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Lacy Mill, Walsden
Aka Travis Holme Mill, Walsden

Ladyship Mills, Halifax
Old Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Ladyship Mills, Halifax
King Cross. Baldwin & Walker produced their Ladyship Wools here.

There were proposals to redevelop the mill and part of the grounds into Ladyship Mills Business Park [2007].

The Mills were demolished.

A Tesco supermarket stands on a part of the site

Ladyship Mills, Ovenden
Mill Lane.

Designed by J. F. Walsh in 1891.

Owned by Standeven & Company Limited.

In October 2007, plans were announced to convert the site into a £1.3m business park

Lambert Dye Works, Elland

Lambert's Mill, Ripponden
Bar Lane. Cotton-spinning and doubling mill built about 1800 by Fenton & Robert Lambert.

In 1855, John Whiteley built Stones Mill on the site


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Land Mill, Blackshawhead
Cotton mill built in 1805. The chimney can still be seen

Land Mill, Colden
Upper Colden Valley mill built around 1796.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Land Mill, Stansfield


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Landemere Quarry, Northowram


Owners and tenants of the quarry have included

 

Part of the quarry at Coley was sold off for waste disposal

Lane Head Quarry, Brighouse


Owners and tenants of the quarry have included

 

See Waterloo, Brighouse

Lane Top Quarry, Norland


Owners and tenants of the quarry have included

 

Lanebottom Mill, Walsden

Lanebottom Picker Works, Walsden

Lanehead Colliery, Ovenden
Swill Hill.

Thomas Bates & Thomas Charnock bought the Colliery [1770]

Laneside Mill
See Laneside House, Todmorden and Waterside Mill

Law Hill Quarry, Southowram
Twinge Lane.

This was a circular shaft sunk to mine the stone, much like the Rastrick stone mines.


Owners and tenants of the quarries have included

 

It was no longer used [by the 1950s]. It was capped and sealed [1960s]

Law Hill Quarry, Stansfield
Recorded in 1874

Law Mill, Cornholme
A name for Frieldhurst Mill, Cornholme when John Law was here [1837]

Law Quarry, Southowram
Law Lane. Opposite Withinfields School.


Owners and tenants of the quarry have included

 

The quarry was filled in [1960s].

A house and the doctors' surgery stand on the site

Law Street Works, Cornholme
Aka Cornholme Reed Works.

Owners and tenants have included

 

Leach Colour Works, Brighouse
Sunnybank Road: 4-storey brick building erected in 1???. It was used by Leach Colour until 2005. There were plans to demolish the building and erect house on the site. It was badly damaged by fire on 9th October 2006.

Larkfield Court housing development now stands on the site.

See Larkhill Academy

Leafland Street Mill, Halifax


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Lee Bank Mills, Ovenden
Stood between Old Lane and the railway line.

7-storey mill built for W. H. Rawson & Company in 1868.

Joint with Union Mills, Halifax.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

On 15th February 1868, a chimney fell causing damage and killing one man.

15th December 1904 Thomas Savile Bowman [24] was caught in a hoist at the Mill and died a few weeks later

Rawson's Mill, Halifax: Lee Bank.

Owners and tenants have included

Lee Bottom Mill, Walsden
Aka Newbridge Mill

Lee Bridge Mill, Halifax
Comprised a large 6-storey mill, extensive 5-storey-high warehousing, and a large weaving shed.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

On 4th October 1853, when it was occupied by the Whitworths, the mill was destroyed

Lee Mill, Hebden Bridge
One of the Hebden valley mills

Lee Mill, Heptonstall
16th century fulling mill.

In 1832, the mill was rebuilt and fustian manufacturing began.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Lee Mill, Todmorden

Lee Mills, Halifax
Lee Bridge. The mill was owned by John Crossley. Worsted manufacturer Enoch Robinson had to move when Crossley needed the premises for his own expansion.


Subsequent owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

See Thomas Campbell Davis

Leopold Wire Works, Brighouse
Armytage Road / George Street.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

The works were badly damaged by a fire in 1886

Leppington's Mill, Brookfoot
Worsted mill owned by Samuel Leppington. The mill was attacked during the Plug Riots of August 1842

Lillands Quarry, Rastrick


Owners and tenants of the quarry have included

 

Lilleshall Foundry, Halifax
Albert Road.


Owners and tenants of the foundry have included

 

Lilley's Dye Works, Elland
Halifax Road. Stood at the north-west end of Elland Bridge.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

The works were demolished in the 1930s when the road was widened

Lilly Lane Mill, Halifax
A water-powered fulling mill was built at Lilly Lane around 1600. The name is derived from Edward Lilley who occupied the mill at one point.


Subsequent owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

There were two 6-storey mills. The newer mill was at the southern end of the site. The boiler and engine house stood between the old and the new mills, and 4 floors were built over the engine and boiler house, the centre mill.

