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Oa Ob Oc Od Of Og Oh Ok Ol On Op Or Os Ot Ou Ov Ow Ox


O. & C. Estates Limited
Company formed by brothers Oliver and Charles Holdsworth.

It is now a part of The Holdsworth Group of companies

Oade, Shadrach
[1872-1928] Son of James Oade.

Born in Brighouse.

He was a carter [1891] / an iron fitter (hydraulics industry) [1911].

On 27th April 1895, he married Emily Marshall [1876-1948] at Elland Parish Church.


Emily was born in Rastrick
 

Children:

  1. James William
  2. Herbert [1897-1952] who was an apprentice (wire industry) [1911]
  3. Nellie [1905-1984]

The family lived at

  • 17 Albion Street, Brighouse [1911]
  • 29 Piggott Street, Lane Head, Brighouse [1918]

Oade, Alice
[1870-1927] Daughter of James Oade.

Around 1:00 am on a day in August 1888, she was travelling in the train which was carrying people home on the Brighouse District Industrial Society Limited annual excursion to Scarborough. As the train was passing through Lightcliffe, Alice, leaned against the door of the crowded train and fell out.

When they reached Lightcliffe station, parties with lanterns went in search, but no trace was found.

She was later found at home in Simpson Street, Brighouse, having gathered herself together and made her own way home.

In 1891, she married Cross Morton.

They moved away from Brighouse.

They both died in Warrington

Oade, James
[1844-1888] Son of John Oade.

Born in Brighouse.

He was a waterman/boatman.

On 25th February 1866, he married Emma Womersley [1847-1921] at Halifax Parish Church.


Emma was born in Brighouse
 

Children:

  1. Fanny [1866-1942] who was a mill hand [1881]
  2. John [1868-1911] who was a silk dresser [1891]
  3. Alice
  4. Shadrach
  5. William [1874-1885]
  6. Sarah Ann [1877-1953] who was a cotton twister [1891]

The family lived at 3 Simpson's Yard, Mill Street, Brighouse [1891]

Oade, James William
[1895-1918] Son of Shadrach Oade.

Born in Brighouse [23rd September 1895].

He was a silk dresser (waste) [1911].

On 8th June 1918, he married Hettie Heathcote at Halifax Parish Church.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 10th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own).

He died 19th September 1918 (aged 22).

He is remembered on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial, France [4], and on Brighouse War Memorial

Oade, John
[1811-1866] Son of William Oade.

He was a waterman [1841-1866].

On 9th August 1832, he married (1) Alice Green [1812-1839] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children:

  1. Joseph [1836-1851]

On 5th August 1839, he married (2) Frances (Fanny) Green [1812-1869] at Halifax Parish Church.


It is possible that his wives were related; they were both Greens and both born in Southowram
 

Children:

  1. William [1840-1896]
  2. James

The family lived at Brighouse Wood [1841-1866].

John died 17th March 1866.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at under £100.

The will was proved by his widow Fanny,

John & Fanny were buried at St Martin's Church, Brighouse

Oade, William
[1782-1855] Born in Hipperholme.

On 18th May 1807, he married Sarah Harrison [1793-1846] in Shelf.


Sarah was the daughter of Joseph Harrison of Shelf
 

Children:

  1. Hannah [b 1807]
  2. Grace [b 1809]
  3. John
  4. Alice [b 1812]
  5. Mary Ann [b 1815]
  6. Elizabeth [b 1818]

Died in Rastrick

Oade, William
[1840-1???] Born in Brighouse.

In 1862, he married Elizabeth Green.


Elizabeth was the daughter of
William Green
 

Oak End Farm, Southowram
See Bankfield Farm, Southowram

Oak Hill Clough, Todmorden

Oak Hill, Todmorden
The house was built in 1920 on the site of Hole Bottom Mill, Todmorden.

Owners and tenants have included

Oak House, Hipperholme
Owners and tenants have included

Oak Lea, Barkisland
Owners and tenants have included

The Oak Room, Old Cock Inn
The Oak Room at The Old Cock, Halifax is on the first floor. It is oak-panelled and has a stained-glass window with 20 lights – some of the glass is original – as discussed in the Foldout.

The overmantel of fireplace is dated 1581.

The plasterwork depicts the Savile arms and was added in the 1630s.

It was at a meeting of the Loyal Georgean Society in The Oak Room, that the decision was made to establish what became the Halifax Permanent Benefit Building & Investment Society.

In 1879, the room was restored by craftsmen who stayed at the Inn whilst they carried out restoration work on Halifax Parish Church.

This is discussed in the book Views of Ancient Buildings in the Parish of Halifax

The Oak Room, Shibden Hall
A room on the first floor at Shibden Hall.

This was built in the 1580s as Robert Waterhouse's best chamber.

There is a clock here by S. B. Pinchin.

On the bedside table are false curls such as those worn by Anne Lister

Oak Villa, Elland
Victoria Road.

Owners and tenants have included

Oakendale, William
Pseudonym of William Dearden

Oakes, Alfred
[1849-1912] Son of Thomas Oakes.

He joined the family business John Oakes & Company

Oakes Farmhouse, Charlestown
Hebden Bridge. House dated 1701

Oakes, Fred
[1885-1918]

He married Unknown.

They lived at 19 Lime Street, Lee Mount.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 1st/5th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own).

He was killed in action in the battle of Valenciennes [1st November 1918] (aged 33).

He was buried at the Auberchicourt British Cemetery, France [III B 14].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance

Oakes House, Holywell Green
Owners and tenants have included

Oakes, John
[1836-1917] JP.

Son of Thomas Oakes.

He was a member of Halifax Town Council / a governor of Heath Grammar School / a damask worsted manufacturer / a partner in Scarborough Brothers & Oakes.

In 1870, he established John Oakes & Company. In 1881, he employed 175 men.

In 1874, he married Rosalina Mellor in Halifax.


Rosalina was the daughter of Rev Enoch Mellor
 

Children:

  1. Rosa Gwendolene [1876-1940]
  2. Margaret Melicent [1878-1963] who married Stephen Leslie Norris [1859-1937]

The family lived at

Rosalina died 25th December 1910.

John died 17th July 1917 (aged 81).

Margaret Melicent died 13th September 1963.

They were buried at Hampstead Cemetery, London

Oakes's: John Oakes & Company
Manufacturers of worsted coatings, suitings, serges, stuff, damask, rep and other materials. Established in 1870 by John Oakes at Regent Works, Halifax. In 1895, they employed over 200 workers

Oakes, John William
[1860-1901] Son of Charles Oakes, cotton spinner.

Born in Sowerby Bridge.

He was a cotton spinner of Mear Clough, Skircoat [1885] / a cotton spinner [1891, 1901].

In 1885, he married Rachel [1866-1???] at Halifax Parish Church.


Rachel, of Mear Clough, Skircoat, was born in Norland, the daughter of Samuel Briggs, joiner.

She was a woollen weaver [1891]

 

Children:

  1. Florence [b 1887] who was a cotton twiner [1901]
  2. Alice [b 1892] who was a cotton winder [1911]
  3. Selwyn
  4. Willie [b 1902]

The family lived at

  • 3 Summerlent? Terrace, Wakefield Road, Sowerby Bridge [1891]
  • 7 Canal Road, Sowerby Bridge [1901]
  • 8 Canal Road, Sowerby Bridge [1911]

John William died in 1901 (aged 41) 

Oakes, Selwyn
[1895-1917] Son of John William Oakes.

He was educated at the Blue Coat School, Halifax / a woollen piece raiser [1911] / employed by Edwards & Rawson [for 5 years] / a Territorial.

During World War I, he was called-up [August 1914], and served as a Private with D Company 2nd/4th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He was reported missing and assumed to have died at Bullecourt [3rd May 1917] (aged 22).

He is remembered on the Arras Memorial, France [6], on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, on the Halifax Parish Church Church Members (WWI) Memorial, and on the Blue Coat School Memorial.

Oakes, Thomas
[1809-1877] He was a general and Baptist Minister.

On 13th April 1835, he married Sarah Wilson [1811-1860] at Halifax Parish Church.

Children:

  1. John
  2. Sarah Jane [1847-1870]
  3. Alfred

The family lived at

  • Haley Hill, Halifax [1841]
  • 7 Bradford Road, Northowram [1851]
  • 29 Gerrard Street, Halifax [1871]

Oakes, Rev William Frederick
[18??-1???] He was rector of Tibberton, Shropshire.

In [Q1] 1863, he married Ellen Elizabeth Rawson in York


Ellen Elizabeth was the daughter of
John Rawson
 

Ellen Elizabeth died in Lowestoft, Suffolk [20th July 1890] (aged 72) 

Oakfield, Halifax
Savile Road

Owners and tenants have included

Oakfield, Lightcliffe
Cecil Avenue.

Owners and tenants have included

Oakhill Clough, Todmorden
Hole Bottom Road. Originally 4 late 18th century cottages

Oaklands, Brighouse
Owners and tenants have included

Oaklands House, Greetland
Carriage Drive. Formerly known as Oatland and Oatland House, Greetland

Oakleigh, Lightcliffe
Denholme Gate Road/Waverley Terrace, Hipperholme.

Owners and tenants have included

Oakleigh, Skircoat
House at the junction of Dry Clough Lane and Skircoat Green Road.

Owners and tenants have included

Oakley, Edith Annie
[1904-1963] Daughter of Rev George Robert Oakley. She was Mayoress to Mary Pickles [1959], President of the Halifax Soroptimist Club [1948], Yorkshire Divisional President of the Federation of Soroptimist Clubs, and First secretary of the Halifax Standing Conference of Women's Organisations.

In the 1930s, she had a school at Clare Hall. When Halifax Corporation acquired Clare Hall, the school moved to premises on the eastern side of Clare Road.

She later established the Bermondsey House School in Halifax.

She later moved to The Gleddings School

Oakley, Eileen
[1903-1965] Daughter of Rev George Robert Oakley.

She married Rev J. Butterworth.

Children:

  1. child
  2. child
  3. child
  4. child

Oakley, George Cecil
[1912-1981] MA, BD.

Son of Rev George Robert Oakley.

He worked at Ramsden's Brewery before he was ordained. He became a missionary in South Africa and Sarawak.

In 1948, he married Dorothy Joan Campbell from Castleford.

Children:

  1. son
  2. son
In 1954, he became incumbent of St Mary's, Willesden, Rural Dean of Brent and Prebendary of St Pauls Cathedral

Oakley, Dr George Gardner
[1871-19??] Son of Dr John Oakley.

Born in Halifax [10th May 1871].

He was educated at Shrewsbury School / St Bartholomew's Hospital London / a medical student [1891] / honorary assistant surgeon to the Eye, Ear, Throat & Nose Department at the Royal Halifax Infirmary / surgeon captain to the 1st Volunteer Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment / temporary captain of the Royal Army Medical Corps, serving in South Africa [1900]

Oakley, Rev George Robert
[1864-1932] MA, BD.

Born in Dublin. His family moved to Yorkshire when he was 1 year old.

He was educated at Sheffield Royal Grammar School and St Aidan's Theological College, Birkenhead and served in Lancashire before becoming Vicar of Illingworth [1923].

On 16th June 1897, he married Lizzie Matthew [1873-1920].


Lizzie was the daughter of John Matthew of Middleton, Lancashire
 

Children:

  1. Arthur Gaskin [1898-1901]
  2. Inez Mary Margaret
  3. Norah Gwendolyn
  4. Eileen
  5. Edith Annie
  6. Hilda Gertrude
  7. William John Terence
  8. Pauline Doris
  9. George Cecil

He wrote several books, including Shall I believe [1910], In Olden Days: Lancashire Legends [1911], The Children's Heritage [1912], Our Father's House, and The Story of St Mary's Illingworth [1923]

Oakley, Hilda Gertrude
[1906-1999] Daughter of Rev George Robert Oakley.

In 1939, she married Harry Hunter from Nursery Lane, Ovenden.

Children:

  1. John
  2. child

Oakley, Inez Mary Margaret
[1900-1992] Daughter of Rev George Robert Oakley. She was Matron at Rugby School. Later, she assisted her sister, Edith, at their Bermondsey House School in Halifax. She handled the domestic side of the business, and worked as chef. She never married

Oakley, Dr John
[1842-19??] MRCS, LSA (Lond), JP.

Born in Shrewsbury [27th March 1842].

He was educated at Shrewsbury, Kings College London, Paris and New York / surgeon to the Royal Canadian & African Mail Steamship Company [1865-1866] / JP [1894] / physician and surgeon [1895] / honorary senior surgeon to the Halifax Ear, Eye and Throat Hospital / medical officer to the Halifax Blind Institute / President of the Halifax Literary & Philosophical Society.

In 1886, he established the Halifax Ear, Eye and Throat Hospital in one wing of his home, Holly House, Halifax.

In [Q4] 1868, he married Emilie Marie Fox [1844-1907] in Shrewsbury.

Children:

  1. George Gardner George G [b 1872] who was a medical student [1891]
  2. Mary Elizabeth [b 1873] who married Edward Lawrence Baddeley
  3. Frank N [b 1878]
  4. Arthur P [b 1881]
  5. Philip D [b 1883]

The family lived at

Living with them [in 1891] was son-in-law Edward Lawrence Baddeley

Oakley, Norah Gwendolyn
[1903-1996] BA, BD.

Daughter of Rev George Robert Oakley.

She taught classics at Crossley & Porter School. In 1948, she left to become lecturer in Divinity at Matlock Teacher Training College. She remained at Matlock until her retirement. She became a Part-time Lecturer in Divinity at Nottingham University. She never married

Oakley, Pauline Doris
[1910-1999] Daughter of Rev George Robert Oakley.

She worked as knitting and craft demonstrator for Paton & Baldwin's.

She married Arthur Woodcock from Southowram. They had no children.

During World War II, she worked in the Post Office at Hipperholme. She later became the secretary of Peartree Lane School, Derby and taught art, embroidery and needlework for many years in Derby

Oakley, William John Terence
[1908-1984] MC.

Son of Rev George Robert Oakley.

He was curate at Drighlinghouses. He went to live in Australia. He was a Captain and Padre in the Australian Army. He was a prisoner of war in Crete [1942]. In 1946, he returned to England. In the 1960s, he was incumbent at several churches, including Tansor with Cotterstock and Fotheringhay, Northants.

He married Peggy Denton from Huddersfield.

Children:

  1. son
  2. son
  3. son

Oakroyd, Brearley
See Grove, Luddendenfoot

Oaks Farm, Charlestown
Hebden Bridge. On the Pennine Way.

House dated inscribed RB TH 1701.

The mid 19th century barn is also listed

Oaks Green Co-Op, Rastrick
On 20th February 1861, a branch of the Brighouse District Industrial Society opened at Oaks Green, Rastrick in premises owned by tailor John Sykes

Oaks Green, Rastrick
Area of Rastrick on New Hey Road.

Mentioned in the Nomina Villarum [1865].

When the congregation at Bridge End chapel declined during the ministry of Rev William Northend, some of the members met here.

See Oaks Green Co-Op, Rastrick

Oaks House, Halifax
Lister Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

The Oaks, Rastrick
Owners and tenants have included

Oaksroyd, Copley
18th century house. Demolished in 19??

Oakwood, Halifax
Albert Promenade.

House at The Rocks.

Owners and tenants have included

Oastler, Richard
[1789-1861] Social reformer who advocated the abolition of slavery, opposed child labour and the Poor Law, and was largely responsible for securing the Factory Act and the Ten Hours Act. He was given the nickname of the Factory King.

Oates...
The entries for people with the surname Oates are gathered together in the SideTrack.

The individuals listed there are not necessarily related to each other.

Oates & Company
Leather business established by brother Henry Oates and James Holroyd Oates at 12 Lister Lane, Halifax.

In 1869, James Holroyd Oates left the partnership.

Later generations of the family joined the business

Oates & Green Limited
Manufacturers of brick, tile, earthenware, sanitary and ceramics products.

Partners included William Oates and Donald Oates.

In 1880, they had a stone quarry at Horley Green. They also had business interests in Wrexham.

In 1907, the business was acquired by the Leeds Fireclay Company Limited.

They were at Beacon Brick Works [1905], Ellen Royd Works, Halifax [1905], North Bridge Station [1905], Horley Green Fire Clay & Sanitary Tube Works [1915], and their brickyard at Range Bank, Halifax [1915].

Their urinals were world-famous – examples can still be seen at the Royal Oak. Brand names for these included Luddenden and Mytholm.

It is said that the firm supplied all the ceramic tiles which originally lined the Blackwall Tunnel in London.

In December 1894, a hurricane demolished one of their chimneys.

In 1908, the business was bought by the Leeds Fireclay Company

In 1958, 7-year-old Carl Bairstow accidentally drowned when he was playing on a home-made raft in the dam at the works. The dam was drained and filled in

Oates & Smith
Stone merchants at Southowram.

Partners included Henry Oates and John Smith.

On 18th August 1874, the partnership was dissolved. Oates carried on the business in his own name and on his own account

Oates & Taylor
Stone merchants at Southowram [1874].

