Shovel and built into the wall of the yard at the Brewers' Cellar.

This was originally a beer house. It closed in 1975


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brick Green Inn, Barkisland
In 1911, the New Rock was known as the Brick Green Inn

Brickmakers' Arms, Halifax
1 Godley Road / 144 New Bank. A sharp-angled building at the junction of New Bank and Lister Road.

It was a Stocks pub [1898]. In 1933, the pub was bought by Websters.

The pub closed on 12th February 1969.

The pub was demolished in 1978 when the area was redeveloped.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs.

See Coffin Row, Godley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bridge & Coffee Tavern, Elland
Recorded on 15th November 1892, when William Bowling was lodging here

Bridge, Brighouse
39 Lower Briggate. Aka The Blazing Rag. Opened in 1847.

The pub had a roller shutter instead of a regular front door.

On March 16th 1900, the pub was sold at auction as part of the Piggott Estate.

The pub closed in 1974 and was converted into flats


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1881: Thomas Johnson
  • 1890: John Walker
  • 1891: John Walker
  • 1900: George Squire
  • 1904: G. F. Thurlow
  • 1905: E. Thurlow
  • 1908: George Swindon Marsh
  • 1911: George Swindon Marsh
  • 1912: A. E. Bray
  • 1913: W. Catherall
  • 1914: W. Evans
  • 1916: Sam Ramsden
  • 1921: F. Shaw
  • 1922: Sam Goodall
  • 19??: Rod Newsom
  • 1933: Charles E. Norman
  • 197?: (possibly) Hazel & Fergus Grieg
  • 1974: (possibly) Charles Norman

 

Bridge, Brighouse
Briggate. Formerly the Anchor Inn

Bridge, Elland
Briggate / Elland Bridge.

Formerly The Royal Hotel stands next to Britannia House.

In 1933, the pub was bought by Websters from Shibden Head Brewery

Bridge End, Hebden Bridge
The original name of the White Swan, Hebden Bridge which stands near the Old Bridge at Hebden Bridge

Bridge Hotel, Greetland
Brow Bridge, 77 Rochdale Road.

Aka the Brow Bridge Inn, Greetland.

Stood opposite the main gate to Clay House.

It was a Bentley & Shaw pub.

The pub closed on 10th August 1967.

It was demolished shortly afterwards.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Shears, Greetland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bridge Inn, Sowerby Bridge

Bridge, Luddenden
3 Brook Street / Bridge End.

The pub closed in 1949


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bridge Street Hotel, Sowerby Bridge
Aka Bridge Street Tavern, Bridge Inn.

Bridge Street / Back West Street. Planning applications show that this was an Alderson pub [May 1901]. It was a Halifax Brewery Company pub [1903], then later it was an Alderson pub [1928, 1945]. Owned by John Naylor and then Thomas Ramsden.

The pub closed in 1951


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bridge Tavern, Halifax
On the corner of 84 Northgate / Grove Street. Opened in 1822. The pub was eventually owned by Brear & Brown.

It was a Whitaker pub [1918].

The pub was sold to Halifax Corporation and closed 17th July 1940. The licence was transferred to the Exley Park, Exley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bridges, Sowerby Bridge
Station Road. Built into the railway arches.

The bar was closed [2013]

Brighton Hotel, Halifax
32 Gaol Lane. In 1871, it is described on the census, as being
between Gaol Lane and Chapel Fold

The pub closed in 1911 following the Licensing Act [1904]


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Britannia Inn, Halifax
73/75 Woolshops.

It was a Knowles pub.

The pub closed on 31st December 1954


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

British Queen, Todmorden
Bacup Road, Cloughfoot / Dulesgate.

Opened about 1840. This was originally a beer house and was given a full licence when the Blue Ball shut down [around 1861]. Robert Barker won the battle for trade and the Blue Ball sold their full licence to the British Queen.

The pub closed in 19??.

It is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Briton, Sowerby


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Broad Door Stones, Midgley

Broad Oak, Hove Edge
Halifax Road.

It was a house before becoming an inn. Owners and tenants of the house have included

In 18??, the house was converted into the Broad Oak Inn.

In 1933, the inn was bought by Websters from Shibden Head Brewery. The pub lost its licence in 1934, and closed on 22nd June 1935

In January 1936, it was sold to Arthur Greenwood.

The property has been demolished. A garage and petrol station were built on the site. In 2008, this was demolished and flats were built on the land


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Broad Street Temperance Hotels, Halifax
See

Broad Tree, Halifax
A group of friends, including Branwell Brontë, met here and at other local pubs.

From 1818, meetings and rehearsals of the Halifax Quarterly Choral Society were held here and at other local Inns


Question: Does anyone know the location of the pub?

 

Broad Tree Hotel, Lee Mount
34a / 42 Ovenden Road, Bank Top. Opened in 1840.