On 29th November 1850, when the mills were occupied by Firth's, many workers were killed or injured when a boiler exploded – see Explosion at Lilly Lane Mill.

On 11th November 1872, several people were killed and others injured when one of the mill's dams burst.

In 1935, a workman was killed as a part of the mill was being demolished.

In 2001, the mill was destroyed by fire

Limed House Soft Bed Colliery, Northowram
Recorded in 1854.

See Limed House, Northowram

Linden Mill, Hebden Bridge
Aka Hebden Works, Hebden Bridge.

Built for the manufacture of clothing.

The building is dated 1905.

Owners and tenants have included

In closed in 1983. In 1988, it was used by several small business units

Linden Works, Heptonstall


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Lindley Moor Pottery

Lineholme Mill, Todmorden
Owned by John Stansfield.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

It was demolished in 19??

Lineholme Steam Saw Mills & Joinery Works
Owners and tenants have included Thomas Greenwood [1897]

Lion Brewery, Shelf
Bracken Lane. Established around 1850. The brewery was originally a farm house in the grounds of Low House, Queensbury.

All that remains of the brewery are walls and an arched gateway – known as The Lion Gate – which is surmounted by a lion, with two doorways at the side

Listerwick Colliery, Shibden
Colliery near to Pump on the Shibden estate. In 1836, Anne Lister planned to build a reservoir to power a waterwheel for the colliery

Little Britain, Ripponden
Aka Hanging Lee Mill, Ripponden.

There was (possibly) a school here, run by Thomas Lees and his wife, Rachel.

See Black Field House, Soyland

Little Hebble Mill, Ovenden
Aka Brook Mill Fulling Mills.

A late 18th century water-powered fulling mill. It was extended and converted to steam power in the 19th century.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Little John Mill, Clifton Common
2-storey woollen fulling, scribbling and carding mill built by John Clegg in 1785. It was erected on land known as Ganger Ing and leased for 84 years from 1786. It was popularly known as Clegg's Mill. It was driven by Clifton Beck.

Around 1808, Samuel Pollard used it as a corn mill. An extra storey was added.

In 1828, it was extended and used for wire drawing by Solomon & Frederick Pitchforth.

The mill was attacked during the Plug Riots of August 1842. A local man, John Baines, was sentenced to 6 months' imprisonment for stopping the water supply to the mill wheel.

Robert Newton and James Burrow began silk working here [1843], John Sutcliffe [18??], and James Dilley [189?].

See George Healey & Sons and Robin Hood Mill, Brighouse

Little Marsh Quarry, Southowram
Part of Little Marsh, Southowram.

Owners and tenants have included

Little Valley Brewery, Hebden Bridge

Livingston Wire Mill, Brighouse
/ Livingstone Wire Mill. Bradford Road (east side).

Recorded in 1910 and 1934.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Livingstone Mills, Halifax
Queens Road / Adelaide Street.


Owners and tenants have included

 

Lob Mill Delph, Todmorden
Recorded on 25th July 1850 in a memorandum between Miss Gibson of Greenwood Lee and William Dewham & Thomas Newton, railway contractors, joiners and builders of Todmorden, who contracted to take stone from the quarry at an annual rent of £10

Lob Mill Rope Works, Langfield
Halifax Road. Stood next to Lob Mill.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

  • Jonas Clegg [around 1890]
  • James Mason [1905]
 

Lob Mill, Todmorden
A water-powered fulling mill is recorded here in 1557. A worsted mill built around 1790 by Christopher Rawdon.

James Hollinrake built the new Lob Mill [1790].


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

The mill chimney was demolished in 1906. The mill was demolished in 19??. A small picnic site and car park mark the location.

See Lob Mill Rope Works, Todmorden

Lock Hill Mills, Sowerby Bridge
Stood on the north bank of the Calder.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

In 3rd January 1880, a fire destroyed the mill which was occupied by Wood Brothers and John Woods & Son.

There was a fire here in 1995 and the mill was demolished

Lockhill Foundry, Sowerby Bridge


Owners and tenants of the foundry have included

 

Lockside Mill, Todmorden
The mill has been converted into apartments

Long Close Quarry, Brighouse
Lightcliffe Road.


Owners and tenants of the quarry have included

 

Long Lea Mills, Elland
Halifax Road.


Owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

Long Lee Iron Works, Elland
Stood alongside the Calder & Hebble Navigation

Long Wall Quarry, Elland
Stone quarry. There was a rock collapse here on 13th June 1867

Longbottom Fulling Mills, Luddendenfoot
Tenterfields. Aka Whitworth's Mill.

It was built on the north bank of the Calder.

Recorded in 1738.