Partners included Thomas Henry Taylor and Joe Oates / Charles Oates

Oates's: Brian Oates's Charity
In his will of 1529, Brian Oates bequeathed money from land and property in Halifax with 6/8d per annum to maintain the highway between Halifax and Shibden Brook, 6/8d for a mass to be sung in Halifax Parish Church, and the remainder to be paid to the priest there.

Oates Brothers
Worsted spinners established by Edwin James Oates and Arthur Donald Oates with business at Ryburne Mill, Halifax.

See Rayner Ramsden

Oates fountain
A drinking fountain dated 1871 set into the south-west turret of North Bridge, Halifax.

This is a memorial to James Oates who worked on the construction of the bridge

Oates's: Joe Oates & Sons
Established by Joe Oates.

Farmers and quarry owners at Royd Farm and quarries, Brookfoot Lane, Southowram [1905]

Oates's: Matthew Oates & Son
Halifax architects. Recorded in 1849 at Ward's End, Halifax. Partners included Matthew Oates and John Edwin Oates.

In 1861, they were recorded at Halifax and York.

Their work included Highroad Well Independent School [1861]

Oates, Pickersgill & Oates
Architectural partnership established by John, Thomas Pickersgill and Matthew Oates.

They were at 7 Union Street, Halifax and in Huddersfield.

The partnership became Pickersgill & Oates and moved to York.

Work by the partnership included St James's Church, Hebden Bridge and St Paul's Church, Cross Stone

Oates Trust Fund
In 1911, Arthur Donald Oates and his sister gave a sum of money in memory of their late brother, Edwin James Oates, of which £4,000 was set aside to start a convalescent home and form part of the Oates Trust Fund.

Oatland House, Greetland
Carriage Drive, Lindwell.

The house was built in 18?? for the Minister at Lindwell Primitive Methodist Church.

It was formerly known as Oatlands.

Owners and tenants have included

Mary, wife of James Holdsworth Titterington, died here [1st February 1911].

It is now 2 houses – Oakland and Highfield – known as Oaklands House

See Oatland Field Terrace, Greetland

Oats Royd, Midgley
House built in 1635 by James Murgatroyd for his son Henry.

A Royalist head and the slogan

Vive le Roy

over the doorway is similar to one at East Riddlesden Hall, Keighley.

The datestone HM 1645 for Henry Murgatroyd has been altered to JW 1645 for James Wynstanley, who owned the house in the mid-19th century. A carved stone head can be seen below the datestone and over a doorway.

Owners and tenants have included

The house was extended in 1846. An extra range of rooms was added to the front of the house, and an Italianate front was added.

The house gave its name to the family's Oats Royd Mill which stands nearby

Oats Royd Mills Brass Band
Aka the Luddenden Old Band.

Luddenden Oats Royd Mills Band, Luddenden Old Band, Oatsroyd, Oats Royd Mill Band.

In 1864, it changed its name when it became associated with J. Murgatroyd & Son's Oats Royd Mills, Luddenden. They had a band room at the Travellers' Rest, Luddenden.

In 1871, the band played at the ceremony when the first sod was cut at Widdop Reservoir.

Disbanded in 1???

Oban House, Brighouse
Lightcliffe Road / Laverock Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Obelisks, Landmarks & Statues

Oberton, Rev Thomas
[18??-18??] Recorded in 1874 at South Parade, Halifax

Obery, Rev John Meeson
[1813-1858] AM.

A native of Walsall. He was educated Highbury College [1833] and Glasgow University [1835] before becoming the first Minister at Harrison Road Chapel, Carlton Street [1838-1849].

He married Martha Harrison [1815-1842].

He lived at 2 Regent Street, Halifax [1845]. He moved to Woodford, Essex. He died in Kensington and was buried at Brompton

O'Boyle, Neil
[1809-1866] Lodging house keeper at Waterhouse Arms Yard, Halifax [1866].

He died 15th November 1866 (aged 57).

He was buried at Stoney Royd Cemetery [K 767 D]

O'Boyle, Thomas
[18??-18??] Militiaman of Southowram.

On 14th May 1867, he was imprisoned for 6 months for threatening David Holdsworth

O'Brien, Christopher Patrick
[19??-] Mayor of Hebden Royd [1985-1986]

O'Brien, Ernest E.
[18??-19??] Editor of the Halifax Guardian.

He lived at Avondale Place, Halifax [1905]

O'Brien, Harry
[1899-1918] Or Henry.

Son of Mary Elizabeth & Thomas O'Brien of 32 Woodside Place, Halifax.

Born in Halifax.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 1st Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers.

He was killed in action [23rd August 1918] (aged 19).

He was buried at the Railway Cutting Cemetery, Courcelles-Le-Comte, France [B 20].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, and on the Memorial at Saint Bernard's Catholic Church

O'Brien, John
[18??-1917] Born in Cork.

During World War I, he enlisted with the West Yorkshire Regiment, then served as a Private with the 6th Battalion South Lancashire Regiment.

He was killed in action [24th April 1917].

He was buried at the Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Iraq [XIX J 14].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, and on the Memorial at Saint Bernard's Catholic Church

O'Brien, John Barrie
[1919-1940] Son of Gertrude & John O'Brien of 14 Clare Road, Halifax.

He was educated at Holy Trinity School & Halifax Modern School / a choirboy at Northowram.

He enlisted [1936].

During World War II, he served as a Sergeant with 51 Squadron Royal Air Force.

He died 15th August 1940 (aged 21).

He was buried at the Brookwood Military Cemetery, Surrey [20 A 1].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance

O'Brien, John William
[1893-1917] Or Willie.

Of 17 Morpeth Street, Charlestown, Halifax.

He was a member of St Bernard's Catholic Church, Halifax / employed by H. Fletcher & Company Limited.

During World War I, he enlisted with the West Yorkshire Regiment [1915], then served as a Private with the 2nd/4th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He was killed in action at Cambrai [20th November 1917] (aged 24).

He is remembered on the Cambrai Memorial, Nord France [6 & 7], on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, and on the Memorial at Saint Bernard's Catholic Church

O'Brien, Joseph
[1873-1916] Son of Catherine & Henry O'Brien of Halifax.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 2nd Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own).

He died 11th September 1916 (aged 43).

He was buried at the Vermelles British Cemetery, France [II C 21].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, and on the Memorial at Saint Bernard's Catholic Church

Occupations

Ockwell, Joseph Steven
[1922-1944] Son of Lydia Harding & Robert W. Ockwell of Small Dole, Sussex.

Born in Swindon, Wiltshire.

During World War II, he served as a Sapper with the Royal Engineers.

He died in Halifax [28th August 1944].

He is remembered on a CWGC headstone at Stoney Royd Cemetery [J 83]

O'Connor, Chris
[19??-] Conservative Councillor for Hipperholme & Lightcliffe. He was Mayor of Calderdale [2001-2002]

He became an Independent councillor after his year of office

O'Connor, Des
[1932-] In February 1985, the entertainer apologised for a comment that
Halifax was a cemetery with lights

which had been wrongly attributed to him by The Sun newspaper

O'Connor, Feargus
[1794-1855] Chartist leader from Dublin. He travelled through the north and midlands of England advocating radicalism.

His paper, the Northern Star, became the official organ of Chartism.

In 1840, he was imprisoned at York for seditious libel. He advocated peasant proprietorship. In 1839, he addressed the Chartist meeting at Peep Green, Hartshead. In 1845, he founded the National Land Company to buy estates for Chartists and lease them by ballot. He was MP for Nottingham in 1847.

In 1852, he was pronounced insane and died in Dr Tuke's Asylum at Turnham Green in Chiswick.

See W. Haigh

O'Connor, Jack
[19??-19??] Todmorden-born footballer. He played for Stockport County in the 1950s. Connor's Bar at the club's Edgeley Park ground is named in his memory

O'Connor, James
[1827-1879] He was a marine store dealer at 13 Gaol Lane, Halifax.

He died in Halifax Workhouse [9th March 1879] (aged 52).

He was buried at Stoney Royd Cemetery [K 900 D]

O'Connor, Mr
[18??-18??]

He married Mary A. [1835-1???].


Mary was born in Wexford, Ireland.

She was a house keeper (domestic) [1881]

 

Children:

  1. William O'Connor
  2. John [b 1861] who was a boot finisher [1881]
  3. Margaret [b 1864] who was a worsted spinner [1881]
  4. Mary A [b 1869] who was a worsted spinner [1881]
  5. Kate [b 1872]

The family lived at 11 Oates Street, Halifax [1881]

Mary was widowed by 1881.

Living with the widowed Mary [in 1881] were son William & his family

O'Connor, Vincent
[1888-1917] Son of William O'Connor.

Born in Halifax.

He lived at 13 Freedom Street, Mount Pleasant, Halifax [1906].

He was a leather dresser [1906] / a postman on the Heptonstall-Blackshaw round / a regular soldier.

He joined the West Yorkshire Regiment at Halifax [June 1906]. He transferred to the West Ridings [September 1906]. He was in Ambala, India [1911]

In 1915, he married Martha Annie Weir at St Patrick's Catholic Church, West Vale.


Martha Annie came from Sowerby Bridge
 

Children:

  1. Eveline [b 1916]

The family lived at 20 Sowerby Street, Sowerby Bridge.

During World War I, he was called-up [August 1914], and served as a Private with the 8th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

His brother Willie was a signaller with the West Riding Regiment [1917].

He fought at Mons and was cut off behind enemy lines. He travelled back to the UK through Holland, disguised as a workman.

He was wounded twice.

He was admitted to No.32 Casualty Clearing Station

dangerously wounded in the body, and very collapsed. He only lived a few hours and passed away peacefully

He died of wounds in France / Flanders [12th August 1917] (aged 28).

He was buried at the Brandhoek New Military Cemetery, Belgium [VI F 2].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Saint George's Church, Sowerby

O'Connor, William
[1859-19??] Son of Mr O'Connor.

Born in Liverpool.

He was a boot maker [1881, 1891] / a shoe maker [1901].

He married Emily Ann [1859-19??].


Emily A was born in Halifax.

She was a brush maker [1881]

 

Children:

  1. Mary Ellen [b 1878] who was a worsted spinner [1891]
  2. Emily A [b 1880]
  3. Annie E [b 1883]
  4. Bernard John [b 1884] who was a cotton spinner [1901]
  5. Margaret [b 1887] who was a cotton spinner [1901]
  6. Agnes M [b 1892]
  7. Vincent
  8. Joseph William / Willie [b 1897] who was a signaller with the West Riding Regiment [WW1] and hospitalised in Stoke-on-Trent with wounds in the right leg & arm [1917]

The family lived at

  • 11 Oates Street, Halifax [with William's widowed mother 1881]
  • 36 Oates Street, Halifax [1891]
  • 27 Holroyd Street, Halifax [1901]

Octagon Tower
The name is used for Wainhouse Tower [1905]

Octave Club, Elland
Casson Place / Huddersfield Road. Social club recorded in 1905.

In 1917, James Hawkyard was secretary

Oddfellows
A benevolent society

See Humility Lodge, Lily of the Valley Lodge, Odd Lads, Prudence of the Vale Lodge, J. A. Riley and Rose of the Valley Lodge

The Oddfellows, Halifax
The building stands at the corner of Prescott Street and Coleridge Street

Oddfellows' Hall, Brighouse
Built in 1850.

The 4-storey building stood behind the George Hotel on Bradford Road. There were one large room, 2 smaller, and a kitchen on the 2 upper floors, with shops and houses on the lower 2 floors.

It was the town's first concert hall.

In 1881, the Salvation Army had to abandon its first meeting here because of public opposition.

During World War II, the building was used by the military.

The Brighouse & Rastrick Band bought the whole building in April 1946, and converted the upper rooms for use as rehearsal facilities.

The building was demolished in 1972 to make way for the Lüdenscheid Link bypass.

Keepers:

  • 1874: J. Broomhead

See Henry Briggs, Brighouse Flour & Industrial Society and Marsden's Homoeopathic Stores, Brighouse

Oddfellows' Hall, Halifax
Magnificent building with a classical Corinthian-pillared front which stood on St James's Road. Opened in 1840.

It became the Alhambra Cinema in 19??.

The building was demolished in 1963.

See Chartism, Royal Hotel & Oddfellows' Hall, Halifax and Stansfield's Variety Theatre, Halifax

Oddfellows' Hall, Luddendenfoot
The Oddfellows was recorded here in 1884

Oddfellows' Hall, Todmorden
Bridge Street.

Opened October 1842 for the Todmorden Oddfellows.

The Hall is said to be haunted by a builder who died whilst the building as being constructed.

The County Court held meetings here.

In October 1851, Jane and William Macarthy set up a theatre in the Hall.

In 1861, a Wesleyan Association Chapel was here

At the end of the 19th century, it was the headquarters of the Todmorden Liberal Club.

On 1st April 1876, it opened as a social club.

In December 1896, it was acquired by Todmorden Liberal Club.

A new hall was built on Oxford Street in 19??.

See Robert Allen, Fielden Statue, Todmorden Oddfellows' Hall War Memorial, Temperance Hotel, Todmorden and Todmorden Mechanics' Institute

Oddie Hall, Heptonstall
Hawden Hole was referred to as Oddie Hall

Oddie, John
[18??-1???] A timber merchant at India Buildings, Halifax [1883].

See Thomas Chambers

Oddie, Rev Samuel
[1???-1879] Born at Wyke. He trained at Idle Academy before becoming Minister at Providence Congregational Church, Elland [1838]. He moved to Ossett [1844-1869]. He died at Pateley Bridge

Oddjobs
Hardware business at Briggate, Brighouse. Formerly known as John Francis Brown's

Oddy, Abner
[18??-1900] Of Brow Lane, Shibden.

He emigrated [1894].

During the South African Wars, he served as a Private with Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry.

He was killed at Rooi Kop, Transvaal [6th September 1900].

He is remembered on the Halifax Parish Church South African War Memorial, and on West View Park War Memorial

Oddy, Alfred
[1863-1942] Born in Halifax.

He was a carpet weaver [1885].

On 31st October 1885, he married Emma Gledhill [1864-1940] at All Souls' Church, Halifax.


Emma was born in Halifax
 

Children:

  1. Edith [b 1886]
  2. Emma Lena [1888-1975] who married Percy Naylor [1889-1922]
  3. Edgar
  4. Annie [b 1901]

The family lived at

  • Liversedge [1895]
  • 8 Milton Square, Heckmondwyke [1911]

Oddy, Arthur
[18??-18??] He was Master of Heywood's School when the scholars and staff moved to the Northowram Mechanics' Institute

Oddy, Edgar
[1886-1917] Son of Edward Oddy.

Born in Northowram.

He was a compositor with Ibberson's, printers.

He lived at Edge Top Lane, Northowram.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 2nd/4th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He was reported missing and assumed to have died at Bullecourt [3rd May 1917] (aged 31).

He is remembered on the Arras Memorial, France [6], on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, and on the Memorial at Saint Matthew's Church, Northowram

Oddy, Edgar
[1894-1917] Son of Alfred Oddy.

Born in Halifax.

He was a wire drawer.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 27th (Tyneside Irish) Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers.

He died 28th April 1917.

He is remembered on the Arras Memorial, France [2 & 3]

Oddy, Edward
[1856-1939] Born in Halifax.

He was a brickworks engine driver & firer [1875].

In 1875, he married Henrietta Kay [1857-1926] in Halifax.


Henrietta was born in Otley
 

Children:

  1. Sophia [18??-1950] who was a worsted coating weaver, and married [Halifax 1922] James Riley
  2. Edgar

The family lived at

  • 10 Hedge Top Lane, Northowram [1901, 1911]
  • 17 Lydgate, Northowram [1917]

Edward, Henrietta and Sophia died at 17 Lydgate, Northowram

Oddy, Ernest
[1874-1942] Son of Alfred Oddy, railway servant.

Born in Halifax.

He was a groom of Water Side, Halifax [1893] / a carter [1901] / a cart driver [1911].

On 8th July 1893, he married Annie Fossey at Halifax Parish Church.


Annie, of Siddal, was the daughter of
George Fossey
 

Children:

  1. Harriet [b 1894]
  2. Harry
  3. Edgar [b 1899] who was a mill worker [1911]
  4. Ernest [b 1904]

The children were born in Halifax.

The family lived at

  • 1 Denton's Buildings, Oxford Lane, Halifax [1901]
  • 6 Lower Shaw Hill, Halifax [1911, 1916]

Living with them in 1901 were Annie's sisters Elizabeth & Clara

Oddy, Ezra
[1862-1938] Born in Halifax.

He was a cabinet maker [1894].

In 1894, he married Hannah Gibson [1868-1933] in Halifax.


Hannah was born in Halifax
 

Children:

  1. Nellie [1895-1966] who married [1924] Ernest Briggs [1900-1972]
  2. Joseph
  3. Arthur [1899-1952]
  4. Edith [b 1907]

The children were born in Halifax.

The family lived at 1 Blake Hill, Shibden, Halifax [1911]

Oddy, Florence
[1903-1983] Daughter of John Oddy.