Question: If the pub only opened in 1840, where were Messrs Crabtree & Chappell on the dates shown?

 

In the early hours of Saturday, 31st January 1857, an unidentified man was found on the doorstep of the pub

in the last degree of exhaustion consistent with life

He died shortly afterwards, and the jury returned a verdict that he had died from starvation. He was never identified.

The pub was bought by Websters around 1873.

The pub closed on 31st August 1971.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: Jonathan Crabtree
  • 1834: John Chappell
  • 1837: John Chappell

 


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Broadbent's

Broadstones, Halifax
Recorded in 1738.

See Angel, Halifax and Broadstones House, Halifax

Brothers Grimm, Sowerby Bridge
Burnley Road. The Bay Horse, Sowerby Bridge was renamed The Brothers Grimm in the early 1990s when the Beardow brothers bought it. The name changed back when the pub company acquired it

Brow Bridge Inn, Greetland
Aka the Bridge Hotel, Greetland

Brown Cow, Elland
Broad Carr Terrace. This was originally a beer house.

The pub closed on 29th December 1934 (extinction of licence).

It is now a private house


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brown Cow, Halifax
Aka The Old Brown Cow.

4 Copper Street.

Opened in 1822.

The pub closed in 1863.

A new hostelry, the New Brown Cow, opened on Swine Market in 1864.

A public notice in the Halifax Guardian of May 1865 announced

BROWN COW HOTEL, HALIFAX

Mr. W. C. Patchett thanks the people of Halifax for the support bestowed upon him and his late father for a period of 53 years at the Old Brown Cow Inn, Cow Green Halifax, and announces his removal to the NEW INN recently built by him at the top of Swine Market


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brown Cow, Halifax
54 Burnley Road / King Cross. In 1862, the pub was bought by Samuel Webster.

The pub closed on 4th April 1939 and was demolished for road widening.

The license was transferred to the new Allan Fold Inn, and some of the stonework from the old pub was incorporated into a retaining wall near the Allan Fold Inn


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brown Cow, Halifax
Aka The New Brown Cow, Patchett's Brown Cow Hotel.

Swine Market.

Opened in 1864 to replace the Old Brown Cow in Copper Street.

A public notice in the Halifax Guardian of May 1865 announced

BROWN COW HOTEL, HALIFAX

Mr. W. C. Patchett thanks the people of Halifax for the support bestowed upon him and his late father for a period of 53 years at the Old Brown Cow Inn, Cow Green Halifax, and announces his removal to the NEW INN recently built by him at the top of Swine Market

In 1880, the property was sold at auction.

It was renamed the Grand Junction Hotel.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brown Cow, Highroad Well
567 Gibbet Street. This was originally a beer house created from a number of cottages.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1894: William Haworth
  • 1905: William Haworth
  • 1910?: Mary Haworth
  • 1936: William Henry Baker

 

Brown Cow, Rishworth
Goathouse / Moselden Heights? / Godly Lane.

Late 17th century pub.

This was originally a beer house.

In September 1920, Whitaker's bought the pub from Lord Savile for £750.

The pub closed in 1955.

It is now known as Brown Cow House.

Henrietta Wells and Florrie Firth were the

two elderly women

mentioned in Geoffrey Siddall's Memories of Pubs in Rishworth.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brown Cow, Sowerby Bridge
28 Bolton Brow.


Question: Does anyone know if this and the Imperial, Sowerby Bridge were nearby, or possibly the same pub?

 

The pub was owned by Frank Waterhouse [1928].

It was a Whitaker pub.

The pub closed in 1975.

It is now flats.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Pubs and Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Sowerby Bridge Brass Band


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Brown Horse, Coley
Denholmegate Road / Lum Brook.

There was a hostelry on this site in the 18th century. This was originally a beer house and obtained its full licence in 1949.

The present pub was built around 1800.

In 1933, the pub was bought by Websters from Shibden Head Brewery. It claims to be the only pub in Yorkshire with this name.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Coley Toll-bar


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Buccaneer, Halifax
122 Hanson Lane. The Armada changed its name to The Buccaneer. It closed in 2009

Buck's Arms, Ogden
Causeway Foot


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Buck, Halifax
Aka The Roebuck, Northgate

Buck Trap, Luddendenfoot
A popular name for the Chatburn & Jennings, Luddendenfoot

Bug Trap, Luddendenfoot
A popular name for the Chatburn & Jennings, Luddendenfoot

Bull & Butcher, Illingworth

Bull & Dog, Halifax
Bull Green.

The pub closed in 1940

Bull & Dog, Sowerby Bridge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1864: Henry Whittell

 

Bull & Dog, Stainland
South Parade. Aka Stone Ridge.

Built around 1820.

It was owned by Brear & Brown [until 1916]. In 1957, it was bought Websters from J. Ainley & Sons.