It was extended to become a 4-storey building with a weaving shop, drying houses and warehouses [1782].

Joseph Priestley was a merchant here [around 1800].

The cotton mill here burned down on 31st January 1804.

There was much damage to the building and machinery in floods on 16th November 1866 and on 23rd December 1880.

On 17th January 1907, William Sunderland was killed whilst working at the mill.


Subsequent owners and tenants of the works have included

 

On Sunday 21st November 1915, fire damaged the Mills.

The Mill was later redeveloped as Tenterfields Business Park.

See Longbottom Bridge, Luddendenfoot

Longbottom Mill, Sowerby Bridge
Wharf Street. Built in the late 18th century. It is said to be one of the earliest – if not the first – fully-integrated woollen mills in the world

Longfield Foundry, Halifax
Parkinson Lane.

Owners and tenants have included

Longfield Works, Holywell Green


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Longroyde Quarry, Rastrick

Owners and tenants have included

Lord Brothers' Mill, Todmorden
See Canal Street Works, Todmorden

Lord Holme Mill, Hebden Bridge
Aka Gibson Mill.

One of the Hebden valley mills

Lord Holme Mill, Todmorden

Low Moor Mill, Todmorden
Aka Shade Mill, Todmorden

Low Underbank Mill, Todmorden
Former name of Jumble Hole Mill, Todmorden. It was used as a dye works

Lower Brear Brewery
Established by partnership of James Alderson and James Shepherd

Lower Dyson Lane Mill, Rishworth
The name Lower distinguished it from Dyson Lane Mill.


Question: I suspect that I have confused some details of this and Dyson Lane Mill. Please email me if you can suggest any corrections to the details in either of the 2 entries

 

Originally a fulling mill [1672].

A cotton spinning facility was added in 1822. This was powered by 2 waterwheels, each 21 ft in diameter.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

The mill was owned by the trustees of Wheelwright's Charities.

See Slitheroe Mill, Rishworth

Lower Edge Quarries, Rastrick
Established in 18??.

The work here is [2008] primarily that of producing crushed and reconstituted stone from the old spoil heaps


Owners and tenants of the quarries have included

 

Lower Ellistones Mill, Greetland
Late 18th century woollen / shoddy mill. It is now derelict

Lower Jack Royd Mill, Ovenden
/ Wheatley. Hebble Lane.

It was used as a wire mill at some point.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Lower Laithe Mill, Stansfield
The mill at Lower Laithe, Stansfield was operated by William Thompson [1861] and William Sutcliffe [1869].

A new warehouse was added in 1869

Lower Lumb Mill, Colden
Aka Low Lumb Mill. Built 1805.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

The mill was on English Heritage's Buildings At Risk Register, but was removed [2009] after repairs had been carried out.

See High Lumb Mill and Lumb Mills, Heptonstall

Lower Lumb Mill, Mill Bank
Cotton mill at Lumb Bridge.

Owners and tenants have included

The mill burned down on 15th October 1864 when was occupied by Heal, Booth & Company

Lower Mill, Brighouse
A mill is recorded on the north bank of the Calder in 1300, established by the Lord of the Manor. The corn and fulling mills were leased.

Lower and Upper Mill were attacked during the Plug Riots of 1842.

The mill was demolished in May 1887

Lower Mill, Midgehole
Textile mill.

Demolished [19??]

Lower Mill, Wainstalls
An early [1820s] name for New Mill, Wainstalls

Lower Shaw Mill, Halifax


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Lower Soyland Mill, Soyland

Lower Stoneswood Mill

Lower Swift Place Mill, Soyland
One of the Swift Place Mills.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Lower White Lee Works
At Lower White Lee, Mytholmroyd. The early 19th century barn is now part of an engineering works

Lower Willow Hall Mills, Sowerby Bridge
There was a mill here which was used for fulling and cotton spinning.

A new cotton mill was built in 1783 at Lower Willow Hall, Sowerby Bridge by Edmund Lodge. It was built of brick and known as the Brick factory. This may have been the first cotton-spinning mill in the district.

A new stone mill was built in 1798 by the Lees family. John Edwards joined their business.

After Edmund Lodge's death in 1799, his sons, Thomas and Henry, carried on cotton spinning until 1810 when they leased out the 2 mills.

There was a fire at the mill in December 1930.


Subsequent owners and tenants have included

 

See Thomas Henry Longbottom

Lower Wormald Mill, Ripponden
Aka Bogden Mill, Rishworth

Luddenden Clothing Factory, Halifax

Luddenden Corn Mill
The manorial corn mill was recorded at Warley in 1274.

In 1663, it was rebuilt by Jane & Henry Murgatroyd.

It is dated 1633 / M H I

Luddenden Mills
A corn mill is mentioned in 1274. There were 2 mills – the lower mill and the upper mill – powered by Luddenden Brook.