She married Clifford Sutcliffe.

In 1942, she was Mayoress when her father was Mayor of Halifax

Oddy, Harry
[1897-1916] Son of Ernest Oddy.

He was a member of Sion Boys' Brigade / a mill worker [1911] / employed by J. Sagar & Company Limited.

During World War I, he joined the Territorials [23rd May 1915], and served as a Private with the 4th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He went to France [May/June 1916].

He had an incident in which his pocket-watch broke after being struck by flying shrapnel.

He suffered multiple gun-shot wounds in the right arm and shoulder, and a scalp wound [3rd August 1916].

He died of wounds in hospital in Rouen [8th September 1916] (aged 19).

He was buried at the St. Sever Cemetery, France [B 23 29].

He is remembered on the Memorial at United Reformed Church, Carlton Street

Oddy, Henry Raphael
[1850-1907] Son of Mr Oddy.

Born in Wyke.

He was a tapestry carpet designer / a landscape painter [1891] / a water colour artist [1901]. He was brother-in-law of Richard E. Nicholson with whom he founded the Halifax Art Society.

He produced landscapes, topographical and architectural pictures in watercolour, pastel and pencil. He took up professional painting in 1890. Some of his drawings can be found in the Yorkshire Coiners by Henry Ling Roth

In 1883, he married Jane Elizabeth, widow of John James Watson.

They lived at

  • 11 Milton Street, Halifax [1881]
  • 8 Wards End, Halifax [1891]
  • 51 Savile Mount, Halifax [1901, 1905, 1907, 1922]

He suffered long periods of paralysis of the limbs. Probate records show that he left effects valued at £2,748 5/-.

See Art Gallery Trust and Northgate End Chapel Bicentenary Memorial

Oddy, Henry Richardson
[1885-1917] Son of Eleanor & Christopher Oddy of 32 Carr Street, Bradford Road, Brighouse.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 10th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He died 20th September 1917 (aged 32).

He is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium [LVIII C 15], and on Brighouse War Memorial

Oddy, James
[1828-1???] Born in Southowram.

He was a flag facer [1851]; a flag quarrier [1861].

Around 1850, he married Sarah [1827-1???].


Sarah was born in Kidderminster
 

Children:

  1. Mary A. [b 1848] who was a worsted twister [1861]
  2. Elizabeth [b 1850] who was a worsted spinner [1861]
  3. Matilda [b 1851] who was a worsted spinner [1861]
  4. Mary J. [b 1854] who was a worsted spinner [1861]
  5. Miles [b 1856]
  6. Eliza [b 1859]

The family lived at

  • Marsh Delves, Southowram [1851]
  • Brow Lane, Northowram [1861]

Oddy, John
[1877-1956] Born at Northowram.

He was brought up as a Methodist. He was a sanitary pipe-fitter [1899], an insurance agent for the Refuge Insurance Company [1907, 1956], where he was known as Honest John for his integrity and straight-dealing, a local Preacher [1893], a member of St Thomas Street Methodist Church, a Labour Councillor for Akroydon Ward [1924], an Alderman, Chairman of Halifax Markets and Parks Committee, and Mayor of Halifax [1942-1943]

On 23rd December 1899, he married (1) Ada Holdsworth [1877-1928].

Children:

  1. (possible) Gilbert [1899-1903]
  2. Charles / Charlie [1901-1981]
  3. Arthur [b 1905] who went missing in 1932
  4. Florence
  5. Harold [b 1907]
  6. Thomas [b 1910]
  7. Nellie [1912-198?] who married John Bickles
  8. Herbert [1912-1915]

On 23rd September 1944, he married (2) Emily Naylor [1882-19??]

The family lived at

  • 2 Godley Road [1899]
  • 7 Lily Street [1901]
  • 19 Primrose Street [1905]
  • 10 Webb Terrace [1910]
  • 69 Chester Road [1925, 1928]
  • 41 Bath Place, Halifax [1956]

It was his ambition to have a crematorium for Halifax. He laid the foundation stone for Park Wood Crematorium [1956] but he died 2 weeks before the crematorium opened

Oddy, Joseph
[1896-1918] Known as Joe.

Son of Ezra Oddy.

Born in Halifax.

He was educated at Hipperholme Grammar School / a clerk at Halifax County Court [from around 1912].

During World War I, he enlisted [June 1917], and served as a Lance Bombardier with the 278th Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery.

He was killed in action by shellfire [21st July 1918].

He was buried at the Hedauville Communal Cemetery Extension, France [E 12].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, on the Memorial at Saint Matthew's Church, Northowram, and on the Memorial at Hipperholme Grammar School

Oddy, Luke
[1832-1???] He was a mason & bricklayer [1881] / a contractor [1888].

He married Ellen [1832-1???].


Ellen was born in Luddenden
 

Children:

  1. Ann [b 1857]
  2. Martha Jane [b 1862] who married Ronald Smith Roper

The family lived at 9 Stansfield Street, Halifax [1881].

Ellen was widowed by 1901

Oddy, Micah
[1864-1923] Born in Northowram.

He was a dyer [1884].

On 26th July 1884, he married Martha Ann Tattersall [1861-1920] at Coley Church.


Martha Ann was born in Shelf
 

Children:

  1. Rena [1885-1952] who married [27th October 1906] Ernest Wilby in Halifax
  2. Willie Oddy

The children were born in Northowram.

The family lived at High Bentley, Shelf [1911]. It appears that the marriage broke down as Micah and Martha Ann were living apart [1901, 1911]

Oddy, Mr
[1???-18??] (Possibly) William.

He married Hannah [1821-1???].

Children:

  1. Emma [b 1848]
  2. Henry Raphael
  3. Ruth Hannah [b 1864]

The family lived at (possibly) Delph Street, Halifax [1861].

See William Cash

Oddy, Mr
[1825-18??]

He married Mary [1830-1???].


Mary was born in Halifax
 

Children:

  1. Elizabeth [b 1850] who was a worsted rover [1881]
  2. Samuel [b 1861] who was a coal miner [1881]
  3. Aquilla [b 1863] who was a coal miner [1881]
  4. Ernest [b 1865] who was a labourer at brick works [1881]
  5. William H. [b 1870]
  6. Mary A. [b 1873]
  7. Bates [b 1876]
  8. Alice [b 1879]

The family lived at 36 Prospect Street, Claremount [1881].

Mary was widowed by 1881

Oddy, William
[1825-18??] He was a flag facer [1851].

Around 1850, he married Mary [1829-1???].


Mary was born in Kidderminster
 

Children:

  1. Elizabeth [b 1850]

The family lived at Marsh Delves, Southowram [1851]

Oddy, Willie
[1897-1918] Son of Micah Oddy.

Born in Northowram [9th February 1897].

He was a mill worker [1911] / a brush maker [1916].

He lived at 18 Wade House Road, Shelf [1916].

During World War I, he enlisted in Halifax [13th July 1916]. He was originally enrolled with the West Riding Regiment but at some stage was transferred and served as a Private with the 1st/9th Battalion Durham Light Infantry.

He was killed in action [28th March 1918].

He was buried at the Gommecourt British Cemetery No.2, Heburterne, France [V D 24].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Shelf Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Odell, George
[1866-1903] Born in Burbage.

He was a cloth finisher.

On 3rd February 1894, he married Mary Hannah Fielding [1873] in Halifax.


Mary Hannah was born in Ripponden
 

Children:

  1. Albert [1892-1909]
  2. Percy
  3. Beatrice [1898-1961] who married [1928] William H. Cheetham

The family lived at

  • 1 Stocks Lane, Luddenden [1901]
  • 2 Halifax Lane, Luddenden [1911]

Odell, Percy
[1896-1916] Son of George Odell.

Born in Luddenden.

He was a woollen feeder [1911] / a mill hand [1915].

He lived at 2 Halifax Lane, Luddenden.

During World War I, he enlisted in Halifax [20th October 1915], and he served as a Private with the 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He arrived in France [4th May 1916].

He died of wounds [2nd July 1916].

He was buried at the Bertrancourt Military Cemetery, France.

He is remembered on Luddenden & Midgley War Memorial, and on Ebenezer United Methodist Memorial, Luddenden Dean

Odeon Cinema, Halifax
Cross Fields. The cinema was built after the clearance of The City, and was opened by Mayor Frank Watkinson on 27th June 1938. It cost £59,727 to build. Capacity 2,058, of which 714 were in the circle.

The first film to be shown was The Perfect Specimen starring Errol Flynn and Joan Blondell. The Brighouse & Rastrick Band played during the interval.

The Odeon closed as a cinema on 18th October 1975.

The disused building was damaged by fire on 16th February 1976.

In 1977, it became a Top Rank Bingo Club, and is now a Mecca, and Halifax's only bingo club.

In May 2009, it was one of a number of local Art Deco buildings which were considered for listing

Odling, Egbert Fraser
[1???-19??] MA.

Vicar of Coley [1926]

O'Donnell, William
[1891-1918] Son of John & Annie O'Donnell of 4 Bank Buildings, Luddendenfoot.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 9th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He died 12th October 1918 (aged 27).

He was buried at the Montay-Neuvilly Road Cemetery, Montay, France [I E 18].

He is remembered on Luddendenfoot War Memorial

O'Donoghue, Rev Edward Geoffrey
[1854-1935] Son of Rev Francis Talbot O'Donoghue.

Born at Walsden Vicarage.

He was educated at Manchester Grammar School and Exeter College Oxford. He was curate in several London parishes. He was headmaster at Kensington Grammar School [1886-1890].

He married (1) Mary Louisa Birley and had 1 son and 3 daughters.

He married (2) Emily Laud

O'Donoghue, Rev Francis Talbot
[18??-18??] Vicar of St Peter's Church, Walsden [1854]

Offspring of Virtue Friendly Society, Halifax
A friendly society recorded in 1894

O'Fusses, Ailsa
[1???-18??] A female packhorse jagger who led teams of Galloways on the Limer's Gate from Bacup into the Calder Valley

Ogden...
The entries for people with the surname Ogden are gathered together in the SideTrack.

The individuals listed there are not necessarily related to each other.

Ogden
District to the north of Halifax. The name has been written Oakden.

See Ogden surname and Poems in Peace & War

Ogden & Company
Ale and porter merchants at 40 Bradford Road, Brighouse [1908]

Ogden & Lumb
Worsted spinners and manufacturers.

They were at Brearley Mills, Luddendenfoot [1859] and Westfield Mills, Mytholmroyd [1874]

Ogden & Maud
Brewers at Pellon. Partners included Edwin Ogden and John Maude.

The partnership was declared bankrupt [March 1874].

See J. & E. Ogden

Ogden Brook
Name given to the Hebble along part of its length

Ogden Brothers & Company
Worsted spinners and manufacturers at Stoney Royd Mills, Halifax, and woolstaplers at Church Street, Halifax. In October 1878, the company was declared bankrupt. Thomas Ogden was senior partner

Ogden Clough
Stream from Ovenden Moor which feeds Ogden Reservoir.

See Borders Bridge, Ogden Clough

Ogden Farm, Triangle
Otter Lee Lane. Mid-19th century laithe-house. Dated 1856. Above the barn door, there is a Venetian window initialled RS

Ogden Golf Club

Ogden's: J. & E. Ogden
Ale and porter brewers at Halifax. Partners included (possibly) Edwin Ogden.

Recorded in December 1873, when the partnership was dissolved

See Ogden & Maud

Ogden's: James Ogden & Sons
Spindle and flyer manufacturer of Northgate, Halifax. Established in 17??.

In 1905, they are recorded at Holme House Bridge Mill, Booth.

In 1948, three men – including the proprietor William Edward Ogden – were killed and several injured when oxyacetylene equipment exploded at their Halifax works. The equipment proved to be defective. There was a public fund for the affected families

Ogden's: Joseph Ogden & Son
Brewers established by Joseph Ogden at New Pellon [1874]

Ogden Kirk

See Ogden Kirk Quarries, Ogden Kirk Reservoir and Poems in Peace & War

Ogden Kirk Reservoir
Built in 1894-1895. It has a capacity of 500,000 gallons. The small stepped weir is a feature

Ogden Lane Pleasure Grounds
Recorded in 1905 at Ogden Lane, Holmfield when the proprietor was Edward Hawkridge

Ogden moor
Crabtree says that this was a part of the township of Ovenden and enclosed around 1814

Ogden Moor Roman Road
In 1963, the archæology group from Ovenden Secondary School discovered a section of Roman road on Ogden Moor

Ogden Plantation
Established around 1900.

See Herbert Tate

Ogden pottery
A type of fineware pottery known as Nicholas Ware which was produced by Nicholas Taylor at his pottery at Ogden in the early 1900s

Ogden Reservoir
This was the first reservoir for Halifax, built 1854 and 1858.

See Friends of Ogden Water, Green Holme Farm, Ogden, Halifax Golf Club, Ogden Clough, Ogden Water Visitor & Interpretation Centre and Skirden Clough

Ogden spindles
In the late 18th century, the Ogden family established an engineering business in Luddenden, producing spindles for the new textile mills

Ogden Water
In 1988, Ogden Reservoir was renamed Ogden Water

Ogden Water Visitor & Interpretation Centre
Waterside and woodland walks, based around Ogden Water, the former Ogden Reservoir.

The site is also known as Ogden Water LNR.

See Boggart's Grave, Ogden, Friends of Ogden Water and Giant's Tooth, Ovenden Moor

Ogilvy, Alfred
[18??-19??] MA.

Curate at Illingworth [1900-1904]. He left to become Vicar of St Mildred's, Lee

Ogilvy, Dr
[18??-19??] Of Luddendenfoot. He was a ship's surgeon before practising at Luddendenfoot. It was said that
he was prepared to deliver a baby, pull out a tooth, or amputate your leg

O'Hara, Patrick
[18??-1917] Born in Dungannon, County Tyrone.

During World War I, he served as a Rifleman with the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles.

He was killed in action [28th January 1917].

He was buried at the Berks Cemetery Extension, Belgium [I N 2].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, and on the Memorial at Saint Bernard's Catholic Church

Ohm, D. McKay
[18??-19??] Headmaster at Grace Ramsden's Endowed School [1917]

O'Katty's, Sammy
Alias of Samuel Sutcliffe

The Okes family
Owned Ewood Hall, Mytholmroyd for a time

Okes Farm, Rishworth
Aka Over Okes.

Property near to Upper Goat House.

Okes is mentioned during the 17th century. By the end of the 17th century, the names Over Okes and Goathouse are used synonymously.

See Lower Okes Farm, Rishworth

Okey, John
[18??-1918] Of Southowram.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 14th (Fife & Forfar Yeomanry) Battalion Black Watch (Royal Highlanders).

He died 10th September 1918.

He was buried at the Templeux-Le-Guerard British Cemetery, France [I B 31].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, on Southowram War Memorial, and on the Memorial at Saint Anne's Church, Southowram

Old Arcade, Halifax
Aka The Arcade.

Victorian block with an arcade of 8 shops – which continues that of Russell Arcade – and runs between Old Market and Russell Street. There are several shops on the outside of the arcade. It was designed by John & Joseph Leeming and opened in 1896.

In February 2007, it was one of several properties which Calderdale Council put up for sale, and sold at auction for £1.4 million.

See Palatine Chambers, Halifax, Petticoat Lane, Scarr's Ironmonger and Shaw Hardcastle Limited

Old Bank
Originally Halifax Bank, this was a section of the ancient Wakefield Gate pathway over Beacon Hill into Halifax. Aka Wakefield Bank.

In July 1643, during the Civil War, there were skirmishes here between the Royalists under Sir Francis Mackworth and the departing Parliamentarians under Sir Thomas Fairfax.

In 1837, it was superseded by New Bank.

There were a number of terraced houses lining the bank. These were demolished and the road was closed to traffic in 196?.

See Folly Steps, Hardcastle's Yard, Halifax and Holy Well

Old Bank Well, Halifax
See Holy Well, Old Bank

Old Barton, Triangle
The house was rebuilt in 1902.

See New Barton, Triangle

The Old Bow Window

Old Bridge, Hebden Bridge
Aka Old Pack Horse Bridge.

The packhorse bridge over Hebden Water is dated 1510. This replaced the original timber bridge – which stood upstream of the present bridge – and which gave its name to the town, Hebden Bridge.

It leads to The Buttress.

It was constructed with contributions and bequests from local benefactors.

Inscriptions on the bridge record repairs and renovations in 1600, 1602, 1657, 1845 and 1890

Repaired by help of John : Greenwood sessions 1600

Repaired by help of Richard Naler Sessions 1602

Repayred by the Rydinge by Order of Session August 4 1657 by H N R G:R G

The bridge is 7 ft 6 ins wide and triangular alcoves in the parapet serve as passing places.

The people of Heptonstall successfully overturned proposals to demolish the bridge when the new turnpike was built in the 1770s.

It was placed on the list of Scheduled Monuments in 1925 or 27th May 1932.

This is discussed in the book Our Home & Country.