The pub closed in 2008.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Abraham Haigh and Stubbins, Stainland


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bull's Head, Halifax
3/5 Bull Green. Built to replace the Old Bull's Head which was demolished when George Street was widened. Opened on 28th August 1940.

Designed by Jackson & Fox.

It has had various names including The Manhattan [1990s], XeSS [2003], and the Bull's Head [2008].

It is currently [2011] a restaurant called the Brasserie at the Bull


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1936: Arthur Hoyle
  • 1940: Arthur Hoyle

 

Bull's Head, Queenshead


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1845: William Briggs

 

Bull's Head, Sowerby


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Bull's Head Tavern, Sowerby Bridge
17 Town Hall Street.

A former coaching inn.

In 1850, a number of local preachers met here for 2 years until Tuel Lane United Methodist Free Chapel was built.

Around 1854, it was acquired by John Naylor and rebuilt in 1864.

A new frontage was erected after the facing wall collapsed.

Planning applications show that this was a Halifax Brewery Company pub [May 1898].

In 1909, then later it was an Alderson pub 1911, then later it was a Ramsden pub.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs

See George Henry Bell, Bull's Head Smoke Club and Borough of Sowerby Bridge


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1821: Mrs Sarah Turner
  • 1822: Mrs Sarah Turner
  • 1829: John Thompson
  • 1834: John Marshall
  • 1837: John Marshall
  • 1845: James Eastwood
  • 1850: J. Riley
  • 1860: John Shaw
  • 1864: John Shaw
  • 1871: Robert Wood
  • 1874: John H. Shaw
  • 1887: Champion Greenwood
  • 1892: Thomas Riley
  • 1894: Champion Greenwood
  • 1902: John Campion Noble
  • 1903: John Campion Noble
  • 1905: Arthur Walker
  • 1913: John Cockroft Hardman
  • 1917: Charles E. Whiteley
  • 1920: Harry Emsley
  • 1931: Harry Emsley
  • 1903: Thomas Dunkerley
  • 1903: Arthur Walker
  • 1911: Arthur Walker
  • 1911: John Cockroft Hardman
  • 1913: John Cockroft Hardman
  • 1913: Rhoda Hardman
  • 1916: Rhoda Hardman
  • 1916: Charles Edward Whiteley
  • 1918: Charles Edward Whiteley
  • 1918: Harry Emsley
  • 1930: Harry Emsley
  • 1930: Daniel Smith
  • 1936: Daniel Smith
  • 1936: Walter Holmes
  • 1945: Walter Holmes
  • 1945: Thomas Ellis

 

Bull, Hebden Bridge
Bridge Lane / 68 Market Street.

In 1889, the inquest into the death of William Clarke was held here.

Planning applications show that this was a Whitaker pub [September 1899].

The pub closed in the 1970s.

On 1st January 1978, fire broke out and the bodies of 2 men were found in the attic, possibly squatters in the empty building.

The building is now a private dwelling.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 18??: John Gibson – from the Hare & Hounds, Hebden Bridge
  • 1842: Sarah Gibson
  • 1861: James Horsfall
  • 1864: Robinson Horsfall
  • 1887: Mrs M. A. Horsfall
  • 1894: Mrs Mary Ann Horsfall
  • 1905: Herbert Morrison
  • 1917: Sam Dawson

 

Bull's Tail, Sowerby Bridge
17 Town Hall Street. Aka The Old Vaults of The Bull's Head.

This was a rum and coffee shop.

The pub closed in 1917. Reopened in 198? The stone flagged floor and the 19th century open fireplace have been retained with wall mounted gaslights

Bull, Warley
Cote Hill


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1822: John Turner

 

Butchers' Arms, Ripponden
Rochdale Road. At Stones, Ripponden. Named for the abattoir that stood next to the pub.

Originally, the pub was 2 of the cottages in a row of cottages. It is thought that there was cloth-making carried out on the upper floor.

The pub eventually absorbed all the cottages.

It was a Ramsden pub.

Until the 1950s, it was a free house and sold only ale.

This is discussed in the book Halifax Pubs Volume Two.

See Henry Whiteley


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Butchers' Arms, Sowerby Bridge
Boulder Clough. Originally a row of late 18th century cottages. Later converted to a public house and restaurant


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

  • 1834: William Barrett
  • 1845: William Barrett

 

Butchers' Arms, Walsden
Bottoms. This was originally a beer house which Eli Crossley opened for the first time in 1830.

The hostelry was to stay almost 100 years in the same family.

In the 1980s, it became the Border Rose


Innkeepers, licensees and landlords:

 

Butts Green, Rishworth
Recorded in 1800. Named for archery butts which were hearabouts.

It became the Spread Eagle, Rishworth


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 16:15 on 6th December 2017 / p200_b / 197