The Murgatroyd family owned the mill from the 1300s until it was sold by Hartley and John Murgatroyd in 1854.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

See Cold Edge Dam Company

Luddendenfoot Joint Sewage Works
Recorded in 1905 at High Royd, off Burnley Road

Luddendenfoot Mill
Burnley Road. Formerly known as Foxcroft's Mill. Around 1850, it was known as Delph Mill.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Latterly, the mill was owned by British Furtex Fabrics Limited.

The mill was demolished in 2004.

A housing estate was built on the site.

See Cold Edge Dam Company, Danny Lane Mill and Luddendenfoot Industrial Co-operative Society

Lumb Brook Mills, Coley
Westercroft Lane.

Aka Lum Brook Mills, Coley, Lum Brook Mills, Hipperholme, Lumb Brook Mills, Hipperholme, Lumb Brook Mills, Northowram, and Lumbrook Mills, Northowram.

Built by Henry Charles McCrea in 1850.


Subsequent owners and tenants of the mills have included

 

Lumb Mill, Mill Bank
Aka Upper Lumb Mill

Lumb Mill, Todmorden

Lumb Mill, Wainstalls
Lumb Lane. Water-powered cotton mill built around 1803 when it was described as
all that new erection used as a cotton mill in Clough Field, at Stones, Warley

It was extended and converted to production of worsted in 1828. It was a 3-storey, stone building.

In 1833, the original waterwheel was replaced by a 36 ft diameter cast-iron overshot wheel. This was used until electric power was introduced in 1953. The wheel is currently [2012] being restored by the owner.

The mill generated its own electricity.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Calvert's used the Mill for winding, spinning, and twisting.

It closed in 1939 on account of the state of the trade, but was revived in 1947 when electricity supplies became uncertain.

The mill was on English Heritage's Buildings At Risk Register, but was removed [2009] after repairs had been carried out.

See Richard Airton, Cold Edge Dam Company, Lumb Cottage, Wainstalls and Lumb Terrace, Wainstalls

Lumb Mill, Warley
Cotton mill built around 1803 by John Garforth. Around 1828, it was converted to worsted production.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

Lumb Mills, Heptonstall
Comprised Low Lumb Mill and High Lumb Mill, Colden/Heptonstall. Built in 1800 by Gamaliel Sutcliffe. In 1802, he built a road – which became known as Gamaliel Lane – to the mills from Mytholm.

See Noah Dale Dam, Colden

Lumb Mills, Sowerby
Their were 2 mills here: Lower Lumb Mill and Upper Lumb Mill

Lumbutts Mill, Todmorden
Until 1783, this mill was a corn mill owned by John Crossley of Scaitcliffe Hall.

In 1783, Samuel Law and his brother Robert – together with Thomas Hughes and his brother-in-law Abraham Crossley – leased the Mill from Crossley with an agreement to convert the mill over to cotton spinning.

In 1784, Robert Law and Thomas Hughes sold their shares in the partnership to Samuel Fielden and manufacturer John Tattersall of Lumbutts Mill.

In 1794, the partnership sold out to Joshua Fielden of Waterside.

The later cotton mill owned by the Fielden family was designed by William Fairbairn around 1830 – see Samuel Fielden. After Samuel's death, the mill passed to his younger brother Joshua, and it remained in the family thereafter.

The Fieldens extended the mill and built the waterwheel tower.

The tower housed (at first) two and then – around 1846 – a unique sequence of three overshot water wheels, one above the other – each 6 ft wide and 30½ ft in diameter – which powered the mill. The water fell 90 ft and the wheels generated about 54 horse-power. 4 dams – including Gaddings Dam - were built to supply water power to the mill. The adjacent chimney is 98 ft high and there is a spiral staircase inside. The tower is a listed building.

An overhead ropeway was built to connect this mill to nearby Jumb Mill to transfer materials from one to the other.

Lumbutts House was the manager's house.

In 1838, the men at the mill were arrested after the Mankinholes riots. The mill finally closed in 1926.

See Jumb Mill, Lumbutts and Samuel Law

Lydgate Brewery, Todmorden
Owners and tenants have included

Lydgate Mill, Todmorden
Aka Low Mill. Built in 1804. It was a 4-storey mill, measuring 30 ft by 72 ft. 10 cottages occupied part of the ground floor.


Owners and tenants of the mill have included

 

On 12th July 1851, John Judson died after by falling from the steps at the mill.

Demolished in 1???

Lydgate Mineral Water Works, Todmorden
Brewery Street, Lydgate.


Owners and tenants of the works have included

 

Lydgate Top Mill, Todmorden


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© Malcolm Bull 2017 / calderdale@aol.com
Revised 19:05 on 25th September 2017 / m408_l / 65