See West End Bridge and White Swan, Hebden Bridge

Old Bridge Inn Pork Pie Appreciation Society
OBIPPAS. Meets every Saturday at the Old Bridge Inn, Ripponden to discuss, review and sample pork pies

Old Bridge, Ripponden
See Old Bridge pub and Ripponden Old Bridge

Old Brodleians
Rugby Union club formed in 1930 by a group of old boys from Hipperholme Grammar School.

The name comes from Matthew Brodley who was involved in setting up the school.

Old Calderdale

Old Castle, Wadsworth
A site near Wadsworth Banks, Mytholmroyd. It is said that there was a castle here built with the permission of Stephen, Count of Blois, nephew of Henry I

Old Chamber, Erringden
A group of buildings on Spencer Lane, Erringden

Crabtree says that a house here was burned when Mr Pilkington lived here in the 14th century.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

Old Close Farm, Southowram
This farm was situated on the north side of Higgin Lane, about 70 yards from the junction with Bank Top.

Owners and tenants have included

The farm was a ruin for many years before being demolished when the houses in Higgin Lane and Merrion Crescent were built

Old Cock Friendly Society
Friendly society recorded in 1798.


Question: Does anyone know anything about the Society or its links with the Old Cock, Halifax?

 

Old Cock Inn, Halifax

Old Cock Library, Halifax
Old Cock Yard. The idea for the library began at a meeting of local Dissenters. In 1823, a News Room and library was founded by Thomas Gledhill. The annual subscription was 1 guinea.

The Library was open on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons. Gledhill was Librarian.

See Halifax Circulating Library

Old Cock Yard, Halifax
Street alongside the Old Cock Inn.

A theatre in the Old Cock Yard is mentioned around 1760.

It was a busy terminus for coaches travelling to Colne & Rochdale [1894], and from and within the district.

In 1768, the Halifax Circulation Library was founded here.

In 1823, a News Room and Library was founded here by Thomas Gledhill. The annual subscription was 1 guinea.

See Well Head

Old Cottage, Ripponden
Known locally as Bottom o' t' Bank and Th' Old Cottage.

This was one of the oldest properties in Ripponden.

It was formerly a pub.

Owners and tenants have included

  • Edward Denton [1850]
  • Herbert Ainley of America [1914]
  • It was in a parlous state [1914]

Old Cragg Hall, Cragg Vale
Aka Cragg Old Hall. Swine Market Lane. F-plan house built in 1617. In the 1830s, it had fallen into disrepair and was bought by Christopher Rawson who rebuilt it. Rawson sold it to Hinchliffe Hinchliffe and it became the home of the Hinchliffe family. It passed to W. A. Simpson-Hinchliffe who lived at Lower Cragg Hall, Cragg Vale.

The hall was owned by the Sunderland family.

The Hall is said to be haunted by the ghost of a servant girl who was murdered in the room over the porch by the son of the Sunderland family.

This is discussed in the book Ancient Halls in & about Halifax

Old Crossleians RUFC
The Rugby Union club for old boys of Crossley & Porter School

Old Dene, Sowerby
Dean Lane. Mid 17th century house.

It stands near Dene House Farm

The Old Dungeon, Warley
Next to the Maypole pub, Warley Town.

Local felons were held here, pending their trials in Halifax.

In the 1770s, Warley Gaol was owned by Joseph Farrar. W. Birch was gaoler

The building later became Warley Co-operative Store

Old Earth Farm, Elland
Elland Lane.

House dated TB 1700.

Parts were rebuilt in the 20th century.

Owners and tenants have included

It is now private dwellings.

The outshut at the rear of the house is now garages.

See Leatherty Coit

Old Edge, Heptonstall
Edge Lane. Aka Edge House. There are traces of the early 16th century timber-framed open hall building which was cased in stone in the early 17th century. A lintel is inscribed
PEACE BE WITHIN THY GATE S T G 16 76

Old Eli Clough, Sowerby
Stream at Cottonstones which joins Shaw's Clough

Old Farm Cottage, Mankinholes
One of 2 late 16th century cottages: Old Farm Cottage and Old Farmhouse

Old Farmhouse, Mankinholes
One of 2 late 16th century cottages: Old Farmhouse and Old Farm Cottage

Old Friendly Society
Elland friendly society established in 1760

Old Gits' League
Popular name for the Brighouse Games League

Old Halifax

Old Halifax
A popular name for Joseph Rideal Smith

Old Hall, Eastwood
Aka Eastwood Old Hall, Great Clough House, Eastwood.

Mid 18th century house.

This was the Manor House and family seat of the Eastwood family

The keystone in the barn is inscribed TME 1767 for Thomas Eastwood.

A window is inscribed DAIRY

Old Hall, Elland
Exley Lane.

Built for Leising de Eland on the site of a house of Gamel.

The house was a 13th century cruck structure cased in stone and was situated at the Exley, on the north bank of the Calder, overlooking what is now Elland Bridge.

It was the family home of the Elland – or Eland family during the 14th century.

Sir John Elland lived here at the time of the Elland Feud. The house was owned by the Savile family of Elland after the Elland Feud.

There were several legends connected to the Hall. A 1778 datestone in the kitchen was said to move. There were stories of secret passages – going beneath the Calder – to Elland Parish Church, Elland New Hall and Clay House, Greetland.

The Hall was demolished in 1976 to make way for the Elland bypass. The stones and the original timber frames were put into storage for the planned construction of a replica house on the Leeds-Harrogate road – possibly at Lotherton Hall at Aberford near Leeds.

Owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in the book The Old Halls & Manor Houses of Yorkshire

See Exley sandstone quarry

Old Hall Farm, Todmorden

Old Hall Farm, Warley
Originally called Warley Town Farm.

Built in the 16th century. A mullion is inscribed 1504.

Owners and tenants have included

This is discussed in the book Our Home & Country.

The property was demolished in 1961. The car park for the Vandals rugby club now occupies the site

Old Hall, Saltonstall
Tudor house built around 1540 by Richard Saltonstall.

Later, it was known as Th' Old Church and was used as a meeting place for Catholics, and then by the Methodists.

It later became a combing shed. In 1760, it was owned by Daniel Greenwood and was known as Warley Hall

Old Hall, Sowerby
Dean Lane.

A later name for Lower Field House.

Early 17th century house adjoining Field House.

Owners and tenants have included

It is now 2 dwellings. Number 2 is interconnected to Field House

Old Hall, Triangle

Old Hall, Washer Lane

Old Haugh End, Sowerby
House known as The Platts.

In 1526, it was owned by John Gaukroger, alias Platts.

The timber-framed building was encased in stone in the 16th century.

The house was owned and extended by the Tillotson family. Archbishop John Tillotson was born here – see Breck, Triangle. A fireplace is dated JT and 1630 to commemorate his birth.

Owners and tenants have included

The Old was added to the name in 1760 when John Lea built Haugh End House, Sowerby next door.

This is discussed in the books Ancient Halls in & about Halifax and Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions.


Pronunciation: The name is pronounced Old haw end
 

Old High Laithe, Widdop

Old Hold Edge, Wadsworth
There are remains of 2 Neolithic or Bronze Age cairns about 4 ft in diameter

Old Hold, Old Town
A farmstead at Wadsworth

Old House Farm, Barkisland
Owners and tenants have included

Old House, Sowerby
Owners and tenants have included

See Upper Old House, Sowerby

Old Lane Chain Bar Toll Gate
Toll gate

Old Lane Dye Works Company Limited
Dyers and finishers at Old Lane Dye Works, Halifax [1905]

Old Lane Tunnel, Halifax
Aka Woodside Tunnel.

It carried the rail service from North Bridge Station, Halifax to Ovenden.

See North Bridge Tunnel

Old Lane Working Men's Club
Recorded in 1905 next to the Old Lane Inn, Halifax

Old Laughton, Ovenden
Joseph Wood of Old Laughton was mentioned in documents dated 25th December 1640

Old Lindley
A part of the township of Stainland. It was called Old Lindley to distinguish it from New Lindley which is a part of Huddersfield.

Old Lindley is also known as Over Lindley. The word is also found as Linley.

See Manor of Lindley and Stainland-With-Old Lindley

Old Lindley, Stainland
Aisled house

Old Lindley Surveyor of the Highways
Those who held the post of Surveyor of the Highways for Old Lindley included:

Old Lock House, Brighouse
Stands on the south side of Brighouse canal basin.

It fell into disrepair, but it has recently been restored

The Old Lodge, Ovenden
Keighley Road. 19th century house

Old Mad Sal
A carved stone head inside the Parish Church of St Thomas à Becket, Heptonstall.

It is possibly the head of a cat

Old Manor Court House
Halifax.

See Moot Hall, Halifax

Old Mansion House, Brighouse
Thornton Square. The house had a garden which extended to Briggate and Thornton Square.

The property was occupied by several generations of the Bottomley family. The last occupant was John Bottomley.

The building was demolished in 1875, and Halifax Commercial Bank – who owned the property – built their first branch on the site.

This was the first bank in Brighouse.

The building has since been occupied by Martins Bank and Barclays Bank.

The Malt Kiln stood next door

Old Market Gaol
A cellar in Old Market, Halifax one of the first places to be used as a gaol.

It was succeeded by the Debtor's Gaol in Gaol Lane, Halifax

Old Market, Halifax

Old Mechanical Society
Heptonstall friendly society established in 1776

Old Men's Parliament, Halifax
Aka Parliament House. A small shelter with seats which stood in People's Park. It was popular with senior citizens. It was demolished in the 1960s.

See Park Parliament, Brighouse

Old Men's Parliament, Shroggs Oak
On 30th November 1933, S. Wilkinson, President, announced that he would provide 23 fellow members with a new suit for Christmas

Old Model Lodging House, Halifax
Cripplegate / King Street.

Recorded in 1861, when Albert Hill was living here.

Recorded in 1905, when Edgar Radcliffe was the proprietor

Old Lady of Lumbutts
Popular name for the 3-ton organ which was installed United Methodist Free Church, Lumbutts. It was renovated in 1989

Old Pack Horse Bridge, Hebden Bridge

Old Poor House, Barkisland
The Barkisland Board of Health met here.

See Barkisland Pinfold

Old Reservoir, Wainstalls
Another name for Black Field Dam, Wainstalls

Old Riding, Warley
Stock Lane / Old Riding Lane.

A house – Oldrydynge – is mentioned in 1561.

A 17th century house was built on the site.

The name comes from Ridding.

Owners and tenants have included

  • Gilbert Brookesbanke
  • James and Gilbert Haldworth
  • The Dean family
  • The Shaw family
  • The Titterington family
  • The Norton family [1950s/1960s]

Old Rishworthians' Rugby Union Football Club
The rugby club of Rishworth School.

Their grounds are at Copley

Old Royd Lock, Todmorden
Lock #17 on the Rochdale Canal. The lock and its overflow channel are listed

Old Royd, Todmorden
Area of Langfield

Old Shibden Hall
Aka Upper Shibden Hall

Old Shop Meadow, Todmorden
The land was owned by Quakers.

In 1827, York Street Wesleyan Methodist Church was built on a part of the land. In 1829, Bridge Street School, Todmorden was built on another part

Old Siddal Hall
The building stands on the west side of Siddal Lane, between Phoebe Lane and Longbottom Terrace,

It was built in 1???.

Owners and tenants have included

  • Thomas Jennings [1836]

    Thomas and his wife Sarah both died in a fire at Old Siddal Hall [1836]

After the fire of 1836, the Hall was rebuilt by Joseph Holt [1844].

It was converted to private housing in 19??.

See Siddal Halls

Old Smithy, Luddenden
High Street. Stood between the Lord Nelson Inn and the church.

It was demolished in 1???.

Luddenden & Midgley War Memorial now stands on the site

Old Station House, Ovenden
See High Level Railway

Old Town
Hilltop village area above Hebden Bridge and part of the township of Wadsworth

Old Town Bowling Club
Recorded in 1913, when the membership was 40.

Recorded in 1917 at Green End, when George Robinson was secretary

Old Town Cricket Club
Formed in 1894.

In 1954, part of the grounds of Boston Hill House, Wadsworth were bought from the rural district council as a new ground for the Club.

Their present cricket ground is on the former Boston Hill Estate

See Ethelbert Redman

Old Town Hall Farm, Old Town
The farm may have given its name to the village of Old Town. The early timber-framed building was replaced by the present building around 1610. A document of 1610 suggests that a secret passage behind a fireplace leads to Pecket Wood.

It is now several private houses

Old Town Hall, Halifax

Old Town Hall, Wadsworth
Mill Lane. The Hall at Old Town stands on a site which has been inhabited since the 14th century.

A timber structure was recorded here in the early 16th century.

There is an early 17th century house – built on the site of an earlier house – and 18th century cottages. A doorway is dated 1600. A row of 20 windows and the 12 chimneys are a feature of the building.

It is said that a secret underground passage behind a fireplace led into Pecket Wood. This was used in the 16th century by those attending illegal Catholic worship.

Owners and tenants have included

The house is now private dwellings.

This is discussed in the book Ancient Halls in & about Halifax

Old Town Lawn Tennis Club
Recorded in 1917 at Green End, Hebden Bridge, when George Robinson was secretary

Old Town Reservoir, Wadsworth
Built between 1850 and 1894.

It has been suggested that the reservoir was built to supply local drinking water and/or for the fountain which was in the grounds of Boston Hill House owned by John Cousin Mitchell

Old Town Slack Farm, Pecket Well

Old Tristram
A life-size collection box in the form of an old man, which stands in Halifax Parish Church. It was carved by John Aked and dated to 1701.

It is said that the original Old Tristram was John Tristram.

See Halifax Parochial Chapelry

Old Well Head
House at Well Head built in 170?.

Property called Lower Old Well Head adjoined.

Owners and tenants have included

Well Head was built later.

It was demolished in 1961.

See Joyce Dewhurst, Harriet Mary Edwards and Emma Sophia Rawson

Old White Lion Society
A friendly society established in 1781 which met at the White Lion Hotel, Hebden Bridge

Old Woman, Todmorden
A rock formation overlooking Burnley Road at Portsmouth

Oldacres, Rev George
[1843-1913] MA.

He was educated at St John's College Cambridge before becoming Assistant Curate at Brighouse [1868-1879] and Vicar of Illingworth [1879-1913].

He died suddenly of pneumonia

Oldfield...
The entries for people with the surname Oldfield are gathered together in the SideTrack.

The individuals listed there are not necessarily related to each other.

Oldfield & Schofield Company Limited
Central Iron Works, Boothtown.

Halifax engineering firm founded in 1898 by Tom Oldfield and Joseph Schofield.

The firm was well-known for manufacturing lathes, especially those used in the production of railway wheels and ammunition shells for World War I.

They later extended the range of products to include planes, shapers and presses.

Arthur White joined the firm as a designer.

Tom retired in 1934. The firm's financial situation was saved by orders for machines to produce arms for World War II.

Joseph retired in 1950 and his sons took over the business.

In 1957, the firm was taken over by the Kerry Machine Tool Group.

They became known as Broadbent & Schofield

Oldfield House, Warley
House dated 1683.

The surname Oldfield may have originated in this area

Oldfields, Warley
Stock Lane. 17th century farm

Oldham, Charles
[1812-1868] A travelling musician.

He died at Bold's Mill Dam, Halifax [10th June 1868] (aged 56).

He was buried at Stoney Royd Cemetery [C 90 D]

Oldham, E.
[18??-19??]

During the South African Wars, he served as a Driver with the 3rd Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He died in 1900.

He is remembered on the Halifax Parish Church 3rd Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment Memorial

Oldham, Richard
[17??-1792] Hatter in Halifax

Oldroyd
Area of Todmorden

Oldroyd Farm, Todmorden
Early 17th century house.

The barn – dated 1720 ISE – is listed.

See Oldroyd, Todmorden

Oldroyd, Gerald
[1894-1917] Son of Gertrude & Joe Oldroyd of 18 Charlesworth Terrace. Pellon.

He was a member of Christ Church, Pellon & the Church Lads' Brigade.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the Royal Army Medical Corps.

He was withdrawn from military service on account of ill-health. He worked on munitions at United Brassfounders.

He died of heart disease in St Luke's Hospital, Halifax [15th June 1917] (aged 23).

He was buried at Mount Tabor Wesleyan Methodist Chapel [A 17].

He is remembered on the Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, and on the Memorial at Christ Church, Pellon

Oldroyd, Herbert
[1894-1917] Son of William Oldroyd & stepson of Joseph Widdop.

He was a member of St Edward's Mission Church, Boothtown / a member of Boothtown Liberal Club / a worsted spinner's doffer at Walker's Mills [1904] / a warehouseman by Rouse & Company [1914].

During World War I, he served as a Gunner with C Battery 246th Brigade Royal Field Artillery.

He was killed in action by a shell [7th August 1917] (aged 23).

He was buried at the Coxyde Military Cemetery, Belgium [II E 11].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance

Oldroyd, John
[17??-18??] Cotton spinner of Ripponden Wood.

See Thomas Crompton

Oldroyd, Madame Marie
[1???-19??] Dance teacher and adjudicator. After World War II, she bought the Queen's Hall, Halifax, and with her daughter, Norma, she ran Madame Oldroyd's School of Dance. In June 1958, she sold the Hall.

She married Unknown.

Children:

  1. Norma

Oldroyd, Mrs
[1???-18??] He ran a private school in Halifax [around 1870]

Oldroyd, Norma
[1921-19??] Daughter of Madame Marie Oldroyd.

Born in Dewsbury.

After World War II, her mother bought the Queen's Hall, Halifax, and she and Norma ran Madame Oldroyd's School of Dance.

In 1941, she married Kenneth Nightingale in Halifax

Oldroyd, Norman
[1917-1943] Of Burnley.

He was educated at Halifax Tech / employed by Halifax General Hospital.

In [Q4] 1939, he married Marjorie J. C. Horsfall in Halifax.

Children:

  1. Harold W. [b 1940]
  2. Patricia E. [b 1941]

They lived at 21 Sefton Terrace, Halifax.

During World War II, he served as a Lance Corporal with the 198th Field Ambulance Royal Army Medical Corps.

He died in a Japanese POW camp in Thailand [19th July 1943] (aged 26).

He was buried at the Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, Thailand [2 G 1].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance

Oldroyd's: W. G. Oldroyd
Recorded in The Tradesmen's Advertiser of 1874, where they were producing
Oldroyd's Well-tried Family Ointment

at their wholesale depot, top of Stannary Street (Pellon Lane), Halifax

Oldroyd, William
[1866-1900] Son of Richard Oldroyd, mason.

Born in Huddersfield.

He was a greengrocer of Range Lane, Halifax [1890] / a coal and coke dealer [1891].

In 1890, he married Annie Pickard [1867-1???] at St Thomas's Church, Claremount.


Annie, of Sladden Street Boothtown, was born in Halifax, the daughter of Elizabeth & John Pickard, mechanic

She was a worsted warper [1891], a grocer shopkeeper [1901]

 

Children:

  1. Ernest [b 1893] who was an apprentice wire drawer at Royston Mill [1904]
  2. Herbert
  3. Mary Alice [b 1896] who was a wire manufacturers winder at Royston Mills [1904]

The family lived at

  • Sladden Street, Northowram [1891]
  • 12 Mill Lane, Boothtown, Halifax [1901]

Living with them [in 1891, 1901] was widowed mother-in-law Elizabeth Pickard [b 1843].

William died in Halifax [1900] (aged 33) 

In 1904, Annie married (2) Joseph Widdop

Olearoid, Timothy
[16??-16??] Of Halifax. In 1670, he issued tradesmen's tokens worth 1d bearing the image of a dolphin

O'Leary, Bernard
[1907-1940] Son of Ellen & Denis O'Leary of 157 Claremount Road, Boothtown.

He was educated at St Joseph's Catholic School, Claremount / employed at Dean Clough Mills.

He enlisted [1926] and served 8 years in India.

During World War II, he served as a Lance Corporal with the 1st/7th Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He was a POW.

He died in d'Ernemont Hospital, Rouen [2nd July 1940] (aged 33).

He was buried at the St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France [S 4 Q 14].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, and on the Memorial at Saint Bernard's Catholic Church

Oliphant, Rev T. N.
[18??-19??] Minister at Moor End Congregational Church [1918-1924]

Oliver & Thompson
Corn millers at Wood Mill, Todmorden.

Partners included Royston Oliver and William Thompson.

The partnership was dissolved in January 1858

Oliver, Arthur
[18??-18??] In 1874, he ran a school in Halifax

Oliver, David
[1778-1875] He married Jane Walker [1777-1843].

Children:

  1. Samuel
  2. Royston
  3. Jeremiah

Oliver, H.
[19??-19??] Owned Brow Bridge Mill, Elland [1960].

He was on the Committee of Elland Cricket Club [1960]

Oliver Hall Bridge, Elland
A bridge under the Lancashire & Yorkshire Railway line at Oliver Hall between Elland and Brighouse

Oliver Hall, Elland
Recorded in 1854.

Owners and tenants have included

See Oliver, Oliver Hall Bridge, Oliver Hall Farm and Oliver Meadows

Oliver Hall Farm, Elland
Elland Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Oliver, Henry
[1834-1887] Police Sergeant in Halifax.

He lived at 6 Ratten Row, Halifax.

He died 8th June 1887 (aged 53).

He was buried at Stoney Royd Cemetery [F 153 D]

Oliver, Jeremiah
[18??-18??] Son of David Oliver.

Born in Leathley Yorkshire [11th January 1808].

He was a physician and surgeon at Todmorden.

He never married.

In February 1839, he brought an action at Halifax Sheriff's Court against the Wapentake of Agbrigg & Morley for damage done during the Mankinholes Riots. He was awarded £50.

Recorded in 1845 at York Street, Todmorden

Oliver, Joseph
[18??-19??] He lived at Castlefields, Rastrick.

He married Unknown.

Children: a daughter [b 1887]

Oliver, Joseph William
[1899-1918] His aunt & uncle ran the Lee Bank Hotel, Halifax.

He worked for Smith, Barker & Willson Limited at Ovenden.

During World War I, he enlisted [1917], and served as a Private with the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.

He died 20th July 1918 (aged 19).

He is remembered on the Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance

Oliver, Matthew
[1798-1881] Born in Lindley.

On 5th October 1824, he married Hannah Eliza Sunderland [1804-1863] from Mytholmroyd, in Halifax.

Children:

  1. Hannah [b 1832]
  2. Grace [b 1834]
  3. Emma [b 1837]
  4. Elizabeth [b 1841]
  5. Matthew
  6. Esther [b 1845]
  7. Benjamin [b 1859]

He died in Bradford

Oliver, Matthew
[1843-1896] Son of Matthew Oliver.

Born in Ovenden

In 1861, he married Susannah Robertshaw [1841-1907] in Bradford.

Children:

  1. John [b 1864]
  2. Florence [b 1871]
  3. Herbert [b 1873]
  4. Hannah [b 1875]
  5. Ethel [b 1879]
  6. Hilda [b 1887]

He died in Leeds

Oliver, Royston
[1804-1884] Son of David Oliver.

Born in Leathley Yorkshire [16th January 1804].

He and his brother, Samuel, had a business at Wood Mill, Todmorden. The mill was attacked and damaged during the Mankinholes Riots.

On 28th November 1827, he married Mary Ann Haigh [1807-1865] in Halifax.

Children:

  1. Ada [1828-1910] who never married
  2. Jane Oliver [b 1829]
  3. Helen [1831-1905] who married [20th September 1853] Edward Ashworth from Rossendale, at Heptonstall
  4. Eliza [b 1842]

In 1855, he was set upon by 6 or more villains on the road to his home in Mutterhole, and robbed of his gold watch and other articles and 13/- in silver. A reward of £50 was offered jointly by the Heptonstall and Todmorden Prosecution Societies.

He died in Chorley [3rd May 1884].

See Oliver & Thompson

Oliver, Samuel
[17??-18??] Son of David Oliver.

He was a surgeon, registrar of births and deaths, and Guardian of the Poor for Langfield.

He and his brother, Royston Oliver, had a business at Wood Mill, Todmorden.

The mill and his house were attacked and damaged during the Mankinholes Riots

Ollerenshaw, Abraham
[1838-1906] Of Halifax.

In [Q3] 1865, he married Mary Jane Tiffany [1844-1919] in Halifax.

Children:

  1. Herbert [1866-1938]
  2. Arthur [1869-1941]
  3. (possibly) Mary Alice [b 1871]
  4. (possibly) Ellen [b 1874]
  5. twins Agnes [1875-1952]
  6. Edith [b 1875]
  7. Joseph Tiffany [1879-1948] who died in New York, USA

Members of the family were buried at Lister Lane Cemetery

Ollerenshaws Limited
Manufacturer of sewing thread founded by Herbert Ollerenshaw in 1898. In 1911, the firm moved to Perseverance Works in Thrum Hall Lane. The firm closed in 19??

Olton, Edith Blanche Alberta
[1868-1955] Known as Edith Blanche.

Born in Barbados.

In 1889, she and William Tell had a son, Charles, who was born in Barbados.

It is not clear if Edith Blanche & William were married.

On 12th July 1892, she married Alfred Butterworth in Barbados.

Children:

  1. Letitia [b Barbados 1893-1919] who was a gold ring maker [1911] and died in Halifax
  2. Edward Sidney [b Rangoon 19th October 1900]
  3. Ethel [b India 1904]

In 1901, Alfred was serving in South Africa in the Boer War, and Edith Blanche (listed as Blanche Tell) was living with son Charles at the Halifax District Barracks.


Question: Where are the 3 Butterworth children at this time?

 

Alfred returned to India [September 1902].

Presumably, Edith Blanche followed him once his Boer War service was over.

Alfred died of dysentery in Calcutta [1905].


The report also mentions cirrhosis of the liver. He is described as addicted to alcohol
 

In 1911, the widowed Edith Blanche (dress maker) and her 3 children were living at 30 Albert Road, Halifax, and son Charles Tell was with the Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment), living at Kandahar Barracks, Hampshire.

Edith Blanche lived in Halifax until her death in 1955

Olympia Cinema, Todmorden
A corrugated iron building erected in 1908 in the grounds on Ridgefoot House. The original Olympia opened as a skating rink.

On 29th January 1910, it became a cinema.

In 1912, colour films arrived.

In 1913, the lessees were Bennett & Tolfree Limited, and the manager was Albert Ernest Nicholls, It was advertised as


THE POPULAR
Pictures & Varieties Theatre

THE HOME OF AMUSEMENT
Always and Excellent Programme of Start Pictures and
High-class Varieties

In 1916, Herbert Hartley and manager Albert Ernest Nicholls, bought the place – see Hartleys Cinemas Limited.

In 1917, Bennett & Tolfree Limited were lessees.

The cinema was demolished in May 1931 and the New Olympia Cinema, Todmorden was built on the site

See John Holroyd Wadsworth

Olympia Garage Limited, Halifax
Barum Top. Car sales, service and repairs business.

Recorded in 1936. The site was subsequently occupied by shops, including a dry cleaners (on the corner), Millman's carpet store. The property was demolished around 1999 and the Barum Top pub built on the site

Olympia Skating Rink, Todmorden
Ridgefoot. Recorded on 10th August 1909, when 750 people attended the formal opening

Olympic Coffee Bar, Halifax
1960s venue on Wards End/Southgate.

Contributor Dave van de Gevel writes

The Olympic Coffee Bar was well favoured as it opened early on Sunday mornings for bus crews and also for us all-nighters from the Plebs, looking for sustenance after a night of doing the stomp to live jazz bands

Onecliffe House, Greetland
Stainland Road.

Owners and tenants have included

  • [1891]

O'Neill, David William
[19??-] He was Mayor of Todmorden [2005-2006]

O'Neill, Dennis
[19??-] Local historian. He was President of Todmorden Antiquarian Society. He was Mayor of Todmorden [1980-1981]

O'Neill, Kris
[1980-2007] Born in Catterick.

He served as a Corporal with the Royal Army Medical Corps.

He was killed 5th April 2007 (aged 27), one of four soldiers killed by a roadside bomb in Basra, Iraq.

He was buried at St Peter's Church, Sowerby

Only House, Northowram
Owners and tenants have included

See Lonely House Farm, Northowram and Only House Wood, Northowram

Only House Wood, Brianscholes
Woodland running south and east of Only House, Northowram

Opacic, Paul
[1966-] Actor Born in Halifax.

He has appeared in many TV rôles

Opticians

Oram, Thomas
[1876-1913] Landlord of the Mount Tavern, Boothtown [1905, 1914].

He died 27th November 1913 (aged 37).

He was buried at Stoney Royd Cemetery [K 83 A]

Orange, Colonel John Edward
[1805-1871] Born in Stafford [14th June 1805],

He joined the Navy as a boy. He transferred to the Army [1825], purchasing a commission as an Ensign. In 1826, he served with the 13th regiment in the First Burmese War, and was awarded the campaign War Medal for his part in the capture of Ava. He later transferred to the 31st Regiment, where he was promoted to Captain. He served in Gibraltar and Ireland.

After 20 years' military service, John, who was by then a Major, retired on half-pay, becoming Staff Officer in charge of the Enrolled Pensioners of the Halifax and Bradford Districts.

Around 1845, the family moved to Halifax.

In 1858, he was raised to the rank of Colonel.

He married Mary Crawford Bromehead [1808-1884] in Eckington, Derbyshire [14th July 1835].


Mary was the daughter of the curate of Eckington, Derbyshire, and great-niece of hymnwriter Rev Joseph Bromehead [1748-1826]
 

Children:

  1. Mary Louisa [1837-1912] who married Rev John Dickenson Knowles
  2. Elizabeth Agnes [1838-1914]
  3. William Alexander Wildman
  4. John Edward Orange [1842-1919] who later added Bromehead as his surname

The family lived at

John Edward died at Harrison Road [24th February 1871], a year after son William Alexander and family were lost at sea.

Mary died 5th March 1884.

Members of the family were buried at All Souls' Church, Halifax

Orange Town
A reader recalls his grandmother saying that
Halifax used to be known as Orange Town


Question: Can anyone confirm this?

 

Orange, William Alexander Wildman
[1839-1870] Son of Colonel John Edward Orange.

Born at Eckington, Derbyshire.

He grew up in Halifax and was educated at Heath Grammar School.

In January 1859, he gained admission to the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich. He was a Lieutenant, stationed at the Royal Engineers' Establishment, Brompton Barracks, Gillingham, Kent [1861].

He served in Bermuda for over 4 years.

He married Elizabeth Amelia (probably) in Bermuda.

Children:

  1. John Edward Roley

In 1870, on their passage home from Bermuda, the family – and a female servant – were all lost at sea aboard the SS City of Boston which sailed from New York – via Halifax, Nova Scotia – to Liverpool. The vessel was reported missing in February 1870, and no trace was ever found.

The family are remembered on his parents' grave at All Souls' Church, Halifax

Orangebox, Halifax
A proposed centre for young people, with facilities such as

  • A roof-top skate park
  • A bouldering tunnel
  • Rehearsal rooms
  • A recording studio
  • An art room

It will be accessible from the refurbished Piece Hall

Orchan Rocks, Todmorden
Natural rock formation on Hudson Moor above Todmorden.

The name may be a corruption of Rocking stone – although there is no such stone now. Others have suggested that the rocks resemble an organ.

Jumps Mill stood below the rocks

Orchard Business Park, Mytholmroyd

See The Orchard, Mytholmroyd

Orchard House, Greetland
Cross Hills, Rochdale Road.

Owners and tenants have included

The Orchard, Mytholmroyd

See Orchard Business Park, Mytholmroyd

Orchestras

Orde, Dora
[19??-] Local writer and member of the Halifax Authors' Circle

Orderly Room, Halifax
The orderly room of the 2nd West Yorkshire Yeoman Cavalry was housed in the Halifax Assembly Rooms with the entrance in Carlton Street [1850]

Ordish, John
[1809-1878] Timber merchant. He established business at Waterside Saw Mills, Halifax [1829].

He married Susannah Kay [1812-1867].


Susannah was the daughter of Mary & John Kay
 

Children:

  1. John Henry [1850-1867]

They lived at The Crescent, Hipperholme.

Susannah died 12th August 1867 (aged 55).

John died 8th December 1878 (aged 69).

Members of the family were buried at Stoney Royd Cemetery

O'Reilly, Rev B.
[19??-19??] Priest at St Thomas of Canterbury Catholic Church, Hebden Bridge [late 1950s]

Organ Builders

Organifax
A fertiliser produced by Halifax Corporation Sewage Department and made from local sewage

Orient Café, Halifax
Run by T. Collinson & Sons Limited at their premises at 13 Crown Street, Halifax [1905].

An advertisement for the business in a local newspaper announced


COLLINSON'S CAFE, 13, CROWN STREET, HALIFAX

Saturday Evening Dances This evening 7.30. p.m. to 11.45.p.m Admission 2s. Cloakroom free

PAULETTE'S ORCHESTRA

Super Sprung Floor. Ideal for Dancing Come and bring your friends

See Wallace Hartley

Oriental Café, Halifax
Recorded in 1905 at 4 Princess Street when the proprietor was Richard Skues.

See Cash Supply Stores Limited and Skues Café, Halifax

The Original Illuminated Clock Almanack
The publication was founded by Alfred Wilson. It first appeared on 15th October 1866 with the 1867 edition. It went on sale at Wilson's shop and cost 2d a copy. The first edition of 5000 copies sold out within a week.

The name comes from the clock which hung above Wilson's cap & hat emporium in Corn Market, Halifax.

Editors included James Bland and John Hartley. Hartley was associated with the publication – as editor and contributor – for a long time, and contributed a large amount of the dialect poetry and prose.

On John Hartley's death in 1915, the Leeds dialect poet Walter Hampson [1864-1932] was invited to take over as editor, and he continued until his own death.

The annual circulation of the Almanack reached 120,000 copies at one time.

The Almanack continued until 1957

Orilley, John
[19??-19??] Should this be O'Riley?

He served in World War II.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on Luddenden & Midgley War Memorial

Orlebar, Basil John
[1885-1915] Elder son of John Orlebar of Silsoe, Bedfordshire.

He married Barbara Florence Edwards.


Barbara was the daughter of
Major Arthur Hancock Edwards
 

They lived at The Dene, Triangle [1915].

During World War I, he served with the 3rd Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment.

He was a Captain with the with the 1st Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment.

He was killed in action [15th January 1915].

He was buried at the Dranouter Churchyard, Belgium [II A 1].

He is remembered on the World War I Memorial in Sowerby Church, and on Triangle War Memorial

Orm, Samuel
[1812-1861] He was an asphalter in Halifax / a lodger at the Hop Pole, Halifax [1861].

He died 27th May 1861.

He was buried at Lister Lane Cemetery [Plot Number 3752] with Balfour Lund, landlord of the Hop Pole

Orm son of Gamel
[10??-11??] Son of Gamel.

Like his father, he managed Elland for the absentee landowners, the de Lacy family.

He married Unknown.

Children:

  1. Leising

Orm son of Magnus
[10??-11??]

(Modern: Orm Magnuson)

Son of Magnus

He held land in Heaton and Hutton, and by marriage in Rawcliffe, Thistleton and Greenhalgh

He married Alice (Aliz).


Alice was the daughter of Hervey
 

Children:

  1. Roger
  2. Warin
  3. (possibly) Agnes

Ormerod...
The entries for people with the surname Ormerod are gathered together in the SideTrack.

The individuals listed there are not necessarily related to each other.

Ormerod's: Abraham Ormerod & Brothers
Partners included Abraham, Peter, and William Ormerod.

The company had several mills in and around Todmorden, including Alma Mill, Walsden, Friths Mill, Walsden, Gorpley Mill, Todmorden, Hollins Mill, Walsden and Ridgefoot Mill, Todmorden.

See Ormerod Brothers & Cheetham

Ormerod & Hirst
Cotton spinners at Broad Holme Mill, Brighouse [1874]

Ormerod & Sugden
Cotton spinners established in 1858 by Charles Jones Ormerod and Henry Sugden at Grove Mills, Elland.

In 1864, following a disastrous fire, the business became H. & J. Sugden.

See Blackburn & Ormerod

Ormerod Brothers
Engineering company and tool makers established at Hebden Bridge before World War I.

In 1918, it became Ormerod Tool Company.

It later became Ormerod Shapers Limited

Ormerod Brothers & Cheetham
Silk spinners established in 1872 from the former Burrow & Monk business.

Partners included Charles Jones Ormerod, Hanson Ormerod, and John Cheetham.

In 1871, newspapers reported


The first stone of a large and extensive silk mill for Ormerod Brothers & Cheetham was laid by George Hepworth on 13th September 1871. The mill was to be built on the street formerly known as Swan Fold
 

They were at Prince Albert Mill, Brighouse [1874].

The partnership was dissolved in May 1881. It carried on as Ormerod Brothers.

See Abraham Ormerod & Brothers

Ormerod Brothers Limited
Silk spinning & weaving business at Woodvale Silk Mills.

When Ormerod Brothers & Cheetham was dissolved in 1881,

Charles Jones Ormerod and Hanson Ormerod carried on the business as Ormerod Brothers.

It became a limited company in 1889 with a capital of £80,000.

It was one of the largest silk spinning concerns in England.

They built Alexandra Mills, Brighouse [1872] and Prince of Wales Mill, Brighouse.

On 8th March 1892, there was a strike of silk pressers at the mills.

When Alexandra Mills burnt down [1903] they bought Woodvale Silk Mills from Richard Kershaw. At this time, they had around 1000 workers.

In 1913, the business was sold to a Macclesfield company but it continued to trade as Ormerod Brothers. The business was run by Charles's sons Charles and George.

By the mid-1960s, the business, still at Woodvale Mills, was owned by Brocklehurst Whiston Amalgamated Limited.

The business closed in the early 1980s

Ormerod's: David Ormerod & Son
Wool waste dealer at West Vale. Partners included David Ormerod (senior)  and David Ormerod (junior).

The partnership was dissolved in September 1878

Ormerod's: H. & T. T. Ormerod
Brighouse wine and spirit merchants carried on by Hanson and Thomas Theodore Ormerod at Ormerod's Yard, Brighouse – the building which was built on the site of the Astoria and subsequently occupied by Hillard's, Tesco's, and currently Wilkinson's now stands on the site. They also had a brewery in the Yard.

Early records of the business go back to 1760. John Ormerod & Sons is recorded in 1845.

On Sunday 5th October 1851, thieves broke into the offices, cut away the safe and carried it to a field where it was blown open by explosives. The safe contained 5/- and some account books. No-one was charged with the robbery

Ormerod's: John Ormerod & Sons
Wine and spirit merchants and ale and porter brewers at Brighouse [1845].

See H. & T. T. Ormerod

Ormerod Shapers Limited
Hebden Bridge. Originally, the Ormerod Tool Company. In 1931, it became a subsidiary of Kitchen & Wade and the name was changed to Ormerod Shapers Limited.

As a part of Kitchen & Wade, the firm was taken over by Asquith's.

When Staveley's took over the business, Ormerod's closed in December 1967

Ormerod's: Thomas Ormerod & Company
Cotton and silk spinners.

They were at Owler Ings Mills, Brighouse [1874] and Prince of Wales Mills, Rastrick [1915]

Ormerod Tool Company
Hebden Bridge engineering company. Established before World War I as Ormerod Brothers.

In 1918, it became Ormerod Tool Company.

They produced shaping machines and machines for processing leather.

In 1931, the firm became a subsidiary of Kitchen & Wade and became Ormerod Shapers Limited

Ormesby, Captain
[18??-18??] He was Superintendent of the Halifax District County Constabulary [1873]. He attended the inquest into the explosion at Flatt's Pit, Clifton [1873]

Ormrod, Tille
[17??-18??] Listed as a Halifax Gent [1791]

Ormsby, Captain Robert S.
[18??-18??] Superintendent in the West Riding Constabulary [1874]

Orphanages
See Crossley Orphanage, Crossley & Porter Orphanage Sanatorium, Smith Orphanage, Brighouse, and Wainstalls Orphanage, Warley

Orr, Rev A. Barrington
[18??-18??] Curate at Elland [18??]

Orr, Edwin
[1887-1916] Born in Halifax.

He was a miner [1915].

In 1915, he married Emily Wood [1888-1965] in Halifax.


Emily was born in Halifax
 

They lived at Littlethorpe Hill, Hartshead [1916].

During World War I, he served as a Sapper with the 252nd Tunnelling Company Royal Engineers.

He was killed in action [25th January 1916].

He was buried at the Auchonvillers Military Cemetery, France [II A 28]

Orr, John
[1863-1???] Son of (deceased) wire drawer William Orr.

Born in Ovenden.

He was tailor of Lee Mount [1885] / a grocer [1891].

In 1885, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Lydia and Thomas Ingham, at St George's Church, Ovenden.

Children:

  1. Thomas W [b 1886]
  2. Edith [b 1888]
  3. Fred [b 1890]

The family lived at 51 John Street, Northowram [1891].

Living with them [in 1891] was mother-in-law Lydia Hutchinson

Orrell House, Sowerby Bridge
The House stands on the north side of Wharf Street, between Church Bank and Grange Place.

Listed next to No. 47 Wharf Street [1901].

Owners and tenants have included

Orthochrome Photographers
They had a shop on Bradford Road, Brighouse [1908]

Orton, Lou
[1916-2004] He and Reg Hargreaves ran several laundries and dry-cleaning businesses in the area – including the Snow White Laundry, Todmorden and Harton Cleaners, Hipperholme. Lou also managed the Barnsley Electric Laundry in Barnsley.

After Reg's death in 1955, Lou carried on the businesses until he emigrated to Australia in 1963

Osborn, Alice Elizabeth
[1870-1923] Daughter of Emma (née Luck) [1847-1926] & Arthur Osborn [1847-1923], butcher.

On 17th August 1891, she married David William Leone Ritchie at St Jude's Church, Hunslet.

Children:

  1. Arthur James

David William died in 1897.

In 1903, Alice Elizabeth was in Southampton and gave birth to a daughter Elsie Winifred Ramsey Ritchie [1903-1999] – father unknown.

In 1911, she was living at Ash Grove Norland with Richard Howarth [1867-1912].


Richard was born in Sowerby.

He was a railway labourer [1911]

 

They never married although they appeared a husband and wife on the 1911 census. She had two children with him

Children:

  1. Leslie Howarth Ritchie [1908-1979]
  2. Maurice Howarth Ritchie [1910-1944]

The family lived at Ash Grove, Norland [1911].

On 10th December 1919, she married Henry Alfred Osborn [1871-1951] at St George's Church, Sowerby

Osborn, Bernard Outram
[1876-1954] Son of Samuel Osborn.

Born in Bradford.

Baptised (as an adult) at St Jude's Church, Savile Park [20th March 1897].

He was Director of a private limited company (employer) [1911].

On 18th May 1910, he married Florence Maud Barber in Burley-in-Wharfedale.


Florence Maud was born in Halifax, the daughter of William Cambridge Barber
 

The family lived at

In 1947, they moved to Goudhurst, Kent.

Florence Maud died at Nicosia Airport, Cyprus [31st March 1954].

Probate records show that she left effects valued at £11,714 0/8d. Probate was granted to her husband.

Bernard Outram died in Goudhurst, Kent [11th October 1954].

Probate records show that he left an estate valued at £107,772 10/8d

Osborn, Dennis Outram
[1908-1982] Only son of Ernest Bacon Osborn.

Born in Halifax [7th June 1908].

Baptised at Lightcliffe [7th August 1908].

He was a second-lieutenant in HM Army [1941] / a worsted spinner [1963]

In 1935?, he married Marie-Louise Hutton Allison from Scotland

Children:

  1. son [b 1937]
  2. Daphne Louise Allison [b 1944?] who married [1968?] Nicolaas van Loenen from South Africa

The family lived at

Osborn, Ernest Bacon
[1870-1941] Son of Samuel Osborn.

Born in Bradford.

Baptised (as an adult) at St Jude's Church, Savile Park [20th March 1897].

He was a spinner [1908] / managing director of Baldwin & Walker Limited [1911].

In 1907, he married Margaret Helen Cowie [1881-1963] in Birkenhead.


Margaret Helen was born in the
 

Children:

  1. Dennis Outram
  2. Perdita [1910-1910]
  3. Nancy Ernestine [1914-1982] who married [1940] James H. Chapman

The family lived at Lightcliffe House [1908, 1911, 1941].

Living with them in 1911 were Richard Arthur Augustus Bottomley and family.

During World War II, he served with the 2nd W. R. Brigade as a Captain, then a Major, and finally a Lieutenant Colonel, with the Royal Field Artillery Royal Field Artillery.

He retired his commission on the [3rd October 1921].

He died in the Princess Royal Ward of the Royal Halifax Infirmary [24th December 1941].

He is remembered on the Baldwin & Walker Roll of Honour.

Probate records show that he left effects valued at £86,825 5/1d. Probate was granted to his widow Margaret Helen and son Dennis Outram.

Margaret Helen died at Arden House, Halifax [11th November 1963].

Probate records show that she left effects valued at £8,731. Probate was granted to her son Dennis Outram and her daughter Nancy Ernestine Chapman

Osborn, Geoffrey
[1887-1915] Son of Samuel Osborn.

His parents lived at Oakleigh, Halifax. His mother moved to Bournemouth after his father died.

He married Mary Crawley.

They lived at Winnipeg, Canada.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the Canadian Contingent.

He was killed north of Ypres [24th April 1915] (aged 28).

He is remembered on the Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance

Osborn, Henry Alfred
[1871-1951] Son of Joseph Osborn, butcher.

He was a discharged soldier [1919].

On 10th December 1919, he married Alice Elizabeth at St George's Church, Sowerby.

The family lived at West Bottom, Norland [1919]

Osborn, Samuel
[1843-1913] He was a worsted spinner employing 6 men & 50 young persons [1871] / a worsted spinner employing 130 [1881] / a knitting yarn spinner [1891] / a manufacturer in Halifax [1897] / a worsted spinner [1910]

In [Q3] 1869, he married Emily Cooke [1846-1917] in Bradford.

Children:

  1. Ernest Bacon
  2. Helen Mabel [b 1872]
  3. Emily Maud [1874-1962] who married Richard Arthur Augustus Bottomley
  4. Bernard Outram
  5. Agnes Margery [b 1881]
  6. Geoffrey [b 1887] who enlisted in the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force [23rd September 1914]

The family lived at

Both Samuel and Emily died in Bournemouth.

Probate records show that Samuel left effects valued at £66,929 5/5d. Probate was granted to his widow Emily and son Ernest Bacon.

Probate records show that Emily left effects valued at £3,962. Probate was granted to Agnes Marjorie Denman-Tubb (widow) 

Osborn, Walter Wilmott
[1880-1917] Or Osborne.

Son of Elizabeth & Henry Osborn of 20 Park Road, Elland.

Born in Pershore, Worcestershire.

During World War I, he served as a Gunner with the 168th Brigade Royal Field Artillery.

He died 2nd June 1917 (aged 36).

He was buried at the Pond Farm Cemetery, Belgium [O 10].

He is remembered on Elland War Memorial

Osborn, Walter Wilmott
[1881-1917] Son of Elizabeth & Henry Osborn of 20 Park Road, Elland.

Born in Pershore, Worcestershire.

During World War I, he served as a Gunner with the 168th Brigade Royal Field Artillery.

He died 2nd June 1917 (aged 36).

He was buried at the Pond Farm Cemetery, Belgium [O 10]

Osborne, Arthur George
[1920-1948] Born in Bognor Regis.

He had lived in Southowram for about 2 years and previously in Halifax.

He was a motor-driver / a labourer.

He lived at New Street, Southowram.

On 25th September 1948, he was found guilty of the murder of Ernest Westwood.

After the murder, Osborne fled to Chichester where he met and planned to marry Dorothy E. Ball. Osborne informed her that he had a house in Halifax. The marriage had to be cancelled when he failed to appear. Miss Ball said that she had bought a wedding cake and a receipt for this was produced at the trial.

He was already married and his wife was in Storthes Hall mental hospital.

On the way back to Halifax, Osborne confessed to the police that he had murdered Mr Westwood and told the police where they could find the screwdriver which he had used.

He claimed that he had broken into Mr Westwood's home to rob him, but he was disturbed by the victim.

It was said at the trial that from the notes made in his collection book, that Mr Westwood had collected about £23 that day but Osborne said he only stole £14.

The judge and the jury recommended mercy, but the Home Secretary saw no justification for this and refused to grant a Stay of Execution.

Osborne was hanged at Armley Jail, Leeds, at 9:00 am on 30th December – his 28th birthday.

It is said that after his execution, his numbers came up at a prize draw at the Southowram club

Osborne, Geoffrey
[1887-1915] His parents lived at Oakleigh, Halifax. His mother moved to Bournemouth after his father died.

During World War I, he served as a Private with the Canadian Contingent.

He was killed north of Ypres [24th April 1915] (aged 28).

He is remembered on the Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance

Osborne, Rev George
[18??-19??] Minister at Trinity United Methodist Free Church, Walsden [1908]. He left in June 1908 to serve at Sowerby Bridge

Osborne House, Hebden Bridge
Owners and tenants have included

Osborneroides
Or Osbornroid. Property at Hipperholme (?) which was owned by Sir Samuel Saltonstall


Question: Can anyone tell me anything about about the property?

 

Oscroft, Rev John
[1797-1869] Born in Hull.

Primitive Methodist Minister at Halifax [1835]

Osler, Rev Charles Henry
[1851-1915] From Ireland.

He was a minister in Ulster and Sheffield before becoming Curate at Halifax Parish Church [1892, 1896], Vicar of St Thomas the Apostle, Claremount [1904, 1907], and Vicar of Warley [1909, 1910, 1911].

He married Unknown.

Children:

  1. son
  2. daughter

The family lived at 6 Clare Road, Halifax [1895].

He died 6th April 1915 (aged 64).

He was buried at Holy Trinity Church, Southport

O'Smith, George
[17??-1???] Of Soyland. He was suspected of being a coiner

Ossipov, Mr
[1???-19??] A well-known character in and around Halifax. He was said to be White Russian and wore a fur hat, and carried an umbrella with a funnel on the ferrule

Ostler, Alan
[1885-1918] MC.

Son of William Henry Ostler.

He was educated at Halifax Secondary School & Heath Grammar School / a journalist [1911].

He worked for the Scarborough Daily Post, then the London Express.

He represented the Daily Express in Southern Morocco, and was the first British correspondent to enter Agadir when Germany made a European War possible. He was expelled from Agadir by Kaid Ghillouli [1911].

During the Turco-Italian campaign of 1911-1912, he was attached to the Turkish forces, and sent accounts of the Turkish aspect.

In 1913, he was in Somaliland, and crossed the Abyssinian frontier and had many adventures with the followers of the Mad Mullah. He was arrested in Berbera where he was arrested by the British authorities and sentenced to 2 months' imprisonment for making an unauthorised journey; the Colonial Secretary cancelled the conviction.

At the beginning of World War I, he represented the Daily Express on the Russian Front, before serving in the British Army. He served as a Lieutenant with 13 Squadron Royal Air Force and the Royal Field Artillery [1918].

He fought at Gallipoli and was invalided home with enteric fever.

He was awarded the Military Cross [1917] for


distinguished services during the fighting in Trones Wood in the Battle of the Somme [1916]
 

where he was wounded by a high explosive shell which burst within a few yards of him; an intervening parapet saved his life.

He was reported missing and assumed to have died [16th September 1918] (aged 33).

He was buried at the Ontario Cemetery, Sains-Les-Marquion, France [I E 17].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, on the Memorial at Heath Grammar School, and on the Memorial at Halifax Secondary School.

His brother Thomas also died in the War

Ostler, Robert
[1820-19??] Born in Howden. He was Clerk to the Halifax School Board [1881].

The family lived at 7 Norfolk Place, King Cross Road, Halifax [1881].

Ostler School was named for him

Ostler, Thomas
[1894-1917] Son of William Henry Ostler.

Born in Wyke.

He was educated at Halifax Secondary School [until 1906] & Heath Grammar School / employed at the West Yorkshire Bank.

During World War I, he enlisted [September 1914], and served as a 2nd Lieutenant with the 11th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's Own). He went to the Front [April 1915], and transferred to the West Yorkshire Regiment [November 1915].

He was killed in action [7th June 1917] (aged 23).

He was buried at the Railway Dugouts Burial Ground (Transport Farm), Belgium [VII N 5].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance, on the Memorial at Heath Grammar School, and on the Memorial at Halifax Secondary School.

His brother Alan also died in the War

Ostler, William Henry
[1860-1938] Born in Howden.

He was Clerk of Halifax School Board [1891, 1901] / Secretary of Borough Council Education Committee [1911].

In [Q2] 1884, he married Annie Hoatson [1861-1931] in Halifax.


Annie was born in Halifax
 

Children:

  1. Alan
  2. Clifford [b 1887] who was a chemist (gas works) [1911] and served with the Indian Cavalry in Baghdad [World War I]
  3. Margaret [b 1891]
  4. Thomas

The family lived at

  • 4 Clare Villas, Huddersfield Road, Wyke [1891]
  • 8 Royds Terrace, Halifax [1901]
  • Ashfield, Warley Town, Halifax [1911]
  • 5 Heath Avenue, Halifax [1917]

Sons Alan & Thomas died in World War I

Oswin, Kenneth
[1923-1944] Son of Elsie Pearce & Horace Oswin.

Born in Halifax [Q2 1923].

He was educated at Akroyd Place School / employed by F. Pratt & Company Limited.

He lived at 211 Pellon Lane, Halifax.

In [Q2] 1944, he married Lillian Elizabeth Barclay in Durham.

They lived at Hebburn, County Durham.

During World War II, he served as a Private with the 2nd Battalion King's Shropshire Light Infantry.

He died 17th October 1944 (aged 21).

He was buried at the Merlo War Cemetery, Netherlands [I A 11].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance

The Otes family of Northowram
Aka Oates. Prominent family in the Northowram, Shibden and Coley districts. Members of the family included James Oates, Isaac Oates, and Esther Oates.

The arms of the family – black cross and crosslets – can be seen on a window at Shibden Hall.

See Cinder Hill, Coley and Bairstow family

The Otes family of Southowram
The family were the first owners of Shibden Hall around 1400

Otes, Gilbert
[1428-1508] Grandson of William Otes.

He received half of the revenue from Shibden Hall after his father's death.

His half-sister, Joan and her husband Robert Savile inherited the property

Otes, Isabel
[1???-1???] She married (1) John Waterhouse.

She married (2) George Wheatley

Otes, James
[1???-1658] Also Oates.

A gentleman who had risen from yeoman clothier stock.

With several other local landowners, he refused to take a knighthood from Charles I and paid the consequent composition.

He married (1) Mary Whitley.

Children:

  1. Joshua
  2. Isaac
  3. son
  4. son
  5. Frances

He married (2) Phoebe Dickinson, a servant.

Children:

  1. James
  2. Phoebe

He owned and lived at several houses in Southowram and Northowram, including

See Dean House, Shelf, The Hollins&44; Luddendenfoot, Lands Head, Northowram, Law, Marsh Hall, Northowram, Plane Trees Farm, Coley and Whinney Royd, Northowram

His will [1657] mentioned several local people and places:


JAMES OTES of the Marshe in Northowrome, co. York, gent. – (Dat 23 June 1657)  - Jas. Sagar of Allerton - Tim Wadisworth of Midgley - Lands etc. of the nature of freehold inheritance lying in the parishes of Halifax, Bradford, Dewisbury or elsewhere in co. York - Son & heir Jas. Otes (under 21)  - my child or childn now 'in ventre sa meere' - Mess. & lands thereto belonging in Northowrome purchased of Thos. Fairbanke - Grandch. Hester now wife of Sam Lister gent - Mary & Thos. Lister chn of sd Hester (under 21)  - Wife Phebe & son Jas. exors - James Otes - Wits - Wm. Midgley, Ja. Sagar (Pr. 15 Apr. 1658 by Phebe relict); res. to Jas. Otes the other exor.
 

Otes, Joan
[14??-15??] Or Janet / Oates.

Daughter of William Otes.

She married (1) Unknown.

She married (2) Robert Savile.

Her initial I is believed to be shown on the ceiling beams in the Savile Room at Shibden Hall

Otes, John
[1???-1???] Of Whytley.

He married Margaret Brodley.


Margaret was the daughter of
Richard Brodley
 

Children:

  1. Margaret
  2. Sebell Otes

Otes, Robert
[15??-15??] He was Halifax parish clerk. In 1575, he was reported because
his ability to be clerk is doubted of and he doth not keep the church clean

Otes, William
[13??-14??] Aka Oates.

A wealthy sheep-farmer and cloth merchant of Southowram [1399].

Around 1420, he built a house called Schepdene which evolved into Shibden Hall.

He married Unknown.

Children:

  1. William

The property passed to his grandson, also William

Otes, William
[14??-14??] Son of William Otes.

He inherited Shibden Hall from his grandfather.

He married (1) Unknown.

They had no children.

In 1456, he married (2) Margaret Waterhouse.

Children:

  1. Joan who married into the Savile family of Elland

Margaret's father, Richard is recorded as having paid a sum of money to William for the marriage

He married (3) Unknown.

Children:

  1. Gilbert

In 1456, William left all his property – notably Shibden Hall – to his daughter Joan. However, when Margaret died, William remarried and a son Gilbert was born, and he tried to change his will in favour of Gilbert. This was contested by the Savile family who took the case to law.

Between 1491 and 1504 the ownership of Shibden was in the hands of the court. The judgement of the court was that the property passed to Joan and the Savile family, and Gilbert received an income from the property during his lifetime

Otes, William
[14??-14??] Son of William Otes.

He married Unknown.

Children:

  1. William

Otes, William
[14??-15??] Built Cinder Hills, Coley around 1513

Otley, Reverdy Carriborne
[1893-1946] Son of Harriet & George Osborne Otley.

Born in Lewisham.

In [Q3] 1919, he married Doris Victoria Scarr in Wandsworth.

They lived in Hebden Bridge.

During World War II, he served as a Lieutenant-Commander with the Royal Naval Reserve.

He died 5th October 1946 (aged 53).

He was buried at Heptonstall Church [I 37]

Otter Lee Farm, Triangle
Otter Lee Lane. Late 18th century / early 19th century house and barn

Ottley's: Thomas Ottley & Company
Tea dealers and coffee roasters at 2 Southgate, Halifax [1834, 1837]

Otty, A.
[18??-18??] Watchmaker & jeweller at 3 Northgate, Halifax [1866]

Ouram
At one time, Southowram and Northowram were known as Ouram or Owram

Ouram Hall
See Little Ireland Farm, Southowram

Ousel Brink
A part of Todmorden

The Outhwaite family of Southowram
Recorded in 1820

Outhwaite, Albert
[1???-1???] Son of Ned Outhwaite.

He became a teacher.

He married (1) Elsie.

He married (2) Lyn (Mabel)

Outhwaite, Captain
[18??-19??] Lord of the Manor of Southowram [1917]

Outhwaite, Ned
[1???-1???] A manager at Brighouse Co-operative Society.

In 19??, he married Susan E. Buckley.

Children:

  1. Albert

Outlane Brass Band
Formed in 1???. Recorded in 1903.

Disbanded in 1???

Outlane Gas Company
Recorded in September 1890, when their annual meeting was held at the Bay Horse, Stainland

Outlane Prize Band
Recorded in 1904, when Lewis Brook Whiteley was solo cornet player with the Band

Outram, Alexander James
[1856-1880] Son of John Outram.

Born in New York.

He was buried at Spring Hill Cemetery, Easton, Maryland, USA

Outram, Benjamin
[1777-1846] Of Greetland.

He was a woollen manufacturer [1841] and a cloth fuller at Outram's Mill, Greetland In 1830, he attempted to spin alpaca wool. He was on the committee of the Huddersfield & Liverpool Direct Railway Company [1845].

On 21st April 1816, he married Martha Thwaites [1798-1879] at Elland Parish Church.


Martha came from Elland
 

Children:

  1. Thomas
  2. John
  3. Benjamin
  4. Anne [1824-1909] who married Rev Philip Sydney Ashworth
  5. Joseph [1827-1878] who emigrated to South America, and died in Tacna, Peru [21st November 1878]
  6. William Henry [1830-1915]
  7. Edmund
  8. Elizabeth [1836-1903] who never married

The family lived at Ellistones House, Greetland [1851, 1861, 1871].

Living with the widowed Martha [in 1861] were visitors daughter-in-law Agnes S. Outram and grandsons Alexander James and Thomas S.

He was buried at Elland Parish Church aged 69 [1st May 1846]. Probate records show that he left effects valued at £6,000.

Other members of the family were buried at St Thomas's Church, Greetland together with Mary Raynard

Outram, Benjamin
[1822-1893] Son of Benjamin Outram.

Born in Greetland [10th January 1822].

He was a cloth fuller at Outram's Mill, Greetland.

In May 1861, he was sworn in as a member of the grand jury of the West Riding Intermediate Sessions.

On 4th December 1858, he married Elizabeth Sutcliff [1839-1862] at Clifton, Gloucestershire.


Elizabeth was the daughter of Samuel Sutcliff of Todmorden
 

Children:

  1. Gertrude [b 1859] who married George Herbert Leather

The family lived at Ellistones [1861].

Elizabeth died 29th August 1862.

Benjamin died in the USA [16th February 1893].

He was buried at Spring Hill Cemetery, Easton, Talbot County, Maryland, USA.

See Jonathan Slater

Outram's Dam, Greetland
Dam at Greetland which supplied water from Holywell Brook to Outram's Mill / Ellistones Mill

Outram, Edmund
[1833-1892] Son of Benjamin Outram.

Born in Greetland [17th September 1833].

He was a landowner [1871] / a manager in finishing & dyeing [1871] / a dyer & finisher at Ellistones Mill, West Vale [1881, 1888] / a dyer & finisher [1891].

In June 1874, he and Joseph Horton of Huddersfield filed a patent for

improvements in steam boilers & furnaces

In November 1887, he and J. Miller of Greetland filed a patent for

improvements in the method of, and apparatus for, pressing and finishing textile fabrics

He never married.

He lived at

Living with him [in 1881] & 1891 were his sisters Anne (widow)  & Elizabeth.

Around 1892, (possibly) a consequence of the fire at Ellistones Mill on 25th November 1888,

financial misfortunes overtook the family

Mary Raymond was a servant at the house when she loaned Outram her savings. In January 1892, items which Mary had been given as security for the loan were removed when Outram's possessions were seized. Mary was so upset that she committed suicide by taking a quantity of phosphorus.

Edmund died 11th May 1892.

He was buried at St Thomas's Church, Greetland

He is mentioned in the List of Local Wills: 1892 Probate records show that he left effects valued at £10.

Probate was granted to his sisters Anne & Elizabeth.

In November 1893, Anne & Elizabeth were in bankruptcy litigation after they contracted to sell Ellistones House, Greetland to a Mr Hawksley

Outram, John
[1819-1895] Son of Benjamin Outram.

Born 31st May 1819.

In 1840, John Outram [aged 21] (merchant) sailed from Liverpool to New York aboard the SS President.

He was a farmer [1870, 1880].

In 1855, he married Agnes Susannah Muir [1832-1913] in Pershore, Worcestershire.


Agnes Susannah was born in Accrington
 

The couple emigrated to Maryland, USA [1855].

Children:

  1. Alexander James
  2. Thomas S.

The boys were born in New York.

The family lived at Talbot County, Maryland, USA [1870, 1880].

In 1861, Agnes and her sons were staying with her widowed mother-in-law Martha at Ellistones House, Greetland.

John died 13th July 1895.

He was buried at Spring Hill Cemetery, Easton, Talbot County, Maryland, USA.

Agnes returned to England and died in Torquay [27th February 1913]. Probate records show that she left effects valued at £1,298 3/10d

Outram, Thomas
[18??-18??] Manufacturing chemist and copperas worker at Holywell Green [1861, 1874].

In January 1858, he was charged with permitting a nuisance at his chemical works, in the manufacture of ammonium sulphate.

In October 1866, Thomas Outram of Greetland filed a patent for

improvements in the manufacturer of cast iron

and in October 1869 a patent for

cast steel

and in June 1874 – with Joseph Horton of Huddersfield – a patent for

improvements in steam boilers and furnaces. The boiler is constructed in 2 parts which are set in brickwork with their ends facing each other, and connected together or not with steam and water tubes. A space is left between the 2 contiguous ends, which is enclosed with brickwork, so as to form a mixing chamber for the products of combustion

He lived at Bradley Hall, Holywell Green [1861]

Outram, Thomas
[1817-1874] Son of Benjamin Outram.

Born in Greetland.

He was a manufacturer of woollen [1851] / a farmer of 225 acres employing 38 servants [1851] / a landowner [1871] / a vitriol maker employing 4 men [1871] / a dyer and finisher employing 38 men [1871] / a farmer of 130 acres employing 4 men [1871].

He was unmarried and living with his widowed mother at Ellistones House, Greetland [1851, 1861, 1871]

Outram, Thomas S.
[1857-1907] Son of John Outram.

Born in New York.

On 8th March 1879, he enlisted in the US Army.

He could be the Thomas S. Outram who wrote

Is exposure at weather bureau stations satisfactory for all instruments? [1902]

On 29th January 1894, he married Jessie G. Murrison [18??-19??], from Wisconsin, at Cook County, Illinois.

They lived at

  • Minneapolis [1900]
  • Hennepin County, Minneapolis [1905]

Ovenden
District of Calderdale to the north of Halifax.

See Population, Parish statistics, North Halifax and Linda Riordan

Ovenden & Halifax Joint Railway

The Ovenden & Halifax Junction Railway Company

Ovenden Band

Ovenden Bard
Several local poets were known as the Ovenden Bard, including Thomas Crossley and Simeon Hirst

Ovenden Beck
Name given to the Hebble along part of its length.

See Water Siphon, Old Lane

Ovenden Board of Guardians
A part of the Halifax Poor Law Union.

Those who have served on the Board of Guardians for Ovenden township have included

  • Samuel Webster, Ovenden Wood [1869]
  • Thomas Robertshaw, Forest House, Ovenden [1869]

Ovenden Board of Health
Established in 18??

Ovenden branch of the Halifax Permanent Building Society
The Ovenden branch of the Halifax & District Permanent Banking Company Limited was at Keighley Road

Ovenden Brotherly Society
A friendly society established at the Illingworth Cross Inn on 3rd November 1788
for us and our families in the forlorn and desolate times of infirmity and disease

In 1819, the Society built 6 cottages on land at Ovenden. They were known as the Club Houses, and the lane which ran behind was eventually named Club Lane

The Society was disbanded in 1840

Ovenden Choral Society
Established in the early 1880s.

Recorded in 1829.

A meeting (possibly) of the Society is recorded at the Ovenden Cross Inn, under the management of George Moss, Henry Emmet, John Watkinson, Henry Watkinson, and the Hartley family

Ovenden Co-Op
Branch number 2 of the Halifax Industrial Society opened in April 1860. It had a boot and shoe department

Ovenden constables
The Foldout lists some of the people who have served as Police Officers in Ovenden.

See Illingworth Gaol

Ovenden Constitutional Club
Recorded in 1905 at Wheatley Lane when Fred Spencer was Secretary.

In 1917, Tom Hartley was Secretary

Ovenden Co-operative Stores
Recorded in 1861 at Nursery Lane when Henry Stansfield was Manager

Ovenden Cricket Club
The club house was formerly the Forest View pub.

Recorded in 1874, when John Priestley, the manager of the club house at the Club, was charged with selling beer without a licence

Ovenden Cross
See Ovenden Cross

Ovenden District Council
Aka Board of Surveyors.

See James Heginbottom

Ovenden Female Benefit Society
Founded on 23rd May 1809. It was initiated
by 12 ladies for self-help – in sickness and old age – of all females joining between the ages of 15 and 32

Miss Elizabeth Wadsworth gave an annual donation of £3 to the Society. The anniversary celebrations were held on Whit Saturday

Ovenden Grange
Aka The Grange, Ovenden.

Recorded on maps produced in 1854.

Owners and tenants have included

Ovenden Grunt
[18??-19??] A well-known Ovenden character who went around grunting at people

Ovenden Hall
The Hanson family are mentioned here in the 16th century. The present house was built by Joseph Fourness in 1662 on the site of an earlier house.

Owners and tenants have included

In 1???, reconstruction work was done by Gamaliel Sutcliffe

In 1944, it became a home for the elderly.

This is discussed in the books Halifax Antiquarian Society Transactions and The Old Halls & Manor Houses of Yorkshire.

See Miss Jane Carter

Ovenden Heights

Ovenden High School Baths
Opened in 1937. The baths are still in use

Ovenden House
House built for Peter Bold about 1727 on the site of an earlier house.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

Around 1961, it was converted into an old people's home

Ovenden House Nursery
Grove Mill Lane. Recorded in 1905, when J. Fowler occupied the nursery

Ovenden Liberal Association

See John William Calvert

Ovenden Library
Recorded in 1929 as Ovenden Branch Library.

Recorded in 1936.

See Frank Cyril Pritchard

Ovenden Local Board
The Local Board for Ovenden.

In 1873, there was controversy between the ratepayers and the Board over the cost of introducing of gas into the district. Jonathan Priestley sent anonymous death threats to members of the Board – James Booth, Wilson Midgley and James Whiteley.

See John Taylor Ramsden

Ovenden Madrigal Society
Established in 18??.

Abel Dean was a conductor for the society

Ovenden, Manor of
The manor was held by the Earls of Warren. It subsequently passed to the Thornhill family [1296], William de Methley, the Savile family, and the Earl of Scarbrough [1750].

The manor court of Ovenden was held at Lee Bridge.

Lord George Halifax Lumley-Savile auctioned off the title of Lord of the Manor in the 1990s

Ovenden Mechanics' Institute & Reading Room
18 Webster Street.

Officers of the Insitute have included

  • John Wilson Manager [1887]
  • J. W. Bairstow Secretary [1905]
  • Herbert Rushby Curator [1905]

The General Baptists Lord's Day School met here

Ovenden Moor
Common land enclosed in 1814.

See Borders Bridge, Ogden Clough, Giant's Tooth, Ovenden Moor, Goose Clough, Ovenden Moor, Hebble, Ogden Clough, Ovenden Moor wind farm, Skirden Clough, Skirden Edge, Spice Cake Hills and Yorkshire Windpower

Ovenden Moor wind farm
The wind farm on Skirden Edge opened in 1993 with 23 turbines – each 50-metre tall – generating enough electricity to supply about 6,000 homes.

In October 2002, there was a proposal by Yorkshire Windpower to increase the height of the turbines to 100 metres. These would be able to supply about 22,000 homes.

In October 2009, there were proposals to replace the 23 turbines with 10 turbines of twice the height – to power 13,000 homes

Ovenden Naturalist Society
Established in 1865. John Walker was a prime mover of the group

Ovenden Overseers of the Poor
The Foldout lists some of the people who have served as Overseer of the Poor for Ovenden

Ovenden Park
The premises of Halifax RUFC with two pitches.

The rugby club began to play there in 1928, initially renting the pitch at a nominal £1 a year from Drake's of Shay Lane.

The ground was bought by Jack Standeven, a member of a local business family, who bequeathed it to his two sons.

In April 1950, one of those sons, D. W. Standeven, who was president of Halifax RUFC, presented the ground to the club in memory of his late father.

There have been proposals to sell the site for supermarket development, with Halifax RUFC relocating to a new ground

Ovenden Police Station
Stands at the junction of the Ovenden Road and Grove Avenue.

In September 2012, this was one of a number of local police stations which were to be closed and sold off in order to cut costs

Ovenden Post Office
Recorded in 1861 at Ovenden Moor Side. It was then at the same address as the business run by Thomas Bottomley, shopkeeper.

Recorded in 1873, when William Parker was postmaster.

Recorded in 1874. It was then at the same address as the business run by Jane Bottomley, newsagent.

Recorded in 1905 at 31 Keighley Road when Harry Elliott was sub-postmaster, and in 1936 when Annie Elliott, newsagent, was in charge.

It later moved from Nursery Lane to the bottom of Mason Square

Ovenden Prize Band
Formed in 1???. Disbanded in 1???

Ovenden Railway Station
In August 1874, Halifax to Ovenden service opened to North Bridge – see Halifax High Level Railway.

The station was constructed at Ladyship by J. Charnock & Sons, and opened on 2nd June 1881.

Trains no longer called at North Bridge, Ovenden and Holmfield after 23rd May 1953.

The station closed on 23rd May 1955.

Remnants of the building survive. A part is used by a scrap merchant.

See Ovenden Station Bridge

Ovenden Reservoirs
The water from two springs in Ovenden fed two reservoirs which were begun in 1826 to give work to the poor. One of the reservoirs was finished around 1827, but the other was not completed till a few years after. Each holds about 2,700,000 gallons

Ovenden, Richard de
[1???-1362] Appointed interim Vicar of Halifax [1349] when the Prior of Lewes did not have anyone to replace Thomas de Getingdon and John de Stamford who had both died of the Black Death. He, too, died of the Black Death

Ovenden Rugby League Football Club

See Rugby Avenue, Ovenden

Ovenden School Board
School Board set up in 18??.

See Bradshaw Board School, Mixenden Board School and Mixenden Community Primary School

Ovenden Station Bridge
Single-arch stone bridge over Lee Brook near Ovenden Station

Ovenden Stocks
The stocks here were used in 1864

Ovenden Subscription Band

Ovenden Surveyor of the Highways
Those who held the post of Surveyor of the Highways for Ovenden included:

Ovenden, Viscount
See Maurice MacMillan

Ovenden, Viscount Macmillan of

Ovenden Ward, Halifax
One of the Electoral Wards of Halifax.

See Joseph Hartley, James Naylor, Mrs Linda Riordan, Fred Sharp, Harry Skelton and John Walsh

Ovenden Ward Liberal Club
Recorded in 1917 at Lee Mount Road, when Henry Dewhirst was secretary

Ovenden Wood
Ovenden. A house is mentioned here in 1381, owned by the Ovendenwood family, the name was later abbreviated to atte Wode, or Woods.

In the 17th century, James Murgatroyd built the houses Long Can, Yew Tree, and Lee House here.

There are several springs in the area

Ovenden Wood Brook
Name given to the Hebble along part of its length

Ovenden Workhouse
In 1777, this accommodated 40 inmates.

See Great Scausby, Bradshaw, Joseph Rhodes and Caleb Spencer

Ovenden Worsted Company Limited
Worsted spinners. Originally called the Ovenden Worsted Spinning Company Limited, they occupied Holmfield Mills, Shay Lane.

John Crossley & Sons acquired the Company and traded under the name Ovenden Worsted Company Limited.

The company was registered in March 1871.

28th March 1871: Capital of 150,000 in 12,000 shares. 7 subscribers took 70 shares. No return made

Their mill was destroyed by fire on 3rd February 1872.

Members of the Company

Recorded in 1874 at Ovenden and at Greetland.

Recorded in 1887 at Holmfield Mills, Ovenden and at 10 Charles Street, Bradford.

The company ceased trading about 1900

Over Bradley, Stainland
Another name for Bradley Hall, Holywell Green. Mentioned in the Nomina Villarum [1865] as being a place in the Parish of Halifax

Over Brea
Aka Upper Brea

Over Brown Hirst, Ovenden
Recorded on maps produced in 1854

Over Hazlehurst, Shibden
See Hazlehurst

Over Nabroyd
The original name of Sunnybank.

The name suggests that the property stood above the road to an area called Nab

Over Shibden
Aka Upper Shibden Hall

The Overall family
Of Rotherham. They owned Cliffe Hill Mansion, Lightcliffe in the 16th century

Overe
Name referring to Southowram in Domesday Book

Overend, Thomas
[1872-1900] He lived at 10 Fleet Street, Halifax.

He was a reservist.

During the South African Wars, he was called-up [December 1899], and served as a Private with the 1st Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment).

He died of enteric fever in South Africa [June 1900] (aged 28).

He is remembered on the Halifax Parish Church South African War Memorial, and on West View Park War Memorial

Overgate Hospice, Elland
Hullen Edge.

The house was the home of Find Graucob, the MD of Nu-Swift Fire Extinguishers.

On his retirement, he and his wife, Sylvia moved to Jersey.

He died in 1978. In 1979, Sylvia gave the house and the adjoining Hazeldene and gardens to the Calderdale Society for Continuing Care for conversion into a hospice.

The hospice opened in September 1981.

See Overgate, Elland

Overgreen Royd Farm, Mixenden
The Mixenden urnfield is nearby

Overwhiskers, Shibden
House.

Owners and tenants have included

  • Frank Ambler [1937]

Overwood Farm, Hebden Bridge
17th century laithe house

Owd Bob
A popular name for the clock on Brighouse Town Hall. In 1912, Robert Thornton presented the town with the clock and the balustrade on the building

Owd Mo'
Popular name for Methodist preacher Moses Welby

Owen, Arthur
[1908-1998] Born in Bristol.

He was classics master at Heath Grammar School [1935-1973] / churchwarden and treasurer of St Paul's Church, King Cross / a member and (possibly) chairman of the Halifax Choral Society [1970s/80s] / chairman of the Halifax Arts Council [1970s]

He wrote the Latin motto inscribed on the school's memorial gates and the Latin school Grace

During World War II, he served in Africa.

In 1941, he married Ethel Mary Fairclough whom he had met whilst home on leave from Africa.

Children:

  1. Peter
  2. Elizabeth

Owen, Rev Edward
[18??-19??] BA.

Pastor at Hope Baptist Church, Hebden Bridge [1908]. In 1919, he was appointed to Zion Church, Bramley

Owen, Ernest
[18??-191?] He served in World War I.

He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the Memorial at Saint John the Evangelist, Warley

Owen, Garfield
[19??-19??] Player with Halifax RLFC [1959]. He won a cap for Wales while at Halifax

Owen, J.
[18??-191?]

During the South African Wars, he served as a Private with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. He died in the conflict.

He is remembered on the Halifax Parish Church South African War Memorial, and on West View Park War Memorial

He died in the conflict.

Owen, Thomas
[18??-1???] Paper maker at Soyland Paper Mill [1884, 1896]. He produced newsprint and wrapping paper

Owens, Dot
[19??-] Of Ovenden, Halifax. In the early 1970s, she started the first UK Star Trek fan club. She appeared on various news and current affairs programmes, organised the conventions, and was known by fans and actors of the science fiction series

Owl Hall, Norland
Near Pickwood Scarr.

Recorded in 1851, when Robert Dearnley lived here

Owler Bank, Hebden Bridge
Hurst Road

Owler Carr Reed Manufacturing Company
Between 1880-1895, Smith Starkie was trading as Owler Carr Reed Manufacturing Company at Owler Carr Mill, Cloughfoot

Owler Ings
Area of Brighouse.

See Ing and Owler

Owlers, Wadsworth
Burlees Lane.

Mid 17th century house

Owlet Hall, Elland
South Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Owram Hall, Shibden
House which stood near the later Industrial School.

Owners and tenants have included

See Southowram Hall

Ox Heys Farm, Shelf
The land was owned by the Knights of St John of Jerusalem.

Subsequent owners and tenants have included

In July 1833, the property was advertised for sale as

a farm house, 2 cottages, a large barn and out-buildings, with about 60 days' work of arable meadow and pasture land, about 13 days' work of wood land with beds of stone, coal, and iron stone, a constant stream of water with a fall of 30 feet which runs through the land and is considered eligible for a mill of manufactory

On 29th August 1940, three bombs fell in a nearby field. A number of incendiary bombs fell to the west of Shelf.

See Lower Ox Heys, Shelf and Middle Ox Heys Farm, Shelf

Oxbury, James Henry
[1869-1942] Born in Brighouse.

He was a cooper [1911].

In 1893, he married Mary Jane Broomhead in Halifax.


Mary Jane was the daughter of
Reuben Broomhead
 

Children:

  1. John [b 1894] who was a cotton spinner [1911]

The family lived at 62 Thornhill Road, Rastrick, Brighouse [1911].

Living with them [in 1911] were Mary Jane's mother Frances Broomhead & siblings Hall Broomhead, Ada Broomhead and Olive Broomhead

Oxford builders
After a disagreement between Oxford University and their local builders in 1608, Sir Henry Savile took masons John Akroyd and John Bentley from Halifax to build the Fellows' Quadrangle at Merton College, and to finish his extensions to the Bodleian Library

Oxford Café, Halifax
George Square.

The building is now a bank.

There was an Oxford Café in Southgate Chambers, Halifax [1936]

Oxford House, Hebden Bridge
Albert Street.

The house has been converted into a restaurant

Oxford Lane Economic Stores
Oxford Lane. A branch of Economic Stores (Halifax) Limited. Opened in 1???

Oxford Street Livery Stables, Todmorden
Established in 1869. Recorded in 1897, when J. Hopkinson was Proprietor

Oxley Dempster Limited
See Robert Dempster & Sons Limited

Oxley, Harry Stanley Peter
[1894-1917] Son of Mr Oxley, and stepson of Louis Smith.

Born in Plymouth.

He was a member of St Paul's Church, King Cross & Sunday School / a card cloth labourer [1911] / employed by Patchett & Sons at Sedburgh Wire Works.

In [Q3] 1917, he married Martha Ellen Albon in Halifax.

They lived at 13 Copley Avenue, Pye Nest, Halifax

During World War I, he served as a Private with the 4th Battalion Grenadier Guards.

He died of wounds [13th October 1917] (aged 23).

He was buried at the Solferino Farm Cemetery, Belgium [I B 9].

He is remembered on the Memorial at Halifax Town Hall Books of Remembrance.

His brother Walter Samuel served with the Scots Guards and was wounded.

His stepfather Louis Smith was blinded and discharged from the Army

Oxley, Miss
[18??-19??] Headmistress at Colden School

Oxley, Mr
[18??-19??] He was a chief stoker with the Royal Navy.

He (possibly) married Elizabeth Truscott [1874-19??].


Elizabeth was born in Plymouth, the daughter of Peter Truscott [1831-1905], an iron moulder
 


No record of the marriage has been found
 

Children:

  1. Harry Stanley Peter
  2. Walter Samuel
  3. Frank Truscott (Oxley) [1898-1904]

The family lived at 7 Hollywood Terrace, Plymouth, Devon [1901].

Living with them [in 1901] was Elizabeth's widowed father Peter Truscott [b St Austell, Cornwall 1831] (retired iron moulder).

In 1907, Elizabeth married Louis Smith in Plymouth


It is not known whether her husband Oxley died, or they were never married, or this was a bigamous marriage
 

Oxley, Walter Samuel
[1896-1956] Son of Mr Oxley, and stepson of Louis Smith.

He was a worsted spinning oiler [1911].

During World War I, he served as a Private with the Scots Guards. He was shot through the jaw and put on light duties at Caterham [1918]

His brother Harry Stanley died in the War.

His stepfather Louis Smith was blinded and discharged from the Army.

Walter Samuel survived the War and died in Halifax [Q4 1956] (aged 60) 

Oxley, Mrs Winifred
[1???-] She was the third Lady Mayor of Halifax [1961-1962]

Oxtoby, Rev John
[1767-1830] Known as Praying Johnny.

Born in Pocklington.

Primitive Methodist Minister in Halifax [1829]

Oxtoby, T.
[18??-18??] Corn miller at Halifax.

In August 1868, he was declared bankrupt

Oxygen Sewage Limited
Recorded in 1905, when their registered office was at Penny Bank Chambers, Halifax

Oxygrains Bridge, Rishworth
A single-arch stone packhorse bridge over Oxygrains Clough. It is about 9 ft wide and about 14 ft long from bank to bank.

In July 1825, masons were invited to contract for

the widening and repairing of Oxygrains Bridge, on the road leading from Ripponden to Oldham, consisting of one arch of 24 feet span

Watson says the name Ox-grains comes from two elements Osc [water] and grains [joining] and means the joining of two streams.

It was superseded by the modern bridge when the Oldham turnpike was built.

The bridge is on the English Heritage Buildings at Risk Register

Oxygrains Clough, Rishworth
A tributary stream which runs from Rishworth Moor and Green Withens Reservoir down to the Ryburn and on to Booth Wood Reservoir.

See Oxygrains Bridge, Rishworth


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z



© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 14:42 on 21st November 2017 / o / 315